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2.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249214, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605662

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus. Despite strong efforts that have been taking place to control the pandemic globally, the virus is on the rise in many countries. Hence, this study assessed the maternal health care services utilization amidst the COVID-19 pandemic in West Shoa zone, Central Ethiopia. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 844 pregnant women or those who gave birth in the last 6 months before the study. A multi-stage sampling technique was used to select the study participants. The data were collected through face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire. Logistic regressions were performed to identify the presence of significant associations, and an adjusted odds ratio with 95%CI was employed for the strength and directions of association between the independent and outcome variables. A P-value of <0.05 was used to declare statistical significance. The prevalence of maternal health service utilization during the COVID-19 pandemic was 64.8%. The odds of maternal health service utilization was higher among mothers who had primary (AOR = 2.16, 95%CI: 1.29-3.60), secondary (AOR = 1.97, 95%CI: 1.13-3.44), and college and above education (AOR = 2.89, 95%CI: 1.34-6.22) than those who could not read and write. Besides, mothers who did travel 30-60 minutes (AOR = 0.37, 95%CI: 0.23-0.59) and 60-90minutes (AOR = 0.10, 95%CI: 0.05-0.19) to reach the health facility had a lower odds of maternal health service utilization than those who did travel <30 minutes. Moreover, mothers who earn 1000-2000 (AOR = 3.10, 95%CI: 1.73-5.55) and > 2000 birrs (AOR = 2.66 95%CI: 1.52-4.64) had higher odds of maternal health service utilization than those who earn <500 birrs. Similarly, the odds of utilizing maternal health service were higher among mothers who did not fear COVID-19 infection (AOR = 2.79, 95%CI: 1.85-4.20), who had not had to request permission from husband to visit the health facility (AOR = 7.24, 95%CI: 2.65-19.75), who had practicedCOVID-19 prevention measure (AOR = 5.82, 95%CI: 3.87-8.75), and used face mask (AOR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.28-3.31) than their counterpart. Empowering mothers and creating awareness on COVID-19 preventionis recommended to improve maternal health service utilization during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Health Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Masks , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Class , Young Adult
3.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 670, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448217

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus currently cause a lot of pressure on the health system. Accordingly, many changes occurred in the way of providing health care, including pregnancy and childbirth care. To our knowledge, no studies on experiences of maternity care Providers during the COVID-19 Pandemic have been published in Iran. We aimed to discover their experiences on pregnancy and childbirth care during the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This study was a qualitative research performed with a descriptive phenomenological approach. The used sampling method was purposive sampling by taking the maximum variation possible into account, which continued until data saturation. Accordingly, in-depth and semi-structured interviews were conducted by including 12 participants, as 4 gynecologists, 6 midwives working in the hospitals and private offices, and 2 midwives working in the health centers. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi's seven stage method with MAXQDA10 software. RESULTS: Data analysis led to the extraction of 3 themes, 9 categories, and 25 subcategories. The themes were as follows: "Fear of Disease", "Burnout", and "Lessons Learned from the COVID-19 Pandemic", respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal health care providers experience emotional and psychological stress and work challenges during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, comprehensive support should be provided for the protection of their physical and mental health statuses. By working as a team, utilizing the capacity of telemedicine to care and follow up mothers, and providing maternity care at home, some emerged challenges to maternal care services can be overcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Perinatal Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Emotions/physiology , Female , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Interviews as Topic , Iran/epidemiology , Maternal Health Services/trends , Middle Aged , Midwifery/statistics & numerical data , Perinatal Care/organization & administration , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Telemedicine/methods
5.
Indian J Med Ethics ; VI(3): 1-24, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319913

ABSTRACT

India's nationwide lockdown to curtail the transmission of Covid-19 has given rise to concerns over the health system's response to maternal and child health (MCH) services. This paper aims to understand the challenges faced by pregnant women seeking institutional care during the lockdown. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of 54 online news reports, published in English and Hindi, between 25 March 2020 and 31 May 2020. They covered cases across 17 states in India and 16 maternal deaths. Three broad thematic categories of challenges for pregnant women emerged from the analysis: 1) physical access to health facilities, 2) admission to health facilities, and 3) lack of respectful maternity care during the lockdown. In conclusion, strengthening health systems and incorporating MCH into the Covid-19 response is imperative. Failure to provide quality MCH services during the lockdown has implications for the continuum of women's care, maternal mortality, and human rights.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Internet , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Newspapers as Topic , Pregnant Women , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Matern Child Health J ; 25(7): 1057-1068, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291367

