Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
Women Birth ; 34(2): 128-135, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454573

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Limited literature is available about women who wish to breastfeed but experience unexpected feelings of aversion in reaction to their infant suckling at the breast while breastfeeding. BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding benefits mothers, infants and society yet breastfeeding rates continue to fall below recommendations in part due to inadequate tailored support after hospital discharge. Influences on breastfeeding are complex and include many physiological, psychosocial and cultural factors. AIM: To better understand the experience of women who have feelings of aversion during breastfeeding by synthesising the existing literature. METHODS: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Maternity and Infant Care databases were searched for relevant literature published between 2000 to 2019. Using Covidence software, five qualitative research studies were identified. Studies were then analysed using meta-ethnographic qualitative synthesis. FINDINGS: Feelings of aversion during breastfeeding were described as visceral and overwhelming; leading to feelings of shame and inadequacy. This synthesis identified five findings; a central conceptual category of "it's such a strong feeling of get away from me" with four key metaphors translated from this central conceptual category: "I do it because I feel it is best for my baby", "I can't control those feelings", "I should be able to breastfeed my son and enjoy it", and "I'm glad I did it". This phenomenon may negatively affect a women's sense of self and impact on the mother-infant relationship. CONCLUSION: Some women who want to breastfeed can experience feelings of aversion while breastfeeding. The feelings of 'aversion' while breastfeeding can inhibit women from achieving their personal breastfeeding goals.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , Maternal Behavior/ethnology , Mothers/psychology , Adult , Affect , Anthropology, Cultural , Breast Feeding/ethnology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interviews as Topic , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Mother-Child Relations , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , Self Concept
2.
J Intellect Disabil Res ; 65(8): 760-771, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255435

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the first COVID-19 lockdown period, various restrictions led to diminished access to both educational and professional support systems for children with an intellectual disability and their families. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and needs of parents caring for a child with an intellectual disability during the first lockdown period in the Netherlands. METHOD: Five mothers caring for a child with an intellectual disability participated in this qualitative study. The participants were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The interviews lasted between 26 and 48 min. The interview recordings were transcribed verbatim, and the transcripts were analysed thematically. RESULTS: Three overarching themes emerged: (1) We need to stay healthy, which centres on the mother's urge to protect their child's well-being; (2) We make it work, which provides insight into how the mothers were handling the drastic changes in their family; and (3) My child's and family's place in the world, which focuses on the mothers' experienced position in the world around them. CONCLUSIONS: The current study provides valuable insights into the experiences and needs of mothers caring for a child with an intellectual disability during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Disabled Children , Intellectual Disability/nursing , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands , Qualitative Research
3.
Womens Health (Lond) ; 17: 17455065211010655, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197340

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Household chaos, including disorder, noise, and crowding within the home, is a risk factor for poor mental and physical health. Household chaos may act upon maternal behaviors of physical activity and sleep, potentially via higher stress. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationships among household chaos, maternal stress, and maternal physical activity and sleep, and identify barriers to home organization during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using an online survey of 1721 mothers of preschoolers (ages = 3.0-5.9 years) in the United States was conducted in May 2020 during COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and early reopening. Mothers reported demographic characteristics, household chaos, stress, physical activity and sleep, and barriers to home organization during the outbreak. Mediation models were conducted among household chaos, stress, and physical activity and sleep with adjustment for covariates. RESULTS: About half of mothers were middle income (48.2%), employed full-time prior to the outbreak (59.1%), and met the physical activity (47.7%), and sleep guideline (49.7%, 7-9 h/day). Household chaos and stress were both negatively related to physical activity and sleep. For every 1 unit increase in mother's current stress, mothers were 11% (95% confidence interval = 6% to 16%) less likely to meet the physical activity guideline and 19% (95% confidence interval = 14% to 23%) less likely to meet the sleep guideline. Household chaos was positively related to stress. Stress partially mediated the relationship between household chaos and physical activity and sleep. Virus concerns, occupational changes (i.e. teleworking), and lack of childcare were barriers to home organization. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 outbreak, many mothers had poor sleep and physical activity, which was associated with household chaos and stress. Opportunities to promote order at the individual, household, and community level may result in beneficial mental and physical health in mothers of young children during the COVID-19 outbreak and beyond.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Family Characteristics , Health Behavior , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Sleep , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
4.
Int Breastfeed J ; 16(1): 36, 2021 04 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has posed several challenges to the provision of newborn nutrition and care interventions including maternal support, breastfeeding and family participatory care. Italy was the first country to be exposed to SARS-CoV-2 in Europe. One of the measures adopted by the Italian government during COVID-19 pandemic was the total lockdown of the cities with complete confinement at home. We aimed to examine the impact of the lockdown caused by COVID-19 pandemic on exclusive breastfeeding in non-infected mothers. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 204 mother-baby dyads during lockdown (9 March to 8 May 2020) that we compared to previously studied 306 mother-baby dyads admitted during the year 2018. To reduce the possible effect of confounding factors on exclusive breastfeeding, a 1:1 matching was performed by using an automatized procedure of stratification that paired 173 mother-baby dyads. Feeding modality was collected at discharge, 30 and 90 days of newborn's life. Exclusive breastfeeding was considered when the infant received only breast milk and no other liquids or solids were given with the exception of vitamins, minerals or medicines. RESULTS: At discharge 69.4% of infants were exclusively breastfed during lockdown versus 97.7% of control group, 54.3% at 30 days vs 76.3 and 31.8% vs 70.5% at 90 days (p < 0.001). The proportion of breastfeeding remaining exclusive from discharge to 30-day was similar between groups (about 80%), but it was lower in lockdown group than in control cohort (58.5% vs 92.4%, p < 0.001) from 30- to 90-days. CONCLUSIONS: Lockdown and home confinement led to a decrease of exclusively breastfeeding in the studied population. Considering the timing to shift from exclusive to non-exclusive breastfeeding, differences between study groups were concentrated during hospital stay and from 30- to 90 days of a newborn's life, confirming that the hospital stay period is crucial in continuing exclusive breastfeeding at least for the first 30 days, but no longer relevant at 90 days of life.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , Breast Feeding/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Maternal Behavior , Pandemics , Quarantine , Adult , Family , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Length of Stay , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support
6.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0240962, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-874207

