Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 19 de 19
Filter
1.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21650, 2021 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504883

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV2 has now spread worldwide causing over four million deaths. Testing strategies are highly variable between countries and their impact on mortality is a major issue. Retrospective multicenter study with a prospective database on all inpatients throughout mainland France. Using fixed effects models, we exploit policy discontinuities at region borders in France to estimate the effect of testing on the case fatality rate. In France, testing policies are determined at a regional level, generating exogenous variation in testing rates between departments on each side of a region border. We compared all contiguous department pairs located on the opposite sides of a region border. The increase of one percentage point in the test rate is associated with a decrease of 0.0015 percentage point in the death rate, that is, for each additional 2000 tests, we could observe three fewer deaths. Our study suggests that COVID-19 population testing could have a significant impact on the mortality rate which should be considered in decision-making. As concern grows over the current second wave of COVID-19, our findings support the implementation of large-scale screening strategies in such epidemic contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/trends , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , France/epidemiology , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/trends , Mortality/trends , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
2.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 20(1): 218, 2021 11 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503722

ABSTRACT

Type 2 diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors for heart failure, the prevalence of which is increasing worldwide. The aim of the review is to highlight the current perspectives of the pathophysiology of heart failure as it pertains to type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the proposed mechanistic bases, explaining the myocardial damage induced by diabetes-related stressors and other risk factors, i.e., cardiomyopathy in type 2 diabetes. We highlight the complex pathology of individuals with type 2 diabetes, including the relationship with chronic kidney disease, metabolic alterations, and heart failure. We also discuss the current criteria used for heart failure diagnosis and the gold standard screening tools for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Currently approved pharmacological therapies with primary use in type 2 diabetes and heart failure, and the treatment-guiding role of NT-proBNP are also presented. Finally, the influence of the presence of type 2 diabetes as well as heart failure on COVID-19 severity is briefly discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Disease Management , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Mass Screening/methods , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Heart Failure/blood , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Humans , Mass Screening/trends , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Peptide Fragments/blood , Prognosis
3.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(3): e1008688, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125385

ABSTRACT

Outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 are threatening the health care systems of several countries around the world. The initial control of SARS-CoV-2 epidemics relied on non-pharmaceutical interventions, such as social distancing, teleworking, mouth masks and contact tracing. However, as pre-symptomatic transmission remains an important driver of the epidemic, contact tracing efforts struggle to fully control SARS-CoV-2 epidemics. Therefore, in this work, we investigate to what extent the use of universal testing, i.e., an approach in which we screen the entire population, can be utilized to mitigate this epidemic. To this end, we rely on PCR test pooling of individuals that belong to the same households, to allow for a universal testing procedure that is feasible with the limited testing capacity. We evaluate two isolation strategies: on the one hand pool isolation, where we isolate all individuals that belong to a positive PCR test pool, and on the other hand individual isolation, where we determine which of the individuals that belong to the positive PCR pool are positive, through an additional testing step. We evaluate this universal testing approach in the STRIDE individual-based epidemiological model in the context of the Belgian COVID-19 epidemic. As the organisation of universal testing will be challenging, we discuss the different aspects related to sample extraction and PCR testing, to demonstrate the feasibility of universal testing when a decentralized testing approach is used. We show through simulation, that weekly universal testing is able to control the epidemic, even when many of the contact reductions are relieved. Finally, our model shows that the use of universal testing in combination with stringent contact reductions could be considered as a strategy to eradicate the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Epidemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Belgium/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/trends , Computational Biology , Computer Simulation , Contact Tracing/methods , Contact Tracing/statistics & numerical data , Contact Tracing/trends , False Negative Reactions , Family Characteristics , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Mass Screening/trends , Models, Statistical , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/trends , Travel
4.
BJOG ; 128(5): 917-920, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119183

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine the differences in detection rate for gestational diabetes (GDM) comparing the methodology recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) compared with testing described as appropriate during the Covid-19 pandemic by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). DESIGN: Cohort study of women delivering between 1 January 2016 and 1 July 2020. SETTING: London Teaching Hospital. POPULATION: All women delivering between 1 January 2016 and 13 May 2020 and follow up of women screening negative between 1 April 2020 and 13 May 2020. METHODS: Retrospective study of prospectively collected data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Detection rate of gestational diabetes. RESULTS: Using the RCOG guidance, the overall rate of women identified as having gestational diabetes fell from 7.7% (1853/24168) to 4.2% (35/831)(P = 0.0003). Of 230 women who tested negative according to the RCOG criteria from 1 April to 13 May but who subsequently had an oral glucose tolerance test, 47 (20.4%) were diagnosed as having gestational diabetes according to the NICE criteria. CONCLUSIONS: In our setting, the RCOG Covid-19 gestational diabetes screening regime failed to detect 47 of 82 (57%) women subsequently identified as gestational diabetics, and therefore cannot be recommended for general use. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Screening for GDM using RCOG Covid criteria reduced detection rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes, Gestational , Diagnostic Screening Programs , Mass Screening , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Adult , Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Diabetes, Gestational/diagnosis , Diabetes, Gestational/epidemiology , Diagnostic Screening Programs/organization & administration , Diagnostic Screening Programs/standards , Female , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/trends , Organizational Innovation , Pregnancy , Program Evaluation , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine/standards , United Kingdom/epidemiology
5.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 50, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088595

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following implementation of strong containment measures, several countries and regions have low detectable community transmission of COVID-19. We developed an efficient, rapid, and scalable surveillance strategy to detect remaining COVID-19 community cases through exhaustive identification of every active transmission chain. We identified measures to enable early detection and effective management of any reintroduction of transmission once containment measures are lifted to ensure strong containment measures do not require reinstatement. METHODS: We compared efficiency and sensitivity to detect community transmission chains through testing of the following: hospital cases; fever, cough and/or ARI testing at community/primary care; and asymptomatic testing; using surveillance evaluation methods and mathematical modelling, varying testing capacities, reproductive number (R) and weekly cumulative incidence of COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 respiratory symptoms using data from Australia. We assessed system requirements to identify all transmission chains and follow up all cases and primary contacts within each chain, per million population. RESULTS: Assuming 20% of cases are asymptomatic and 30% of symptomatic COVID-19 cases present for testing, with R = 2.2, a median of 14 unrecognised community cases (8 infectious) occur when a transmission chain is identified through hospital surveillance versus 7 unrecognised cases (4 infectious) through community-based surveillance. The 7 unrecognised community upstream cases are estimated to generate a further 55-77 primary contacts requiring follow-up. The unrecognised community cases rise to 10 if 50% of cases are asymptomatic. Screening asymptomatic community members cannot exhaustively identify all cases under any of the scenarios assessed. The most important determinant of testing requirements for symptomatic screening is levels of non-COVID-19 respiratory illness. If 4% of the community have respiratory symptoms, and 1% of those with symptoms have COVID-19, exhaustive symptomatic screening requires approximately 11,600 tests/million population using 1/4 pooling, with 98% of cases detected (2% missed), given 99.9% sensitivity. Even with a drop in sensitivity to 70%, pooling was more effective at detecting cases than individual testing under all scenarios examined. CONCLUSIONS: Screening all acute respiratory disease in the community, in combination with exhaustive and meticulous case and contact identification and management, enables appropriate early detection and elimination of COVID-19 community transmission. An important component is identification, testing, and management of all contacts, including upstream contacts (i.e. potential sources of infection for identified cases, and their related transmission chains). Pooling allows increased case detection when testing capacity is limited, even given reduced test sensitivity. Critical to the effectiveness of all aspects of surveillance is appropriate community engagement, messaging to optimise testing uptake and compliance with other measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Independent Living/trends , Models, Theoretical , Population Surveillance/methods , Australia/epidemiology , Basic Reproduction Number/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Early Diagnosis , Feasibility Studies , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/trends
6.
Res Dev Disabil ; 109: 103852, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065563

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Screening and diagnostic assessments tools for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are important to administer during childhood to facilitate timely entry into intervention services that can promote developmental outcomes across the lifespan. However, assessment services are not always readily available to families, as they require significant time and resources. Currently, in-person screening and diagnostic assessments for ASD are limited due to the COVID-19 pandemic and will continue to be a concern for situations that limit in-person contact. Thus, it is important to expand the modalities in which child assessments are provided, including the use of technology. AIMS: This systematic review aims to identify technologies that screen or assess for ASD in 0-12 year-old children, summarizing the current state of the field and suggesting future directions. METHODS: An electronic database search was conducted to gather relevant articles to synthesize for this review. OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: 16 studies reported use of novel technology to assess children suspected of ASD. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Results strongly supported live-video evaluations, video observations, and online or phone methods, but there is a need for research targeting the feasibility of these methods as it applies to the stay-at-home orders required by the pandemic, and other situations that limit clients from seeing providers in-person.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Mass Screening , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Humans , Inventions , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/trends
7.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(1): 407-413, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062312

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Diabetes and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) share a bidirectional relationship. Hyperglycemia occurring in the setting of either previously diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes is known to be associated with poor outcomes. Here, we aim to provide a simple and practical guidance on the diagnosis and management of hyperglycemia in admitted patients with COVID-19. METHODS: The guidance is formulated based on experience of authors and relevant literature on the subject searched using Pubmed. RESULTS: Every patient admitted to a COVID care facility should be investigated for hyperglycemia using a combination of tests including capillary blood glucose, fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c. Oral glucose lowering drugs can be considered in patients with mild COVID illness who have mild hyperglycemia [pre-meal blood glucose of <180 mg/dl (10 mmol/L) and post-meal blood glucose of <250 mg/dl (13.9 mmol/L)] and no contraindication to the use of these agents.. All patients with moderate-severe disease and/or hyperglycemia of greater severity should be initiated on insulin therapy. Hyperglycemia should be aggressively screened for and managed in patients receiving systemic glucocorticoids. CONCLUSION: This document provides a broad overview on the diagnosis and management of hyperglycemia at COVID care facilities and should be useful to a wide range of healthcare personnel involved in care of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/trends , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Mass Screening/trends , Blood Glucose/drug effects , Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Management , Humans , Hyperglycemia/therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , India/epidemiology , Mass Screening/standards
9.
Public Health Res Pract ; 30(4)2020 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005729

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused major disruptions to many aspects of life in Australia and globally. This includes actual and potential future impacts on Australia's three national screening programs for breast, bowel and cervical cancer. These programs aim to improve cancer outcomes through an organised approach to the early detection of cancer and precancer in asymptomatic populations. The design of each program varies according to biological differences in the three cancers, the available screening technology, the target population, and variations in their administration of Australia's federal, state and territory jurisdictions. The observed and potential impacts of COVID-19 on these programs, and on related activities such as the current national enquiry into lung cancer screening feasibility, therefore vary significantly. This article focuses on observed short-term impacts, adaptations and the longer-term outlook for cancer screening in relation to COVID-19. It summarises potential responses to minimise the harms of disruptions caused by COVID-19, and highlights research and policy opportunities in the pandemic response and recovery which could inform and accelerate optimisation of cancer screening in the long term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Australia , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colonoscopy , Early Detection of Cancer/trends , Female , Humans , Intestinal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Male , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/trends , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis
10.
Euro Surveill ; 25(47)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976162

ABSTRACT

We present preliminary results of a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) impact assessment on testing for HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections in the WHO European Region. We analyse 98 responses from secondary care (n = 36), community testing sites (n = 52) and national level (n = 10). Compared to pre-COVID-19, 95% of respondents report decreased testing volumes during March-May and 58% during June-August 2020. Reasons for decreases and mitigation measures were analysed.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Services/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Health Impact Assessment , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Clinical Laboratory Services/trends , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Europe , HIV Infections/diagnosis , Hepatitis C/diagnosis , Hepatitis, Viral, Human/diagnosis , Humans , Male , Mass Screening/trends , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , World Health Organization
11.
J Diabetes Res ; 2020: 9036847, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894922

ABSTRACT

Recently, telemedicine has become remarkably important, due to increased deployment and development of digital technologies. National and international guidelines should consider its inclusion in their updates. During the COVID-19 pandemic, mandatory social distancing and the lack of effective treatments has made telemedicine the safest interactive system between patients, both infected and uninfected, and clinicians. A few potential evidence-based scenarios for the application of telemedicine have been hypothesized. In particular, its use in diabetes and complication monitoring has been remarkably increasing, due to the high risk of poor prognosis. New evidence and technological improvements in telemedicine application in diabetic retinopathy (DR) have demonstrated efficacy and usefulness in screening. Moreover, despite an initial increase for devices and training costs, teleophthalmology demonstrated a good cost-to-efficacy ratio; however, no national screening program has yet focused on DR prevention and diagnosis. Lack of data during the COVID-19 pandemic strongly limits the possibility of tracing the real management of the disease, which is only conceivable from past evidence in normal conditions. The pandemic further stressed the importance of remote monitoring. However, the deployment of device and digital application used to increase screening of individuals and monitor progression of retinal disease needs to be easily accessible to general practitioners.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetic Retinopathy/diagnosis , Diabetic Retinopathy/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Diabetic Retinopathy/epidemiology , Humans , Mass Screening/economics , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Mass Screening/trends , Ophthalmology/economics , Ophthalmology/methods , Ophthalmology/organization & administration , Ophthalmology/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/trends
12.
Oncologist ; 26(2): e338-e341, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893248