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pregnancy and postpartum periods require continuity in care and counseling. During the pandemic process, telemedicine and telenursing applications have been used to meet the need for healthcare throughout the world, and skills in this area have been developed. This study aimed to identify the use of mobile applications by pregnant women in receiving health information, counseling, and healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic and their distress levels during pregnancy. METHODS: This research was a descriptive cross-sectional study. The study was designed as an online survey administered between August 2020 and November 2020 via a questionnaire and the Tilburg Pregnancy Distress Scale (TPDS). A total of 376 women agreed to participate in the study. Women were included if they were literate, had a gestational age of ≥ 12th weeks, and accommodated within the Republic of Turkey's boundaries. RESULTS: A total of 77.9% of participants reported using pregnancy-related mobile applications during the pandemic. The mean total Tilburg Pregnancy Distress Scale score was 24.09, and 37.2% of the participants were found to be at risk for high distress according to the cut-off point. There was a significant difference between the change in receiving health services and the anxiety about coronavirus transmission and the Tilburg Pregnancy Distress Scale total score. (p ≤ 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study helped understand the pandemic's impact on pregnancy distress and usage of mobile health applications by pregnant women during the pandemic. Also, our results indicate that a decrease in pregnant women receiving health services during this period. Mobile health applications appear to be usable for prenatal follow-ups because mobile applications are common among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Maternal Health Services , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Psychological Distress , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pregnancy/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(2): 323-330, 2021 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280855

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have short-term and long-term impacts on health services across sub-Saharan African countries. A telephone survey in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, and Nigeria was conducted to assess the effects of the pandemic on healthcare services from the perspectives of healthcare providers (HCPs) and community members. A total of 900 HCPs (300 from each country) and 1,797 adult community members (approximately 600 from each country) participated in the study. Adjusted risk ratios (ARRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using modified Poisson regression. According to the HCPs, more than half (56%) of essential health services were affected. Child health services and HIV/surgical/other services had a slightly higher percentage of interruption (33%) compared with maternal health services (31%). A total of 21.8%, 19.3%, and 7.7% of the community members reported that their family members and themselves had difficulty accessing childcare services, maternal health, and other health services, respectively. Nurses had a lower risk of reporting high service interruptions than physicians (ARR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.56-0.95). HCPs at private facilities (ARR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.59-0.84) had a lower risk of reporting high service interruptions than those at governmental facilities. Health services in Nigeria were more likely to be interrupted than those in Burkina Faso (ARR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.19-1.59). Health authorities should work with multiple stakeholders to ensure routine health services and identify novel and adaptive approaches to recover referral services, medical care, maternal and child health, family planning, immunization and health promotion, and prevention during the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , Child , Child Health Services/standards , Child Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Maternal Health Services/standards , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Nigeria/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Telephone , Young Adult
8.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0252735, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278177

