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1.
Work ; 67(4): 783-790, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771012

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the pandemic process, COVID-19 has a serious occupational safety risk for healthcare professionals. Therefore, determining their health and safety perceptions and attitudes in the pandemic process is very important. This study aims to determine which is more effective in work accident prevention behavior: safety awareness and competencies of healthcare professionals or perception of fatalism. METHOD: For this purpose, a questionnaire was applied to 326 healthcare professionals. The questionnaire consists of four parts: (1) demographic information of the employees, (2) scale of preventing occupational accidents, (3) fatalism perception scale in occupational health and safety, and (4) security awareness and competency scale. Descriptive statistical methods, multiple regression and correlation analysis were used in the analysis of the data. RESULTS: It was determined that the participants' safety awareness and competencies were at the high level and their fatalism perceptions were at the low level. The average of the responses given by the participants to the scale of preventing work accidents was above the middle level. According to the study, the safety awareness and competencies of health workers were found to be about three times more effective on the behavior of preventing work accidents than the perception of fatalism. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, it is important to recommend managers to take the step to increase the safety awareness and competencies of those working in their institutions.


Subject(s)
Accidents, Occupational/prevention & control , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Health , Adult , Awareness , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
2.
West J Emerg Med ; 22(6): 1253-1256, 2021 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1761082

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Emergency medical services (EMS) dispatchers have made efforts to determine whether patients are high risk for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) so that appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) can be donned. A screening tool is valuable as the healthcare community balances protection of medical personnel and conservation of PPE. There is little existing literature on the efficacy of prehospital COVID-19 screening tools. The objective of this study was to determine the positive and negative predictive value of an emergency infectious disease surveillance tool for detecting COVID-19 patients and the impact of positive screening on PPE usage. METHODS: This study was a retrospective chart review of prehospital care reports and hospital electronic health records. We abstracted records for all 911 calls to an urban EMS from March 1-July 31, 2020 that had a documented positive screen for COVID-19 and/or had a positive COVID-19 test. The dispatch screen solicited information regarding travel, sick contacts, and high-risk symptoms. We reviewed charts to determine dispatch-screening results, the outcome of patients' COVID-19 testing, and documentation of crew fidelity to PPE guidelines. RESULTS: The sample size was 263. The rate of positive COVID-19 tests for all-comers in the state of Massachusetts was 2.0%. The dispatch screen had a sensitivity of 74.9% (confidence interval [CI], 69.21-80.03) and a specificity of 67.7% (CI, 66.91-68.50). The positive predictive value was 4.5% (CI, 4.17-4.80), and the negative predictive value was 99.3% (CI, 99.09-99.40). The most common symptom that triggered a positive screen was shortness of breath (51.5% of calls). The most common high-risk population identified was skilled nursing facility patients (19.5%), but most positive tests did not belong to a high-risk population (58.1%). The EMS personnel were documented as wearing full PPE for the patient in 55.7% of encounters, not wearing PPE in 8.0% of encounters, and not documented in 27.9% of encounters. CONCLUSION: This dispatch-screening questionnaire has a high negative predictive value but moderate sensitivity and therefore should be used with some caution to guide EMS crews in their PPE usage. Clinical judgment is still essential and may supersede screening status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Emergency Medical Services , Mass Screening/instrumentation , Patient Acuity , Triage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Testing , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Medical Staff, Hospital , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(1)2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752886

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In March 2020, the Dallas Fort Worth Metroplex experienced a surge in acute COVID-19 infections. At that time, no consistent protocols existed for follow-up of discharged patients with COVID-19 from the William P Clements Jr University Hospital at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Simultaneously, medical students were suspended from in-person clinical activities to limit viral spread. In response to these events, a telemedicine elective was created to provide timely and high-quality telehealth follow-up for recently discharged patients with COVID-19. METHODS: The pilot team, consisting of several second-year through fourth-year medical students, developed a call script that included warning signs and symptoms, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for isolation and primary care physician referral information. Patients with COVID-19 discharged from the emergency department (ED) and inpatient services were identified and assigned to student callers. All patients were discussed with an attending physician, who was available if an acute issue arose. The elective also included education on the SBAR (situation, background, assessment, and recommendation) handover technique, telehealth education, updated COVID-19 literature and CDC guidelines. RESULTS: Improvement was noted in students' ability to identify patients who required escalation of care, as seen by over 60% of patients who were advised to return to ED required hospital admission. Statistically significant improvement was observed in the students' degree of feeling informed about the current state of COVID-19 and their degree of comfort with interviewing patients over the phone. DISCUSSION: This elective provided quality virtual healthcare to patients with COVID-19 while allowing medical students to progress in their medical education and participate in patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Student Run Clinic , Students, Medical , Telemedicine , Humans , Medical Staff, Hospital
4.
Intern Med J ; 52(5): 745-754, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705589

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Junior doctors experience high levels of psychological distress and emotional exhaustion. The current Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in significant changes to healthcare globally, with quantitative studies demonstrating increased fatigue, depression and burnout in junior doctors. However, there has been limited qualitative research to examine junior doctors' experiences, challenges and beliefs regarding management of future crises. AIMS: To investigate the workplace and psychosocial experiences of Australian junior doctors working during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Australian healthcare workers were invited to participate in a nationwide, voluntary, anonymous, single time point, online survey between 27 August and 23 October 2020. A qualitative descriptive study of responses to four free-text questions from 621 junior doctors was undertaken, with responses analysed using inductive content analysis. RESULTS: Participants were predominantly female (73.2%), aged 31-40 years (48.0%) and most frequently reported working in medical specialties (48.4%), emergency medicine (21.7%) or intensive care medicine (11.4%). Most (51.9%) participants had 0-5 years of clinical experience since medical graduation. Junior doctors described experiences related to four key themes: a hierarchical, difficult workplace culture; challenging working conditions; disrupted training and career trajectories; and broader psychosocial impacts. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated longstanding, workplace issues and stressors for junior doctors and highlighted the threat that crises pose to medical workforce retention. There is an urgent need for authentic, positive workplace cultural interventions to engage, validate and empower junior doctors. CONCLUSIONS: Challenging workplace cultures and conditions, which have worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic, are associated with poor psychological well-being in junior doctors. There exists a need for long-term, widespread improvements in workplace culture and working conditions to ensure junior doctors' well-being, facilitate workforce retention and enhance the safety and quality of patient care in Australia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital , Pandemics , Workplace/psychology
6.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(5): e291-e299, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672352

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated severity, prevalence, and predictors of workplace disruption and mental health symptoms in Australian junior and senior hospital medical staff during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey collected data on demographics, workplace disruption, personal relationships, and mental health. RESULTS: One thousand twenty-one (62.1%) senior and 745 (37.9%) junior medical staff, located primarily in Victoria, completed the survey. Work disruptions were common but varied by seniority, withjunior staff more frequently exposed to COVID- 19 (P < 0.001). Symptoms of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and burnout were common but significantly higher in junior doctors (P  = 0.011 to < 0.001). Common predictors for experiencing mental health symptoms were identified, including prior mental health diagnoses and worsening personal relationships. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has had significant but varied impacts on junior and senior doctors, with junior doctors particularly susceptible to harm to mental health. Interventions to safeguard hospital medical staff and prevent attrition of this important workforce are urgently needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Medical Staff, Hospital , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(1): 312-319, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629608

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Worldwide transmission of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and related morbidity and mortality has presented a global challenge for several reasons. One such underrecognized and unaddressed aspect is the emotional health problems that medical staff have developed during this pandemic. The purpose of this one-month study was to examine anxiety levels and sleep quality of 100 medical staff members who worked in medical clinics treating COVID-19 patients in Saudi hospitals and to investigate the association of both anxiety levels and sleep quality with age, sex, and distinctive demographics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated anxiety levels and sleep quality of 100 medical staff members (age range 20-60 years) who worked in medical clinics treating COVID-19 patients in Saudi hospitals and the association of both anxiety levels and sleep quality with age, sex, and distinctive demographics. Anxiety levels and sleep quality were measured using the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (SAS and PSQI, respectively). RESULTS: A significant increment in anxiety and poor sleep quality was found in medical staff caring for COVID-19 patients. Anxiety levels in females were higher than males; however, poor sleep quality was somewhat higher in males vs. females but did not vary between age groups. Age was significantly negatively correlated with anxiety symptoms; individuals < 40 years old vs. ≥ 40 had more significant anxiety levels. We observed that medical staff with top-level salaries demonstrated a significant correlation (p = 0.028) between poor sleep quality and ill effects vs. those who had lower pay rates. A correlation between income and anxiety was not found. CONCLUSIONS: The higher the probability and intensity of exposure to coronavirus patients, the more noteworthy the danger that medical staff will experience the ill effects of mental issues.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Demography , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
8.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1640-1645, 2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572709

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: To analyze the virus spread among Sassari Hospital staff in the first Covid-19 wave and the impact of the Swab Team, a multidisciplinary task force entitled of nasopharyngeal swab collection and testing. METHODOLOGY: Nasopharyngeal swabs from HCWs between March 6 and May 28 2020 are evaluated. RESULTS: 4919 SARS-CoV-2 tests were performed on 3521 operators. Nurses and doctors are the categories at highest risk. After the Swab Team institution, the average number of swabs raised from 47/day to 86/day (p = 0.007). Positive samples decreased from 18.6% to 1.7% (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The Swab Team is effective in increasing the cases tested and in reducing the reporting time. Procedure standardization reduces the risk for all the subjects involved (no transmission among swab team members, nor during the sample collection).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Medical Staff, Hospital , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Patient Care Team , SARS-CoV-2 , Specimen Handling , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
9.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1597-1602, 2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572703

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 was declared a pandemic in March 2020, requiring a comprehensive response from all healthcare systems, including Mexico's. As medical residents' training did not involve epidemic response, we decided to evaluate their level of training on this subject, specifically self-perceived knowledge level and capacity to respond to epidemiological crises. METHODOLOGY: Medical residents from two hospitals belonging to PEMEX (Mexico's state-owned petroleum company) were included in a cross-sectional study. All participants answered a modified version of the survey developed by the University of Lovaina's Center for Research and Education in Emergency Care. Participants were analyzed according to their relevant "clinical" or "surgical" residency tracks. Data were analyzed using through Chi-square tests, t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients with significance established at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Of a total of 94 resident participants in this study, 56.7% self-perceived themselves as being poorly prepared to confront the pandemic. Only 25.5% of the participants referred previous experience in medical responses to public health emergencies, and only 35.1% reported ever receiving education on this topic. CONCLUSIONS: Medical residents-who have been involved with caring for victims of the pandemic-are under the general perception that they are not prepared, experienced, or educated enough to respond to such a widespread massive public health emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Internship and Residency , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital , Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e056122, 2021 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571205

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This paper reports findings exploring junior doctors' experiences of working during the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. DESIGN: Qualitative study using in-depth interviews with 15 junior doctors. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, anonymised and imported into NVivo V.12 to facilitate data management. Data were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. SETTING: National Health Service (NHS) England. PARTICIPANTS: A purposive sample of 12 female and 3 male junior doctors who indicated severe depression and/or anxiety on the DASS-21 questionnaire or high suicidality on Paykel's measure were recruited. These doctors self-identified as having lived experience of distress due to their working conditions. RESULTS: We report three major themes. First, the challenges of working during the COVID-19 pandemic, which were both personal and organisational. Personal challenges were characterised by helplessness and included the trauma of seeing many patients dying, fears about safety and being powerless to switch off. Work-related challenges revolved around change and uncertainty and included increasing workloads, decreasing staff numbers and negative impacts on relationships with colleagues and patients. The second theme was strategies for coping with the impact of COVID-19 on work, which were also both personal and organisational. Personal coping strategies, which appeared limited in their usefulness, were problem and emotion focused. Several participants appeared to have moved from coping towards learnt helplessness. Some organisations reacted to COVID-19 collaboratively and flexibly. Third, participants reported a positive impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on working practices, which included simplified new ways of working-such as consistent teams and longer rotations-as well as increased camaraderie and support. CONCLUSIONS: The trauma that junior doctors experienced while working during COVID-19 led to powerlessness and a reduction in the benefit of individual coping strategies. This may have resulted in feelings of resignation. We recommend that, postpandemic, junior doctors are assigned to consistent teams and offered ongoing support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine
11.
Am J Emerg Med ; 52: 128-131, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561972

ABSTRACT

AIM OF THE STUDY: In this study we aimed to investigate whether changing rescuers wearing N95 masks every 1 min instead of the standard CPR change over time of 2 min would make a difference in effective chest compressions. METHODS: This study was a randomized controlled mannequin study. Participants were selected from healthcare staff. They were divided into two groups of two people in each group. The scenario was implemented on CPR mannequin representing patient with asystolic arrest, that measured compression depth, compression rate, recoil, and correct hand position. Two different scenarios were prepared. In Scenario 1, the rescuers were asked to change chest compression after 1 min. In Scenario 2, standard CPR was applied. The participants' vital parameters, mean compression rate, correct compression rate/ratio, total number of compressions, compression depth, correct recoil/ratio, correct hand position/ratio, mean no-flow time, and total CPR time were recorded. RESULTS: The study hence included 14 teams each for scenarios, with a total of 56 participants. In each scenario, 14 participants were physicians and 14 participants were women. Although there was no difference in the first minute of the cycles starting from the fourth cycle, a statistically significant difference was observed in the second minute in all cycles except the fifth cycle. CONCLUSION: Changing the rescuer every 1 min instead of every 2 min while performing CPR with full PPE may prevent the decrease in compression quality that may occur as the resuscitation time gets longer.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/methods , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/standards , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Fatigue/prevention & control , Heart Arrest/therapy , Medical Staff, Hospital , N95 Respirators , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Manikins , Turkey
12.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259887, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526687

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After Action Review is a form of facilitated team learning and review of events. The methodology originated in the United States Army and forms part of the Incident Management Framework in the Irish Health Services. After Action Review has been hypothesized to improve safety culture and the effect of patient safety events on staff (second victim experience) in health care settings. Yet little direct evidence exists to support this and its implementation has not been studied. AIM: To investigate the effect of After Action Review on safety culture and second victim experience and to examine After Action Review implementation in a hospital setting. METHODS: A mixed methods study will be conducted at an Irish hospital. To assess the effect on safety culture and second victim experience, hospital staff will complete surveys before and twelve months after the introduction of After Action Review to the hospital (Hospital Survey on Safety Culture 2.0 and Second Victim Experience and Support Tool). Approximately one in twelve staff will be trained as After Action Review Facilitators using a simulation based training programme. Six months after the After Action Review training, focus groups will be conducted with a stratified random sample of the trained facilitators. These will explore enablers and barriers to implementation using the Theoretical Domains Framework. At twelve months, information will be collected from the trained facilitators and the hospital to establish the quality and resource implications of implementing After Action Review. DISCUSSION: The results of the study will directly inform local hospital decision-making and national and international approaches to incorporating After Action Review in hospitals and other healthcare settings.


Subject(s)
Hospitals , Medical Staff, Hospital , Organizational Culture , Safety Management , Computer Simulation , Hospital Administration , Humans , Ireland , Patient Care Team , Risk Management
13.
Acad Med ; 97(3S): S28-S34, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522353

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To better prepare for potential future large-scale redeployments, this study examines quality of supervision and care as perceived by redeployed residents, fellows, and attendings during a COVID-19 surge. METHOD: During April and May 2020, attendings, fellows, and residents redeployed at 2 teaching hospitals were invited to participate in a survey, which included questions on respondents' prior experience; redeployed role; amount of supervision needed and received; and perceptions of quality of supervision, patient care, and interprofessional collaboration. Frequencies, means, and P values were calculated to compare perceptions by experience and trainee status. Narrative responses to 2 open-ended questions were independently coded; themes were constructed. RESULTS: Overall, 152 of 297 (51.2%) individuals responded, including 64 of 142 attendings (45.1%), 40 of 79 fellows (50.6%), and 48 of 76 residents (63.2%). Fellows and attendings, regardless of prior experience, perceived supervision as adequate. In contrast, experienced residents reported receiving more supervision than needed, while inexperienced residents reported receiving less supervision than needed and rated overall supervision as poor. Attendings, fellows, and experienced residents rated the overall quality of care as acceptable to good, whereas inexperienced residents perceived overall quality of care as worse to much worse, particularly when compared with baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Narrative themes indicated that the quality of supervision and care was buffered by strong camaraderie, a culture of informal consultation, team composition (mixing experienced with inexperienced), and clinical decision aids. The markedly negative view of inexperienced residents suggests a higher risk for disillusionment, perhaps even moral injury, during future redeployments. Implications for planning are explored.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Medical Staff, Hospital , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , New York , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 41, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513182

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has negatively impacted countries across the globe. Infected individuals will seek aid at various health care facilities. Many patients will recover without requiring specialised treatment. A significant percentage of infected individuals will need critical care management, which will begin in the emergency department, generally staffed by junior doctors. Junior doctors will need to stabilize, triage and manage these patients prior to referral to specialized units. Above and beyond the usual occupational demands that accompany junior doctors in state facilities, this pandemic will thrust further responsibility on them. The objectives were to describe crisis preparedness of junior doctors in the areas of triage decision-making and critical care management, outside the intensive care unit. METHODS: this is a descriptive, cross-sectional study, utilizing a web-based survey. Junior doctors in South Africa, being doctors in year one or year two of internship and community service, were invited to participate anonymously via various social media platforms. Results: a total of 210 junior doctors across South Africa answered the survey. Junior doctors expressed confidence with knowledge of intubation drugs, to perform intubation and cardiopulmonary arrest resuscitation without supervision. Only 13.3% of respondents expressed comfort with setting and adjusting ventilator settings independently. 57% of participants expressed discomfort with making critical care triage decisions. Ninety-three percent (93%) of participants expressed benefit from a telemedicine intervention. CONCLUSION: junior doctors in South Africa indicate that they are prepared to initiate management of the critically ill patient outside the intensive care unit but remain uncertain in their ability to provide ongoing critical care management. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need to prepare junior doctors with the ability to manage critical care triage and management in emergency rooms. Leveraging of the workforce in South Africa may be potentiated by telemedicine interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care/methods , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Triage/methods , Clinical Competence , Clinical Decision-Making , Critical Illness/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Internship and Residency , South Africa , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Am J Emerg Med ; 51: 342-347, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499591

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the declaration of the novel Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) as a global pandemic by the World Health Organization, frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) and staff in the Emergency Departments (ED) started experiencing feelings of anxiety and fear from the projected exponential spread and the potential burden on the healthcare system and infrastructure. In Lebanon, major local factors contributing to this fear were the rapid escalation of COVID-19 cases across the country, the lack of preparedness, and the shortage of personal protective equipment, in addition to the evolving economic crisis and financial restrictions. This study aims to investigate the immediate psychological impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on ED staff working in a hospital environment in relation to their household income. METHODS: Self-reported cross-sectional survey was delivered to the frontline staff working at the Department of Emergency Medicine of AUBMC in Beirut, Lebanon. General demographic characteristics, scores of Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7), scores of Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), and scores of Burnout Measure-Short (BMS) version were collected. RESULTS: 74 HCWs (49.6%) participated in the study. The mean age for participants was (31.78 ± 9.49). More than half of the participants were nurses and more than 70% reported a monthly salary of less than 2000 USD. The household income was negatively associated with the participants' scores on the GAD-7 and PHQ-9, but not the BMS. Previous mental health diagnosis was positively associated with the PHQ-9 and BMS scores, while seeking mental health care was negatively associated with the PHQ-9 and BMS scores. CONCLUSION: At our tertiary care center in a low-income, low resource country amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, the HCWs reported marked psychological disturbances on different scales. In particular, the financial burden was associated with increased anxiety and clinical depression, but was not associated with burnout.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Economic Recession , Health Personnel/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Fear , Female , Humans , Lebanon , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Middle Aged , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Self Report , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
16.
BMJ ; 374: n2274, 2021 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495354
19.
Am J Emerg Med ; 51: 184-191, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474269

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) care in the Emergency Department (ED) has had to be modified during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Scarce literature exists on comfort of clinicians (defined as physicians, nurses & advanced practice providers-APP's) in these new roles and their perceived understanding of new algorithms. METHODS: Routine CPA care in our ED was modified during the COVID-19 pandemic. This involved clinicians in shared leadership roles alongside COVID-19 specific changes to CPA algorithms. The new protocol was operationalized through a two-step educational intervention involving didactic education and in-situ simulations. Univariate analyses using student's t-test assessed effectiveness of this educational intervention with clinician comfort as team leaders and perceived knowledge as primary outcomes on a scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Subgroup analysis across physicians (attending & resident), nurses & APP's were also undertaken with an alpha of 0.05, and p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Secondary outcomes of task saturation, procedural safety and error prevention were also analyzed. RESULTS: Across 83 of 95 total participants, our primary outcome of clinician comfort in the team leader role improved from a mean value of 3.41 (SD: 1.23) pre-intervention to 4.11 (SD: 0.88) with a p-value <0.001 post intervention. Similar and statistically significant findings in clinician comfort were noted across all subgroups except attending physicians and APP's. Perceived knowledge increased from a mean value of 3.54 (SD: 1.06) pre-intervention to a mean value of 4.24 (SD: 0.67) with a p-value <0.001 post intervention. Similar and statistically significant findings in perceived knowledge were noted across all subgroups except APP's. Responses were registered in either the strongly agree or agree category with regards to task saturation (89%), procedural safety (93%) and error prevention (71%) across all clinicians post intervention. CONCLUSION: Our pilot investigation of the effectiveness of an educational intervention of a novel CPA protocol in the ED during the COVID-19 pandemic reached statistical significance with regards to clinician comfort in shared leadership roles and perceived knowledge. These findings suggest that the protocol is rapidly teachable, usable and can be efficiently disseminated across ED clinicians of varying experience, especially in pandemic settings. Further work regarding effectiveness of this new protocol in real life cardiac arrest scenarios is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Heart Arrest/therapy , Leadership , Algorithms , Clinical Competence , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Medical Staff, Hospital , Nurses , Pandemics , Physicians , Pilot Projects
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