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1.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 384-390, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513255

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To measure the Saudi population's sleep quality during the lockdown of COVID-19. METHODS: An internet-based questionnaire that was performed during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic among the Saudi population over 2 weeks from April 1 to April 15, 2020. We used the instant messaging application WhatsApp and Twitter to reach the targeted population. Saudi citizens and non-Saudi residents who can read and understand the questionnaire were recruited. Data were analyzed using Stata and SPSS. RESULTS: A total of 790 responses were included. The majority of participants were the Saudi population 735 (92.9%). The prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality were 54.4% and 55.5%, respectively. Saudi citizenship was associated with longer sleep duration (p=0.031). Female gender and being married were associated with worse global PSQI, sleep quality, sleep distribution, sleep latency, and daytime dysfunction. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Saudi population had a high prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality. Routine monitoring of the psychological impact of life-threatening outbreaks and the adoption of effective early mental health actions should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Male , Marital Status/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Public Policy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Sleep Latency , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data
2.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 58: 102626, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1126666

ABSTRACT

Mental health issues among health care workers (HCWs) in treatment settings during COVID-19 remains understudied in India. This study examines its prevalence and correlates among HCWs in Karnataka State, India. HCWs who attended a workshop to improve mental health well-being during COVID-19 completed an anonymous online questionnaire. In addition to socio-demographics, domains assessed include occupational characteristics, COVID-19 related concerns, anxiety/depression, substance use, suicidality, lifestyle and family functioning. Of the 3083 HCWs who completed the survey (response rate-51.4 %), anxiety disorder and depression was highest among those with frontline COVID-19 responsibilities (anxiety disorder-26.6 %, depression-23.8 %). Prevalence was significantly higher among those with clinical responsibilities compared to those with supportive responsibilities (anxiety disorder: 23.9 % vs 15.5 %), (depression: 20.0 % vs 14.2 %). In the backward step-wise logistic regression analysis, HCWs with anxiety disorder were more likely to be doctors/nurses/hospital assistants, older, female, unmarried, without a leisure activity, report increased alcohol use and suicidal thoughts after pandemic onset, and having a history of receiving mental health interventions. Participants with depression additionally had family distress and hardly ever exercised. To conclude, mental health issues are common among HCWs in India. Interventions need to ensure that HCWs are protected from mental health consequences of working in COVID-19 treatment settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Adult , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Marital Status/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
3.
J Aging Stud ; 56: 100907, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-953385

ABSTRACT

In this piece I argue that the pandemic with its emphasis on social distancing as a desirable civic norm can reconfigure popular understanding of mature female singlehood in India- a condition that is often described in the language of lacks and social failures. The pandemic, I argue, has reaffirmed the everyday practices of upper middle-class professional women (ages 50-60 years) lending them as positive agentic subjects who are invested in self-actualization and an appreciation of intimate solitude. Overall, by specifically focusing on subjectivities and social aspirations of my interlocutors during the pandemic, I illuminate ways in which middle aged selfhood is lived in all its fragility, ambivalence and emergent possibilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Marital Status/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Quarantine/psychology , Social Stigma , Women/psychology , Female , Humans , India , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(9): e2019686, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739606

ABSTRACT

Importance: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the policies to contain it have been a near ubiquitous exposure in the US with unknown effects on depression symptoms. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of and risk factors associated with depression symptoms among US adults during vs before the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationally representative survey study used 2 population-based surveys of US adults aged 18 or older. During COVID-19, estimates were derived from the COVID-19 and Life Stressors Impact on Mental Health and Well-being study, conducted from March 31, 2020, to April 13, 2020. Before COVID-19 estimates were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted from 2017 to 2018. Data were analyzed from April 15 to 20, 2020. Exposures: The COVID-19 pandemic and outcomes associated with the measures to mitigate it. Main Outcomes and Measures: Depression symptoms, defined using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 cutoff of 10 or higher. Categories of depression symptoms were defined as none (score, 0-4), mild (score, 5-9), moderate (score, 10-14), moderately severe (score, 15-19), and severe (score, ≥20). Results: A total of 1470 participants completed the COVID-19 and Life Stressors Impact on Mental Health and Well-being survey (completion rate, 64.3%), and after removing those with missing data, the final during-COVID-19 sample included 1441 participants (619 participants [43.0%] aged 18-39 years; 723 [50.2%] men; 933 [64.7%] non-Hispanic White). The pre-COVID-19 sample included 5065 participants (1704 participants [37.8%] aged 18-39 years; 2588 [51.4%] women; 1790 [62.9%] non-Hispanic White). Depression symptom prevalence was higher in every category during COVID-19 compared with before (mild: 24.6% [95% CI, 21.8%-27.7%] vs 16.2% [95% CI, 15.1%-17.4%]; moderate: 14.8% [95% CI, 12.6%-17.4%] vs 5.7% [95% CI, 4.8%-6.9%]; moderately severe: 7.9% [95% CI, 6.3%-9.8%] vs 2.1% [95% CI, 1.6%-2.8%]; severe: 5.1% [95% CI, 3.8%-6.9%] vs 0.7% [95% CI, 0.5%-0.9%]). Higher risk of depression symptoms during COVID-19 was associated with having lower income (odds ratio, 2.37 [95% CI, 1.26-4.43]), having less than $5000 in savings (odds ratio, 1.52 [95% CI, 1.02-2.26]), and exposure to more stressors (odds ratio, 3.05 [95% CI, 1.95-4.77]). Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that prevalence of depression symptoms in the US was more than 3-fold higher during COVID-19 compared with before the COVID-19 pandemic. Individuals with lower social resources, lower economic resources, and greater exposure to stressors (eg, job loss) reported a greater burden of depression symptoms. Post-COVID-19 plans should account for the probable increase in mental illness to come, particularly among at-risk populations.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Income/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Depression/psychology , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Male , Marital Status/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Stress, Psychological/psychology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
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