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2.
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging ; 16(5): 609-624, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320177

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Myocardial injury in patients with COVID-19 and suspected cardiac involvement is not well understood. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to characterize myocardial injury in a multicenter cohort of patients with COVID-19 and suspected cardiac involvement referred for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). METHODS: This retrospective study consisted of 1,047 patients from 18 international sites with polymerase chain reaction-confirmed COVID-19 infection who underwent CMR. Myocardial injury was characterized as acute myocarditis, nonacute/nonischemic, acute ischemic, and nonacute/ischemic patterns on CMR. RESULTS: In this cohort, 20.9% of patients had nonischemic injury patterns (acute myocarditis: 7.9%; nonacute/nonischemic: 13.0%), and 6.7% of patients had ischemic injury patterns (acute ischemic: 1.9%; nonacute/ischemic: 4.8%). In a univariate analysis, variables associated with acute myocarditis patterns included chest discomfort (OR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.17-3.40, P = 0.01), abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG) (OR: 1.90; 95% CI: 1.12-3.23; P = 0.02), natriuretic peptide elevation (OR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.60-5.58; P = 0.0006), and troponin elevation (OR: 4.21; 95% CI: 2.41-7.36; P < 0.0001). Variables associated with acute ischemic patterns included chest discomfort (OR: 3.14; 95% CI: 1.04-9.49; P = 0.04), abnormal ECG (OR: 4.06; 95% CI: 1.10-14.92; P = 0.04), known coronary disease (OR: 33.30; 95% CI: 4.04-274.53; P = 0.001), hospitalization (OR: 4.98; 95% CI: 1.55-16.05; P = 0.007), natriuretic peptide elevation (OR: 4.19; 95% CI: 1.30-13.51; P = 0.02), and troponin elevation (OR: 25.27; 95% CI: 5.55-115.03; P < 0.0001). In a multivariate analysis, troponin elevation was strongly associated with acute myocarditis patterns (OR: 4.98; 95% CI: 1.76-14.05; P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: In this multicenter study of patients with COVID-19 with clinical suspicion for cardiac involvement referred for CMR, nonischemic and ischemic patterns were frequent when cardiac symptoms, ECG abnormalities, and cardiac biomarker elevations were present.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Artery Disease , Heart Injuries , Myocarditis , Humans , Myocarditis/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Retrospective Studies , Predictive Value of Tests , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Troponin , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
4.
Molecules ; 28(9)2023 Apr 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312357

ABSTRACT

Medium- and long-chain saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids (FFAs) are known to bind to human serum albumin (HSA), the main plasma carrier protein. Atomic-level structural data regarding the binding mode in Sudlow's sites I (FA7) and II (FA4, FA3) of the polyunsaturated ω-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), however, are largely unknown. Herein, we report the combined use of saturation transfer difference (STD) and Interligand NOEs for Pharmacophore Mapping (INPHARMA) NMR techniques and molecular docking calculations to investigate the binding mode of DHA and EPA in Sudlow's sites Ι and ΙΙ of HSA. The docking calculations and the significant number of interligand NOEs between DHA and EPA and the drugs warfarin and ibuprofen, which are stereotypical ligands for Sudlow's sites I and II, respectively, were interpreted in terms of competitive binding modes and the presence of two orientations of DHA and EPA at the binding sites FA7 and FA4. The exceptional flexibility of the long-chain DHA and EPA and the formation of strongly folded structural motives are the key properties of HSA-PUFA complexes.


Subject(s)
Eicosapentaenoic Acid , Serum Albumin, Human , Humans , Eicosapentaenoic Acid/metabolism , Docosahexaenoic Acids , Molecular Docking Simulation , Binding Sites , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Fatty Acids, Unsaturated/metabolism
5.
Int J Hyperthermia ; 40(1): 2174274, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2309328

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to analyze and summarize the most common adverse events (AEs) and complications after magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapy in uterine fibroids (UFs) and to establish the risk factors of their occurrence. METHODS: We searched for original research studies evaluating MRgFUS therapy in UFs with outcomes containing AEs and/or complications in different databases (PubMed/MEDLINE, SCOPUS, COCHRANE) until March 2022. Reviews, editorials, opinions or letters, case studies, conference papers and abstracts were excluded from the analysis. The systematic literature search identified 446 articles, 43 of which were analyzed. RESULTS: According to available evidence, the overall incidence of serious complications in MRgFUS therapy is relatively low. No AEs/complications were reported in 11 out of 43 analyzed studies. The mean occurrence of all AEs in the analyzed material was 24.67%. The most commonly described AEs included pain, skin burns, urinary tract infections and sciatic neuropraxia. Major AEs, such as skin ulcerations or deep vein thrombosis, occurred in 0.41% of cases in the analyzed material. CONCLUSION: MRgFUS seems to be safe in UF therapy. The occurrence of AEs, especially major ones, is relatively low in comparison with other methods. The new devices and more experience of their users seem to reduce AE rate. The lack of unification in AE reporting and missing data are the main issues in this area. More prospective, randomized studies with unified reporting and long follow-up are needed to determine the safety in a long-term perspective.


Subject(s)
High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation , Leiomyoma , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional , Uterine Neoplasms , Humans , Female , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional/methods , Leiomyoma/diagnostic imaging , Leiomyoma/therapy , High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation/adverse effects , High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation/methods , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
6.
Biomacromolecules ; 24(4): 1901-1911, 2023 04 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2293064

ABSTRACT

A series of four oxime-linked octavalent sialic acid and oligosialic acid poly(ether amidoamine) glycodendrimers were synthesized. In the attachment of the sialic acids to the dendrimer core, chemoselective oxime bonds were formed between the unprotected sugars (sialic acid or α-2,8-linked di- through tetra-sialic acids) and the aminooxy-terminated dendrimer core in a microwave-mediated reaction, resulting in good to excellent yields (58-100%) of the fully functionalized octavalent glycodendrimers. Next, using a combination of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance and working from the inside outward, we employed a systematic method to assign the proton and carbon signals starting with the smallest linkers and dendrimer cores and moving gradually up to the completed octavalent glycodendrimers. Through this approach, the assignment of the protons and carbons was possible, including the E- and Z-isomers related to the oxime dendrimer to sugar connections and relative quantities of each. These glycodendrimers were designed as broad-spectrum inhibitors of viral pathogens.


Subject(s)
Dendrimers , N-Acetylneuraminic Acid , N-Acetylneuraminic Acid/chemistry , Oximes/chemistry , Dendrimers/chemistry , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Sialic Acids
7.
Chem Biodivers ; 20(6): e202201197, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295949

ABSTRACT

Four undescribed biflavonoid alkaloids, sinenbiflavones A-D, were isolated from Cephalotaxus sinensis using a MS/MS-based molecular networking guided strategy. Their structures were elucidated by series of spectroscopic methods (HR-ESI-MS, UV, IR, 1D, and 2D NMR). Sinenbiflavones A-D are the first examples of amentoflavone-type (C-3'-C-8'') biflavonoid alkaloids. Meanwhile, sinenbiflavones B and D are the unique C-6-methylated amentoflavone-type biflavonoid alkaloids. Sinenbiflavone D showed weak SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro inhibitory activity with 43 % inhibition rate at 40 µM.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids , Biflavonoids , COVID-19 , Cephalotaxus , Biflavonoids/chemistry , Molecular Structure , Cephalotaxus/chemistry , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , SARS-CoV-2 , Alkaloids/chemistry , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
8.
J Clin Ultrasound ; 51(4): 613-621, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301433

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Cardiac injury is commonly reported in COVID-19 patients, resulting associated to pre-existing cardiovascular disease, disease severity, and unfavorable outcome. Aim is to report cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings in patients with myocarditis-like syndrome during the acute phase of SARS-CoV-2 infection (AMCovS) and post-acute phase (cPACS). METHODS: Between September 2020 and January 2022, 39 consecutive patients (24 males, 58%) were referred to our department to perform a CMR for the suspicion of myocarditis related to AMCovS (n = 17) and cPACS (n = 22) at multimodality evaluation (clinical, laboratory, ECG, and echocardiography). CMR was performed for the assessment of volume, function, edema and fibrosis with standard sequences and mapping techniques. CMR diagnosis and the extension and amount of CMR alterations were recorded. RESULTS: Patients with suspected myocarditis in acute and post-COVID settings were mainly men (10 (59%) and 12 (54.5%), respectively) with older age in AMCovS (58 [48-64]) compared to cPACS (38 [26-53]). Myocarditis was confirmed by CMR in most of cases: 53% of AMCovS and 50% of cPACS with negligible LGE burden (3 [IQR, 1-5] % and 2 [IQR, 1-4] %, respectively). Myocardial infarction was identified in 4/17 (24%) patients with AMCovS. Cardiomyopathies were identified in 12% (3/17) and 27% (6/22) of patients with AMCovS and cPACS, including DCM, HCM and mitral valve prolapse. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with acute and post-acute COVID-19 related suspected myocarditis, CMR improves diagnostic accuracy characterizing ischemic and non-ischemic injury and unraveling subclinical cardiomyopathies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiomyopathies , Myocarditis , Male , Humans , Female , Myocarditis/complications , Myocarditis/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Contrast Media
9.
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 39(4): 821-830, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301369

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19)-related myocardial injury is an increasingly recognized complication and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the most commonly used non-invasive imaging technique for myocardial involvement. This study aims to assess myocardial structure by T2*-mapping which is a non-invasive gold-standard imaging tool for the assessment of cardiac iron deposition in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia without significant cardiac symptoms. Twenty-five patients with COVID-19 pneumonia and 20 healthy subjects were prospectively enrolled.Cardiac volume and function parameters, myocardial native-T1, and T2*-mapping were measured. The association of serum ferritin level and myocardial mapping was analyzed. There was no difference in terms of cardiac volume and function parameters. The T2*-mapping values were lower in patients with COVID-19 compared to controls (35.37 [IQR 31.67-41.20] ms vs. 43.98 [IQR 41.97-46.88] ms; p < 0.0001), while no significant difference was found in terms of native-T1 mapping value(p = 0.701). There was a positive correlation with T2*mapping and native-T1 mapping values (r = 0.522, p = 0.007) and negative correlation with serum ferritin values (r = - 0.653, p = 0.000), while no correlation between cardiac native-T1 mapping and serum ferritin level. Negative correlation between serum ferritin level and T2*-mapping values in COVID-19 patients may provide a non-contrast-enhanced alternative to assess tissue structural changes in patients with COVID-19. T2*-mapping may provide a non-contrast-enhanced alternative to assess tissue alterations in patients with COVID-19. Adding T2*-mapping cardiac MRI in patients with myocardial pathologies would improve the revealing of underlying mechanisms. Further in vivo and ex vivo animal or human studies designed with larger patient cohorts should be planned.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Predictive Value of Tests , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Myocardium/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Ferritins , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine/methods , Contrast Media
10.
Molecules ; 28(7)2023 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294416