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have affected cancer management. We aimed to evaluate changes in every oncology care pathway essential step, from screening to treatment, during the pandemic. Monthly oncological activity differences between 2019 and 2020 (screening tests, histopathological analyzes, multidisciplinary tumor board meetings (MTBMs), diagnostic announcement procedures (DAPs), and treatments were calculated in two French areas experiencing different pandemic intensity (Reims and Colmar). COVID-19 has had a dramatic impact in terms of screening (-86% to -100%), diagnosis (-39%), and surgical treatment (-30%). This global decrease in all essential oncology care pathway steps contrasted with the relative stability of chemotherapy (-9%) and radiotherapy use (-16%). Outbreak occurred earlier and with more intensity in Colmar but had a comparable impact in both areas regarding MTMBs and DAPs. The current ONCOCARE-COV study is still in progress and with a longer follow-up to analyze postlockdown situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/standards , Medical Oncology/trends , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing/standards , Critical Pathways/standards , Critical Pathways/statistics & numerical data , Critical Pathways/trends , France/epidemiology , Humans , Mass Screening/standards , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Mass Screening/trends , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/immunology , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/standards , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Telemedicine/standards
15.
In Vivo ; 34(5): 3047-3053, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740636

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Coronavirus disease is spreading worldwide. Due to fast transmission and high fatality rate drastic emergency restrictions were issued. During the lockdown, only urgent medical services are guaranteed. All non-urgent services, as breast cancer (BC) screening, are temporarily suspended. The potential of breast cancer screening programs in increasing the survival rate and decreasing the mortality rate has been widely confirmed. Suspension could lead to worse outcomes for breast cancer patients. Our study aimed to analyse the data and provide estimates regarding the temporary BC screening suspension. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data regarding breast cancer and respective screening programs were achieved through literature research and analysis. RESULTS: Considering three different scenarios with respect to the lockdown's impact on breast cancer screening, we estimate that approximately 10,000 patients could have a missed diagnosis during these 3 months. Considering a 6-month period, as suggested by the Imperial college model, the number of patients who will not receive a diagnosis will rise to 16,000. CONCLUSION: Breast cancer screening should be resumed as soon as possible in order to avoid further breast cancer missed diagnosis and reduce the impact of delayed diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Early Detection of Cancer , Mass Screening/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Mammography , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Adv Respir Med ; 88(3): 173-175, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-676724

ABSTRACT

As of May 10, 2020, the United States of America (USA) has 1,367,079 cases of SARS CoV-2 and 80,773 deaths associated with the disease. New York alone has more than 333,000 cases and nearly 21,271 deaths. As we are trying to reopen our economies, the biggest risk we face is a surge in the immediate cases of new infections. The second wave of infection in the fall has also been predicted. As per the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) latest data set, among the dead from SARS COV-2 in the USA, 80% were 65 years or older. Despite lower percentages of people living in nursing homes and the fact that they represented only 11% of total cases of SARS CoV-2 cases, the maximum death rate has been seen there. A staggering 27,700 people died in long-term facilities in the USA as per the database by the New York Times. These deaths accounted for one-third of the deaths related to SARS CoV-2, making it the most intensively hurt group of al. lThe ground reality is that unfortunately, even now, most of these facilities do not have enough tests that can stop the outbreak. We suggest special targeting of residents of long-term care facilities, and the HCPs involved in these facilities to stop the spread of SARS CoV-2. Extreme measures including the highest testing numbers should be allocated to these facilities and rigorous Infection control measures should be undertaken so that the SARS-CoV-2 virus does not enter and infect the patients in these facilities and if it does, it is limited to the facility.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Mass Screening/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Primary Prevention/trends , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
18.
Oncologist ; 25(6): 463-467, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-66231

ABSTRACT

Italy and the rest of the world are experiencing an outbreak of a novel beta-coronavirus known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In this context, in Italy, we reorganized the National Health System and prioritized the clinical cancer care scenario, balancing risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission versus the magnitude of clinical benefit deriving from a specific therapeutic approach. As initial actions, we recommended that routine screening be suspended and that patients with early and advanced cancer be treated as outpatients as much as possible and at the nearest medical center. Patients who need to be hospitalized for cancer treatment were protected from potential SARS-CoV-2 infection by creating a dedicated diagnostic and therapeutic internal pathway for cancer treatment. We implemented reorganization of the hospital networks, based on a hub-and-spoke design. Stronger personal protection was made available for patients with cancer. Because of the extreme burden created by COVID-19, antitumor treatment was initiated only after considering patient performance status, comorbidities, biology of disease, and the likely impact of treatment on outcome. Treatment strategies were discussed in the context of a multidisciplinary tumor board. Treatment decision making balanced risk and benefits of treatment in the context of the specific pandemic level, on a case-by-case basis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Hospitalization , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/trends , Italy/epidemiology , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Mass Screening/standards , Mass Screening/trends , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/trends , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/standards , Patient Care Team/trends , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...