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1.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 29(9): 5711-5719, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of same-day mastectomy with reconstruction has continued to increase across the United States in recent years. Prior studies have shown that same-day mastectomy with reconstruction leads to increased patient satisfaction and allows hospitals to use resources better. This study sought to evaluate the implementation of same-day mastectomy with a reconstruction recovery protocol for patients undergoing mastectomy at our institution. METHODS: Under an institutional review board-approved protocol, a retrospective cohort analysis compared patients who underwent mastectomy April 2016 through April 2017 with those who had mastectomy March 2020 through March 2021. Length of stay, postoperative intravenous (IV) opioid administration, safety end points, and cost were the main variables examined. RESULTS: The study compared 457 patients in 2016-2017 with 428 patients in 2020-2021. The median hospital length of stay decreased from 24.6 h in 2016-2017 to 5.5 h in 2020-2021 (p < 0.001). The percentage of patients requiring postoperative IV opioids decreased from 69.1 % in 2016-2017 to 50 % in 2020-2021 (p < 0.001). The rates of unplanned readmissions within 30 days after mastectomy did not differ between the two groups, with a rate of 3.7 % in 2016-2017 and a rate of 5.1 % in 2020-2021 (p = 0.30). Reducing the rate of overnight admissions after mastectomy by 65.8 % resulted in a cost reduction of 65.8 %. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of same-day mastectomy with a reconstruction protocol across a large academic center and two satellite sites was a safe alternative to conventional mastectomy recovery plans.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Mammaplasty , Analgesics, Opioid , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Mammaplasty/methods , Mastectomy/methods , Retrospective Studies
2.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 29(9): 5799-5808, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833452

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Practices regarding recovery after mastectomy vary significantly, including overnight stay versus discharge same day. Expanded use of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) algorithms and the recent COVID pandemic have led to increased number of patients who undergo home recovery after mastectomy (HRAM). METHODS: The Patient Safety Quality Committee of the American Society of Breast Surgeons created a multispecialty working group to review the literature evaluating HRAM after mastectomy with and without implant-based reconstruction. A literature review was performed regarding this topic; the group then developed guidance for patient selection and tools for implementation. RESULTS: Multiple, retrospective series have reported that patients discharged day of mastectomy have similar risk of complications compared with those kept overnight, including risk of hematoma (0-5.1%). Multimodal strategies that improve nausea and analgesia improve likelihood of HRAM. Patients who undergo surgery in ambulatory surgery centers and by high-volume breast surgeons are more likely to be discharged day of surgery. When evaluating unplanned return to care, the only significant factors are African American race and increased comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: Review of current literature demonstrates that HRAM is a safe option in appropriate patients. Choice of method of recovery should consider patient factors, such as comorbidities and social situation, and requires input from the multidisciplinary team. Preoperative education regarding pain management, drain care, and after-hour access to medical care are crucial components to a successful program. Additional investigation is needed as these programs become more prevalent to assess quality measures such as unplanned return to care, complications, and patient satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Surgeons , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Mastectomy/methods , Retrospective Studies , United States
3.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(3): 261-267, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272214

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: At the end of 1 year of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, we aimed to reveal the changes in breast cancer cases in the context of cause and effect based on the data of surgically treated patients in our institution. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with breast cancer were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of patients who were operated in the year before the COVID-19 pandemic, and Group 2 consisted of patients who were operated within the first year of the pandemic. Tumor size, axillary lymph node positivity, distant organ metastasis status, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and type of surgery performed were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: The tumor size, axillary lymph node positivity, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy were higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p = .005, p = .012, p = .042, respectively). In addition, the number of breast-conserving surgery + sentinel lymph node biopsy were lower, while the number of mastectomy and modified radical mastectomy were higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p = .034). CONCLUSION: Patients presented with larger breast tumors and increased axillary involvement during the pandemic. Moreover, distant organ metastases may increase in the future.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Delayed Diagnosis/trends , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Female , Humans , Lymph Node Excision/trends , Lymphatic Metastasis , Mastectomy/methods , Mastectomy/trends , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Retrospective Studies , Tumor Burden , Turkey
4.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(5): e141-e143, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121494