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID- 19 outbreak in the Netherlands (March 2020) and the associated social distancing measures, families were enforced to stay at home as much as possible. Adolescents and their families may be particularly affected by this enforced proximity, as adolescents strive to become more independent. Yet, whether these measures impact emotional well-being in families with adolescents has not been examined. In this ecological momentary assessment study, we investigated if the COVID-19 pandemic affected positive and negative affect of parents and adolescents and parenting behaviors (warmth and criticism). Additionally, we examined possible explanations for the hypothesized changes in affect and parenting. To do so, we compared daily reports on affect and parenting that were gathered during two periods of 14 consecutive days, once before the COVID-19 pandemic (2018-2019) and once during the COVID-19 pandemic. Multilevel analyses showed that only parents' negative affect increased as compared to the period before the pandemic, whereas this was not the case for adolescents' negative affect, positive affect and parenting behaviors (from both the adolescent and parent perspective). In general, intolerance of uncertainty was linked to adolescents' and parents' negative affect and adolescents' positive affect. However, Intolerance of uncertainty, nor any pandemic related characteristics (i.e. living surface, income, relatives with COVID-19, hours of working at home, helping children with school and contact with COVID-19 patients at work) were linked to the increase of parents' negative affect during COVID-19. It can be concluded that on average, our sample (consisting of relatively healthy parents and adolescents) seems to deal fairly well with the circumstances. The substantial heterogeneity in the data however, also suggest that whether or not parents and adolescents experience (emotional) problems can vary from household to household. Implications for researchers, mental health care professionals and policy makers are discussed.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Behavior/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Child Welfare/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Parenting/psychology , Parents/psychology , Paternal Behavior/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Affect , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Netherlands/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Uncertainty
9.
J Pediatr ; 226: 64-70, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-765222

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of separation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive mother-newborn dyads on breastfeeding outcomes. STUDY DESIGN: This observational longitudinal cohort study of mothers with SARS-CoV-2 PCR-and their infants at 3 NYU Langone Health hospitals was conducted between March 25, 2020, and May 30, 2020. Mothers were surveyed by telephone regarding predelivery feeding plans, in-hospital feeding, and home feeding of their neonates. Any change prompted an additional question to determine whether this change was due to coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). RESULTS: Of the 160 mother-newborn dyads, 103 mothers were reached by telephone, and 85 consented to participate. There was no significant difference in the predelivery feeding plan between the separated and unseparated dyads (P = .268). Higher rates of breastfeeding were observed in the unseparated dyads compared with the separated dyads both in the hospital (P < .001) and at home (P = .012). Only 2 mothers in each group reported expressed breast milk as the hospital feeding source (5.6% of unseparated vs 4.1% of separated). COVID-19 was more commonly cited as the reason for change in the separated group (49.0% vs 16.7%; P < .001). When the dyads were further stratified by symptom status into 4 groups-asymptomatic separated, asymptomatic unseparated, symptomatic separated, and symptomatic unseparated-the results remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: In the setting of COVID-19, separation of mother-newborn dyads impacts breastfeeding outcomes, with lower rates of breastfeeding both during hospitalization and at home following discharge compared with unseparated mothers and infants. No evidence of vertical transmission was observed; 1 case of postnatal transmission occurred from an unmasked symptomatic mother who held her infant at birth.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infant Care/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Maternal Behavior , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant Care/psychology , Infant Care/statistics & numerical data , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pregnancy , Young Adult
10.
Am J Perinatol ; 37(13): 1377-1384, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-752407

