Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 277
Filter
1.
Cien Saude Colet ; 27(7): 2817-2825, 2022 Jul.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239179

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic scenario raises the amplification of the debate around the production and circulation of information about epidemics. In this sense, the objective of this article is to discuss how social contexts shape the news, taking as an example the case of the news coverage that transformed an epizootic of yellow fever, in the summer of 2007/2008, into an epidemic of urban yellow fever. This is a qualitative research with journalists who worked in two large circulation newspapers and actively participated in the coverage of the event. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and submitted to discourse analysis, which allowed the identification of three factors that influenced the production of a media epidemic of yellow fever: the working conditions and the modus operandi of the newsrooms; the political-ideological dimension of the newspapers; and the difficulties of translation of technical-scientific information. A critical understanding of the production process of the journalistic text can contribute to the construction of communication strategies that minimize the circulation of misinformation on public health in traditional media (newspapers, magazines, radio, TV and news portals).


O cenário da pandemia de COVID-19 suscita a ampliação do debate em torno da produção e circulação de informações sobre epidemias. Nesse sentido, o objetivo deste artigo é discutir como os contextos sociais configuram as notícias, tomando como exemplo o caso da cobertura jornalística que transformou uma epizootia de febre amarela, no verão 2007/2008, em uma epidemia de febre amarela urbana. Trata-se de uma pesquisa qualitativa com jornalistas que trabalhavam em dois jornais de grande circulação e participaram ativamente da cobertura do evento. As entrevistas foram gravadas, transcritas e submetidas à análise de discurso, o que permitiu identificar três fatores que influenciaram a produção de uma epidemia midiática de febre amarela: as condições de trabalho e o modus operandi das redações; a dimensão político-ideológica dos jornais; e as dificuldades de tradução das informações técnico-científicas. A compreensão crítica do processo de produção do texto jornalístico pode contribuir para a construção de estratégias comunicacionais que minimizem a circulação de desinformação em saúde pública nas mídias tradicionais (jornais, revistas, rádio, tevê e portais de notícias).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Yellow Fever , Communication , Humans , Mass Media , Pandemics , Public Health , Yellow Fever/epidemiology , Yellow Fever/prevention & control
2.
J Community Health ; 47(2): 306-310, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232977

ABSTRACT

A number of the people who have recovered from the acute effects of COVID-19 are facing long term sequelae from the infection. As the COVID-19 pandemic is still evolving, so is knowledge of the long-term effects of the virus on patients who still experience symptoms. Clearly, news media play a crucial role in distributing information and this distribution of information can, in turn, influence the actions of the public. The purpose of this study was to describe the content of news coverage of COVID-19 long haul symptoms currently posted on the internet. This study utilized Google News, a news aggregator service, and included the first 100 English language pieces of news. Video content and news article content were coded in depth for information on COVID-19 long haul symptoms. A total of 41% of news reports mentioned the length of time that the COVID-19 related symptoms persist. The length of time was reported to range from 1 month to more than 1 year. The symptom most commonly mentioned was tiredness or fatigue (74%), followed by difficulty breathing or shortness of breath (62 cases; 62%), and difficulty thinking or concentrating (50 cases; 50%). Other symptoms were mentioned less frequently. There were no statistically significant differences in any of the content including having video, written news reports, or both video and written news reports by source of the news reports based on consumer, professional, or television or internet-based news (p = .14). More complete coverage by online news media of the long-term effects of COVID-19 enhances public awareness of the post-acute syndromes, augments health providers' awareness of the range of chronic COVID-19 effects and the possibility of a second infection, increases the probability of patients' seeking and obtaining the proper care for their symptoms, and contributes to preventive actions for enhancing public health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Mass Media , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Television
3.
Lancet ; 401(10390): 1757, 2023 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237269
4.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol ; 58(7): 1087-1098, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244645