ABSTRACT

At the onset of the COVID-19 crisis, a 63-year-old woman with multiple life-limiting comorbidities was referred with a necrotic infected left breast mass on a background of breast cancer treated with conservation surgery and radiotherapy 22 years previously. The clinical diagnosis was locally advanced breast cancer, but four separate biopsies were non-diagnostic. Deteriorating renal function and incipient sepsis and endocarditis resulted in urgent salvage mastectomy during the peak of the COVID19 pandemic. The final diagnosis was infected ischaemic/infarcted breast (wet gangrene) secondary to vascular insufficiency related to diabetes, cardiac revascularisation surgery and breast radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Breast/surgery , Diabetic Angiopathies/therapy , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/therapy , Gangrene/therapy , Mastectomy/methods , Mastitis/therapy , Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy/methods , Breast/blood supply , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/diagnosis , Coronary Artery Bypass , Debridement/methods , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetic Angiopathies/diagnosis , Diabetic Angiopathies/etiology , Diagnosis, Differential , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/diagnosis , Female , Gangrene/diagnosis , Humans , Infarction , Mammary Arteries/surgery , Mastectomy, Segmental , Mastitis/diagnosis , Middle Aged , Morganella morganii , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Radiotherapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Salvage Therapy
5.
In Vivo ; 35(1): 635-639, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011856

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: The perspective validation of a selective approach in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery was performed in order to assess whether patients as well as Health Care Workers (HCWs) were exposed to any undue risk of COVD-19 infection. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From March 9th to June 9th 2020, 207 patients were phone-triaged by a dedicated Breast Care Nurse; a patient-tailored program was adopted with the aim of avoiding hospitalization of SARS-CoV-2 symptomatic patients, with a careful prioritization of surgical procedures according to specific disease features. RESULTS: Two hundred and three out of 207 patients underwent operation; seven patients were temporarily excluded because they tested positive at phone triage (n=3), or in-hospital triage (n=3); another asymptomatic patient with negative NP swab tested IgM Ab-positive so that surgery was re-scheduled two weeks later. Four patients had no surgery; one of them was reconsidered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) after testing positive at phone triage; three patients were excluded because they were already hospitalized for COVID-19. Overall, mean in-hospital stay was 2.2 days (±SD, 0.7) and, after hospital discharge, no patient required readmission. CONCLUSION: This preventive program avoided any COVID-19 infection among patients and HCWs, so that an elective breast cancer surgical procedure can be safely and timely pursued without affecting the oncologic outcome.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mastectomy/methods , Preventive Health Services/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Medical Oncology/methods , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Triage/methods
6.
Breast ; 55: 1-6, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-969026

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In order to minimise the risk of breast cancer patients for COVID-19 infection related morbidity and mortality prioritisation of care has utmost importance since the onset of the pandemic. However, COVID-19 related risk in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery has not been studied yet. We evaluated the safety of breast cancer surgery during COVID-19 pandemic in the West of Scotland region. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of patients having breast cancer surgery was carried out in a geographical region during the first eight weeks of the hospital lockdown and outcomes were compared to the regional cancer registry data of pre-COVID-19 patients of the same units (n = 1415). RESULTS: 188 operations were carried out in 179 patients. Tumour size was significantly larger in patients undergoing surgery during hospital lockdown than before (cT3-4: 16.8% vs. 7.4%; p < 0.001; pT2 - pT4: 45.5% vs. 35.6%; p = 0.002). ER negative and HER-2 positive rate was significantly higher during lockdown (ER negative: 41.3% vs. 17%, p < 0.001; HER-2 positive: 23.4% vs. 14.8%; p = 0.004). While breast conservation rate was lower during lockdown (58.6% vs. 65%; p < 0.001), level II oncoplastic conservation was significantly higher in order to reduce mastectomy rate (22.8% vs. 5.6%; p < 0.001). No immediate reconstruction was offered during lockdown. 51.2% had co-morbidity, and 7.8% developed postoperative complications in lockdown. There was no peri-operative COVID-19 infection related morbidity or mortality. CONCLUSION: breast cancer can be safely provided during COVID-19 pandemic in selected patients.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Mastectomy/methods , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Carcinoma In Situ/pathology , Breast Carcinoma In Situ/surgery , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/pathology , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/pathology , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/surgery , Carcinoma, Lobular/pathology , Carcinoma, Lobular/surgery , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data , Mastectomy, Segmental/methods , Mastectomy, Segmental/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Scotland/epidemiology , State Medicine , Tumor Burden
11.
J Am Coll Surg ; 231(4): 434-447.e2, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728647

