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6.
Am J Manag Care ; 27(4): e101-e104, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194879

ABSTRACT

In public health insurance programs, federal and state regulators use network adequacy standards to ensure that health plans provide enrollees with adequate access to care. These standards are based on provider availability, anticipated enrollment, and patterns of care delivery. We anticipate that the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic will have 3 main effects on provider networks and their regulation: enrollment changes, changes to the provider landscape, and changes to care delivery. Regulators will need to ensure that plans adjust their network size should there be increased enrollment or increased utilization caused by forgone care. Regulators will also require updated monitoring data and plan network data that reflect postpandemic provider availability. Telehealth will have a larger role in care delivery than in the prepandemic period, and regulators will need to adapt network standards to accommodate in-person and virtual care delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Planning , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Insurance Coverage/standards , Insurance, Health/standards , Public Sector , Health Insurance Exchanges , Humans , Insurance Coverage/legislation & jurisprudence , Insurance Coverage/organization & administration , Insurance, Health/legislation & jurisprudence , Insurance, Health/organization & administration , Medicaid/legislation & jurisprudence , Medicare/legislation & jurisprudence , United States
7.
J Health Polit Policy Law ; 46(3): 505-526, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110057

ABSTRACT

The United States is facing a maternal health crisis with rising rates of maternal mortality and morbidity and stark disparities in maternal outcomes by race and socioeconomic status. Among the efforts to address this issue, one policy proposal is gaining particular traction: extending the period of Medicaid eligibility for pregnant women beyond 60 days after childbirth. The authors examine the legislative and regulatory pathways most readily available for extending postpartum Medicaid, including their relative political, economic, and public health trade-offs. They also review the state and federal policy activity to date and discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the prospects for policy change.


Subject(s)
Insurance Coverage/legislation & jurisprudence , Maternal Health , Medicaid/legislation & jurisprudence , Policy , Postpartum Period , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , United States/epidemiology
11.
Drug Alcohol Depend ; 218: 108355, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-866644

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Expanding access to and utilization of naloxone is a vitally important harm reduction strategy for preventing opioid overdose deaths, particularly in vulnerable populations like Medicaid beneficiaries. The objective of this study was to characterize the landscape of monthly prescription fill limit policies in Medicaid programs and their potential implications for expanding naloxone use for opioid overdose harm reduction. METHODS: A cross-sectional, multi-modal online and telephonic data collection strategy was used to identify and describe the presence and characteristics of monthly prescription fill limit policies across state Medicaid programs. Contextual characteristics were described regarding each state's Medicaid enrollment, opioid prescribing rates, and overdose death rates. Data collection and analysis occurred between February and May 2020. RESULTS: Medicaid-covered naloxone fills are currently subject to monthly prescription fill limit policies in 10 state Medicaid programs, which cover 20 % of the Medicaid population nationwide. Seven of these programs are located in states ranking in the top 10 highest per-capita opioid prescribing rates in the country. However, 8 of these programs are located in states with opioid overdose death rates below the national average. CONCLUSIONS: Medicaid beneficiaries at high risk of opioid overdose living in states with monthly prescription fill limits may experience significant barriers to obtaining naloxone. Exempting naloxone from Medicaid prescription limit restrictions may help spur broader adoption of naloxone for opioid overdose mortality prevention, especially in states with high opioid prescribing rates. Achieving unfettered naloxone coverage in Medicaid is critical as opioid overdoses and Medicaid enrollment increase amid the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Drug Prescriptions , Medicaid/legislation & jurisprudence , Naloxone/therapeutic use , Narcotic Antagonists/therapeutic use , Analgesics, Opioid/poisoning , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Drug Overdose/drug therapy , Drug Overdose/mortality , Humans , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
12.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(3): 775-778, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-754317

ABSTRACT

In the midst of the COVID-19 outbreak, health care reform has again taken a major role in the 2020 election, with Democrats weighing Medicare for All against extensions of the Affordable Care Act, while Republicans quietly seem to favor proposals that would eliminate much of the ACA and cut Medicaid. Although states play a major role in health care funding and administration, public and scholarly debates over these proposals have generally not addressed the potential disruption that reform proposals might create for the current state role in health care. We examine how potential reforms influence state-federal relations, and how outside factors like partisanship and exogenous shocks like the COVID-19 pandemic interact with underlying preferences of each level of government. All else equal, reforms that expand the ACA within its current framework would provide the least disruption for current arrangements and allow for smoother transitions for providers and patients, rather than the more radical restructuring proposed by Medicare for All or the cuts embodied in Republican plans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Care Reform/legislation & jurisprudence , National Health Insurance, United States/legislation & jurisprudence , Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act/legislation & jurisprudence , Humans , Medicaid/legislation & jurisprudence , Medicare/legislation & jurisprudence , National Health Insurance, United States/trends , Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act/trends , United States , Universal Health Insurance/legislation & jurisprudence
13.
J Gen Intern Med ; 35(10): 3040-3042, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-723582

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is poised to drastically alter the Medicaid program. While state Medicaid programs are currently expanding coverage policies and enrollment to address acute public health needs, states will soon face significant budget shortfalls. These impending changes may renew partisan debates about restrictive policies like work requirements, which generally require beneficiaries to verify their participation in certain activities-such as employment, job search, or training programs-in order to receive or retain coverage. We argue that restrictive Medicaid policies are driven, to a great extent, by political party affiliation, highlighting the outsized role of partisanship in Medicaid policy adoption. To combat these dynamics, additional efforts are needed to improve community-informed decision-making, strengthen evaluation approaches to tie evidence to policymaking, and boost participation in and understanding of the political processes that affect policy change.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/economics , Health Policy/economics , Medicaid/economics , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Health Policy/legislation & jurisprudence , Humans , Medicaid/legislation & jurisprudence , Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act , Politics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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