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in changes to perinatal and neonatal care, concentrating on minimizing risks of transmission to the newborn and health care staff while ensuring medical care is not compromised for both mother and infant. Current recommendations on infant care and feeding when mother has COVID-19 ranges from mother-infant separation and avoidance of human milk feeding, to initiation of early skin-to-skin contact and direct breastfeeding. Health care providers fearing risks of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) maternal-infant transmission may veer toward restricted breastfeeding practices. We reviewed guidelines and published literature and propose three options for infant feeding depending on various scenarios. Option A involves direct breastfeeding with the infant being cared for by the mother or caregiver. In option B, the infant is cared for by another caregiver and receives mother's expressed milk. In the third option, the infant is not breastfed directly and does not receive mother's expressed milk. We recommend joint decision making by parents and the health care team. This decision is also flexible as situation changes. We also provide a framework for counseling mothers on these options using a visual aid and a corresponding structured training program for health care providers. Future research questions are also proposed. We conclude that evidence and knowledge about COVID-19 and breastfeeding are still evolving. Our options can provide a quick and flexible reference guide that can be adapted to local needs. KEY POINTS: · SARS-CoV-2 is unlikely transmitted via human milk.. · A shared decision making on infant feeding is the preferred approach.. · Mothers can safely breastfeed with appropriate infection control measures..


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Milk, Human/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Counseling/methods , Decision Making , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Maternal Behavior , Mothers/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Risk Adjustment/methods , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Am J Perinatol ; 37(13): 1310-1316, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744409

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The novel virus known as severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has led to a terrifying pandemic. The range of illness severity among children is variable. This study aims to assess the characteristics of newborns born to SARS-CoV-2-positive women compared with those mothers who tested negative. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective cohort study performed at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in New York City from March to May 2020. Electronic medical records of mother-baby dyads were reviewed. RESULTS: Seventy-nine mothers tested for SARS-CoV-2 were included, out of which 18.98% of mothers tested SARS-CoV-2 positive. We found a significant association between symptoms and SARS-CoV-2 status. We observed a significant association between newborns of SARS-CoV-2 positive and SARS-CoV-2 negative mothers regarding skin-to-skin contact (p < 0.001). Both groups showed significant differences regarding isolation (p < 0.001). Interestingly, regarding SARS-CoV-2 infection in newborns, only one newborn tested SARS-CoV-2 positive and was unstable in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). With the multivariable logistic regression model, babies of SARS-CoV-2 positive mothers were three times as likely to have desaturations in comparison to newborns from negative mothers. Also, newborns of SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers were four times more likely to have poor feeding, compared with newborns of SARS-CoV-2-negative mothers. Finally, babies of SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers were ten times more likely to be symptomatic at the 2-week follow-up. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 has caused major morbidity and mortality worldwide. Neonates born to mothers with confirmed or suspected SARS-CoV-2 are most of the time asymptomatic. However, neonatal critical illness due to SARS-CoV-2 is still a possibility; thus, isolation precautions (such as avoiding skin-to-skin contact and direct breastfeeding) and vertical transmission should be studied thoroughly. In addition, testing these newborns by nasopharyngeal swab at least at 24 hours after birth and monitoring them for the development of symptoms for 14 days after birth is needed. KEY POINTS: · For SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers, reducing transmission of infection to newborns is crucial.. · Newborns of SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers are usually asymptomatic and may not be easily infected.. · Critical illness in the newborn may still happen, so monitoring is needed..


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Asymptomatic Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care, Neonatal/statistics & numerical data , Male , Maternal Behavior , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Neonatal Screening/methods , New York City/epidemiology , Oximetry/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 19(9): 2169-2173, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has affected the world from every aspect. Individuals are drained from social, financial, and emotional percussion of this pandemic. Psychosocial consequences are far greater than are being perceived. It is anticipated that once the pandemic is over the psycho-emotional turbulence would shake the whole populations of affected countries. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To review the psychological consequences of COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A literature search was conducted on major databases from January 2020 to April 2020 with the search terms of Covid-19, Corona virus, psychological, depression, anxiety, phobias, obsessive behaviors, paranoia, parental relationship, marital life and maternal and fetal bond. CONCLUSION: Patients with COVID-19 infection are more likely to suffer from a myriad of psychological consequences, and this infection may have profound effect on parenting, relationships, marital life, elderly, and maternal-fetal bond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Age Factors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/transmission , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Global Burden of Disease , Global Health , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Male , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Maternal-Fetal Relations/psychology , Obsessive Behavior/epidemiology , Obsessive Behavior/etiology , Obsessive Behavior/psychology , Paranoid Disorders/epidemiology , Paranoid Disorders/etiology , Paranoid Disorders/psychology , Parenting/psychology , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Phobic Disorders/etiology , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pregnancy , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...