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic led to concerns about increases in suicidal behaviour. Research indicates that certain types of media coverage of suicide may help reduce suicidality (the Papageno effect), while other types may increase suicidality (the Werther effect). This study aimed to examine the tone and content of Canadian news articles about suicide during the first year of the pandemic. METHODS: Articles about suicide from Canadian news sources were collected and coded for adherence to responsible reporting of suicide guidelines. Articles which directly discussed suicidal behaviour in the COVID-19 context were identified and compared to other suicide articles in the same period. Lastly, a thematic analysis was conducted on the sub-sample of articles discussing suicide in the COVID-19 context. RESULTS: The sub-set of articles about suicide in the COVID-19 context (n = 103) contained significantly more putatively helpful content compared to non-COVID-19 articles (n = 457), such as including help information (56.3% Vs 23.6%), quoting an expert (68.0% Vs 16.8%) and educating about suicide (73.8% Vs 24.9%). This lower adherence among non-COVID-19 articles is concerning as they comprised over 80% of the sample. On the plus side, fewer than 10% of all articles provided monocausal, glamourized or sensational accounts of suicide. Qualitative analysis revealed the following three themes: (i) describing the epidemiology of suicidal behaviour; (ii) discussing self and communal care; and (iii) bringing attention to gaps in mental health care. CONCLUSION: Media articles about suicide during the first year of the pandemic showed partial adherence to responsible reporting of suicide guidelines, with room for improvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Humans , Pandemics , Canada , Suicide/psychology , Mass Media
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 25: e45417, 2023 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325695

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccine hesitancy during the COVID-19 pandemic was exacerbated by an infodemic of conflating accurate and inaccurate information with divergent political messages, leading to varying adherence to health-related behaviors. In addition to the media, people received information about COVID-19 and the vaccine from their physicians and closest networks of family and friends. OBJECTIVE: This study explored individuals' decision-making processes in receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, focusing on the influence of specific media outlets, political orientation, personal networks, and the physician-patient relationship. We also evaluated the effect of other demographic data like age and employment status. METHODS: An internet survey was disseminated through the Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine Facebook account. The survey included questions on media sources for COVID-19 information, political affiliation, presidential candidate choice, and multiple Likert-type agreement scale questions on conceptions of the vaccine. Each respondent was assigned a media source score, which represented the political leaning of their media consumption. This was calculated using a model based on data from the Pew Research Center that assigned an ideological profile to various news outlets. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 1757 respondents, with 89.58% (1574/1757) of them choosing to take the COVID-19 vaccine. Those employed part-time and the unemployed were at 1.94 (95% CI 1.15-3.27) and 2.48 (95% CI 1.43-4.39) greater odds of choosing the vaccine than those employed full-time. For every 1-year increase in age, there was a 1.04 (95% CI 1.02-1.06) multiplicative increase in odds of choosing to receive the vaccine. For every 1-point increase in media source score toward more Liberal or Democrat, there was a 1.06 (95% CI 1.04-1.07) multiplicative increase in odds of choosing to take the COVID-19 vaccine. The Likert-type agreement scale showed statistically significant differences (P<.001) between respondents; those who chose the vaccine agreed more strongly on their belief in the safety and efficacy of vaccines, the influence of their personal beliefs, and the encouragement and positive experiences of family and friends. Most respondents rated their personal relationship with their physician to be good, but this factor did not correlate with differences in vaccine decision. CONCLUSIONS: Although multiple factors are involved, the role of mass media in shaping attitudes toward vaccines cannot be ignored, especially its ability to spread misinformation and foster division. Surprisingly, the effect of one's personal physician may not weigh as heavily in one's decision-making process, potentially indicating the need for physicians to alter their communication style, including involvement in social media. In the era of information overload, effective communication is critical in ensuring the dissemination of accurate and reliable information to optimize the vaccination decision-making process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination , Mass Media
6.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 47(3): 100058, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320075

