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1.
J Investig Med ; 70(2): 428-435, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533072

ABSTRACT

The psychological burden of the COVID-19 pandemic may have a lasting effect on emotional well-being of healthcare workers. Medical personnel working at the time of the pandemic may experience elevated occupational stress due to the uncontrollability of the virus, high perceived risk of infection, poor understanding of the novel virus transmission routes and unavailability of effective antiviral agents. This study used path analysis to analyze the relationship between stress and alexithymia, emotional processing and negative/positive affect in healthcare workers. The sample included 167 nurses, 65 physicians and 53 paramedics. Sixty-two (21.75 %) respondents worked in COVID-19-designated hospitals. Respondents were administered the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20, Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, Emotional Processing Scale, and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. The model showed excellent fit indices (χ2 (2)=2.642, p=0.267; CFI=0.999, RMSEA=0.034, SRMR=0.015). Multiple group path analysis demonstrated physicians differed from nurses and paramedics at the model level (X2 diff (7)=14.155, p<0.05 and X2 diff (7)=18.642, p<0.01, respectively). The relationship between alexithymia and emotional processing was stronger in nurses than in physicians (difference in beta=0.27; p<0.05). Individual path χ2 tests also revealed significantly different paths across these groups. The results of the study may be used to develop evidence-based intervention programs promoting healthcare workers' mental health and well-being.


Subject(s)
Affective Symptoms , COVID-19 , Medical Staff , Pandemics , Affective Symptoms/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Humans , Medical Staff/psychology
2.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253753, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282313

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is a public health emergency of international concern and poses a challenge to the mental health and sleep quality of front-line medical staff (FMS). The aim of this study was to investigate the sleep quality of FMS during the COVID-19 outbreak in China and analyze the relationship between mental health and sleep quality of FMS. METHODS: From February 24, 2020 to March 22, 2020, a cross-sectional study was performed with 543 FMS from a medical center in Western China. A self-reported questionnaire was used to collect data anonymously. The following tests were used: The Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) for symptoms of anxiety, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for depressive symptoms, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for sleep quality assessment. RESULTS: Of the 543 FMS, 216 (39.8%) were classified as subjects with poor sleep quality. Anxiety (P<0.001), depression (P<0.001), and the prevalence of those divorced or widowed (P<0.05) were more common in FMS with poor sleep quality than in participants with good sleep quality. The FMS exhibiting co-occurrence of anxiety and depression were associated with worse scores on sleep quality than those medical staff in the other three groups/categories. The difference in sleep quality between the FMS with only depression and the FMS experiencing co-occurrence of anxiety and depression was statistically significant (P<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in sleep quality between the FMS experiencing only anxiety and the FMS with co-occurrence of anxiety and depression (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a noteworthy increase in the prevalence of negative emotions and sentiments among the medical staff, along with poor overall sleep quality. We anticipate that this study can stimulate more research into the mental state of FMS during outbreaks and other public health emergencies. In addition, particular attention must be paid to enhance the sleep quality of FMS, along with better planning and support for FMS who are continuously exposed to the existing viral epidemic by virtue of the nature of their profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medical Staff/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
3.
BMJ Open ; 11(6): e046350, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282098

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To survey anxiety and depression symptoms to COVID-19 outbreak in the public, medical staff and patients during the initial phase of the pandemic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional online survey administered through WeChat Mini Program using Chinese versions of Zung Self-rating Depression Scale and Zung Self-rating Anxiety Scale. SETTING: Guangzhou, China. PARTICIPANTS: 47 378 public, 1512 medical staff and 125 patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: Higher rates of depression (47.8%) and anxiety symptoms (48.7%) were shown by patients who were screened positive compared with those of the public (35.6%, 25.7%) or medical staff (15.4%, 13.3%). The professional identity of a nurse, conditions of 'with an infected family member' and 'working at the frontline' were risk factors to depression or anxiety symptoms for the medical staff. Younger age, lower educational level, female and not having adequate masks were the risk factors for the public. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 outbreak increased people's depression or anxiety emotion responses, which varied extensively among the patients, public and medical staff.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Medical Staff/psychology , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e929454, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) broke out in China. This study was to investigate the situation of mental health status among medical staff following COVID-19. MATERIAL AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted through structured questionnaires to collect the demographical information of the participating medical staff via WeChat following COVID-19 crisis. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), impact of events scale revised (IES-R), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scale were used to evaluate depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and sleep quality, respectively. 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. RESULTS A total of 597 medical staff's information was included for the statistical analysis, and found 45.23% of subjects had PTSD symptoms, the mean PSQI score was 6.320±3.587. The results of multivariable analysis implied that medical workers who did not participate in the Hubei aid program (ß=4.128; 95% CI, 0.983-7.272; P=0.010) and PTSD symptoms (ß=7.212; 95% CI, 4.807-9.616; P<0.001) were associated with a higher tendency to depression. The PSQI score was linearly related to the CES-D score (ß=1.125; 95% CI, 0.804-1.445; P<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that medical workers who did not participate in the Hubei aid program, no traumatic experience before COVID-19 outbreaks, and PTSD symptoms may affect the tendency to depression in females, but not in males. PSQI score was linearly related to the CES-D score both in males and females. CONCLUSIONS The medical staff with PTSD symptoms and higher PSQI score may have a higher tendency to depression following COVID-19 outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Medical Staff , Sleep Wake Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/psychology , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e25945, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269619