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: During the COVID-19 pandemic the organization of maternity care changed drastically; this study into the experiences of maternity care professionals with these changes provides suggestions for the organization of care during and after pandemics. DESIGN: An online survey among Dutch midwives, obstetricians and obstetric residents. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to investigate associations between the respondents' characteristics and answers. RESULTS: Reported advantages of the changes were fewer prenatal and postpartum consultations (50.1%). The necessity and safety of medical interventions and ultrasounds were considered more critically (75.9%); 14.8% of community midwives stated they referred fewer women to the hospital for decreased fetal movements, whereas 64.2% of the respondents working in hospital-based care experienced fewer consultations for this indication. Respondents felt that women had more confidence in giving birth at home (57.5%). Homebirths seemed to have increased according to 38.5% of the community midwives and 65.3% of the respondents working in hospital-based care. Respondents appreciated the shift to more digital consultations rather than face-to-face consultations. Mentioned disadvantages were that women had appointments alone, (71.1%) and that the community midwife was not allowed to join a woman to obstetric-led care during labour and subsequently stay with her (56.8%). Fewer postpartum visits by family and friends led to more tranquility (59.8%). Overall, however, 48.0% of the respondents felt that the safety of maternity care was compromised due to policy changes. CONCLUSIONS: Maternity care professionals were positive about the decrease in routine care and the increased confidence of women in home birth, but also felt that safety in maternity care was sometimes compromised. According to the respondents in a future crisis situation it should be possible for community midwives to continue to deliver a personal handover after the referral of women to the hospital, and to stay with them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Midwifery/statistics & numerical data , Prenatal Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Home Childbirth/methods , Home Childbirth/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Labor, Obstetric , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands , Pregnancy , Prenatal Care/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
9.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 416, 2021 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On the 27th of March 2020 the Zimbabwean government declared the Covid-19 pandemic a 'national disaster'. Travel restrictions and emergency regulations have had significant impacts on maternity services, including resource stock-outs, and closure of antenatal clinics during the lockdown period. Estimates of the indirect impact of Covid-19 on maternal and perinatal mortality was expected it to be considerable, but little data was yet available. This study aimed to examine the impact of Covid-19 and lockdown control measures on non-Covid outcomes in a government tertiary level maternity unit in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, by comparing maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality before, and after the lockdown was implemented. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational study, using a cross-sectional design to compare routine monthly maternal and perinatal statistics three months before and after Covid-19 emergency measures were implemented at Mpilo Central Hospital. RESULTS: Between January-March and April-June 2020, the mean monthly deliveries reduced from 747.3 (SD ± 61.3) in the first quarter of 2020 to 681.0 (SD ± 17.6) during lockdown, but this was not statistically significant, p = 0.20. The Caesarean section rates fell from a mean of 29.8% (SD ± 1.7) versus 28.0% (SD ± 1.7), which was also not statistically significant, p = 0.18. During lockdown, the percentage of women delivering at Mpilo Central Hospital who were booked at the hospital fell from a mean of 41.6% (SD ± 1.1) to 35.8% (SD ± 4.3) which was statistically significant, p = 0.03. There was no significant change, however, in maternal mortality or severe maternal morbidity (such as post-partum haemorrhage (PPH), uterine rupture, and severe preeclampsia/eclampsia), stillbirth rate or special care baby unit admission. There was an increase in the mean total number of early neonatal deaths (ENND) (mean 18.7 (SD ± 2.9) versus 24.0 (SD ± 4.6), but this was not statistically significant, p = 0.32. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, maternity services at Mpilo showed resilience during the lockdown period, with no significant change in maternal and perinatal adverse outcomes, with the same number of man-hours worked before and during the lockdown Maternal and perinatal outcomes should continue to be monitored to assess the impact of Covid-19 and the lockdown measures as the pandemic in Zimbabwe unfolds. Further studies would be beneficial to explore women's experiences and understand how bookings and deliveries at local clinics changed during this time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Maternal Health Services/trends , Maternal Mortality , Morbidity , Perinatal Mortality , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Zimbabwe/epidemiology
10.
Matern Child Health J ; 25(6): 881-891, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201551

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: High maternal and neonatal mortality rates in developing regions like Pakistan are linked to low rates of institutional deliveries. One way to improve rates of institutional deliveries is through improving institutional delivery service satisfaction in women. The aim of this research is to identify which factors influence delivery service satisfaction during the period of COVID-19 and which socio-demographic characteristics of women are associated with greater fear of catching COVID-19 during institutional deliveries. METHODS: A total of 190 women who had given birth between May to June, 2020, were sampled from two private and two public sector hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan. A standardized tool was modified for use and a combination of descriptive statistics and multivariate regression was applied. RESULTS: The results reveal that a majority of women, at 74.7%, are afraid of contracting COVID-19; specifically, women delivering at public hospitals, those who are illiterate or semi-literate, with more than four children, with low household income, and who are unemployed. Regression models are used to identify factors related to higher satisfaction, including the following: (i) pre-delivery care (explanatory power of R2 = 0.651); (ii) during delivery care (R2 = 0.716); (iii) after delivery care for women (R2 = 0.525); and (iv) after delivery care for newborn (R2 = 0.780). The main areas which influence satisfaction include the following: service quality of staff and administration; maintenance of hygiene and sanitation; involvement in decision-making; provision of necessary information; and advice for breastfeeding, immunization and family planning. CONCLUSIONS FOR PRACTICE: Based on our findings, we recommend improved regulation of delivery services in both public and private hospitals and increased protection for disadvantaged women groups to maintain service quality during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Child Health , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Maternal Health , Personal Satisfaction , Adult , Female , Humans , Pakistan , Prenatal Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(2): 76-82, 2021 04.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183983