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This article aims to examine the framing of the issue of food security in very remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in print media and press releases during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. METHODS: Newspaper articles were identified following a systematic search of the Factiva database, and press releases were identified from manual search of key stakeholder websites from January to June 2020 and analysed using a combined adapted framework of the Bacchi's What's the Problem Represented to be? Framework and the Narrative Policy Framework. RESULTS: A food delivery "problem" dominated representations in press releases, and food supply at store level had prominence in print media. Both presented the cause of food insecurity as a singular, identifiable point in time, framed the issue as one of helplessness and lack of control, and proposed policy action. CONCLUSIONS: The issue of food security was represented in the media as a simple issue requiring an immediate fix, as opposed to a complex issue requiring a systems-level and sustained policy response. IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: This study will help to guide future media dialogue to impact on both immediate and longer-term solutions to food insecurity in very remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Australia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services, Indigenous , Humans , Australia/epidemiology , Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples , Food Security , Nutrition Policy , Pandemics , Mass Media
7.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(12): e42179, 2022 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2308982

ABSTRACT

The pervasiveness of social media is irrefutable, with 72% of adults reporting using at least one social media platform and an average daily usage of 2 hours. Social media has been shown to influence health-related behaviors, and it offers a powerful tool through which we can rapidly reach large segments of the population with tailored health messaging. However, despite increasing interest in using social media for dissemination of public health messaging and research exploring the dangers of misinformation on social media, the specifics of how public health practitioners can effectively use social media for health promotion are not well described. In this viewpoint, we propose a novel framework with the following 5 key principles to guide the use of social media for public health campaigns: (1) tailoring messages and targeting them to specific populations-this may include targeting messages to specific populations based on age, sex, or language spoken; interests; or geotargeting messages at state, city, or zip code level; (2) including members of the target population in message development-messages should be designed with and approved by members of the community they are designed to reach, to ensure cultural sensitivity and trust-building; (3) identifying and addressing misinformation-public health practitioners can directly address misinformation through myth-busting messages, in which false claims are highlighted and explained and accurate information reiterated; (4) leveraging information sharing-when designing messages for social media, it is crucial to consider their "shareability," and consider partnering with social media influencers who are trusted messengers among their online followers; and (5) evaluating impact by measuring real-world outcomes, for example measuring foot traffic data. Leveraging social media to deliver public health campaigns enables us to capitalize on sophisticated for-profit advertising techniques to disseminate tailored messaging directly to communities that need it most, with a precision far beyond the reaches of conventional mass media. We call for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as state and local public health agencies to continue to optimize and rigorously evaluate the use of social media for health promotion.


Subject(s)
Social Media , Adult , Humans , Public Health , Mass Media , Health Promotion/methods , Communication
8.
Soc Sci Med ; 324: 115863, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305804

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the pandemic healthcare professionals and political leaders routinely used traditional and new media outlets to publicly respond to COVID-19 myths and inaccuracies. We examine how variations in the sources and messaging strategies of these public statements affect respondents' beliefs about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: We analyzed the results of an experiment embedded within a multi-wave survey deployed to US and UK respondents in January-February 2022 to examine these effects. We employ a test-retest between-subjects experimental protocol with a control group. Respondents were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions reflecting discrete pairings of message source (political authorities vs. healthcare professionals) and messaging strategy (debunking misinformation vs. discrediting mis-informants) or a control condition. We use linear regression to compare the effects of exposure to treatment conditions on changes in respondent beliefs about the potential risks associated with COVID-19 vaccination. RESULTS: In the UK sample, we observe a statistically significant decrease in beliefs about the risks of COVID-19 vaccines among respondents exposed to debunking messages by healthcare professionals. We observe a similar relationship in the US sample, but the effect was weaker and not significant. Identical messages from political authorities had no effect on respondents' beliefs about vaccine risks in either sample. Discrediting messages critical of mis-informants likewise had no influence on respondent beliefs, regardless of the actor to which they were attributed. Political ideology moderated the influence of debunking statements by healthcare professionals on respondent vaccine attitudes in the US sample, such that the treatment was more effective among liberals and moderates than among conservatives. CONCLUSIONS: Brief exposure to public statements refuting anti-vaccine misinformation can help promote vaccine confidence among some populations. The results underscore the joint importance of message source and messaging strategy in determining the effectiveness of responses to misinformation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Linear Models , Mass Media , Vaccination , Communication
9.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284841, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300843