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms and the associated risk factors among first-line medical staff in Wuhan during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic.From March 5 to 15, 2020, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Hamilton Depression scale were used to investigate the anxiety and depression status of medical staff in Wuhan Cabin Hospital (a Hospital). Two hundred seventy-six questionnaires were received from 96 doctors and 180 nurses, including 79 males and 197 females.During the COVID-19 epidemic, the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression was 27.9% and 18.1%, respectively, among 276 front-line medical staff in Wuhan. The prevalence rate of anxiety and depression among doctors was 19.8% and 11.5%, respectively, and the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression among nurses was 32.2% and 21.7%, respectively. Females recorded higher total scores for anxiety and depression than males, and nurses recorded higher scores for anxiety and depression than doctors.During the COVID-19 epidemic, some first-line medical staff experienced mental health problems such as depression and anxiety. Nurses were more prone to anxiety and depression than doctors. Effective strategies toward to improving the mental health should be provided to first-line medical staff, especially female medical staff and nurses.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Medical Staff/psychology , Mobile Health Units/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Fear , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Workload/psychology
7.
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci ; 272(1): 81-93, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233260

ABSTRACT

Facing with COVID-19 epidemic such a catastrophic health emergency, the mental health status of medical staff deserves attention. We conducted a two-stage of psychological status monitoring after the end of the assistance and 14 days of isolation, further targeted the vulnerable groups in need of intervention. The study is a cross-sectional survey on 1156 Yunnan medical staff aid to Hubei. Used Cluster sampling method to collect data at 2 time points (at the end of returning from Wuhan and the 14th day of isolation), from March 18, 2020 to April 6, 2020. Female and nurse had higher rates of depressive symptoms than male and doctors and other occupations. The proportion of female with mild and above moderate anxiety levels (22.91%, 2.61%) was higher than male (17.35%, 1.03%) (p < 0.05). Female had a better impaired sleep quality (45.06%, 17.49%) more than male (28.57%, 7.94%). Medical staff supported in Wuhan and with junior professional titles reported a higher proportion of sleep quality impairment. At the 14th isolation day stage, the proportion of nurses changed from depression to health (9.15%) and from health to depression (6.1%) better than doctors. The front-line medical staffs had suffered greater psychological pressure in the treatment process of major public health emergency. Researches on the dynamic monitor for the change of psychological status after aiding epidemic areas were still in relatively blank stage. Targeting the vulnerable characteristics of aiding medical staff is significant for effective psychological intervention and sustainable operation of health system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Medical Staff , Mental Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Epidemics/prevention & control , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/psychology , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
8.
Recenti Prog Med ; 111(4): 205-206, 2020 Apr.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156093

ABSTRACT

In this pandemic global emergency, self-care and psycho-physical wellbeing's programs for healthcare workers are an absolute priority. Now more than ever, physicians and nurses are facing abnormal burdens of work, stressful clinical and organizational conditions and emotional charges that are challenging their ability to cope and jeopardizing their own lives. By improving nutritional education in medical faculties, implementing healthy lifestyles promotion and burnout prevention projects in the hospitals, we will be able to maintain a good quality of care throughout these trying times and hopefully we will improve the selfcare strategies for health professionals for the next future.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Medical Staff/psychology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Self Care , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotional Adjustment , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Life Style , Nutritional Support , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Workload
9.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248758, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154079

