Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 63
Filter
1.
Med Princ Pract ; 31(1): 54-58, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741735

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The recent outbreak of COVID-19 limited the resources of the National Health System necessitating the formulation of novel practice recommendations for oncological care. To date, management guidelines for cancer patients in case of pandemic are not available. Each center tried to manage its own needs and requests independently, often reducing access to treatment and diagnostic exams to patients. Here, we have described the management of cancer patients during COVID-19 infection with suggestions of some practical approaches applied by our Regional Center for Oncological Orientation (COrO) in S.G. Moscati Hospital (Taranto, Italy). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Our strategy was to minimize any interruption of cancer treatment through the extension of Taranto's Health Regional (COrO). The extension of the oncological network, assisted by the General Management of Taranto ASL through agreements with private structures in Taranto's area, allowed cancer patients to receive up to 11 different types of services, according to their needs (first investigation or follow-up), and represents an exclusive organization on the entire Italian territory. RESULTS: Thanks to the organization of the COrO in 2020, 1,406 first oncological visits and 566 preparatory treatments were carried out, 372 of exemption for oncological pathology (free health care) were activated, and 1,742 instrumental investigations and 7 cases of civil invalidity were performed (certificate of disability). CONCLUSIONS: We have overcome barriers to care of oncology patients leading to a reduction of waiting lists representing a practical application model that can be extended to other healthcare settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care , Disease Outbreaks , Hospitals , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Italy , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Pandemics
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2133877, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530062

ABSTRACT

Importance: Telehealth use including secure messages has rapidly expanded since the COVID-19 pandemic, including for multidisciplinary aspects of cancer care. Recent reports described rapid uptake and various benefits for patients and clinicians, suggesting that telehealth may be in standard use after the pandemic. Objective: To examine attitudes and perceptions of multidisciplinary cancer care clinicians toward telehealth and secure messages. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional specialty-specific survey (ie, some questions appear only for relevant specialties) among multidisciplinary cancer care clinicians, collected from April 29, 2020, to June 5, 2020. Participants were all 285 clinicians in the fields of medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgical oncology, survivorship, and oncology navigation from all 21 community cancer centers of Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Main Outcomes and Measures: Clinician satisfaction, perceived benefits and challenges of telehealth, perceived quality of telehealth and secure messaging, preferred visit and communication types for different clinical activities, and preferences regarding postpandemic telehealth use. Results: A total of 202 clinicians (71%) responded (104 of 128 medical oncologists, 34 of 37 radiation oncologists, 16 of 62 breast surgeons, 18 of 28 navigators, and 30 of 30 survivorship experts; 57% (116 of 202) were women; 73% [147 of 202] between ages 36-55 years). Seventy-six percent (n = 154) were satisfied with telehealth without statistically significant variations based on clinician characteristics. In-person visits were thought to promote a strong patient-clinician connection by 99% (n = 137) of respondents compared with 77% (n = 106) for video visits, 43% (n = 59) for telephone, and 14% (n = 19) for secure messages. The most commonly cited benefits of telehealth to clinicians included reduced commute (79%; n = 160), working from home (74%; n = 149), and staying on time (65%; n = 132); the most commonly cited negative factors included internet connection (84%; n = 170) or equipment problems (72%; n = 146), or physical examination needed (64%; n = 131). Most respondents (59%; n = 120) thought that video is adequate to manage the greater part of patient care in general; and most deemed various telehealth modalities suitable for any of the queried types of patient-clinician activities. For some specific activities, less than half of respondents thought that only an in-person visit is acceptable (eg, 49%; n = 66 for end-of-life discussion, 35%; n = 58 for new diagnosis). Most clinicians (82%; n = 166) preferred to maintain or increase use of telehealth after the pandemic. Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey of multidisciplinary cancer care clinicians in the COVID-19 era, telehealth was well received and often preferred by most cancer care clinicians, who deemed it appropriate to manage most aspects of cancer care. As telehealth use becomes routine in some cancer care settings, video and telephone visits and use of asynchronous secure messaging with patients in cancer care has clear potential to extend beyond the pandemic period.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
5.
Med Princ Pract ; 31(1): 54-58, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506625

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The recent outbreak of COVID-19 limited the resources of the National Health System necessitating the formulation of novel practice recommendations for oncological care. To date, management guidelines for cancer patients in case of pandemic are not available. Each center tried to manage its own needs and requests independently, often reducing access to treatment and diagnostic exams to patients. Here, we have described the management of cancer patients during COVID-19 infection with suggestions of some practical approaches applied by our Regional Center for Oncological Orientation (COrO) in S.G. Moscati Hospital (Taranto, Italy). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Our strategy was to minimize any interruption of cancer treatment through the extension of Taranto's Health Regional (COrO). The extension of the oncological network, assisted by the General Management of Taranto ASL through agreements with private structures in Taranto's area, allowed cancer patients to receive up to 11 different types of services, according to their needs (first investigation or follow-up), and represents an exclusive organization on the entire Italian territory. RESULTS: Thanks to the organization of the COrO in 2020, 1,406 first oncological visits and 566 preparatory treatments were carried out, 372 of exemption for oncological pathology (free health care) were activated, and 1,742 instrumental investigations and 7 cases of civil invalidity were performed (certificate of disability). CONCLUSIONS: We have overcome barriers to care of oncology patients leading to a reduction of waiting lists representing a practical application model that can be extended to other healthcare settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care , Disease Outbreaks , Hospitals , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Italy , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Pandemics
6.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2124766, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473777

ABSTRACT

Importance: Triplet chemotherapy with fluorouracil, folinic acid, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan plus bevacizumab (FOLFOXIRI-B) is an effective first-line treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the degree of implementation of FOLFOXIRI-B in daily practice is unknown. Objectives: To evaluate the current adoption rate of FOLFOXIRI-B in patients with mCRC and investigate the perspectives of medical oncologists toward this treatment option. Design, Setting, and Participants: This 1-week, multicenter, cross-sectional study in the Netherlands used a flash mob design, which facilitates ultrafast data generation (flash) through the engagement of numerous researchers (mob). During the study week (March 1-5, 2021), patient data were retrieved from electronic health records of 47 hospitals on patients with mCRC who were referred to a medical oncologist between November 1, 2020, and January 31, 2021. Interviews were simultaneously conducted with 101 medical oncologists from 52 hospitals who regularly treat patients with mCRC. Exposure: First-line systemic treatment as determined by the treating physician. Main Outcomes and Measures: The FOLFOXIRI-B prescription rate was the main outcome. Current practice was compared with prescription rates in 2015 to 2018. Eligibility for treatment with FOLFOXIRI-B was estimated. An exploratory outcome was medical oncologists' reported perspectives on FOLFOXIRI-B. Results: A total of 5948 patients in the Netherlands (median age [interquartile range], 66 [57-73] years; 3503 [59%] male; and 3712 [62%] with left-sided or rectal tumor) were treated with first-line systemic therapy for synchronous mCRC. A total of 282 patients with mCRC underwent systemic therapy during the study period (2021). Of these 282 patients, 199 (71%) were treated with intensive first-line therapy other than FOLFOXIRI-B, of whom 184 (65%) were treated with oxaliplatin doublets with or without bevacizumab; 14 (5%) with irinotecan doublets with or without bevacizumab, panitumumab, or cetuximab; and 1 (0.4%) with irinotecan with bevacizumab. Fifty-four patients (19%) were treated with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy with or without bevacizumab, 1 patient (0.4%) with panitumumab monotherapy, and 3 (1%) with immune checkpoint inhibitors. In total, 25 patients (9%; 95% CI, 6%-12%) were treated with first-line FOLFOXIRI-B compared with 142 (2%; 95% CI, 2%-3%) in 2015 to 2018. During the study period, 21 of 157 eligible patients (13.4%) in the Netherlands were treated with FOLFOXIRI-B. A total of 87 medical oncologists (86%) reported discussing FOLFOXIRI-B as a treatment option with eligible patients. A total of 47 of 85 (55%) generally communicated a preference for a chemotherapy doublet to patients. These oncologists reported a significantly lower awareness of guidelines and trial results. Toxic effects were the most reported reason to prefer an alternative regimen. Conclusions and Relevance: The findings of this study suggest that FOLFOXIRI-B prescription rates have marginally increased in the last 5 years. Considering that most medical oncologists discuss this treatment option, the prescription rate found in this study was below expectations. Awareness of guidelines and trial data seems to contribute to the discussion of available treatment options by medical oncologists, and the findings of this study suggest a need for repeated and continuing medical education.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Bevacizumab/administration & dosage , Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Drug Prescriptions/statistics & numerical data , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Fluorouracil/administration & dosage , Humans , Leucovorin/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands , Oxaliplatin/administration & dosage , Research Design
9.
Br J Cancer ; 125(11): 1486-1493, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442759