ABSTRACT

The article aims to understand the process through which scientific experts gain and maintain remarkable media visibility. It has been analysed a corpus of 213,875 articles published by the eight most important Italian newspapers across the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021. By exploring this process along the different phases of the management of the emergency in Italy, it was observed that some scientific experts achieve high media visibility-and sometimes notwithstanding their low academic reputation-thus becoming a sort of "media star". Scientific literature about the relationship between experts and media is considerable, nonetheless we found a lack of theoretical models able to analyse under which conditions experts are able to enter and to remain prominent in the media sphere. A Media Experts Evolutionary Model (MEEM) is proposed in order to analyze the main conditions under which experts can acquire visibility and how they can "survive" in media arena. We proceeded by analysing visibility of experts during SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and considering both their individual credentials previously acquired and the media environment processes of selection; MEEM acts hence as a combination of these two levels. Regarding the credentials, we accounted for i) institutional role/position, ii) previous media visibility, and iii) matches between scientific credentials and media competence. In our analysis, we collected evidence that high visibility in newspapers can be seen as evolutionary in the sense that some profiles-i.e. a particular configuration of credentials-are more adapt to specific media environments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Communication , Italy/epidemiology , Mass Media
10.
J Hosp Med ; 17(5): 396-398, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2274520
11.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1078115, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2288407

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Preprints have become an important tool for meeting the challenges of health communication in the context of COVID-19. They allow scientists to disseminate their results more quickly due to the absence of a peer review process. Preprints have been well-received by scientists, however, there have been concerns about the exposure of wider public audiences to preprints due in part to this lack of peer review. Methods: The aim of this study is to examine the dissemination of preprints on medRxiv and bioRxiv during the COVID-19 pandemic using content analysis and statistical analysis. Results: Our findings show that preprints have played an unprecedented role in disseminating COVID-19-related science results to the public. Discussion: While the overall media coverage of preprints is unsatisfactory, digital native news media performed better than legacy media in reporting preprints, which means that we could make the most of digital native media to improve health communication. This study contributes to understanding how science communication has evolved in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and provides some practical recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mass Media
12.
Public Health ; 218: 106-113, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2254237