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, surgical delays have been common for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and early-stage estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, often in favor of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET). To understand possible ramifications of these delays, we examined the association between time to operation and pathologic staging and overall survival (OS). STUDY DESIGN: Patients with DCIS or ER+ cT1-2N0 breast cancer treated from 2010 through 2016 were identified in the National Cancer Database. Time to operation was recorded. Factors associated with pathologic upstaging were examined using logistic regression analyses. Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyze OS. Analyses were stratified by disease stage and initial treatment strategy. RESULTS: There were 378,839 patients identified. Among those undergoing primary surgical procedure, time to operation was within 120 days in > 98% in all groups. Among cT1-2N0 patients selected for NET, operations were performed within 120 days in 59.6% of cT1N0 and 30.9% of cT2N0 patients. Increased time to operation was associated with increased odds of pathologic upstaging in DCIS patients (ER+: 60 to 120 days: odds ratio 1.15; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.22; more than 120 days: odds ratio 1.44; 95% CI, 1.24 to 1.68; ER-: 60 to 120 days: NS; more than 120 days: odds ratio 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.82; 60 days or less: reference), but not in patients with invasive cancer, irrespective of initial treatment strategy. No difference in OS was seen by time to operation in DCIS or NET patients. CONCLUSIONS: Increased time to operation was associated with a small increase in pathologic upstaging in DCIS patients, but did not impact OS. In patients with cT1-2N0 disease, NET use did not impact stage or OS, supporting the safety of delay strategies in ER+ breast cancer patients during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Mastectomy/methods , Neoplasm Staging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate/trends , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
J Surg Oncol ; 122(5): 844-847, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690213

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Smoke is generated by energy-based surgical instruments. The airborne by-products may have potential health implications. METHODS: We developed a simple way to use de conventional surgical evacuator coupled with de electrosurgical pen attached to a 14G bladder catheter for open surgery. It was used in ten prospective patients with breast cancer. RESULTS: We notice a high reduction in surgical smoke during all breast surgery. A questionnaire was used for all participants of the surgery to answer the impression that they had about the device. The subjective impression was that the surgical smoke in contact whit the surgical team was reduced by more than 95%. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical smoke is the gaseous by-product produced by heat-generating devices in various surgical procedures. Surgical smoke may contain chemicals particles, bacteria, and viruses that are harmful and increase the risk of infection for surgeons and all the team in the operation room due to long term exposure of smoke mainly in coronavirus disease 2019 age. The adapted device described is a very simple and cheaper way to use smoke evacuators attached with the monopolar electrosurgical pen to reduce smoke exposure to the surgical team worldwide.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Electrosurgery/instrumentation , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Electrosurgery/economics , Electrosurgery/methods , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Lymph Node Excision/instrumentation , Lymph Node Excision/methods , Mastectomy/instrumentation , Mastectomy/methods , Nipples/surgery , Operating Rooms , Pandemics , Smoke/prevention & control , Urinary Catheters
13.
Breast Cancer ; 28(1): 137-144, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691217

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 is a declared worldwide pandemic. In our country, due to shortage of hospitals and beds in intensive care unit, oncological and breast cancer (BC) resources are temporarily shifted to COVID-19 patients. In addition, risk of cross-infections should be considered in these frail patients. To accomplish more surgical procedures and to reduce the length of hospital stay (LOS), fast track awake BC surgery should be implemented. The aim of the study is to estimate the effects of surgical shift in our facility during the early COVID-19 outbreak. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 30th January 2020 to 30th of March 2020, 86 consecutive patients were retrospectively enrolled and divided into pre-COVID-19-BC and COVID-19-BC. Clinical parameters and anamnestic data were collected and analyzed. Surgical procedures, relative complications and type of anaesthesia were reported. The effect on surgical time (ST), operative room time (ORT) and length of stay (LOS) were described and examined. RESULTS: No statistical difference was found in complications rate, clinical data and surgical procedures (p > 0.05). Awake breast conservative surgery (BCS) was the most frequent procedure in COVID-19-BC (p = 0.006). A statistically significant decrease in ORT and LOS was reported in COVID-19-BC (p = 0.040 and p = 0.0015 respectively), while comparable time resulted for ST (p = 0.976). Mean ORT and LOS reduction were 20.79 min and 0.57 hospital bed days. CONCLUSION: In the "COVID-19 era", fast track awake breast surgery provides a reduction of ORT, LOS and potentially surgical treatment for a wider number of oncological patients.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , Mastectomy/methods , Aged , Anesthesia/methods , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay , Lymph Node Excision , Mastectomy/adverse effects , Mastectomy, Segmental/adverse effects , Mastectomy, Segmental/methods , Middle Aged , Operative Time , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Wakefulness
15.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 182(3): 679-688, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-608129

