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1.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e21615, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has shined a harsh light on a critical deficiency in our health care system: our inability to access important information about patients' values, goals, and preferences in the electronic health record (EHR). At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK), we have integrated and systematized health-related values discussions led by oncology nurses for newly diagnosed cancer patients as part of routine comprehensive cancer care. Such conversations include not only the patient's wishes for care at the end of life but also more holistic personal values, including sources of strength, concerns, hopes, and their definition of an acceptable quality of life. In addition, health care providers use a structured template to document their discussions of patient goals of care. OBJECTIVE: To provide ready access to key information about the patient as a person with individual values, goals, and preferences, we undertook the creation of the Patient Values Tab in our center's EHR to display this information in a single, central location. Here, we describe the interprofessional, interdisciplinary, iterative process and user-centered design methodology that we applied to build this novel functionality as well as our initial implementation experience and plans for evaluation. METHODS: We first convened a working group of experts from multiple departments, including medical oncology, health informatics, information systems, nursing informatics, nursing education, and supportive care, and a user experience designer. We conducted in-depth, semistructured, audiorecorded interviews of over 100 key stakeholders. The working group sought consensus on the tab's main content, homing in on high-priority areas identified by the stakeholders. The core content was mapped to various EHR data sources. We established a set of high-level design principles to guide our process. Our user experience designer then created wireframes of the tab design. The designer conducted usability testing with physicians, nurses, and other health professionals. Data validation testing was conducted. RESULTS: We have already deployed the Patient Values Tab to a pilot sample of users in the MSK Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology Service, including physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, and administrative staff. We have early evidence of the positive impact of this EHR innovation. Audit logs show increasing use. Many of the initial user comments have been enthusiastically positive, while others have provided constructive suggestions for additional tab refinements with respect to format and content. CONCLUSIONS: It is our challenge and obligation to enrich the EHR with information about the patient as a person. Realization of this capability is a pressing public health need requiring the collaboration of technological experts with a broad range of clinical leaders, users, patients, and families to achieve solutions that are both principled and practical. Our new Patient Values Tab represents a step forward in this important direction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Electronic Health Records/organization & administration , Medical Informatics/methods , Palliative Care/methods , Quality of Life/psychology , User-Centered Design , Humans
2.
JCO Clin Cancer Inform ; 5: 881-896, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551280

ABSTRACT

Cancer Informatics for Cancer Centers (CI4CC) is a grassroots, nonprofit 501c3 organization intended to provide a focused national forum for engagement of senior cancer informatics leaders, primarily aimed at academic cancer centers anywhere in the world but with a special emphasis on the 70 National Cancer Institute-funded cancer centers. This consortium has regularly held topic-focused biannual face-to-face symposiums. These meetings are a place to review cancer informatics and data science priorities and initiatives, providing a forum for discussion of the strategic and pragmatic issues that we faced at our respective institutions and cancer centers. Here, we provide meeting highlights from the latest CI4CC Symposium, which was delayed from its original April 2020 schedule because of the COVID-19 pandemic and held virtually over three days (September 24, October 1, and October 8) in the fall of 2020. In addition to the content presented, we found that holding this event virtually once a week for 6 hours was a great way to keep the kind of deep engagement that a face-to-face meeting engenders. This is the second such publication of CI4CC Symposium highlights, the first covering the meeting that took place in Napa, California, from October 14-16, 2019. We conclude with some thoughts about using data science to learn from every child with cancer, focusing on emerging activities of the National Cancer Institute's Childhood Cancer Data Initiative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medical Informatics , Neoplasms , Adolescent , Child , Data Science , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
4.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 286: 3-8, 2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511999

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted many global industries and shifted the digital health landscape by stimulating and accelerating the delivery of digital care. It has emphasized the need for a system level informatics implementation that supports the healthcare management of populations at a macro level while also providing the necessary support for front line care delivery at a micro level. From data dashboard to Telemedicine, this crisis has necessitated the need for health informatics transformation that can bridge time and space to provide timely care. However, heath transformation cannot solely rely on Health Information Technology (HIT) for progress, but rather success must be an outcome of system design focus on the contextual complexity of the health system where HIT is used. This conference highlights the important roles context plays for health informatics in global pandemics and aims to answer critical questions in four main areas: 1) health information management in the covid-19 context, 2) implementation of new practices and technologies in healthcare, 3) sociotechnical analysis of task performance and workload in healthcare, and 4) innovations in design and evaluation methods of health technologies. We deem this as a call to action to understand the importance of context while solving the last mile problem in delivering the informatics solutions that are needed to support our public health response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medical Informatics , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 286: 11-15, 2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1508509

ABSTRACT

Law and regulation have not received much attention as part of the context shaping and being shaped by health informatics. Telemedicine, data, devices and software, and electronic health records (EHRs) are examples of how technologies are affected by privacy, intellectual property protections, and other law and regulation.


Subject(s)
Medical Informatics , Telemedicine , Electronic Health Records , Pandemics , Privacy
6.
Int J Med Inform ; 157: 104639, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499949

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated digital health applications in multifaceted disease management dimensions. This study aims (1) to identify risk issues relating to the rapid development and redeployment of COVID-19 related e-health systems, in primary care, and in the health ecosystems interacting with it and (2) to suggest evidence-based evaluation directions under emergency response. METHOD: After initial brainstorming of digital health risks posed in this pandemic, a scoping review method was adopted to collect evidence across databases of PubMed, CINAHL, and EMBASE. Peer-review publications, reports, news sources, and websites that credibly identified the challenges relating digital health scaled for COVID-19 were scrutinized. Additional supporting materials were obtained through snowball sampling and the authors' global digital health networks. Studies satisfying the selection criteria were charted based on their study design, primary care focus, and coverage of e-health areas of risk. RESULTS: Fifty-eight studies were mapped for qualitative synthesis. Five identified digital health risk areas associated with the pandemic were governance, system design and coordination, information access, service provision, and user (professional and public) reception. We observed that rapid digital health responses may embed challenges in health system thinking, the long-term development of digital health ecosystems, and interoperability of health IT infrastructure, with concomitant weaknesses in existing evaluation theories. CONCLUSION: Through identifying digital health risks posed during the pandemic, this paper discussed potential directions for next-generation informatics evaluation development, to better prepare for the post-COVID-19 era, a new future epidemic, or other unforeseen global health emergencies. An updated evidence-based approach to health informatics is essential to gain public confidence in digital health across primary and other health sectors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medical Informatics , Ecosystem , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 84-90, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447385

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To summarize the recent literature and research and present a selection of the best papers published in 2020 in the field of Health Information Management (HIM) and Health Informatics. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature for the IMIA Yearbook HIM section was performed by the two section editors with the help of a medical librarian. We searched bibliographic databases for HIM-related papers using both MeSH headings and keywords in titles and abstracts. A shortlist of the fifteen best candidate papers was first selected by section editors before being peer-reviewed by independent external reviewers. RESULTS: The three major themes of Health Information Exchange (transmitting, sharing, and accessing patient health-related data and information) (HIE), Data Quality, and Privacy and Security make up 80% of the fifteen papers, with individual papers on personal health records, information governance and the professionalism of the HIM field. CONCLUSIONS: Traditional HIM concerns about HIM practice and workforce as well as issues about the data in electronic health records (EHRs) including data quality, coding, health information exchange among entities within the healthcare systems and privacy and confidentiality continue to be a large part of the HIM research literature. Although there was little research applying these themes to pandemic concerns, HIM professionals have the expertise to make ccontributions to public health informatics research and this research would benefit from their involvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Information Exchange , Health Information Management , Bibliometrics , Comorbidity , Dementia/classification , Humans , Information Dissemination , Medical Informatics
9.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(9): e29990, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443977

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has required clinicians to pivot to offering services via telehealth; however, it is unclear which patients (users of care) are equipped to use digital health. This is especially pertinent for adults managing chronic diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes, which require regular follow-up, medication management, and self-monitoring. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to measure the trends and assess factors affecting health information technology (HIT) use among members of the US population with and without cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS: We used serial cross-sectional data from the National Health Interview Survey for the years 2012-2018 to assess trends in HIT use among adults, stratified by age and cardiovascular risk factor status. We developed multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, race, insurance status, marital status, geographic region, and perceived health status to assess the likelihood of HIT use among patients with and without cardiovascular disease risk factors. RESULTS: A total of 14,304 (44.6%) and 14,644 (58.7%) participants reported using HIT in 2012 and 2018, respectively. When comparing the rates of HIT use for the years 2012 and 2018, among participants without cardiovascular risk factors, the HIT use proportion increased from 51.1% to 65.8%; among those with one risk factor, it increased from 43.9% to 59%; and among those with more than one risk factor, it increased from 41.3% to 54.7%. Increasing trends in HIT use were highest among adults aged >65 years (annual percentage change [APC] 8.3%), who had more than one cardiovascular risk factor (APC 5%) and among those who did not graduate from high school (APC 8.8%). Likelihood of HIT use was significantly higher in individuals who were younger, female, and non-Hispanic White; had higher education and income; were married; and reported very good or excellent health status. In 2018, college graduates were 7.18 (95% CI 5.86-8.79), 6.25 (95% CI 5.02-7.78), or 7.80 (95% CI 5.87-10.36) times more likely to use HIT compared to adults without high school education among people with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, one cardiovascular risk factor, or no cardiovascular risk factors, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Over 2012-2018, HIT use increased nationally, with greater use noted among younger and higher educated US adults. Targeted strategies are needed to engage wider age, racial, education, and socioeconomic groups by lowering barriers to HIT access and use.


Subject(s)
Heart Disease Risk Factors , Medical Informatics/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(9): e26317, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Along with the proliferation of health information technologies (HITs), there is a growing need to understand the potential privacy risks associated with using such tools. Although privacy policies are designed to inform consumers, such policies have consistently been found to be confusing and lack transparency. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to present consumer preferences for accessing privacy information; develop and apply a privacy policy risk assessment tool to assess whether existing HITs meet the recommended privacy policy standards; and propose guidelines to assist health professionals and service providers with understanding the privacy risks associated with HITs, so that they can confidently promote their safe use as a part of care. METHODS: In phase 1, participatory design workshops were conducted with young people who were attending a participating headspace center, their supportive others, and health professionals and service providers from the centers. The findings were knowledge translated to determine participant preferences for the presentation and availability of privacy information and the functionality required to support its delivery. Phase 2 included the development of the 23-item privacy policy risk assessment tool, which incorporated material from international privacy literature and standards. This tool was then used to assess the privacy policies of 34 apps and e-tools. In phase 3, privacy guidelines, which were derived from learnings from a collaborative consultation process with key stakeholders, were developed to assist health professionals and service providers with understanding the privacy risks associated with incorporating HITs as a part of clinical care. RESULTS: When considering the use of HITs, the participatory design workshop participants indicated that they wanted privacy information to be easily accessible, transparent, and user-friendly to enable them to clearly understand what personal and health information will be collected and how these data will be shared and stored. The privacy policy review revealed consistently poor readability and transparency, which limited the utility of these documents as a source of information. Therefore, to enable informed consent, the privacy guidelines provided ensure that health professionals and consumers are fully aware of the potential for privacy risks in using HITs to support health and well-being. CONCLUSIONS: A lack of transparency in privacy policies has the potential to undermine consumers' ability to trust that the necessary measures are in place to secure and protect the privacy of their personal and health information, thus precluding their willingness to engage with HITs. The application of the privacy guidelines will improve the confidence of health professionals and service providers in the privacy of consumer data, thus enabling them to recommend HITs to provide or support care.


Subject(s)
Medical Informatics , Privacy , Adolescent , Humans , Informed Consent , Policy , Risk Assessment
11.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 143: 112228, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432983

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is a respiratory illness associated with high mortality, has been classified as a pandemic. The major obstacles for the clinicians to contain the disease are limited information availability, difficulty in disease diagnosis, predicting disease prognosis, and lack of disease monitoring tools. Additionally, the lack of valid therapies has further contributed to the difficulties in containing the pandemic. Recent studies have reported that the dysregulation of the immune system leads to an ineffective antiviral response and promotes pathological immune response, which manifests as ARDS, myocarditis, and hepatitis. In this study, a novel platform has been described for disseminating information to physicians for the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with COVID-19. An adjuvant approach using compounds that can potentiate antiviral immune response and mitigate COVID-19-induced immune-mediated target organ damage has been presented. A prolonged beneficial effect is achieved by implementing algorithm-based individualized variability measures in the treatment regimen.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/methods , Medical Informatics/methods , Algorithms , COVID-19/immunology , Disease Management , Disease Progression , Gastrointestinal Tract/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Severity of Illness Index
12.
Health Inf Manag ; 50(1-2): 26-34, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398798

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of information and communication technology (ICT) has tremendous potential to enhance communication among physicians, leading to improvements in service delivery. However, the protection of health information in digital/electronic format is an ongoing concern. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine guidance for the protection of health information when using ICT from all 10 of Canada's provincial regulatory colleges for physicians and to discuss the potential policy and service delivery implications. METHOD: A search of the regulatory college websites was conducted, followed by a document analysis (content and thematic). RESULTS: The college website search identified 522 documents; 12 of these documents (from 8 of the 10 colleges) met the study criteria. These documents were notable for the considerable variation in the scope and detail of guidance provided across the colleges. CONCLUSION: While the federal-provincial division of powers in Canada enables different jurisdictional approaches to health service delivery and, thus, opportunities for policy learning, this governing structure may also contribute to a lack of incentive for collaboration, leading to an absence of standardised guidance for health information protection when using ICT. This, in turn, may result in unequal and inequitable protection of health information across the provinces. Therefore, a macro-level approach to policy development in this area may hold the greatest promise for enhancing the protection of health information and doing so in a more standardised manner in countries with federal systems of governance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Computer Security , Government Regulation , Medical Informatics , Canada , Health Policy , Medical Informatics/legislation & jurisprudence , Physicians , Policy Making , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 4-7, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392954

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To introduce the 2021 International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) Yearbook by the editors. METHODS: The editorial provides an introduction and overview to the 2021 IMIA Yearbook whose special topic is "Managing Pandemics with Health Informatics - Successes and Challenges". The Special Topic, the keynote paper, and survey papers are discussed. The IMIA President's statement and the IMIA dialogue with the World Health Organization are introduced. The sections' changes in the Yearbook Editorial Committee are also described. RESULTS: Health informatics, in the context of a global pandemic, led to the development of ways to collect, standardize, disseminate and reuse data worldwide: public health data but also information from social networks and scientific literature. Fact checking methods were mostly based on artificial intelligence and natural language processing. The pandemic also introduced new challenges for telehealth support in times of critical response. Next generation sequencing in bioinformatics helped in decoding the sequence of the virus and the development of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccines. CONCLUSIONS: The Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic shows the need for timely, reliable, open, and globally available information to support decision making and efficiently control outbreaks. Applying Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR) requirements for data is a key success factor while challenging ethical issues have to be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Information Dissemination , Health Information Exchange , Humans , Medical Informatics
14.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 100-104, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392949

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To select the best papers that made original and high impact contributions in the area of human factors and organizational issues in biomedical informatics in 2020. METHODS: A rigorous extraction process based on queries from Web of Science® and PubMed/Medline was conducted to identify the scientific contributions published in 2020 that address human factors and organizational issues in biomedical informatics. The screening of papers on titles and abstracts independently by the two section editors led to a total of 1,562 papers. These papers were discussed for a selection of 12 finalist papers, which were then reviewed by the two section editors, two chief editors, and by three external reviewers from internationally renowned research teams. RESULTS: The query process resulted in 12 papers that reveal interesting and rigorous methods and important studies in human factors that move the field forward, particularly in clinical informatics and emerging technologies such as brain-computer interfaces. This year three papers were clearly outstanding and help advance in the field. They provide examples of applying existing frameworks together in novel and highly illuminating ways, showing the value of theory development in human factors. Emerging themes included several which discussed physician burnout, mobile health, and health equity. Those concerning the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (Covid-19) were included as part of that section. CONCLUSION: The selected papers make important contributions to human factors and organizational issues, expanding and deepening our knowledge of how to apply theory and applications of new technologies in health.


Subject(s)
Electronic Health Records , Health Equity , Medical Informatics/organization & administration , User-Computer Interface , Burnout, Professional , Humans
15.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 134-140, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392948

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this synopsis, we give an overview of recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2020 in the field of Clinical Information Systems (CIS). METHOD: As CIS section editors, we annually apply a systematic process to retrieve articles for the International Medical Informatics Association Yearbook of Medical Informatics. For seven years now, we use the same query to find relevant publications in the CIS field. Each year we retrieve more than 2,400 papers which we categorize in a multi-pass review to distill a preselection of 15 candidate papers. External reviewers and yearbook editors then assess the selected candidate papers. Based on the review results, the IMIA Yearbook editorial board chooses up to four best publications for the section at a selection meeting. To get an overview of the content of the retrieved articles, we use text mining and term co-occurrence mapping techniques. RESULTS: We carried out the query in mid-January 2021 and retrieved a deduplicated result set of 2,787 articles from 1,135 different journals. We nominated 15 papers as candidates and finally selected four of them as the best papers in the CIS section. As in the previous years, the content analysis of the articles revealed the broad spectrum of topics covered by CIS research. Thus, this year we could observe a significant impact of COVID-19 on CIS research. CONCLUSIONS: The trends in CIS research, as seen in recent years, continue to be observable. What was very visible was the impact of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has affected not only our lives but also CIS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Information Systems , Biomedical Research , Health Information Systems , Humans , Medical Informatics
16.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 233-238, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392947

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To summarize key contributions to current research in the field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) and to select best papers published in 2020. METHOD: A bibliographic search using a combination of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) descriptors and free-text terms on CRI was performed using PubMed, followed by a double-blind review in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be then peer-reviewed by external reviewers. After peer-review ranking, a consensus meeting between two section editors and the editorial team was organized to finally conclude on the selected four best papers. RESULTS: Among the 877 papers published in 2020 and returned by the search, there were four best papers selected. The first best paper describes a method for mining temporal sequences from clinical documents to infer disease trajectories and enhancing high-throughput phenotyping. The authors of the second best paper demonstrate that the generation of synthetic Electronic Health Record (EHR) data through Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) could be substantially improved by more appropriate training and evaluation criteria. The third best paper offers an efficient advance on methods to detect adverse drug events by computer-assisting expert reviewers with annotated candidate mentions in clinical documents. The large-scale data quality assessment study reported by the fourth best paper has clinical research informatics implications, in terms of the trustworthiness of inferences made from analysing electronic health records. CONCLUSIONS: The most significant research efforts in the CRI field are currently focusing on data science with active research in the development and evaluation of Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning (AI/ML) algorithms based on ever more intensive use of real-world data and especially EHR real or synthetic data. A major lesson that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has already taught the scientific CRI community is that timely international high-quality data-sharing and collaborative data analysis is absolutely vital to inform policy decisions.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Medical Informatics , Computer Security , Data Mining , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Machine Learning , Pharmacovigilance , Phenotype
17.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 105-125, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392946

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The year 2020 was predominated by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The objective of this article is to review the areas in which clinical information systems (CIS) can be and have been utilized to support and enhance the response of healthcare systems to pandemics, focusing on COVID-19. METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE, Google Scholar, the tables of contents of major informatics journals, and the bibliographies of articles were searched for studies pertaining to CIS, pandemics, and COVID-19 through October 2020. The most informative and detailed studies were highlighted, while many others were referenced. RESULTS: CIS were heavily relied upon by health systems and governmental agencies worldwide in response to COVID-19. Technology-based screening tools were developed to assist rapid case identification and appropriate triaging. Clinical care was supported by utilizing the electronic health record (EHR) to onboard frontline providers to new protocols, offer clinical decision support, and improve systems for diagnostic testing. Telehealth became the most rapidly adopted medical trend in recent history and an essential strategy for allowing safe and effective access to medical care. Artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms were developed to enhance screening, diagnostic imaging, and predictive analytics - though evidence of improved outcomes remains limited. Geographic information systems and big data enabled real-time dashboards vital for epidemic monitoring, hospital preparedness strategies, and health policy decision making. Digital contact tracing systems were implemented to assist a labor-intensive task with the aim of curbing transmission. Large scale data sharing, effective health information exchange, and interoperability of EHRs remain challenges for the informatics community with immense clinical and academic potential. CIS must be used in combination with engaged stakeholders and operational change management in order to meaningfully improve patient outcomes. CONCLUSION: Managing a pandemic requires widespread, timely, and effective distribution of reliable information. In the past year, CIS and informaticists made prominent and influential contributions in the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Information Systems , Medical Informatics , Telemedicine , Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Contact Tracing , Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Electronic Health Records , Epidemics , Health Information Exchange , Health Information Interoperability , Humans , Information Dissemination
18.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 69-74, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392943

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To summarize significant research contributions on managing pandemics with health informatics published in 2020. METHODS: An extensive search using PubMed and Scopus was conducted to identify peer-reviewed articles published in 2020 that examined health informatics systems used during the global COVID-19 pandemic. The selection process comprised three steps: 1) 15 candidate best papers were first selected by the two section editors; 2) external reviewers from internationally renowned research teams reviewed each candidate best paper; and 3) the final selection of three best papers was conducted by the editorial committee of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) Yearbook. RESULTS: Selected best papers represent the important and diverse ways that health informatics supported clinical and public health responses to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Selected papers represent four groups of papers: 1) Use of analytics to screen, triage, and manage patients; 2) Use of telehealth and remote monitoring to manage patients and populations; 3) Use of EHR systems and administrative systems to manage internal operations of a hospital or health system; and 4) Use of informatics methods and systems by public health authorities to capture, store, manage, and visualize population-level data and information. CONCLUSION: Health informatics played a critical role in managing patients and populations during the COVID-19 pandemic. Health care and public health organizations both leveraged available information systems and standards to rapidly identify cases, triage infected individuals, and monitor population trends. The selected best papers represent a fraction of the body of knowledge stemming from COVID-19, most of which is focused on pandemic response. Future work will be needed to help the world recover from the pandemic and strengthen the health information infrastructure in preparation for the next pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medical Informatics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Medical Records Systems, Computerized , Public Health Practice , Telemedicine
19.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 176-184, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392942

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We examine the knowledge ecosystem of COVID-19, focusing on clinical knowledge and the role of health informatics as enabling technology. We argue for commitment to the model of a global learning health system to facilitate rapid knowledge translation supporting health care decision making in the face of emerging diseases. METHODS AND RESULTS: We frame the evolution of knowledge in the COVID-19 crisis in terms of learning theory, and present a view of what has occurred during the pandemic to rapidly derive and share knowledge as an (underdeveloped) instance of a global learning health system. We identify the key role of information technologies for electronic data capture and data sharing, computational modelling, evidence synthesis, and knowledge dissemination. We further highlight gaps in the system and barriers to full realisation of an efficient and effective global learning health system. CONCLUSIONS: The need for a global knowledge ecosystem supporting rapid learning from clinical practice has become more apparent than ever during the COVID-19 pandemic. Continued effort to realise the vision of a global learning health system, including establishing effective approaches to data governance and ethics to support the system, is imperative to enable continuous improvement in our clinical care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Knowledge Management , Learning Health System , Medical Informatics , Data Analysis , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Information Dissemination , Information Storage and Retrieval
20.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 75-83, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392941

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To identify gaps and challenges in health informatics and health information management during the COVID-19 pandemic. To describe solutions and offer recommendations that can address the identified gaps and challenges. METHODS: A literature review of relevant peer-reviewed and grey literature published from January 2020 to December 2020 was conducted to inform the paper. RESULTS: The literature revealed several themes regarding health information management and health informatics challenges and gaps: information systems and information technology infrastructure; data collection, quality, and standardization; and information governance and use. These challenges and gaps were often driven by public policy and funding constraints. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 exposed complexities related to responding to a world-wide, fast moving, quickly spreading novel virus. Longstanding gaps and ongoing challenges in the local, national, and global health and public health information systems and data infrastructure must be addressed before we are faced with another global pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Information Management , Medical Informatics , Data Accuracy , Data Collection/standards , Humans , Public Health Administration , Public Health Practice/legislation & jurisprudence , United States
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