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The relationship between human mobility and nature of science (NOS) salience in the UK news media was examined. STUDY DESIGN: This is a mixed-method study. METHODS: A time series NOS salience data set was established from the content analysis of 1520 news articles related to non-pharmaceutical interventions of COVID-19. Data were taken from articles published between November 2021 and February 2022, which correlates with period of the change from pandemic to endemic status. Vector autoregressive model fitting with human mobility took place. RESULTS: The findings suggest that it was not the number of COVID-19 news articles nor the actual number of cases/deaths, but the specific NOS content that was associated with mobility change during the pandemic. Data indicate a Granger causal negative direction (P < 0.1) for the effect of the NOS salience represented in the news media on mobility in parks, as well as the effect of scientific practice, scientific knowledge and professional activities communicated in news media on recreational activities and grocery shopping. NOS salience was not associated with the mobility for transit, work or residential locations (P > 0.1). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the study suggest that the ways in which the news media discuss epidemics can influence changes in human mobility. It is therefore essential that public health communicators emphasise the basis of scientific evidence to eliminate potential media bias in health and science communication for the promotion of public health policy. The present study approach, which combines time series and content analysis and uses an interdisciplinary lens from science communication, could also be adopted to other interdisciplinary health-related topics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Communication , Mass Media
13.
J Gen Intern Med ; 38(4): 1030-1037, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2253506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Broadcast media is a method to communicate health information to the general public and has previously been used in prior public health emergencies. Despite the current ubiquity of social media, traditional news programming retains relatively large audiences, which increased during the COVID-19 pandemic's early days. Viewership of broadcast media networks' evening news skews toward older groups (age 65 and up) which were vulnerable to health complications related to the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVES: The current study explored the trends in American broadcast network news media coverage of prevention during the initial wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Quantitative content analysis using the Public Health Framework for Prevention was used to analyze three major US media networks' evening news content for thematic trends in COVID-19 coverage during the first US pandemic wave from March to May 2020. SUBJECTS: A total of 117 episodes of the evening news, 39 from each of the three major US media networks, evenly divided among the first 13 weeks of the pandemic in the US. MAIN MEASURES: Outcome variables included average seconds of coverage per episode devoted to prevention strategies, COVID-19 coverage not related to prevention, and non-COVID-19 coverage. KEY RESULTS: The proportion of coverage dedicated to COVID-19 sharply increased in the first 2 weeks of March and decreased in the last 2 weeks of May. Networks focused approximately half the COVID-19 coverage time on prevention issues (288 seconds/episode) compared to non-prevention issues (538 seconds/episode). Prevention coverage varied over time. CONCLUSIONS: Although coverage included COVID-19 prevention content, more of the coverage was on other pandemic-related issues (e.g., economic impacts). Because public network news outlets have broad reach and accessibility, they could be an effective partner for public health agencies disseminating prevention messaging for current and future disease outbreaks and threats to public health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Mass Media , Public Health/methods , Disease Outbreaks
14.
Am J Nurs ; 123(1): 13-14, 2023 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2245780
15.
PLoS One ; 18(1): e0278098, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243774

ABSTRACT

National differences in uncertainty, inequality, and trust have been accentuated by COVID-19. There are indications that the pandemic has impacted societies characterized by high uncertainty, inequality, and low trust harder than societies characterized by low uncertainty, equality, and high trust. This study investigates differential response strategies to COVID-19 as reflected in news media of two otherwise similar low uncertainty societies: Denmark and Sweden. The comparison is made using a recent approach to information dynamics in unstructured data. The main findings are that the news dynamics generally mirror public-health policies, capture fundamental socio-cultural variables related to uncertainty and trust, and may provide a measure of societal uncertainty. The findings can provide insights into evolutionary trajectories of decision-making under high uncertainty and, from a methodological level, be used to develop a media-based index of uncertainty and trust.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Uncertainty , Mass Media , Trust
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(4)2023 Feb 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241914

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Stigma relating to health can result in a broad range of vulnerabilities and risks for patients and healthcare providers. The media play a role in people's understanding of health, and stigma is socially constructed through many communication channels, including media framing. Recent health issues affected by stigma include monkeypox and COVID-19. OBJECTIVES: This research aimed to examine how The Washington Post (WP) framed the stigma around monkeypox and COVID-19. Guided by framing theory and stigma theory, online news coverage of monkeypox and COVID-19 was analyzed to understand the construction of social stigma through media frames. METHODS: This research used qualitative content analysis to compare news framings in The Washington Post's online news coverage of monkeypox and COVID-19. RESULTS: Using endemic, reassurance, and sexual-transmission frames, The Washington Post predominantly defined Africa as the source of monkeypox outbreaks, indirectly labeled gays as a specific group more likely to be infected with monkeypox, and emphasized that there was no need to worry about the spread of the monkeypox virus. In its COVID-19 coverage, The Washington Post adopted endemic and panic frames to describe China as the source of the coronavirus and to construct an image of panic regarding the spread of the virus. CONCLUSIONS: These stigma discourses are essentially manifestations of racism, xenophobia, and sexism in public health issues. This research confirms that the media reinforces the stigma phenomenon in relation to health through framing and provides suggestions for the media to mitigate this issue from a framing perspective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Monkeypox , Male , Humans , Mass Media , Washington , Social Stigma
17.
Am J Nurs ; 123(2): 16, 2023 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2237702
18.
Public Underst Sci ; 32(5): 641-657, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2224012