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: e-learning was underutilized in the past especially in developing countries. However, the current crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic forced the entire world to rely on it for education. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the university medical staff perceptions, evaluate their experiences, recognize their barriers, challenges of e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, and investigate factors influencing the acceptance and use of e-learning as a tool teaching within higher education. METHODS: Data was collected using an electronic questionnaire with a validated Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) for exploring factors that affect the acceptance and use of e-learning as a teaching tool among medical staff members, Zagazig University, Egypt. RESULTS: The majority (88%) of the staff members agreed that the technological skills of giving the online courses increase the educational value of the experience of the college staff. The rate of participant agreement on perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and acceptance of e-learning was (77.1%, 76.5%, and 80.9% respectively). The highest barriers to e-learning were insufficient/ unstable internet connectivity (40%), inadequate computer labs (36%), lack of computers/ laptops (32%), and technical problems (32%). Younger age, teaching experience less than 10 years, and being a male are the most important indicators affecting e-learning acceptance. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the challenges and factors influencing the acceptance, and use of e-learning as a tool for teaching within higher education. Thus, it will help to develop a strategic plan for the successful implementation of e-learning and view technology as a positive step towards evolution and change.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Education, Distance , Medical Staff/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt , Female , Humans , Internet Access , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching , Universities
10.
Inquiry ; 58: 46958021997344, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1097070

ABSTRACT

There are few studies on the psychological status of medical staff during the COVID-19 outbreak. Our study addresses whether lack of communication affects the psychological status of medical team members supporting Wuhan during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. We used general symptom index (GSI) scores of the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) to evaluate participants' psychological status. We adopted a stratified sampling method and selected the fourth team, with a total of 137 members, as participants. In total 76.6% and 69.7% of female and male participants, respectively, had bachelor's degrees; 41.6% and 21.2% of female and male participants, respectively, were unmarried. Regarding communication, 14.29% and 6.06% of female and male participants, respectively, reported a lack of communication with the team (LCWT). Additionally, 13.0% and 6.1% of female and male participants, respectively, experienced fear of being infected (FoBI). LCWT and FoBI were positively correlated with GSI score (estimated change = 0.2, 95% CI [0.1-0.3]). When adjusted for gender, age, and FoBI, LCWT was positively correlated with GSI score (P < .05). Increasing communication among medical team members can reduce GSI scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Interprofessional Relations , Medical Staff/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Self Report , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085084

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, a survey was conducted using the questionnaire method among participants consisting of both ordinary people (n = 325) and frontline anti-epidemic medical staff (n = 310), and physiological data was obtained on the basis of physical examination. This study aimed to scrutinize the influence of Type A personality on the biochemical indicators of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and the behavioral indicators of appetite and sleep disorder, and to analyze the mediating effect of depression. Meanwhile, multiple-group path analysis was used to evaluate path differences between the models of two samples. The results of the mediation analysis for both samples demonstrated that depression significantly mediated the relationship between Type A personality and appetite and sleep disorder. The results of multiple-group path analysis showed that the relationship between Type A personality and appetite and sleep disorder seems to be significantly stronger in ordinary people, whereas the relationship between depression and appetite and sleep disorder, as well as with the path towards AST, seems to be significantly stronger in frontline anti-epidemic medical staff. This paper provides ideas for the selection and distribution of medical personnel based on personality characteristics in major public health emergencies, and physical and mental health status should be taken into account to provide relative health assistance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff/psychology , Mental Health , Type A Personality , Appetite , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Humans , Pandemics , Physical Examination , Sleep Wake Disorders
12.
Ann Surg ; 273(3): e91-e96, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066513

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the stress levels and experience of academic surgeons by training status (eg, housestaff or faculty). BACKGROUND: Covid-19 has uniquely challenged and changed the United States healthcare system. A better understanding of the surgeon experience is necessary to inform proactive workforce management and support. METHODS: A multi-institutional, cross-sectional telephone survey of surgeons was conducted across 5 academic medical centers from May 15 to June 5, 2020. The exposure of interest was training status. The primary outcome was maximum stress level, measured using the validated Stress Numerical Rating Scale-11 (range 0-10). RESULTS: A total of 335 surveys were completed (49.3% housestaff, 50.7% faculty; response rate 63.7%). The mean maximum stress level of faculty was 7.21 (SD 1.81) and of housestaff was 6.86 (SD 2.06) (P = 0.102). Mean stress levels at the time of the survey trended lower amongst housestaff (4.17, SD 1.89) than faculty (4.56, SD 2.15) (P = 0.076). More housestaff (63.6%) than faculty (40.0%) reported exposure to individuals with Covid-19 (P < 0.001). Subjects reported inadequate personal protective equipment in approximately a third of professional exposures, with no difference by training status (P = 0.557). CONCLUSIONS: During the early months of the Covid-19 pandemic, the personal and professional experiences of housestaff and faculty differed, in part due to a difference in exposure as well as non-work-related stressors. Workforce safety, including adequate personal protective equipment, expanded benefits (eg, emergency childcare), and deliberate staffing models may help to alleviate the stress associated with disease resurgence or future disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty, Medical/psychology , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency , Medical Staff/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
13.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 20(1): 1007, 2020 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050445

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 has been a pandemic around the world, which affirmatively brought mental health problems to medical staff. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of anxiety in Chinese medical staff and examine the mediation effects of coping styles on the relationship between social support and anxiety. METHODS: A cross-sectional study via internet survey was conducted from 15 March to 30 March, 2020. The social demographic data, Self-rated Anxiety Scale, Social Support Rate Scale and Trait Coping Style Scale were collected. Pearson correlation and a structural equation model were performed to examine the relationships of these variables. The bootstrap analysis was conducted to evaluate the mediation effects. RESULTS: A total of 453 medical staff participated in this study. The mean score of SAS was 46.1 (SD = 10.4). Up to 40.8% of the participants had anxiety symptoms. The participants lived with family members had lower SAS score (45.1 ± 9.8 vs 49.6 ± 11.8). Social support was negatively associated with anxiety, mediated by positive coping and negative coping partially significantly with an effect size of - 0.183. CONCLUSIONS: Chinese medical staff had a high level of anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Coping styles had effects on the association between social support and anxiety. Sufficient social support and training on positive coping skills may reduce anxiety in medical staff.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Medical Staff/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Support , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(20): 10874-10878, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-914963

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to survey medical staff's acceptance of online Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) during the Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia (NCP), and to know some information of physical and emotional response of those medical staff who worked at the forefront of COVID-19, through the playback amount of the online MBSR training. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Considering the working environment of medical staff in forefront of NCP, we designed and recorded MBSR audio album including 13 sessions, covering 24 hours of a day, then sent the album to medical staff who had been working in Wuhan, Hubei province, China. We collected the playback amount in each session on February 10th and February 24th, which were one week and three weeks after the album was finished. RESULTS: On February 10th and February 24th, there were separately 5778 and 10640 times of broadcasting. The highest broadcasting frequency session was at 5:00 am, followed by 7:00 am. The least broadcasting frequency sessions were 17:00 pm and 19:00 pm. The broadcasting amount in the 6 periods of the night (from 21:00 pm to 7:00 am) was significantly higher than those in the daytime (from 9:00 am to 19:00 pm), with a statistical difference. The tendency of the amount of playback was consistent, which was not affected by the specific content of the mindfulness exercises. CONCLUSIONS: Online MBSR exercises were well accepted by medical staff in the COVID-19. It may help them relax and reduce the risk of stress reactions. During the NCP, medical staff may have different degrees of sleep and emotional problems, which need to be paid more attention to.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Medical Staff/psychology , Mindfulness/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological/therapy , COVID-19 , China , Female , Humans , Internet-Based Intervention , Male , Pandemics , Social Media , Treatment Outcome
16.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 58(228): 550-553, 2020 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-793482

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 is a pandemic disease first detected in Wuhan, China on last December 2019. Many doctors and nurses, were infected and lost their life by COVID-19 around the world. Therefore COVID-19 brought unbearable psychological pressure on doctors, and nurses. The objective of this study is to find the prevalence of anxiety among medical doctors and nurses. METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study of 101 doctors and nurses carried out in a tertiary care center. Convenience sampling was done with the study period from April to May 2020. Ethical approval was taken from the institutional review board of NAMS (IRB reference no. 1076). The collected data stored and analyzed with statistical software (SPSS version 26.0). Point estimate at 95% Confidence Interval was calculated along with frequency and proportion for binary data. RESULTS: Out of 101 participants prevalence of anxiety was found to be 74 (73.3%) (64.68-81.33 at 95% Confidence Interval). Among them, 9 (8.9%) of participants experienced sever types of generalized anxiety disorder, 23 (22.8%) moderate, and 42 (41.6%) mild type. Similarly, 18 (17.8%) and 10 (9.9%) of participants felt very difficult and extreme difficulty at the workplace and home respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The mental health of medical doctors and nurses is significantly affected during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hospital administration should conduct psychological preparedness training to the medical profession before posting on duty to provide quality health services to the patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Medical Staff/psychology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Affect Disord ; 278: 144-148, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-746020

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is well known that unexpected pandemic has led to an increase in mental health problems among a variety of populations. METHODS: In this study, an online non-probability sample survey was used to anonymously investigate the anxiety and depression symptoms among medical staff under the COVID-19 outbreak. The questionnaire included Perceived Stress Scale-10 (PSS-10), Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Scale (GAD-7) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Factors associated with anxiety and depression symptoms were estimated by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 1090 medical staff were investigated in this study. The estimated self-reported rates of anxiety symptoms, depression symptoms and both of the two were 13.3%, 18.4% and 23.9% respectively. Factors associated with self-reported anxiety symptoms include married status (OR=2.3, 95%CI: 1.2, 4.4), not living alone (OR=0.4, 95%CI: 0.2, 0.7), never confiding their troubles to others (OR=2.2, 95%CI: 1.4, 3.5) and higher stress (OR=14.4, 95%CI: 7.8, 26.4). Factors associated with self-reported depression symptoms include not living alone (OR=0.4, 95%CI: 0.3, 0.7), sometimes/often getting care from neighbours (OR=0.6, 95%CI: 0.4, 0.9), never confiding their troubles to others (OR=2.0, 95%CI: 1.3, 3.0) and higher stress (OR=9.7, 95%CI: 6.2, 15.2). LIMITATIONS: The study was a non-probability sample survey. Besides, scales used in this study can only identify mental health states. CONCLUSIONS: Under outbreak of COVID-19, self-reported rates of anxiety symptoms and depression symptoms were high in investigated medical staff. Psychological interventions for those at high risk with common mental problems should be integrated into the work plan to fight against the epidemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Medical Staff/psychology , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Prevalence
19.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 620-626, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745323

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the insomnia status and relevant factors for the medical staff in the medical aid team for Hubei Province during the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019. METHODS: A convenient sampling survey was conducted among 1 056 medical staff in the national medical team of Hubei Province by using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and the Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy (RES). RESULTS: The incidence from moderate to severe insomnia was 35.14%, and the total self-efficacy of emotion regulation was 3.60±0.91. Univariate analysis showed that the incidence of insomnia in female medical workers in Hubei Province was higher than that of male medical workers, which was increased with the elongation of work time and frequency. In addition, insomnia was associated with age, perceived ambient exposure and infection, and RES scores. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the occurrence of insomnia was mainly related to gender, perceived peripheral exposure, infection, and RES scores. CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia is very common among medical workers in Hubei Province during the COVID-19 epidemic. Insomnia is related to the medical work status, the gender and their own emotional management and regulation in the epidemic area.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Medical Staff/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Emotional Regulation , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
20.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 633-640, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the psychological status of medical staff in the epidemic period of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and to analyze its influential factors. METHODS: A total of 373 medical staff from Xiangya Hospital and the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University were enrolled for this study. The General Sociological Data Questionnaire, Symptom Check-List 90 (SCL-90), and self-designed public opinion response questionnaire were used to assess general sociological data, mental health scores, and ability to respond to COVID-19 related public opinion information of medical staff. The mental health scores of medical staff with different general sociological data and public opinion information coping abilities were compared. Influential factors of mental health were analyzed. RESULTS: The average score of 10 factors in SCL-90 of 373 medical staff was less than 2 points. 14.21% medical staff had one or more factor scores more than two points, including 11.26% with terror symptoms, 7.77% with compulsive symptoms, and 5.63% with anxiety. The main sources of COVID-19 information for medical staff included WeChat, microblog, Jinri toutiao, TV and radio. 66.22% medical staff regularly verified information about COVID-19 through official websites or formal channels. A great deal of COVID-19 information in WeChat could make medical staff nervous (34.05%), anxious (30.29%), and insecure (29.22%). 68.63% medical staff sometimes were worried about getting infected because they knew information about COVID-19. Different departments of medical staff, getting cough or having a fever recently, and the degree of fear of infection had an impact on the SCL-90 score of medical staff, the differences were all statistically significant (all P<0.05). Stepwise regression analysis showed that the impact of COVID-19 information on their life in WeChat, getting cough or having a fever recently, insomnia-early caused by COVID-19 information in WeChat, different departments, and the degree of fear of infection COVID-19 were the influential factors for the mental health of medical staff (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the epidemic of COVID-19, medical staff suffered from psychological problems to various degrees. It is necessary to establish a psychological assistance platform and guide the direction of public opinion correctly to promote the mental health of medical staff.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Status , Medical Staff/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Compulsive Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fear , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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