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, teleconsultation was implemented in clinical practice to limit patient exposure to COVID-19 while monitoring their treatment and follow-up. We sought to examine the satisfaction of patients with breast cancer (BC) who underwent teleconsultations during this period. METHODS: Eighteen centres in France and Italy invited patients with BC who had at least one teleconsultation during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic to participate in a web-based survey that evaluated their satisfaction (EORTC OUT-PATSAT 35 and Telemedicine Satisfaction Questionnaire [TSQ] scores) with teleconsultation. RESULTS: Among the 1299 participants eligible for this analysis, 53% of participants were undergoing standard post-treatment follow-up while 22 and 17% were currently receiving active anticancer therapy for metastatic and localised cancers, respectively. The mean satisfaction scores were 77.4 and 73.3 for the EORTC OUT-PATSAT 35 and TSQ scores, respectively. In all, 52.6% of participants had low/no anxiety. Multivariable analysis showed that the EORTC OUT-PATSAT 35 score correlated to age, anxiety score and teleconsultation modality. The TSQ score correlated to disease status and anxiety score. CONCLUSION: Patients with BC were satisfied with oncology teleconsultations during the COVID-19 pandemic. Teleconsultation may be an acceptable alternative follow-up modality in specific circumstances.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine , Adult , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
11.
Cancer Control ; 28: 10732748211038736, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362041

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Alongside the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic, Brazil also faces an ongoing rise in cancer burden. In 2020, there were approximately 592 000 new cancer cases and 260 000 cancer deaths. Considering the heterogeneities across Brazil, this study aimed to estimate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer-related hospital admissions at a national and regional level. METHODS: The national, regional, and state-specific monthly average of cancer-related hospital admission rates per 100 000 inhabitants and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated from March to July (2019: pre-COVID-19; and 2020: COVID-19 period). Thematic maps were constructed to compare the rates between periods and regions. RESULTS: Cancer-related hospital admissions were reduced by 26% and 28% for clinical and surgical purposes, respectively. In Brazil, the average hospitalization rates decreased from 13.9 in 2019 to 10.2 in 2020 per 100,000 inhabitants, representing a rate difference of -3.7 (per 100,000 inhabitants; 95% CI: -3.9 to -3.5) for cancer-related (clinical) hospital admissions. Surgical hospital admissions showed a rate decline of -5.8 per 100,000 (95% CI: -6.0 to -5.5). The reduction in cancer-related admissions for the surgical procedure varies across regions ranging between -2.2 and -10.8 per 100 000 inhabitants, with the most significant decrease observed in the south and southeastern Brazil. CONCLUSIONS: We observed a substantial decrease in cancer-related hospital admissions during the COVID-19 pandemic with marked differences across regions. Delays in treatment may negatively impact cancer survival in the future; hence, cancer control strategies to mitigate the impact are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Geography , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
12.
Anticancer Res ; 41(7): 3561-3565, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299778