ABSTRACT

Anti-intellectualism (resentment, hostility, and mistrust of experts) has become a growing concern during the pandemic. Using topic modeling and supervised machine learning, this study examines the elements and sources of anti-Fauci tweets as a case of anti-intellectual discourse on social media. Based on the theoretical framework of science-related populism, we identified three anti-intellectual discursive elements in anti-Fauci tweets: people-scientist antagonism, delegitimizing the motivation of scientists, and delegitimizing the knowledge of scientists. Delegitimizing the motivation of scientists appeared the most in anti-Fauci tweets. Politicians, conservative news media, and non-institutional actors (e.g. individuals and grassroots advocacy organizations) co-constructed the production and circulation of anti-intellectual discourses on Twitter. Anti-intellectual discourses resurged even under Twitter's content moderation mechanism. We discuss theoretical and practical implications for building public trust in scientists, effective science communication, and content moderation policies on social media.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mass Media
19.
PLoS One ; 17(12): e0267871, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196892

ABSTRACT

Can comics effectively convey scientific knowledge about COVID-19 to youth? What types and how many sources of information did youth have about COVID-19 during the pandemic? How are sources of information associated with accurate COVID-19 knowledge? To answer these questions, we surveyed youth in grades 5-9 in a Midwestern United States school district in the winter of 2020-2021. The online survey used measures of COVID-19 knowledge and sources, with an embedded experiment on COVID-19 relevant comics. Guided by an integrated science capital and just-in-time health and science information acquisition model, we also measured level of science capital, science identity, and utility of science for health and society. The school district protocol required parental consent for participation; 264 of ~15,000 youth participated. Youth were randomly assigned one of four comic conditions before receiving an online survey. Results indicate that, similar to knowledge gains in comic studies on other science topics, reading the comics was associated with 7 to 29% higher accuracy about COVID-19. We found that youth reported getting information about COVID-19 from between 0-6 sources including media, family, friends, school, and experts. The bivariate positive association of news versus other sources with accuracy of knowledge did not persist in the full model, yet the positive association of a higher number of sources and accuracy did persist in the multivariate models. The degree of valuing the utility of science for their health moderated the number of sources to accuracy association. Those with less value on science for health had a stronger positive association of number of sources and accuracy in COVID-19 knowledge. We conclude that during a pandemic, even with health and science information ubiquitous in the news media, increasing youth access to a variety of accurate sources of information about science and health can increase youth knowledge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Information Sources , Mass Media , Schools , Friends
20.
J Health Commun ; 27(10): 727-736, 2022 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2166085

ABSTRACT

The Egyptian government has acquired COVID-19 vaccines from different sources; however, the vaccination rates and vaccine acceptance among the public remained low. News media play an influential role in shaping the public's understanding of medical issues and promoting health behaviors such as vaccination. Guided by the Extended Parallel Processing Model (EPPM) and the framing theory, a content analysis of COVID-19 vaccines coverage in two established Egyptian newspapers in Arabic (Al-Goumhuria and Al-Masry Al-Youm) between January 2020 and November 2021 was conducted. Findings suggested that the Egyptian newspapers focused on the efficacy of the vaccines but downplayed the severity of COVID-19. Most articles from both newspapers did not use gain or loss frames, although Al-Goumhuria was most likely to use both (loss and gain) frames simultaneously. Specific vaccine information regarding its safety, side effects, and effectiveness was minimal in both newspapers. The differences in COVID-19 vaccine coverage between the two newspapers were limited, suggesting a high level of government control of COVID-19 related content, regardless of whether it is state- or private-owned newspaper. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings were discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Egypt , COVID-19/prevention & control , Mass Media , Health Behavior
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL