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1.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 18(6): 1832-1833, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2201874

Subject(s)
Medical Oncology , Humans
2.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 18(10): 691-693, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196631
4.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 7: 797-801, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140237
5.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 26(4): 333-334, 2022 07 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2123321

ABSTRACT

Exactly where are we in the practice of clinical oncology nursing, now indelibly altered by the COVID-19 pandemic? Depending on the day or hour, experts in clinical oncology care claim that clinical oncology practice has stab.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Medical Oncology , Oncology Nursing , Pandemics
6.
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol ; 180: 103869, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116509

ABSTRACT

Telehealth facilitates access to cancer care for patients unable to attend in-person consultations, as in COVID-19. This systematic review used the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance (RE-AIM) framework to evaluate telehealth implementation and examine enablers and barriers to optimal implementation in oncology. MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched between January 2011-June 2022. Eighty-two articles representing 73 studies were included. One study explicitly used the RE-AIM framework to guide study design, conduct, or reporting. Reach (44%) and implementation (38%) were most commonly reported, maintenance (5%) least commonly. Key telehealth implementation enablers included professional-led delivery, patient-centred approaches, and positive patient perceptions. Key barriers included patient discomfort with technology, limited supporting clinic infrastructure, and poor access to reliable internet connection and videoconferencing. While a patient-centred and professional-supported approach enables telehealth implementation, technology and infrastructure constraints need surmounting for sustained implementation beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Medical Oncology
7.
Trials ; 23(1): 927, 2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108880

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in severe interruptions to clinical research worldwide. This global public health crisis required investigators and researchers to rapidly develop and implement new strategies and solutions to mitigate its negative impact on the progress of clinical trials. In this paper, we describe the challenges, strategies, and lessons learned regarding the continuation of a supportive oncology clinical trial during the pandemic. We hope to provide insight into the implementation of clinical trials during a public health emergency to be better prepared for future instances.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the US National Institute of Health (NCT03030859). Registered on 22 January 2017.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Medical Oncology , Neoplasms/therapy
8.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 299: 118-125, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099073

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine can provide a solution for disease management during the COVID-19 pandemic. This literature review aims to explore the role of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic for management of cancer patients. METHOD: A comprehensive systematic search was conducted in PubMed, Science Direct, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases for the papers published until April 2021. Studies were included in case they had practically used telemedicine in the management of cancer patients during the COVID-19 crisis. RESULTS: After screening 2614 titles and abstracts and reviewing 305 full-texts, 16 studies were found to be eligible. The results indicated that most of the patients contacted by telemedicine services mostly used to intract with patients breast cancer (n=4, 25%). The most common use of telemedicine was the provision of virtual visit services (n=10, 62.25%). Besides, communication was most frequently provided by live video conferences (n=11, 68.75%). CONCLUSION: Telemedicine can provide continued access to necessary health services in oncology care and serve as an important role in pandemic planning and response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Medical Oncology/methods
9.
BMJ ; 379: o2624, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097963
10.
Oncol Nurs Forum ; 49(6): 491-499, 2022 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089262

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To explore the experience of oncology nurses during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. PARTICIPANTS & SETTING: 21 RNs, advanced practice RNs, and physician associates from inpatient and ambulatory care settings at a comprehensive cancer center in the northeastern United States. METHODOLOGIC APPROACH: A qualitative study using interpretive description was conducted through semistructured interviews. Data were recorded and transcribed verbatim, reviewed for accuracy, and coded into themes following an iterative process of analysis. FINDINGS: The theme of "Doing It Together: Struggling, Adapting, and Holding Each Other Up" describes the experience of oncology nurses during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. The following three themes provide further insight: "Struggling With Constant Change and Uncertainty," "Managing Workload Intensity," and "Experiencing Emotional Distress." As the year progressed, "Identifying Benefits and Finding Hope" began to emerge. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: The findings suggest a need for programs to help nurses cope with the continuing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, mental health and well-being resources, and nursing guidelines for telehealth and relocation to other units.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oncology Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , Medical Oncology , Qualitative Research
11.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085154
12.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085153
13.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085152
14.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085151
15.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085150
16.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085149
17.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085148
18.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085147
19.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085146
20.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085145
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