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to analyze available resources, guidelines in use, and preparedness to care for newborn infants at maternity centers in Argentina during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: Cross-sectional study based on a survey administered to medical and nursing staff. In May 2020, Argentine facilities with more than 500 annual births were contacted; 58 % of these were from the public sector. RESULTS: In total, 104/147 facilities answered (71 %). All had guidelines for care during the pandemic, and 93 % indicated they had been trained on how to use them. A companion was not allowed during childbirth in 26 % of private facilities and in 60 % of public ones (p < 0.01). Deferred cord clamping was recommended in 87 %; rooming-in with asymptomatic newborns was promoted in 62 %; breastfeeding using protective measures was recommended in 70 %; and breast milk using a bottle, in 23 %. In 94 %, family visiting in the Neonatology Unit was restricted. Difficulties included the unavailability of individual rooms for symptomatic newborn infants and a potential shortage of health care staff and personal protective equipment. CONCLUSIONS: All facilities are aware of the national guidelines to fight the pandemic. Most have the resources to comply with the recommended protective measures. There is uncertainty as to whether personal protective equipment, staff, and physical space available at the different facilities would be enough if cases increased significantly.


Introducción. El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar recursos disponibles, guías utilizadas y preparación para la atención de neonatos en maternidades de Argentina durante la pandemia de COVID-19. Método. Estudio transversal mediante una encuesta enviada a equipos médicos y de enfermería. En mayo de 2020, se contactaron instituciones de más de 500 nacimientos anuales en la Argentina, el 58 % del sector público. Resultados. Respondieron 104/147 instituciones (el 71 %). Todas contaban con guías para la atención durante la pandemia, y un 93 % refirió haber recibido capacitación para su uso. No autorizaban la presencia de acompañante en el parto el 26 % de instituciones privadas y el 60 % de las públicas (p < 0,01). El 87 % recomendaba ligadura oportuna del cordón, el 62 % promovía internación conjunta en neonatos asintomáticos, un 70 % recomendaba la puesta al pecho con medidas de protección, y el 23 %, leche materna mediante biberón. El 94 % restringía el ingreso de familiares a Neonatología. Las dificultades incluyeron imposibilidad de contar con habitaciones individuales para neonatos sintomáticos y potencial limitación del personal de salud y equipos de protección personal. Conclusiones. Todas las instituciones conocen las guías nacionales para enfrentar la pandemia. La mayoría cuenta con recursos para respetar las medidas de protección recomendadas. Existe incertidumbre sobre si, ante un aumento significativo en el número de casos, serán suficientes los elementos de protección personal, el personal y el espacio físico disponible en los distintos centros.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Infant Care/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Maternal Health Services/organization & administration , Argentina/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Policy , Humans , Infant Care/statistics & numerical data , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Male , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy
12.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248488, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172872

