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1.
Work ; 67(4): 783-790, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771012

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the pandemic process, COVID-19 has a serious occupational safety risk for healthcare professionals. Therefore, determining their health and safety perceptions and attitudes in the pandemic process is very important. This study aims to determine which is more effective in work accident prevention behavior: safety awareness and competencies of healthcare professionals or perception of fatalism. METHOD: For this purpose, a questionnaire was applied to 326 healthcare professionals. The questionnaire consists of four parts: (1) demographic information of the employees, (2) scale of preventing occupational accidents, (3) fatalism perception scale in occupational health and safety, and (4) security awareness and competency scale. Descriptive statistical methods, multiple regression and correlation analysis were used in the analysis of the data. RESULTS: It was determined that the participants' safety awareness and competencies were at the high level and their fatalism perceptions were at the low level. The average of the responses given by the participants to the scale of preventing work accidents was above the middle level. According to the study, the safety awareness and competencies of health workers were found to be about three times more effective on the behavior of preventing work accidents than the perception of fatalism. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, it is important to recommend managers to take the step to increase the safety awareness and competencies of those working in their institutions.


Subject(s)
Accidents, Occupational/prevention & control , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Health , Adult , Awareness , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(1): 312-319, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629608

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Worldwide transmission of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and related morbidity and mortality has presented a global challenge for several reasons. One such underrecognized and unaddressed aspect is the emotional health problems that medical staff have developed during this pandemic. The purpose of this one-month study was to examine anxiety levels and sleep quality of 100 medical staff members who worked in medical clinics treating COVID-19 patients in Saudi hospitals and to investigate the association of both anxiety levels and sleep quality with age, sex, and distinctive demographics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated anxiety levels and sleep quality of 100 medical staff members (age range 20-60 years) who worked in medical clinics treating COVID-19 patients in Saudi hospitals and the association of both anxiety levels and sleep quality with age, sex, and distinctive demographics. Anxiety levels and sleep quality were measured using the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (SAS and PSQI, respectively). RESULTS: A significant increment in anxiety and poor sleep quality was found in medical staff caring for COVID-19 patients. Anxiety levels in females were higher than males; however, poor sleep quality was somewhat higher in males vs. females but did not vary between age groups. Age was significantly negatively correlated with anxiety symptoms; individuals < 40 years old vs. ≥ 40 had more significant anxiety levels. We observed that medical staff with top-level salaries demonstrated a significant correlation (p = 0.028) between poor sleep quality and ill effects vs. those who had lower pay rates. A correlation between income and anxiety was not found. CONCLUSIONS: The higher the probability and intensity of exposure to coronavirus patients, the more noteworthy the danger that medical staff will experience the ill effects of mental issues.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Demography , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
Am J Emerg Med ; 51: 342-347, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499591

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the declaration of the novel Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) as a global pandemic by the World Health Organization, frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) and staff in the Emergency Departments (ED) started experiencing feelings of anxiety and fear from the projected exponential spread and the potential burden on the healthcare system and infrastructure. In Lebanon, major local factors contributing to this fear were the rapid escalation of COVID-19 cases across the country, the lack of preparedness, and the shortage of personal protective equipment, in addition to the evolving economic crisis and financial restrictions. This study aims to investigate the immediate psychological impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on ED staff working in a hospital environment in relation to their household income. METHODS: Self-reported cross-sectional survey was delivered to the frontline staff working at the Department of Emergency Medicine of AUBMC in Beirut, Lebanon. General demographic characteristics, scores of Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7), scores of Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), and scores of Burnout Measure-Short (BMS) version were collected. RESULTS: 74 HCWs (49.6%) participated in the study. The mean age for participants was (31.78 ± 9.49). More than half of the participants were nurses and more than 70% reported a monthly salary of less than 2000 USD. The household income was negatively associated with the participants' scores on the GAD-7 and PHQ-9, but not the BMS. Previous mental health diagnosis was positively associated with the PHQ-9 and BMS scores, while seeking mental health care was negatively associated with the PHQ-9 and BMS scores. CONCLUSION: At our tertiary care center in a low-income, low resource country amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, the HCWs reported marked psychological disturbances on different scales. In particular, the financial burden was associated with increased anxiety and clinical depression, but was not associated with burnout.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Economic Recession , Health Personnel/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Fear , Female , Humans , Lebanon , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Middle Aged , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Self Report , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
5.
Bull Menninger Clin ; 85(3): 254-270, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470682

ABSTRACT

Sleep problems among frontline medical staff during the COVID-19 epidemic require attention. A total of 249 frontline medical staff who were recruited to support Wuhan completed this cross-sectional study. A web-based questionnaire about insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue was used to assess mental health status. The prevalence of sleep disorders among frontline medical staff was 50.6%. More time spent in Wuhan and a history of insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue were associated with a higher risk of insomnia. People who stayed in Wuhan for a long time with a history of insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue symptoms might be at high risk of insomnia.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , China , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors
6.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 63(1): e1-e6, 2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395089

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to an unprecedented international emergency, resulting in a need to adapt the existing healthcare systems, in order to enable ongoing patient care despite the current disruptions. Telemedicine may be a viable option to continue hospital workflow, however there are barriers to its implementation. We set out to establish what barriers might exist and to assess the viability of teleclinics within the province KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), as perceived by doctors. METHODS: This was a quantitative, observational, survey-based study targeted at medical doctors working in both the public as well as the private healthcare sector in University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN). RESULTS: One hundred and forty-seven (147) responses were included. The majority (86%) of respondents felt that telemedicine could provide a useful means to continuing hospital workflow, however, only 47% believed that it was a viable option for their unit. The major barrier identified was a feeling that doctors would-be at-increased medico-legal risk. Only 38.4% of doctors were familiar with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) guidelines on telemedicine usage. Other major barriers included: doctors feeling uncomfortable with not seeing a patient in person or not being able to perform a thorough physical examination. Other reasons identified as potential barriers were doctors foreseeing difficulty in accessing patient medical records and the absence of available systems to order investigations without the patient being physically present. CONCLUSION: Telemedicine is currently not widely utilised in KZN; although most doctors were of the opinion that it could be a useful tool in order to continue the workflow during the pandemic. The major barrier identified were issues surrounding medico-legal coverage.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Remote Consultation/methods , Telephone , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Liability, Legal , Male , Medical Records , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa/epidemiology
7.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(2): 372-374, 2021 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371031

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has demanded rapid institutional responses to meet the needs of patients and employees in the face of a serious new disease. To support the well-being of frontline staff, a series of debriefing sessions was used to drive a rapid-cycle quality-improvement process. The goals were to confidentially determine personal coping strategies used by staff, provide an opportunity for staff cross-learning, identify what staff needed most, and provide a real-time feedback loop for decision-makers to create rapid changes to support staff safety and coping. Data were collected via sticky notes on flip charts to protect confidentiality. Management reviewed the data daily. Institutional responses to problems identified during debrief sessions were tracked, visualized, addressed, and shared with staff. More than 10% of staff participated over a 2-week period. Feedback influenced institutional decisions to improve staff schedules, transportation, and COVID-19 training.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faith-Based Organizations/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Healthcare/methods , Tertiary Healthcare/statistics & numerical data , Faith-Based Organizations/standards , Hospitals/standards , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Kenya/epidemiology , Medical Staff, Hospital/education , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Health Care/organization & administration , Quality of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Healthcare/standards
8.
BMJ Open Qual ; 10(3)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322830

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Junior doctors are working in an increasingly overstretched National Health Service. In 2018, Kettering General Hospital (KGH) was awarded £60 800 of government funds to create high-quality rest facilities and improve junior doctor well-being. METHODS: An audit and survey in KGH identified the structural and functional improvements needed. From November 2019 to June 2020, £47 841.24 was spent on creating new rest facilities. On completion, a postaction review assessed how the changes impacted morale, well-being and quality of patient care. RESULTS: The majority of doctors were happy with the new rest areas (60%), a majority felt that they would use the on-call room area (63%) and the renovation improved morale and well-being. There was an increased ability to take breaks. However, the majority of doctors are not exception-reporting missing breaks: 79% (2019), 74% (2020). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: This report recommends the maintenance of increased staffing levels and rest facilities during the recovery phase of COVID-19. The remaining £12 958.76 should be directed at sustaining the quality of KGH rest facilities. Lastly, the rate of exception-reporting must be increased through improving awareness, exploring alternative methods and supporting the action when necessary. The continual investment into rest facilities ensures workforce well-being and translates into patient safety.


Subject(s)
Fatigue/prevention & control , Hospital Design and Construction/methods , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Shift Work Schedule , Sleep , Humans , Morale , Patient Safety , Quality Improvement , State Medicine , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(28): e26646, 2021 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309663

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The SARS- CoV-2 virus has been a public health crisis since its emergence in 2019. It has affected nearly all aspects of life. Education has been particularly hit, and a lot of effort has been put to implement more and more virtual platforms through online classes, meetings and conferences. Medical education has also been affected, especially because of the need for hands-on education, specifically in the clinical setting of the last 2 years. This had a huge psychological impact on the medical students currently enrolled in medical schools around the globe.In this descriptive study, we sent all medical students at the American University of Beirut Faculty of Medicine (AUBFM) an online anonymous survey by email. The survey started with general questions (age, gender and medical school year), followed by 3 sections that contain questions pertaining to the attitudes of medical students towards clinical rotations and online classes. Data was then analyzed using SPSSv24 and was then reported as percentages.Students were almost equally divided among the medical school classes (Med 1, 2, 3, and 4). The majority of clinical students (Med 3 and Med 4) reported that they feel nervous during their rotations in the hospital. Moreover, they reported that they have increased their use of disinfectants and personal protective equipment since the emergence of the pandemic. Moreover, the majority of medical students reported that they feel more stressed after shifting to online classes. Medical students also reported that they would be willing to go back to on-campus classes.This study aimed at describing the response of medical students at AUBFM to the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of stress. Limited data exists in the literature concerning the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical students in the middle East. Medical students reported that they feel more stressed and nervous during their clinical rotations and after the shift to online education, affecting their academic and social life. Further studies using a larger sample size are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Education, Distance , Female , Humans , Lebanon , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e931881, 2021 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266949

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has exerted immense pressure on medical systems in China and abroad. This study aimed to compare the sleep quality of medical personnel conscripted to the Wuhan Union Cancer Centre to offer support during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic to the sleep quality of those who remained at Anhui Medical University Hospital and to determine the role of interventions in improving sleep quality. MATERIAL AND METHODS Questionnaires were completed by 369 individuals who were conscripted to support Wuhan (N=137) and others who were not (the control group; N=232). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure the duration and quality of sleep. The Anhui Provincial Health Commission organized a comprehensive intervention, consisting of physical-psychological-social dimensions, over the course of 2 weeks. RESULTS Only 34.21% of the Wuhan support workers reported better sleep quality, as opposed to the 55.60% of the control group at stage 1 (t/χ²=14.005, P<.001). Furthermore, despite the Wuhan support group being more prone to poor sleep quality, their sleep quality significantly improved after the interventions. CONCLUSIONS The findings from this study showed that medical staff who were conscripted to offer support during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic suffered from impaired quality of sleep. The use of questionnaire-based sleep assessments may provide individualized approaches to supporting medical personnel during future epidemics and pandemics. Furthermore, our results indicate that relevant interventions can significantly improve sleep quality, while a prolonged break after interventions does not affect sleep quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
13.
JAMA ; 325(12): 1127-1129, 2021 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160216
16.
Saudi Med J ; 42(3): 306-314, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125359

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of burnout among health care workers (HCWs) who are working in Saudi Arabia during the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and explore individual and work-related factors associated with burnout in this population. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study conducted between June to August of 2020, we invited HCWs through social channels to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire inquired about demographics, factors related to burnout, and used the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory scale to indicate burnout. A total of 646 HCWs participated. RESULTS: The mean (SD) age of participants was 34.1 (9.5) years. Sixty-one percent were female. The prevalence of burnout among HCWs was 75%. Significant factors associated with burnout were age, job title, years of experience, increased working hours during the pandemic, average hours of sleep per day, exposure to patients with COVID-19, number of times tested for COVID-19, and perception of being pushed to deal with COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: Health care workers as frontline workers, face great challenges during this pandemic, because of the nature of their work. Efforts should be made to promote psychological resilience for HCWs during pandemics. This study points out the factors that should be invested in and the factors that may not be influential.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Adult , Age Factors , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Marital Status , Prevalence , Psychological Distance , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sleep Deprivation , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Work Schedule Tolerance
17.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 82(2): 1-9, 2021 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110765

ABSTRACT

Research carried out in 2016 by the authors investigated the challenges that doctors in training experience around leadership and followership in the NHS. The study explored contemporary healthcare leadership culture and the role of followership from the perspective of early career doctors. It found that the leadership and followership challenges for these doctors in training were associated with issues of social and professional identity, communication, the medical hierarchy, and relationships with senior colleagues (support and trust). These challenges were exacerbated by the busy and turbulent clinical environment in which they worked. To cope with various clinical situations and forms of leadership, doctors in training engage in a range of different followership behaviours and strategies. The study raised implications for medical education and training and suggested that followership should be included as part of formal training in communication and team working skills. The importance of both leadership and followership in the delivery of safe and effective patient care has been brought sharply into focus by the COVID-19 pandemic. This article revisits these challenges in light of the pandemic and its impact on the experiences of doctors in training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Leadership , Medical Staff, Hospital , Teaching/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Career Mobility , Cooperative Behavior , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Medical Staff, Hospital/education , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/standards , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Skills
18.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 34(Suppl): S103-S112, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100002

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care workers treating Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients face significant stressors such as caring for critically ill and dying patients, physically demanding care requiring new degrees of personal protective equipment use, risk of contracting the disease, and putting loved ones at risk. This study investigates the stress impact from COVID-19 exposure and how nurses and medical providers (eg, physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) experience these challenges differently. METHODS: An electronic, self-administered questionnaire was sent to all hospital staff over 6 weeks surveying exposure to COVID-19 patients and degree of stress caused by this exposure. Responses from medical providers and nurses were analyzed for significant contributors to stress levels, as well as comparing responses from medical providers versus nurses. RESULTS: Stress levels from increased risk of disease contraction while on the job, fear of transmitting it to family or friends, and the resulting social stigma were highest in medical staff during the COVID-19 pandemic. Compared with medical providers, nurses had nearly 4 times the odds of considering job resignation due to COVID-19. However, most health care workers (77.4% of medical providers and 52.9% of nurses) strongly agreed or agreed with the statements indicating high levels of altruism in their desire to treat COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: The significant stress burden placed on nurses likely contributes to increased thoughts of job resignation. However, health care providers displayed high levels of altruism during this time of extreme crisis, despite their personal risks of caring for COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Adult , Altruism , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Perception , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Stigma , Surveys and Questionnaires
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