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1.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 299: 118-125, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099073

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine can provide a solution for disease management during the COVID-19 pandemic. This literature review aims to explore the role of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic for management of cancer patients. METHOD: A comprehensive systematic search was conducted in PubMed, Science Direct, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases for the papers published until April 2021. Studies were included in case they had practically used telemedicine in the management of cancer patients during the COVID-19 crisis. RESULTS: After screening 2614 titles and abstracts and reviewing 305 full-texts, 16 studies were found to be eligible. The results indicated that most of the patients contacted by telemedicine services mostly used to intract with patients breast cancer (n=4, 25%). The most common use of telemedicine was the provision of virtual visit services (n=10, 62.25%). Besides, communication was most frequently provided by live video conferences (n=11, 68.75%). CONCLUSION: Telemedicine can provide continued access to necessary health services in oncology care and serve as an important role in pandemic planning and response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Medical Oncology/methods
3.
Future Oncol ; 18(12): 1437-1448, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674205

ABSTRACT

Background: The present study describes the steps of developing a hybrid teleoncology system to provide treatment plans for breast cancer patients. Materials & methods: This research was conducted in four stages, including developing a proposal for experts, identifying and analyzing system requirements, designing a prototype and implementing and evaluating the final version of the hybrid teleoncology system. Results: The results of the usability evaluation showed that the users evaluated the system at a good level and, in practice, the implemented system was perceived to be useful by specialists in providing treatment plans for cancer patients. Conclusion: The hybrid teleoncology system is a practical alternative to traditional methods for providing treatment plans to breast cancer patients.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Medical Oncology/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods
5.
Curr Oncol Rep ; 24(1): 99-103, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641006

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to describe the current state of telemedicine within neuro-oncology. This article will address the development of tele-neuro-oncology over time with a focus on current use and applications of telemedicine within the field. Current modalities and practical considerations for tele-neuro-oncology visits and opportunities for growth will be highlighted. RECENT FINDINGS: The use of telemedicine has expanded significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly within neuro-oncology. The use of telemedicine is widely accepted by neuro-oncologic patients and providers and continues to expand in utilization and scope. The use of tele-neuro-oncology is expected to develop further with opportunities for multidisciplinary and integrated care, clinical trials, research, and education. Telemedicine provides a unique, patient-centered approach to neuro-oncologic care. Telehealth will remain a valuable tool, and its use and role are expected to expand within neuro-oncology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Medical Oncology/methods , Nervous System Neoplasms , Telemedicine/trends , Humans , Nervous System Neoplasms/diagnosis , Nervous System Neoplasms/therapy , Patient-Centered Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/standards
6.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 74(suppl 1): e20201080, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626609

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to describe the experience of a private outpatient network for hematology and oncology treatment in the adoption of management tools to face the risk of contamination by SARS-CoV-2. METHOD: an experience report on the use of a root cause analysis method to identify potential risks of contamination by COVID-19 among patients and employees. Through the risks identified through the Ishikawa Diagram, we built an action plan, linked to the 5W2H tool, for planning and decision-making implemented. RESULTS: the number of attendances in person and people circulating in the units was reduced, protective distance measures and new protection barriers were fundamental to control the risks of spreading COVID-19 in patients and employees. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: the management tools served as a valuable tool in the construction of measures, making the measures in question more clearly and applicable.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Oncology/methods , Occupational Health , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Curr Oncol Rep ; 23(11): 134, 2021 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530397

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Since the past year, the fast spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has represented a global health threat, especially for cancer patients, that has required an urgent reorganization of clinical activities. Here, we will critically revise the profound impact that the pandemic has generated in lung cancer patients, as well the most significant challenges that oncologists have to face to maintain the highest possible standards in the management of lung cancer patients in the pandemic era. RECENT FINDINGS: Evidences suggested a higher susceptibility and mortality of lung cancer patients due to COVID-19. The hard management of this patient population has been also due to the potential cross interference of anti-tumor drugs on SARS-Cov-2 infection and to the differential diagnosis between COVID-19 pneumonitis and drug-related pneumonitis. COVID-19 pandemic has generated a profound reshaping of oncological activities and the development of recommendations by the oncology scientific community to prioritize anti-tumor treatments for lung cancer patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Comorbidity , Diagnosis, Differential , Humans , Medical Oncology/methods , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
8.
Technol Cancer Res Treat ; 20: 15330338211050764, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477207

ABSTRACT

A pandemic of coronavirus diseases 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak is a major public health emergency that has spread in the fastest speed, and caused the most extensive infection world widely. Transbronchial biopsy (TBB) and computed tomography guided percutaneous needle biopsy (CTPNB) is the most common and significant method for the diagnosis of lung cancer. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the indications of TBB and CTPNB must be managed strictly. Therefore, it is extremely indispensable to perform meticulous and individualized management for lung cancer patients to protect the patients from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Biopsy , Bronchi/pathology , Bronchoscopy/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Image-Guided Biopsy/methods , Lung/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Medical Oncology/methods , Postoperative Period , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
12.
Curr Oncol ; 27(2): 69, 2020 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383927
13.
Indian J Cancer ; 58(1): 35-37, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335298
14.
J Exp Clin Cancer Res ; 40(1): 240, 2021 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322942