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The global COVID-19 pandemic has radically changed the way health care is delivered in many countries around the world. Evidence on the experience of those receiving or providing maternity care is important to guide practice through this challenging time. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Australia. Five key stakeholder cohorts were included to explore and compare the experiences of those receiving or providing care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Women, their partners, midwives, medical practitioners and midwifery students who had received or provided maternity care from March 2020 onwards in Australia were recruited via social media and invited to participate in an online survey released between 13th May and 24th June 2020; a total of 3701 completed responses were received. FINDINGS: While anxiety related to COVID-19 was high among all five cohorts, there were statistically significant differences between the responses from each cohort for most survey items. Women were more likely to indicate concern about their own and family's health and safety in relation to COVID-19 whereas midwives, doctors and midwifery students were more likely to be concerned about occupational exposure to COVID-19 through working in a health setting than those receiving care through attending these environments. Midwifery students and women's partners were more likely to respond that they felt isolated because of the changes to the way care was provided. Despite concerns about care received or provided not meeting expectations, most respondents were satisfied with the quality of care provided, although midwives and midwifery students were less likely to agree. CONCLUSION: This paper provides a unique exploration and comparison of experiences of receiving and providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. Findings are useful to support further service changes and future service redesign. New evidence provided offers unique insight into key stakeholders' experiences of the rapid changes to health services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Attitude to Health , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Middle Aged , Midwifery/education , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 10(1): 37, 2021 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 has caused significant toll over the globe. Pregnant women are at risk of infection. The present study examined the frequency of washing hands with soap and wearing face mask when going out, prevalence of depression and anxiety, and identified their associated factors among pregnant women during the early phase of COVID-19 outbreak in China. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted between 24 February and 3 March 2020. A total of 15 428 pregnant women who were using maternal health care services in China completed a questionnaire which assessed their socio-demographic and pregnancy-related characteristics, contextual, cognitive and social factors related to COVID-19, frequency of washing hands and wearing face masks, and depression and anxiety. Logistics regression analyses were performed to identify the associated factors of preventive behaviours and mental health. RESULTS: The prevalence of probable anxiety and depression was 28.2% and 43.6% respectively. 19.8% reported always wearing face mask when going out, and 19.1% reported washing hands with soap for more than 10 times per day. Results from logistic regression analyses showed that older age was associated with lower levels of depression and anxiety (OR = 0.42-0.67) and higher frequency of washing hands (OR = 1.57-3.40). Higher level of education level was associated with probable depression (OR = 1.31-1.45) and higher frequency of wearing face mask (OR = 1.50-1.57). After adjusting for significant socio-demographic and pregnancy-related factors, place of residence being locked down (aOR = 1.10-1.11), being quarantined (aOR = 1.42-1.57), personally knowing someone being infected with COVID-19 (aOR = 1.80-1.92), perception that COVID-19 would pose long term physical harm to human (aOR = 1.25-1.28) were associated with higher levels of depression and anxiety, while the perception that the disease will be under control in the coming month was associated with lower levels of depression and anxiety (aOR = 0.59-0.63) and lower tendency of always wearing face mask (aOR = 0.85). Social support was associated with lower levels of depression and anxiety (aOR = 0.86-0,87) and higher frequency of washing hands (aOR = 1.06). CONCLUSIONS: The mental health and preventive behaviours of pregnant women during COVID-19 outbreak was associated with a range of socio-demographic, pregnancy-related, contextual, cognitive and social factors. Interventions to mitigate their mental health problems and to promote preventive behaviours are highly warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Health Behavior , Mental Health , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Age Factors , China , Depression/epidemiology , Educational Status , Female , Hand Disinfection/trends , Humans , Logistic Models , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Odds Ratio , Personal Protective Equipment , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/psychology , Prenatal Care , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
Pan Afr Med J ; 37(Suppl 1): 32, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033041

ABSTRACT

Lockdown policies, travel restrictions and reduced provision of healthcare in Zimbabwe in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have brought unprecedented challenges for healthcare delivery. Maternity services, including antenatal care, labour and delivery as well as postnatal care have been affected directly and indirectly by the pandemic and resultant control interventions, with delays introduced at several points across the continuum of care. Unfortunately, maternity conditions are time-sensitive, and delays can negatively impact feto-maternal outcomes, with increased maternal, fetal or neonatal morbidity and mortality. An audit at central hospitals revealed reduced utilisation of maternity services and a trend towards an increase in maternal mortality. A formal evaluation is required; however, mitigating public health interventions are required, especially as the burden of COVID-19 in the country has considerably come down. The World Health Organisation offers useful technical guidance for maintaining essential health services in pandemic times in low-resources settings, and rationalising the use of personal protective equipment, which can be contextualised and adopted to restore and maintain essential health services. Restoration of essential maternity services is urgently required in an environment that protects healthcare workers and their clients, minimising their risk of contracting COVID-19 whilst optimising fetomaternal outcomes. Thus, the various stakeholders involved in maternity care must urgently come together and find ways of achieving this goal.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Maternal Health Services/supply & distribution , Public Health , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Maternal Health Services/organization & administration , Maternal Health Services/standards , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , Zimbabwe
15.
Matern Child Health J ; 25(1): 15-21, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947046

