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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674667

ABSTRACT

Mast cells (MCs) have relevant participation in inflammatory and vascular hyperpermeability events, responsible for the action of the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS), that affect patients inflicted by the severe form of COVID-19. Given a higher number of activated MCs present in COVID-19 patients and their association with vascular hyperpermeability events, we investigated the factors that lead to the activation and degranulation of these cells and their harmful effects on the alveolar septum environment provided by the action of its mediators. Therefore, the pyroptotic processes throughout caspase-1 (CASP-1) and alarmin interleukin-33 (IL-33) secretion were investigated, along with the immunoexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), bradykinin receptor B1 (B1R) and bradykinin receptor B2 (B2R) on post-mortem lung samples from 24 patients affected by COVID-19. The results were compared to 10 patients affected by H1N1pdm09 and 11 control patients. As a result of the inflammatory processes induced by SARS-CoV-2, the activation by immunoglobulin E (IgE) and degranulation of tryptase, as well as Toluidine Blue metachromatic (TB)-stained MCs of the interstitial and perivascular regions of the same groups were also counted. An increased immunoexpression of the tissue biomarkers CASP-1, IL-33, ACE2, B1R and B2R was observed in the alveolar septum of the COVID-19 patients, associated with a higher density of IgE+ MCs, tryptase+ MCs and TB-stained MCs, in addition to the presence of intra-alveolar edema. These findings suggest the direct correlation of MCs with vascular hyperpermeability, edema and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) events that affect patients with a severe form of this disease. The role of KKS activation in events involving the exacerbated increase in vascular permeability and its direct link with the conditions that precede intra-alveolar edema, and the consequent DAD, is evidenced. Therapy with drugs that inhibit the activation/degranulation of MCs can prevent the worsening of the prognosis and provide a better outcome for the patient.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Capillary Permeability , Kallikrein-Kinin System/physiology , Lung/pathology , Mast Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Autopsy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Caspase 1/metabolism , Female , Humans , Interleukin-33/metabolism , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Male , Mast Cells/metabolism , Mast Cells/virology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
3.
Biofactors ; 47(2): 232-241, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1178977

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 leads to severe respiratory problems, but also to long-COVID syndrome associated primarily with cognitive dysfunction and fatigue. Long-COVID syndrome symptoms, especially brain fog, are similar to those experienced by patients undertaking or following chemotherapy for cancer (chemofog or chemobrain), as well in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) or mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). The pathogenesis of brain fog in these illnesses is presently unknown but may involve neuroinflammation via mast cells stimulated by pathogenic and stress stimuli to release mediators that activate microglia and lead to inflammation in the hypothalamus. These processes could be mitigated by phytosomal formulation (in olive pomace oil) of the natural flavonoid luteolin.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cognitive Dysfunction/drug therapy , Fatigue/drug therapy , Luteolin/therapeutic use , Brain/drug effects , Brain/physiopathology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cognitive Dysfunction/complications , Cognitive Dysfunction/physiopathology , Cognitive Dysfunction/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Fatigue/complications , Fatigue/physiopathology , Fatigue/virology , Humans , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 650331, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156125

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection represents a global health crisis. Immune cell activation via pattern recognition receptors has been implicated as a driver of the hyperinflammatory response seen in COVID-19. However, our understanding of the specific immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 remains limited. Mast cells (MCs) and eosinophils are innate immune cells that play pathogenic roles in many inflammatory responses. Here we report MC-derived proteases and eosinophil-associated mediators are elevated in COVID-19 patient sera and lung tissues. Stimulation of viral-sensing toll-like receptors in vitro and administration of synthetic viral RNA in vivo induced features of hyperinflammation, including cytokine elevation, immune cell airway infiltration, and MC-protease production-effects suppressed by an anti-Siglec-8 monoclonal antibody which selectively inhibits MCs and depletes eosinophils. Similarly, anti-Siglec-8 treatment reduced disease severity and airway inflammation in a respiratory viral infection model. These results suggest that MC and eosinophil activation are associated with COVID-19 inflammation and anti-Siglec-8 antibodies are a potential therapeutic approach for attenuating excessive inflammation during viral infections.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD/immunology , Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Eosinophils/immunology , Lectins/immunology , Mast Cells/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , Antigens, CD/genetics , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte/genetics , Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Eosinophils/drug effects , Eosinophils/metabolism , Eosinophils/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lectins/antagonists & inhibitors , Lectins/genetics , Lectins/metabolism , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/metabolism , Mast Cells/virology , Mice, Transgenic , Peptide Hydrolases/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism
7.
Biofactors ; 46(6): 927-933, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966303

ABSTRACT

Recent articles report elevated markers of coagulation, endothelial injury, and microthromboses in lungs from deceased COVID-19 patients. However, there has been no discussion of what may induce intravascular coagulation. Platelets are critical in the formation of thrombi and their most potent trigger is platelet activating factor (PAF), first characterized by Demopoulos and colleagues in 1979. PAF is produced by cells involved in host defense and its biological actions bear similarities with COVID-19 disease manifestations. PAF can also stimulate perivascular mast cell activation, leading to inflammation implicated in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Mast cells are plentiful in the lungs and are a rich source of PAF and of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1ß and IL-6, which may contribute to COVID-19 and especially SARS. The histamine-1 receptor antagonist rupatadine was developed to have anti-PAF activity, and also inhibits activation of human mast cells in response to PAF. Rupatadine could be repurposed for COVID-19 prophylaxis alone or together with other PAF-inhibitors of natural origin such as the flavonoids quercetin and luteolin, which have antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and anti-PAF actions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cyproheptadine/analogs & derivatives , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/prevention & control , Platelet Activating Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Platelets/drug effects , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cyproheptadine/therapeutic use , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Luteolin/therapeutic use , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/pathology , Mast Cells/virology , Platelet Activating Factor/genetics , Platelet Activating Factor/metabolism , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/pathology , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/blood , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology
8.
Drug Discov Ther ; 14(5): 259-261, 2020 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895584

ABSTRACT

Regardless of the severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a high proportion of patients struggle with persistent respiratory or systemic symptoms after recovery. This is called "postCOVID syndrome", for which pulmonary fibrosis is one of the pathogenesis. Besides T-lymphocytes and macrophages, mast cells also contribute to the development of cytokine storm and thus stimulate the activity of fibroblasts. Additionally, by the exocytotic release of fibroblast-activating factors, mast cells directly facilitate the progression of pulmonary fibrosis. In our previous basic studies, anti-allergic drugs (olopatadine, ketotifen), antibiotics (clarithromycin) and corticosteroids (hydrocortisone, dexamethasone) inhibited the process of exocytosis and showed their potency as highly effective mast cell stabilizers. Given such pharmacological properties of these commonly used drugs, they may be useful in the treatment of post-COVID-19 pulmonary fibrosis and in relieving the symptoms of post-COVID syndrome.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Anti-Allergic Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Cell Degranulation/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Mast Cells/drug effects , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Animals , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Mast Cells/immunology , Mast Cells/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/immunology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Biol Regul Homeost Agents ; 34(6): 1971-1975, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-814874

ABSTRACT

SARS-Cov-2 infection causes local and systemic inflammation mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and COX-2 eicosanoid products with metabolic dysfunction and tissue damage that can lead to patient death. These effects are primarily induced by IL-1 cytokines, which are involved in the elevation of hepatic acute phase proteins and fever. IL-1 has a broad spectrum of biological activities and participates in both innate and acquired immunity. In infections, IL-1 induces gene expression and synthesis of several cytokines/chemokines in both macrophages and mast cells (MCs). The activation of MCs triggers the secretion of mediators stored in the granules, and the de novo synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In microorganism infections, the release of IL-1 macrophage acts on adhesion molecules and endothelial cells leading to hypotension and septic shock syndrome. IL-1 activated by SARS-CoV-2 stimulates the secretion of TNF, IL-6 and other cytokines, a pro-inflammatory complex that can lead to cytokine storm and be deleterious in both lung and systemically. In SARS-CoV-2 septic shock, severe metabolic cellular abnormalities occur which can lead to death. Here, we report that SARS-CoV-2 induces IL-1 in macrophages and MCs causing the induction of gene expression and activation of other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Since IL-1 is toxic, its production from ubiquitous MCs and macrophages activated by SARS-CoV-2 can also provokes both gastrointestinal and brain disorders. Furthermore, in these immune cells, IL-1 also elevates nitric oxide, and the release of inflammatory arachidonic acid products such as prostaglndins and thromboxane A2. All together these effects can generate cytokine storm and be the primary cause of severe inflammation with respiratory distress and death. Although, IL-1 administered in low doses may be protective; when it is produced in high doses in infectious diseases can be detrimental, therefore, IL-1 blockade has been studied in many human diseases including sepsis, resulting that blocking it is absolutely necessary. This definitely nurtures hope for a new effective therapeutic treatment. Recently, two interesting anti-IL-1 cytokines have been widely described: IL-37 and IL-1Ra. IL-37, by blocking IL-1, has been observed to have anti-inflammatory action in rodents in vivo and in transfected cells. It has been reported that IL-37 is a very powerful protein which inhibits inflammation and its inhibition can be a valid therapeutic strategy. IL-37 is a natural suppressor of inflammation that is generated through a caspase-1 that cleaves pro-IL-37 into mature IL-37 which translocates to the nucleus and inhibits the transcription of pro-inflammatory genes; while IL-1Ra inhibits inflammation by binding IL-1 to its IL-1R (receptor). We firmly believe that blocking IL-1 with an anti-inflammatory cytokine such as IL-37 and/or IL-1Ra is an effective valid therapy in a wide spectrum of inflammatory disorders including SARS-CoV-2-induced COVID-19. Here, we propose for the first time that IL-37, by blocking IL-1, may have an important role in the therapy of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Interleukin-1/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Macrophages/virology , Mast Cells/virology
10.
J Biol Regul Homeost Agents ; 34(5): 1629-1632, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-782629

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 virus is an infectious agent commonly found in certain mammalian animal species and today also in humans. SARS-CoV-2, can cause a pandemic infection with severe acute lung injury respiratory distress syndrome in patients with COVID-19, that can lead to patient death across all ages. The pathology associated with pandemic infection is linked to an over-response of immune cells, including virus-activated macrophages and mast cells (MCs). The local inflammatory response in the lung that occurs after exposure to SARS-CoV-2 is due to a complex network of activated inflammatory innate immune cells and structural lung cells such as bronchial epithelial cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Bronchial epithelial cells and fibroblasts activated by SARS-CoV-2 can result in the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and induction of MC differentiation. In addition, endothelial cells which control leukocyte traffic through the expression of adhesion molecules are also able to amplify leukocyte activation by generating interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and CXC chemokines. In this pathologic environment, the activation of mast cells (MCs) causes the release of histamine, proteases, cytokines, chemokines and arachidonic acid compounds, such as prostaglandin D2 and leukotrienes, all of which are involved in the inflammatory network. Histamine is stored endogenously within the secretory granules of MCs and is released into the vessels after cell stimulation. Histamine is involved in the expression of chemokine IL-8 and cytokine IL-6, an effect that can be inhibited by histamine receptor antagonists. IL-1 is a pleiotropic cytokine that is mainly active in inflammation and immunity. Alveolar macrophages activated by SARS-CoV-2 through the TLR produce IL-1 which stimulates MCs to produce IL-6. IL-1 in combination with IL-6 leads to excessive inflammation which can be lethal. In an interesting study published several years ago (by E. Vannier et al., 1993), it was found that histamine as well as IL-1 are implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary inflammatory reaction, after micorganism immune cell activation. IL-1 in combination with histamine can cause a strong increase of IL-1 levels and, consequently, a higher degree of inflammation. However, it has been reported that histamine alone has no effect on IL-1 production. Furthermore, histamine enhances IL-1-induced IL-6 gene expression and protein synthesis via H2 receptors in peripheral monocytes. Therefore, since MCs are large producers of histamine in inflammatory reactions, this vasoactive amine, by increasing the production of IL-1, can amplify the inflammatory process in the lung infected with SARS-CoV-2. Here, we have proposed for the first time an emerging role for histamine released by MCs which in combination with IL-1 can cause an increase in lung inflammation induced by the viral infection SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Histamine/immunology , Interleukin-1/immunology , Mast Cells/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Inflammation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Neuroscientist ; 26(5-6): 402-414, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-655850

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a new pandemic infectious disease that originated in China. COVID-19 is a global public health emergency of international concern. COVID-19 causes mild to severe illness with high morbidity and mortality, especially in preexisting risk groups. Therapeutic options are now limited to COVID-19. The hallmark of COVID-19 pathogenesis is the cytokine storm with elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1ß, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), chemokine (C-C-motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). COVID-19 can cause severe pneumonia, and neurological disorders, including stroke, the damage to the neurovascular unit, blood-brain barrier disruption, high intracranial proinflammatory cytokines, and endothelial cell damage in the brain. Mast cells are innate immune cells and also implicated in adaptive immune response, systemic inflammatory diseases, neuroinflammatory diseases, traumatic brain injury and stroke, and stress disorders. SARS-CoV-2 can activate monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, mast cells, neutrophils, and induce cytokine storm in the lung. COVID-19 can activate mast cells, neurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells. SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause psychological stress and neuroinflammation. In conclusion, COVID-19 can induce mast cell activation, psychological stress, cytokine storm, and neuroinflammation.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Cytokines/immunology , Mast Cells/immunology , Nervous System Diseases/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Humans , Mast Cells/virology , Nervous System Diseases/complications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2
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