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The yearly Think Tank Meeting of the Italian Network for Tumor Biotherapy (NIBIT) Foundation, brings together in Siena, Tuscany (Italy), experts in immuno-oncology to review the learnings from current immunotherapy treatments, and to propose new pre-clinical and clinical investigations in selected research areas. MAIN: While immunotherapies in non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma led to practice changing therapies, the same therapies had only modest benefit for patients with other malignancies, such as mesothelioma and glioblastoma. One way to improve on current immunotherapies is to alter the sequence of each combination agent. Matching the immunotherapy to the host's immune response may thus improve the activity of the current treatments. A second approach is to combine current immunotherapies with novel agents targeting complementary mechanisms. Identifying the appropriate novel agents may require different approaches than the traditional laboratory-based discovery work. For example, artificial intelligence-based research may help focusing the search for innovative and most promising combination partners. CONCLUSION: Novel immunotherapies are needed in cancer patients with resistance to or relapse after current immunotherapeutic drugs. Such new treatments may include targeted agents or monoclonal antibodies to overcome the immune-suppressive tumor microenvironment. The mode of combining the novel treatments, including vaccines, needs to be matched to the patient's immune status for achieving the maximum benefit. In this scenario, specific attention should be also paid nowadays to the immune intersection between COVID-19 and cancer.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/therapy , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immunity/immunology , Immunotherapy/methods , Italy , Medical Oncology/methods
15.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e933088, 2021 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314975

ABSTRACT

Synthetic mRNA and the expression of therapeutic proteins have accelerated vaccine development to prevent infection and heralds a new era in targeted immunotherapy in oncology. Therapeutic mRNA vaccines rely on available tumor tissue for gene sequencing analysis to compare the patient's normal cellular DNA sequences and those of the tumor. Carrier-based mRNA vaccines for cancer immunotherapy are now in development that use delivery systems based on peptides, lipids, polymers, and cationic nano-emulsions. There have also been recent developments in dendritic cell-based mRNA vaccines. For patients with available tumor tissue samples, it is possible to develop mRNA vaccines that result in the expression of tumor antigens by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), resulting in innate and adaptive immune responses. Ongoing developments in mRNA immunotherapy include modifications in the route of administration and combined delivery of multiple mRNA vaccines with checkpoint inhibitors. This Editorial aims to present a brief overview of how mRNA immunotherapy may change the therapeutic landscape of personalized medicine for patients with solid malignant tumors.


Subject(s)
Cancer Vaccines/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/therapy , RNA, Messenger/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Humans , Immunotherapy/methods , Medical Oncology/methods , Precision Medicine/methods
16.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) ; 14(2): 147-150, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299252
18.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 520-523, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288675

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In light of the COVID-19 recommendations from the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland, we aimed to study patient and clinician satisfaction with a newly established telephone (TP) colorectal clinic service in lieu of traditional face-to-face (FTF) appointments. Comparative outcomes included patient versus clinician satisfaction; patient versus clinician desire to continue TP clinics postpandemic; and views of Specialty Trainee 3+ (ST3+)/Specialty Associate Specialist (SAS) doctors versus consultants on TP compared with FTF appointments. METHODS: We conducted a prospective service evaluation of patient and clinician satisfaction with colorectal surgery TP clinics between 1 June 2020 and 30 June 2020 in a British District General Hospital. RESULTS: Patients had higher satisfaction than clinicians with TP clinics: 91.5% versus 66.6% reported above-average experience [odds ratio (OR) = 5.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53 to 18.75, p = 0.01]. Clinicians had lower demand to continue TP clinics post-COVID-19 versus patients, with a trend towards significance (60% versus 82.9%, OR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.97, p = 0.08). ST3+/SAS doctors were more likely than consultants to find TP clinics inferior to FTF consultation for patient assessment (48.3% versus 23.7%, OR = 3.00, 95% CI 1.17 to 7.71, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: While clinicians may be concerned that patient assessment suffers, patient satisfaction with TP clinics is high. There should be a place for TP clinics post-COVID-19 but there must be a robust process for patient selection as well as adequate training for current and future generations of clinicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Medical Oncology/methods , Remote Consultation/methods , Telephone , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/standards , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Job Satisfaction , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Remote Consultation/standards , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
19.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 41: e339-e353, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249568

ABSTRACT

Optimizing the well-being of the oncology clinician has never been more important. Well-being is a critical priority for the cancer organization because burnout adversely impacts the quality of care, patient satisfaction, the workforce, and overall practice success. To date, 45% of U.S. ASCO member medical oncologists report experiencing burnout symptoms of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. As the COVID-19 pandemic remains widespread with periods of outbreaks, recovery, and response with substantial personal and professional consequences for the clinician, it is imperative that the oncologist, team, and organization gain direct access to resources addressing burnout. In response, the Clinician Well-Being Task Force was created to improve the quality, safety, and value of cancer care by enhancing oncology clinician well-being and practice sustainability. Well-being is an integrative concept that characterizes quality of life and encompasses an individual's work- and personal health-related environmental, organizational, and psychosocial factors. These resources can be useful for the cancer organization to develop a well-being blueprint: a detailed start plan with recognized strategies and interventions targeting all oncology stakeholders to support a culture of community in oncology.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Oncologists/psychology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Internet , Job Satisfaction , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Social Support , United States
20.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 41: e13-e19, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249567

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the simultaneous increased focus on structural racism and racial/ethnic disparities across the United States have shed light on glaring inequities in U.S. health care, both in oncology and more generally. In this article, we describe how, through the lens of fundamental ethical principles, an ethical imperative exists for the oncology community to overcome these inequities in cancer care, research, and the oncology workforce. We first explain why this is an ethical imperative, centering the discussion on lessons learned during 2020. We continue by describing ongoing equity-focused efforts by ASCO and other related professional medical organizations. We end with a call to action-all members of the oncology community have an ethical responsibility to take steps to address inequities in their clinical and academic work-and with guidance to practicing oncologists looking to optimize equity in their research and clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Health Equity/statistics & numerical data , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Racism/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Health Equity/ethics , Healthcare Disparities/ethics , Humans , Medical Oncology/ethics , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , Public Health/ethics , Public Health/methods , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Racism/ethics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , United States
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