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To advocate perspectives to strengthen existing healthcare systems to prioritize maternal health services amidst and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic in low- and middle income countries. DESCRIPTION: COVID-19 directly affects pregnant women causing more severe disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The indirect effects due to the monumental COVID-19 response are much worse, increasing maternal and neonatal mortality. ASSESSMENT: Amidst COVID-19, governments must balance effective COVID-19 response measures while continuing delivery of essential health services. Using the World Health Organization's operational guidelines as a base, countries must conduct contextualized analyses to tailor their operations. Evidence based information on different services and comparative cost-benefits will help decisions on trade-offs. Situational analyses identifying extent and reasons for service disruptions and estimates of impacts using modelling techniques will guide prioritization of services. Ensuring adequate supplies, maintaining core interventions, expanding non-physician workforce and deploying telehealth are some adaptive measures to optimize care. Beyond the COVID-19 pandemic, governments must reinvest in maternal and child health by building more resilient maternal health services supported by political commitment and multisectoral engagement, and with assistance from international partners. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-sectoral investments providing high-quality care that ensures continuity and available to all segments of the population are needed. A robust primary healthcare system linked to specialist care and accessible to all segments of the population including marginalized subgroups is of paramount importance. Systematic approaches to digital health care solutions to bridge gaps in service is imperative. Future pandemic preparedness programs must include action plans for resilient maternal health services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Developing Countries/statistics & numerical data , Maternal Health Services/organization & administration , Mothers/psychology , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Mothers/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Poverty/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
16.
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs ; 46(1): 21-29, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811164

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to describe how the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic has affected pregnancy, prenatal maternity care practices, and infant feeding plans among pregnant persons in the United States. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study using an app-based survey. METHODS: A link to the survey was sent via email to users of the Ovia Pregnancy app on May 20, 2020 and was open for 1 week. Participants were asked to complete the survey as it applied to their pregnancy, breastfeeding, and maternity care received during the COVID-19 pandemic, beginning approximately February 2020 through the time of the survey. There were 258 respondents who completed the survey. RESULTS: The majority (96.4%; n = 251) of pregnant women felt they received safe prenatal care during this time period. Slightly less 86.3% (n = 215) felt they received adequate prenatal care during this time period. 14.2% (n = 33) reported changing or considering changing the location where they planned to give birth due to COVID-19. Of those who reported they had begun purchasing items for their baby, 52.7% reported that the COVID-19 pandemic has affected their ability to get items they need for their baby. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Although it is imperative to implement policies that reduce risk of transmission of COVID-19 to pregnant women and health care providers, it is necessary for health care providers and policy makers to listen to the collective voices of women during pregnancy about how COVID-19 has affected their birth and infant feeding plans and their perception of changes in prenatal care.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/psychology , Prenatal Care/psychology , Adult , Breast Feeding/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Patient Education as Topic , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Prenatal Care/statistics & numerical data
18.
BMJ Glob Health ; 5(6)2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614887

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has substantially impacted maternity care provision worldwide. Studies based on modelling estimated large indirect effects of the pandemic on services and health outcomes. The objective of this study was to prospectively document experiences of frontline maternal and newborn healthcare providers. METHODS: We conducted a global, cross-sectional study of maternal and newborn health professionals via an online survey disseminated through professional networks and social media in 12 languages. Information was collected between 24 March and 10 April 2020 on respondents' background, preparedness for and response to COVID-19 and their experience during the pandemic. An optional module sought information on adaptations to 17 care processes. Descriptive statistics and qualitative thematic analysis were used to analyse responses, disaggregating by low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) and high-income countries (HICs). RESULTS: We analysed responses from 714 maternal and newborn health professionals. Only one-third received training on COVID-19 from their health facility and nearly all searched for information themselves. Half of respondents in LMICs received updated guidelines for care provision compared with 82% in HICs. Overall, 47% of participants in LMICs and 69% in HICs felt mostly or completely knowledgeable in how to care for COVID-19 maternity patients. Facility-level responses to COVID-19 (signage, screening, testing and isolation rooms) were more common in HICs than LMICs. Globally, 90% of respondents reported somewhat or substantially higher levels of stress. There was a widespread perception of reduced use of routine maternity care services, and of modification in care processes, some of which were not evidence-based practices. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial knowledge gaps exist in guidance on management of maternity cases with or without COVID-19. Formal information-sharing channels for providers must be established and mental health support provided. Surveys of maternity care providers can help track the situation, capture innovations and support rapid development of effective responses.


Subject(s)
Child Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Occupational Stress , Poverty , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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