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this work was to prepare new isatin- and monothiomalondiamide-based indole derivatives, as well as to study the properties of the new compounds. The four-component reaction of 5-R-isatins (R = H, CH3), malononitrile, monothiomalonamide (3-amino-3-thioxo- propanamide) and triethylamine in hot EtOH yields a mixture of isomeric triethylammonium 6'-amino-3'-(aminocarbonyl)-5'-cyano-2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-1'H- and 6'-amino-3'-(aminocarbonyl)- 5'-cyano-2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-3'H-spiro[indole-3,4'-pyridine]-2'-thiolates. The reactivity and structure of the products was studied. We found that oxidation of spiro[indole-3,4'-pyridine]-2'-thiolates with DMSO-HCl system produced only acidification products, diastereomeric 6'-amino-5'-cyano-5-methyl-2-oxo-2'-thioxo-1,2,2',3'-tetrahydro-1'H-spiro-[indole-3,4'-pyridine]- 3'-carboxamides, instead of the expected isothiazolopyridines. The alkylation of the prepared spiro[indole-3,4'-pyridine]-2'-thiolates upon treatment with N-aryl α-chloroacetamides and α-bromoacetophenones proceeds in a regioselective way at the sulfur atom. In the case of α-bromoacetophenones, ring-chain tautomerism was observed for the S-alkylation products. According to NMR data, the compounds consist of a mixture of stereoisomers of 2'-amino-6'-[(2-aryl-2-oxoethyl)thio]-3'-cyano-2-oxo-1'H-spiro[indoline-3,4'-pyridine]-5'-carboxamides and 5'-amino-3'-aryl-6'-cyano-3'-hydroxy-2-oxo-2',3'-dihydrospiro[indoline-3,7'-thiazolo[3,2-a]pyridine]-8'-carboxamides in various ratios. The structure of the synthesized compounds was confirmed by IR spectroscopy, HRMS, 1H and 13C DEPTQ NMR studies and the results of 2D NMR experiments (1H-13C HSQC, 1H-13C HMBC). Molecular docking studies were performed to investigate suitable binding modes of some new compounds with respect to the transcriptional regulator protein PqsR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The docking studies revealed that the compounds have affinity for the bacterial regulator protein PqsR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with a binding energy in the range of -5.8 to -8.2 kcal/mol. In addition, one of the new compounds, 2'-amino-3'-cyano-5-methyl-2-oxo-6'-{[2-oxo-2-(p-tolylamino)ethyl]thio}-1'H-spiro-[indoline-3,4'-pyridine]-5'-carboxamide, showed in vitro moderate antibacterial effect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and good antioxidant properties in a test with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical. Finally, three of the new compounds were recognized as moderately active herbicide safeners with respect to herbicide 2,4-D in the laboratory experiments on sunflower seedlings.


Subject(s)
Isatin , Pyridines , Molecular Docking Simulation , Indoles/pharmacology , Indoles/chemistry , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
11.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0282394, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287689

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long-term symptoms are frequent after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We studied the prevalence of post-acute myocardial scar on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 and its association with long-term symptoms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective observational single-center study, 95 formerly hospitalized COVID-19 patients underwent CMR imaging at the median of 9 months after acute COVID-19. In addition, 43 control subjects were imaged. Myocardial scar characteristic of myocardial infarction or myocarditis were noted from late gadolinium enhancement images (LGE). Patient symptoms were screened using a questionnaire. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation or median (interquartile range). RESULTS: The presence of any LGE was higher in COVID-19 patients (66% vs. 37%, p<0.01) as was the presence of LGE suggestive of previous myocarditis (29% vs. 9%, p = 0.01). The prevalence of ischemic scar was comparable (8% vs. 2%, p = 0.13). Only two COVID-19 patients (7%) had myocarditis scar combined with left ventricular dysfunction (EF <50%). Myocardial edema was not detected in any participant. The need for intensive care unit (ICU) treatment during initial hospitalization was comparable in patients with and without myocarditis scar (47% vs. 67%, p = 0.44). Dyspnea, chest pain, and arrhythmias were prevalent in COVID-19 patients at follow-up (64%, 31%, and 41%, respectively) but not associated with myocarditis scar on CMR. CONCLUSIONS: Myocardial scar suggestive of possible previous myocarditis was detected in almost one-third of hospital-treated COVID-19 patients. It was not associated with the need for ICU treatment, greater symptomatic burden, or ventricular dysfunction at 9 months follow-up. Thus, post-acute myocarditis scar on COVID-19 patients seems to be a subclinical imaging finding and does not commonly require further clinical evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Injuries , Myocarditis , Humans , Myocarditis/complications , Contrast Media , Cicatrix/complications , Ventricular Function, Left , COVID-19/complications , Gadolinium , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Heart Injuries/complications , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine/methods , Predictive Value of Tests
12.
Pediatr Cardiol ; 44(5): 1108-1117, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285032

ABSTRACT

There have been reports of myocarditis following vaccination against COVID-19. We sought to describe cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings among pediatric patients. Retrospective review at a large academic center of patients clinically diagnosed with post-vaccine myocarditis (PVM) undergoing CMR. Data collected included parametric mapping, ventricular function, and degree of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Post-processing strain analysis was performed using feature tracking. Strain values, T1/T2 values, and ventricular function were compared to age- and gender-matched controls with viral myocarditis using a Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. Among 12 patients with presumed PVM, 11 were male and 11 presented after the second vaccination dose, typically within 4 days. All presented with chest pain and elevated troponin. 10 met MRI criteria for acute myocarditis. All had LGE typically seen in the lateral and inferior walls; only five had prolonged T1 values. 10 met criteria for edema based on skeletal muscle to myocardium signal intensity ratio and only 5 had prolonged T2 mapping values. Patients with PVM had greater short-axis global circumferential and radial strain, right ventricle function, and cardiac output when compared to those with viral myocarditis. Patients with PVM have greater short-axis global circumferential and radial strains compared to those with viral myocarditis. LGE was universal in our cohort. Signal intensity ratios between skeletal muscle and myocardium may be more sensitive in identifying edema than T2 mapping. Overall, the impact on myocardial strain by CMR is less significant in PVM compared to more classic viral myocarditis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Humans , Male , Child , Female , Myocarditis/diagnostic imaging , Myocarditis/etiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Contrast Media , Predictive Value of Tests , Gadolinium , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Myocardium/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Retrospective Studies , Vaccination , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine , Ventricular Function, Left
13.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 12(6): e027801, 2023 03 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2264637

ABSTRACT

Background Meta-analysis can identify biological factors that moderate cardiac magnetic resonance myocardial tissue markers such as native T1 (longitudinal magnetization relaxation time constant) and T2 (transverse magnetization relaxation time constant) in cohorts recovering from COVID-19 infection. Methods and Results Cardiac magnetic resonance studies of patients with COVID-19 using myocardial T1, T2 mapping, extracellular volume, and late gadolinium enhancement were identified by database searches. Pooled effect sizes and interstudy heterogeneity (I2) were estimated with random effects models. Moderators of interstudy heterogeneity were analyzed by meta-regression of the percent difference of native T1 and T2 between COVID-19 and control groups (%ΔT1 [percent difference of the study-level means of myocardial T1 in patients with COVID-19 and controls] and %ΔT2 [percent difference of the study-level means of myocardial T2 in patients with COVID-19 and controls]), extracellular volume, and the proportion of late gadolinium enhancement. Interstudy heterogeneities of %ΔT1 (I2=76%) and %ΔT2 (I2=88%) were significantly lower than for native T1 and T2, respectively, independent of field strength, with pooled effect sizes of %ΔT1=1.24% (95% CI, 0.54%-1.9%) and %ΔT2=3.77% (95% CI, 1.79%-5.79%). %ΔT1 was lower for studies in children (median age: 12.7 years) and athletes (median age: 21 years), compared with older adults (median age: 48 years). Duration of recovery from COVID-19, cardiac troponins, C-reactive protein, and age were significant moderators for %ΔT1 and/or %ΔT2. Extracellular volume, adjusted by age, was moderated by recovery duration. Age, diabetes, and hypertension were significant moderators of the proportion of late gadolinium enhancement in adults. Conclusions T1 and T2 are dynamic markers of cardiac involvement in COVID-19 that reflect the regression of cardiomyocyte injury and myocardial inflammation during recovery. Late gadolinium enhancement and to a lesser extent extracellular volume, are more static biomarkers moderated by preexisting risk factors linked to adverse myocardial tissue remodeling.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Contrast Media , Child , Humans , Aged , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Gadolinium , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine/methods , Myocardium/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Predictive Value of Tests
14.
Kardiol Pol ; 81(5): 463-471, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a great medical challenge as it provokes acute respiratory distress and has pulmonary manifestations and cardiovascular (CV) consequences. AIMS: This study compared cardiac injury in COVID-19 myocarditis patients with non-COVID-19 myocarditis patients. METHODS: Patients who recovered from COVID-19 were scheduled for cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) owing to clinical myocarditis suspicion. The retrospective non-COVID-19 myocarditis (2018-2019) group was enrolled (n = 221 patients). All patients underwent contrast-enhanced CMR, the conventional myocarditis protocol, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). The COVID study group included 552 patients at a mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of 45.9 (12.6) years. RESULTS: CMR assessment confirmed myocarditis-like LGE in 46% of the cases (68.5% of the segments with LGE <25% transmural extent), left ventricular (LV) dilatation in 10%, and systolic dysfunction in 16% of cases. The COVID-19 myocarditis group showed a smaller median (interquartile range [IQR]) LV LGE (4.4% [2.9%-8.1%] vs. 5.9% [4.4%-11.8%]; P <0.001), lower LV end-diastolic volume (144.6 [125.5-178] ml vs. 162.8 [136.6-194] ml; P <0.001), limited functional consequence (left ventricular ejection fraction, 59% [54.1%-65%] vs. 58% [52%-63%]; P = 0.01), and a higher rate of pericarditis (13.6% vs. 6%; P = 0.03) compared to non-COVID-19 myocarditis. The COVID-19-induced injury was more frequent in septal segments (2, 3, 14), and non-COVID-19 myocarditis showed higher affinity to lateral wall segments (P <0.01). Neither obesity nor age was associated with LV injury or remodeling in subjects with COVID-19 myocarditis. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19-induced myocarditis is associated with minor LV injury with a significantly more frequent septal pattern and a higher pericarditis rate than non-COVID-19 myocarditis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Pericarditis , Humans , Middle Aged , Myocarditis/etiology , Myocarditis/complications , Contrast Media , Stroke Volume , Gadolinium , Ventricular Function, Left , Retrospective Studies , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine/methods , COVID-19/complications , Myocardium/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Predictive Value of Tests
16.
J Cardiovasc Magn Reson ; 25(1): 21, 2023 03 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2259089

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an ongoing global pandemic that has affected nearly 600 million people to date across the world. While COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory illness, cardiac injury is also known to occur. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is uniquely capable of characterizing myocardial tissue properties in-vivo, enabling insights into the pattern and degree of cardiac injury. The reported prevalence of myocardial involvement identified by CMR in the context of COVID-19 infection among previously hospitalized patients ranges from 26 to 60%. Variations in the reported prevalence of myocardial involvement may result from differing patient populations (e.g. differences in severity of illness) and the varying intervals between acute infection and CMR evaluation. Standardized methodologies in image acquisition, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of CMR abnormalities across would likely improve concordance between studies. This consensus document by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) provides recommendations on CMR imaging and reporting metrics towards the goal of improved standardization and uniform data acquisition and analytic approaches when performing CMR in patients with COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Diseases , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/standards , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Myocarditis/diagnostic imaging , Predictive Value of Tests , Heart Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Heart Diseases/etiology
17.
J Med Chem ; 66(7): 5289-5304, 2023 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258013

ABSTRACT

N6-(((trimethylsilyl)-methoxy)carbonyl)-l-lysine (TMSK) and N6-trifluoroacetyl-l-lysine (TFAK) are non-canonical amino acids, which can be installed in proteins by genetic encoding. In addition, we describe a new aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase specific for N6-(((trimethylsilyl)methyl)-carbamoyl)-l-lysine (TMSNK), which is chemically more stable than TMSK. Using the dimeric SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) as a model system with three different ligands, we show that the 1H and 19F nuclei of the solvent-exposed trimethylsilyl and CF3 groups produce intense signals in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum. Their response to active-site ligands differed significantly when positioned near rather than far from the active site. Conversely, the NMR probes failed to confirm the previously reported binding site of the ligand pelitinib, which was found to enhance the activity of Mpro by promoting the formation of the enzymatically active dimer. In summary, the amino acids TMSK, TMSNK, and TFAK open an attractive path for site-specific NMR analysis of ligand binding to large proteins of limited stability and at low concentrations.


Subject(s)
Amino Acids , COVID-19 , Humans , Amino Acids/chemistry , Lysine , Ligands , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Proteins/metabolism , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Binding Sites
18.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl ; 62(14): e202217171, 2023 03 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2229623

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 in December 2019 required the formation of international consortia for a coordinated scientific effort to understand and combat the virus. In this Viewpoint Article, we discuss how the NMR community has gathered to investigate the genome and proteome of SARS-CoV-2 and tested them for binding to low-molecular-weight binders. External factors including extended lockdowns due to the global pandemic character of the viral infection triggered the transition from locally focused collaborative research conducted within individual research groups to digital exchange formats for immediate discussion of unpublished results and data analysis, sample sharing, and coordinated research between more than 50 groups from 18 countries simultaneously. We discuss key lessons that might pertain after the end of the pandemic and challenges that we need to address.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Communicable Disease Control , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Magnetic Resonance Imaging
19.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 22293, 2022 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2186032

ABSTRACT

Analytical tools to study cell physiology are critical for optimizing drug-host interactions. Real time pulse chase NMR spectroscopy, RTPC-NMR, was introduced to monitor the kinetics of metabolite production in HEK 293T cells treated with COVID-19 vaccine-like lipid nanoparticles, LNPs, with and without mRNA. Kinetic flux parameters were resolved for the incorporation of isotopic label into metabolites and clearance of labeled metabolites from the cells. Changes in the characteristic times for alanine production implicated mitochondrial dysfunction as a consequence of treating the cells with lipid nanoparticles, LNPs. Mitochondrial dysfunction was largely abated by inclusion of mRNA in the LNPs, the presence of which increased the size and uniformity of the LNPs. The methodology is applicable to all cultured cells.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nanoparticles , Humans , HEK293 Cells , Lipids/chemistry , RNA, Messenger/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines , Liposomes , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Mitochondria/genetics , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics
20.
J Cardiovasc Magn Reson ; 24(1): 73, 2022 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196336

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by infection with severe acute respiratory suyndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is now entering its 4th year with little evidence of abatement. As of December 2022, the World Health Organization Coronavirus (COVID-19) Dashboard reported 643 million cumulative confirmed cases of COVID-19 worldwide and 98 million in the United States alone as the country with the highest number of cases. While pneumonia with lung injury has been the manifestation of COVID-19 principally responsible for morbidity and mortality, myocardial inflammation and systolic dysfunction though uncommon are well-recognized features that also associate with adverse prognosis. Given the broad swath of the population infected with COVID-19, the large number of affected professional, collegiate, and amateur athletes raises concern regarding the safe resumption of athletic activity (return to play, RTP) following resolution of infection. A variety of different testing combinations that leverage the electrocardiogram, echocardiography, circulating cardiac biomarkers, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging have been proposed and implemented to mitigate risk. CMR in particular affords high sensitivity for myocarditis but has been employed and interpreted non-uniformly in the context of COVID-19 thereby raising uncertainty as to the generalizability and clinical relevance of findings with respect to RTP. This consensus document synthesizes available evidence to contextualize the appropriate utilization of CMR in the RTP assessment of athletes with prior COVID-19 infection to facilitate informed, evidence-based decisions, while identifying knowledge gaps that merit further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Sports , Humans , American Heart Association , Consensus , Leadership , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Myocarditis/diagnostic imaging , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Societies, Medical
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