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: As our hospitals conserve and re-allocate resources during the COVID-19 crisis, there is urgent need to determine how best to continue caring for breast cancer patients. During the time window before the COVID-19 critical peak and particularly thereafter, as hospitals are able to resume cancer operations, we anticipate that there will be great need to maximize efficiency to treat breast cancer. The goal of this study is to present a same-day protocol that minimizes resource utilization to enable hospitals to increase inpatient capacity, while providing care for breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction during the COVID-19 crisis. METHODS: IRB exempt patient quality improvement initiative was conducted to detail the operationalization of a novel same-day breast reconstruction protocol. Consecutive patients having undergone immediate breast reconstruction were prospectively enrolled between February and March of 2020 at Massachusetts General Hospital during the COVID-19 crisis. Peri-operative results and postoperative complications were summarized. RESULTS: Time interval from surgical closure to patient discharge was 5.02 ± 1.29 h. All patients were discharged home, with no re-admissions or emergency department visits. No postoperative complications were observed. CONCLUSION: This report provides an instruction manual to operationalize a same-day breast reconstruction protocol, to meet demands of providing appropriate cancer treatment during times of unprecedented resource limitations. Pre-pectoral implant-based breast reconstruction can be the definitive procedure or be used as a bridge to autologous reconstruction. Importantly, we hope this work will be helpful to our patients and community as we emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/methods , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Mammaplasty/methods , Mastectomy/methods , Quality Improvement , Adult , Aftercare , Anesthesiology , Betacoronavirus , Breast Implantation , Breast Implants , COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Efficiency , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Health Resources , Home Care Services , Humans , Length of Stay , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Readmission , Perioperative Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy , Surgery, Plastic , Surgical Oncology , Telemedicine , Tissue Expansion Devices
16.
Breast ; 52: 110-115, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-437530

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Corona Virus Disease 19 (COVID-19) had a worldwide negative impact on healthcare systems, which were not used to coping with such pandemic. Adaptation strategies prioritizing COVID-19 patients included triage of patients and reduction or re-allocation of other services. The aim of our survey was to provide a real time international snapshot of modifications of breast cancer management during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A survey was developed by a multidisciplinary group on behalf of European Breast Cancer Research Association of Surgical Trialists and distributed via breast cancer societies. One reply per breast unit was requested. RESULTS: In ten days, 377 breast centres from 41 countries completed the questionnaire. RT-PCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 prior to treatment was reported by 44.8% of the institutions. The estimated time interval between diagnosis and treatment initiation increased for about 20% of institutions. Indications for primary systemic therapy were modified in 56% (211/377), with upfront surgery increasing from 39.8% to 50.7% (p < 0.002) and from 33.7% to 42.2% (p < 0.016) in T1cN0 triple-negative and ER-negative/HER2-positive cases, respectively. Sixty-seven percent considered that chemotherapy increases risks for developing COVID-19 complications. Fifty-one percent of the responders reported modifications in chemotherapy protocols. Gene-expression profile used to evaluate the need for adjuvant chemotherapy increased in 18.8%. In luminal-A tumours, a large majority (68%) recommended endocrine treatment to postpone surgery. Postoperative radiation therapy was postponed in 20% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer management was considerably modified during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our data provide a base to investigate whether these changes impact oncologic outcomes.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Mastectomy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiotherapy/methods , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Disease Management , Europe/epidemiology , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Mass Screening , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Workload/statistics & numerical data
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