ABSTRACT

AIM: Radiation therapy is a cornerstone of oncological treatment and oncological patients show greater risk of developing complications related to COVID-19 infection. Stringent social restrictions have ensured a significant reduction in the spread of the virus, but also gave rise to a number of critical issues for radiation oncology wards. For this reason, the Directors of the Radiation Oncology Departments (RODs) of Lazio, Abruzzo and Molise regions shared their experience and ideas in order to create a common document that may assist in facing the negative impacts of the pandemic on radiation oncology wards and patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was conducted according to the Estimate-Talk-Estimate method. Five issues were proposed and rated. Among approved issues, statements were proposed anonymously, then harmonized and finally voted on according to a Likert scale from 1 to 9. Those for which an agreement of 7-9 was observed were finally approved. RESULTS: The document was developed with 42 statements dealing about safety measures for patients and staff, organization of clinical and work activities, usage of Information Technology systems for meetings/smart working. An agreement was recorded for 34 statements. CONCLUSION: This document sets out some recommendations for RODs and can provide valuable management information for Oncological Radiotherapy wards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Radiation Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
13.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 520-523, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288675

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In light of the COVID-19 recommendations from the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland, we aimed to study patient and clinician satisfaction with a newly established telephone (TP) colorectal clinic service in lieu of traditional face-to-face (FTF) appointments. Comparative outcomes included patient versus clinician satisfaction; patient versus clinician desire to continue TP clinics postpandemic; and views of Specialty Trainee 3+ (ST3+)/Specialty Associate Specialist (SAS) doctors versus consultants on TP compared with FTF appointments. METHODS: We conducted a prospective service evaluation of patient and clinician satisfaction with colorectal surgery TP clinics between 1 June 2020 and 30 June 2020 in a British District General Hospital. RESULTS: Patients had higher satisfaction than clinicians with TP clinics: 91.5% versus 66.6% reported above-average experience [odds ratio (OR) = 5.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53 to 18.75, p = 0.01]. Clinicians had lower demand to continue TP clinics post-COVID-19 versus patients, with a trend towards significance (60% versus 82.9%, OR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.97, p = 0.08). ST3+/SAS doctors were more likely than consultants to find TP clinics inferior to FTF consultation for patient assessment (48.3% versus 23.7%, OR = 3.00, 95% CI 1.17 to 7.71, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: While clinicians may be concerned that patient assessment suffers, patient satisfaction with TP clinics is high. There should be a place for TP clinics post-COVID-19 but there must be a robust process for patient selection as well as adequate training for current and future generations of clinicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Medical Oncology/methods , Remote Consultation/methods , Telephone , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/standards , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Job Satisfaction , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Remote Consultation/standards , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
15.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 17(2): 547-550, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268381

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Health emergency due to COVID-19 started in Uruguay on March 13, 2020; our mastology unit tried to ensure adequate oncological care, and protect patients from the virus infection and complications. OBJECTIVE: To assess the health care activities in the "peak" of the pandemic during 3 months. MATERIALS AND METHODS: we collected data from the electronic health record. RESULTS: There were a total of 293 medical appointments from 131 patients (221 face-to-face), that decreased by 16.7% compared to the same period in 2019 (352 appointments). The medical appointments were scheduled to evaluate the continuity of systemic treatment or modifications (95 patients; 72.5%), follow-up (17; 12.9%), first-time consultation (12; 9.1%), and assess paraclinical studies (7; 5.3%). The patients were on hormone therapy (81 patients; 74%), chemotherapy (CT) (21; 19%), and anti-HER2 therapies (9; 8%). New twenty treatments were initiated. Of the 14 patients that were on adjuvant/neoadjuvant CT, 9 (64.3%) continued with the same regimen with the addition of prophylactic granulocyte-colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF), and 5 (35.7%), who were receiving weekly paclitaxel, continued the treatment with no changes. Of the seven patients that were on palliative CT, 2 (28.5%) continued the treatment with the addition of G-CSF, 3 (42.8%) continued with weekly capecitabine or paclitaxel with no treatment changes, and 2 (28.5%) changed their treatment regimen (a less myelosuppressive regimen was selected for one and due to progression of the disease in the other patient). The ninety patients who were receiving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, or palliative criteria hormone therapy and/or anti-HER2 therapies, continued the treatment with no changes. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence suggests that, although medical appointments decreased by approximately 17%, we could maintain healthcare activities, continued most of the treatments while the most modified was CT with G-CSF to avoid myelosuppression.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Bone Marrow/drug effects , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/administration & dosage , Hematopoiesis/drug effects , Hematopoiesis/immunology , Humans , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Referral and Consultation/standards , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards , Uruguay/epidemiology
16.
Gynecol Oncol ; 162(1): 4-11, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225432

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has quickly transformed healthcare systems with expansion of telemedicine. The past year has highlighted risks to immunosuppressed cancer patients and shown the need for health equity among vulnerable groups. In this study, we describe the utilization of virtual visits by patients with gynecologic malignancies and assess their social vulnerability. METHODS: Virtual visit data of 270 gynecology oncology patients at a single institution from March 1, 2020 to August 31, 2020 was obtained by querying a cohort discovery tool. Through geocoding, the CDC Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) was utilized to assign social vulnerability indices to each patient and the results were analyzed for trends and statistical significance. RESULTS: African American patients were the most vulnerable with a median SVI of 0.71, Asian 0.60, Hispanic 0.41, and Caucasian 0.21. Eighty-seven percent of patients in this study were Caucasian, 8.9% African American, 3.3% Hispanic, and 1.1% Asian, which is comparable to the baseline institutional gynecologic cancer population. The mean census tract SVI variable when comparing patients to all census tracts in the United States was 0.31 (range 0.00 least vulnerable to 0.98 most vulnerable). CONCLUSIONS: Virtual visits were utilized by patients of all ages and gynecologic cancer types. African Americans were the most socially vulnerable patients of the cohort. Telemedicine is a useful platform for cancer care across the social vulnerability spectrum during the pandemic and beyond. To ensure continued access, further research and outreach efforts are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Asian Americans/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/diagnosis , Gynecology/organization & administration , Gynecology/standards , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Socioeconomic Factors , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology , /statistics & numerical data
17.
Gynecol Oncol ; 162(1): 12-17, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213578

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare gynecologic oncology surgical treatment modifications and delays during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic between a publicly funded Canadian versus a privately funded American cancer center. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study of all planned gynecologic oncology surgeries at University Health Network (UHN) in Toronto, Canada and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) in Boston, USA, between March 22,020 and July 302,020. Surgical treatment delays and modifications at both centers were compared to standard recommendations. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to adjust for confounders. RESULTS: A total of 450 surgical gynecologic oncology patients were included; 215 at UHN and 235 at BWH. There was a significant difference in median time from decision-to-treat to treatment (23 vs 15 days, p < 0.01) between UHN and BWH and a significant difference in treatment delays (32.56% vs 18.29%; p < 0.01) and modifications (8.37% vs 0.85%; p < 0.01), respectively. On multivariable analysis adjusting for age, race, treatment site and surgical priority status, treatment at UHN was an independent predictor of treatment modification (OR = 9.43,95% CI 1.81-49.05, p < 0.01). Treatment delays were higher at UHN (OR = 1.96,95% CI 1.14-3.36 p = 0.03) and for uterine disease (OR = 2.43, 95% CI 1.11-5.33, p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: During the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic, gynecologic oncology patients treated at a publicly funded Canadian center were 9.43 times more likely to have a surgical treatment modification and 1.96 times more likely to have a surgical delay compared to an equal volume privately funded center in the United States.


Subject(s)
Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Hospitals, Private/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Public/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Canada/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Cancer Care Facilities/standards , Cancer Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/diagnosis , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Gynecology/economics , Gynecology/organization & administration , Gynecology/standards , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Private/economics , Hospitals, Private/organization & administration , Hospitals, Private/standards , Hospitals, Public/economics , Hospitals, Public/organization & administration , Hospitals, Public/standards , Humans , Medical Oncology/economics , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers/economics , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Time Factors , Triage/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL