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1.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e929454, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) broke out in China. This study was to investigate the situation of mental health status among medical staff following COVID-19. MATERIAL AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted through structured questionnaires to collect the demographical information of the participating medical staff via WeChat following COVID-19 crisis. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), impact of events scale revised (IES-R), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scale were used to evaluate depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and sleep quality, respectively. 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. RESULTS A total of 597 medical staff's information was included for the statistical analysis, and found 45.23% of subjects had PTSD symptoms, the mean PSQI score was 6.320±3.587. The results of multivariable analysis implied that medical workers who did not participate in the Hubei aid program (ß=4.128; 95% CI, 0.983-7.272; P=0.010) and PTSD symptoms (ß=7.212; 95% CI, 4.807-9.616; P<0.001) were associated with a higher tendency to depression. The PSQI score was linearly related to the CES-D score (ß=1.125; 95% CI, 0.804-1.445; P<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that medical workers who did not participate in the Hubei aid program, no traumatic experience before COVID-19 outbreaks, and PTSD symptoms may affect the tendency to depression in females, but not in males. PSQI score was linearly related to the CES-D score both in males and females. CONCLUSIONS The medical staff with PTSD symptoms and higher PSQI score may have a higher tendency to depression following COVID-19 outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Medical Staff , Sleep Wake Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/psychology , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e25945, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269619

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms and the associated risk factors among first-line medical staff in Wuhan during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic.From March 5 to 15, 2020, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Hamilton Depression scale were used to investigate the anxiety and depression status of medical staff in Wuhan Cabin Hospital (a Hospital). Two hundred seventy-six questionnaires were received from 96 doctors and 180 nurses, including 79 males and 197 females.During the COVID-19 epidemic, the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression was 27.9% and 18.1%, respectively, among 276 front-line medical staff in Wuhan. The prevalence rate of anxiety and depression among doctors was 19.8% and 11.5%, respectively, and the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression among nurses was 32.2% and 21.7%, respectively. Females recorded higher total scores for anxiety and depression than males, and nurses recorded higher scores for anxiety and depression than doctors.During the COVID-19 epidemic, some first-line medical staff experienced mental health problems such as depression and anxiety. Nurses were more prone to anxiety and depression than doctors. Effective strategies toward to improving the mental health should be provided to first-line medical staff, especially female medical staff and nurses.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Medical Staff/psychology , Mobile Health Units/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Fear , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Workload/psychology
3.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 42(6): 103090, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242863

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Currently we are faced with countless patients with prolonged invasive mechanical ventilation as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, with the consequent increase in the need for tracheostomies and the risks that this includes for both patients and staff. OBJECTIVE: It is necessary to establish a safety protocol for the performance of percutaneous tracheostomies in order to reduce the associated infections. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 77 patients underwent tracheostomies between March 2020 and March 2021, evaluating the safety of the protocol and the rate of contagion among the staff. RESULTS: Percutaneous tracheostomy was performed according to the protocol in 72 patients, 5 were excluded due to unfavorable anatomy or other reasons. There were no cases of SARS COVID-19 contagion among health personnel attributable to the procedure during the three-week follow-up period. There were no surgical complications in this series. CONCLUSION: The authors recommend implementing security protocols such as the one discussed in this work, given its low contagion rate and ease of implementation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Tracheostomy/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Risk , Safety , Time Factors , Tracheostomy/methods
4.
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci ; 272(1): 81-93, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233260

ABSTRACT

Facing with COVID-19 epidemic such a catastrophic health emergency, the mental health status of medical staff deserves attention. We conducted a two-stage of psychological status monitoring after the end of the assistance and 14 days of isolation, further targeted the vulnerable groups in need of intervention. The study is a cross-sectional survey on 1156 Yunnan medical staff aid to Hubei. Used Cluster sampling method to collect data at 2 time points (at the end of returning from Wuhan and the 14th day of isolation), from March 18, 2020 to April 6, 2020. Female and nurse had higher rates of depressive symptoms than male and doctors and other occupations. The proportion of female with mild and above moderate anxiety levels (22.91%, 2.61%) was higher than male (17.35%, 1.03%) (p < 0.05). Female had a better impaired sleep quality (45.06%, 17.49%) more than male (28.57%, 7.94%). Medical staff supported in Wuhan and with junior professional titles reported a higher proportion of sleep quality impairment. At the 14th isolation day stage, the proportion of nurses changed from depression to health (9.15%) and from health to depression (6.1%) better than doctors. The front-line medical staffs had suffered greater psychological pressure in the treatment process of major public health emergency. Researches on the dynamic monitor for the change of psychological status after aiding epidemic areas were still in relatively blank stage. Targeting the vulnerable characteristics of aiding medical staff is significant for effective psychological intervention and sustainable operation of health system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Medical Staff , Mental Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Epidemics/prevention & control , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/psychology , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
5.
Inquiry ; 58: 46958021997344, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1097070

ABSTRACT

There are few studies on the psychological status of medical staff during the COVID-19 outbreak. Our study addresses whether lack of communication affects the psychological status of medical team members supporting Wuhan during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. We used general symptom index (GSI) scores of the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) to evaluate participants' psychological status. We adopted a stratified sampling method and selected the fourth team, with a total of 137 members, as participants. In total 76.6% and 69.7% of female and male participants, respectively, had bachelor's degrees; 41.6% and 21.2% of female and male participants, respectively, were unmarried. Regarding communication, 14.29% and 6.06% of female and male participants, respectively, reported a lack of communication with the team (LCWT). Additionally, 13.0% and 6.1% of female and male participants, respectively, experienced fear of being infected (FoBI). LCWT and FoBI were positively correlated with GSI score (estimated change = 0.2, 95% CI [0.1-0.3]). When adjusted for gender, age, and FoBI, LCWT was positively correlated with GSI score (P < .05). Increasing communication among medical team members can reduce GSI scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Interprofessional Relations , Medical Staff/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Self Report , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Int J Med Sci ; 18(6): 1492-1501, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1089157

ABSTRACT

Objectives: As of 11 Feb 2020, a total of 1,716 medical staff infected with laboratory-confirmed the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2) in China had been reported. The predominant cause of the infection among medical staff remains unclear. We sought to explore the epidemiological, clinical characteristics and prognosis of infected medical staff. Methods: Medical staff who infected with SARS-Cov-2 and admitted to Union Hospital, Wuhan between 16 Jan to 25 Feb, 2020 were included in this single-centered, retrospective study. Data were compared by occupation and analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: A total of 101 medical staff (32 males and 69 females; median age: 33) were included in this study and 74.3% were nurses. A small proportion of the cohort had contact with specimens (3%) as well as patients infected with SARS-Cov-2 in fever clinics (15%) and isolation wards (3%). 80% of medical staff showed abnormal IL-6 levels and 33% had lymphocytopenia. Chest CT mainly manifested as bilateral (62%), septal/subpleural (77%) and groundglass opacities (48%). The major differences between doctors and nurses manifested in laboratory indicators. As of the last observed date, no patient was transferred to intensive care unit or died. Fever (HR=0.57; 95% CI 0.36-0.90) and IL-6 levels greater than 2.9 pg/ml (HR=0.50; 95% CI 0.30-0.86) were unfavorable factors for discharge. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that the infection of medical staff mainly occurred at the early stages of SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in Wuhan, and only a small proportion of infection had an exact mode. Meanwhile, medical staff infected with COVID-19 have relatively milder symptoms and favorable clinical course than ordinary patients, which may be partly due to their medical expertise, younger age and less underlying diseases. The potential risk factors of fever and IL-6 levels greater than 2.9 pg/ml could help to identify medical staff with poor prognosis at an early stage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
8.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 20(1): 1007, 2020 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050445

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 has been a pandemic around the world, which affirmatively brought mental health problems to medical staff. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of anxiety in Chinese medical staff and examine the mediation effects of coping styles on the relationship between social support and anxiety. METHODS: A cross-sectional study via internet survey was conducted from 15 March to 30 March, 2020. The social demographic data, Self-rated Anxiety Scale, Social Support Rate Scale and Trait Coping Style Scale were collected. Pearson correlation and a structural equation model were performed to examine the relationships of these variables. The bootstrap analysis was conducted to evaluate the mediation effects. RESULTS: A total of 453 medical staff participated in this study. The mean score of SAS was 46.1 (SD = 10.4). Up to 40.8% of the participants had anxiety symptoms. The participants lived with family members had lower SAS score (45.1 ± 9.8 vs 49.6 ± 11.8). Social support was negatively associated with anxiety, mediated by positive coping and negative coping partially significantly with an effect size of - 0.183. CONCLUSIONS: Chinese medical staff had a high level of anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Coping styles had effects on the association between social support and anxiety. Sufficient social support and training on positive coping skills may reduce anxiety in medical staff.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Medical Staff/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Support , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
9.
J Infect ; 81(4): 621-624, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-801950

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Care homes have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and continue to suffer large outbreaks even when community infection rates are declining, thus representing important pockets of transmission. We assessed occupational risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection among staff in six care homes experiencing a COVID-19 outbreak during the peak of the pandemic in London, England. METHODS: Care home staff were tested for SARS-COV-2 infection by RT-PCR and asked to report any symptoms, their contact with residents and if they worked in different care homes. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was performed on RT-PCR positive samples. RESULTS: In total, 53 (21%) of 254 staff were SARS-CoV-2 positive but only 12/53 (23%) were symptomatic. Among staff working in a single care home, SARS-CoV-2 positivity was 15% (2/13), 16% (7/45) and 18% (30/169) in those reporting no, occasional and regular contact with residents. In contrast, staff working across different care homes (14/27, 52%) had a 3.0-fold (95% CI, 1.9-4.8; P<0.001) higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 positivity than staff working in single care homes (39/227, 17%). WGS identified SARS-CoV-2 clusters involving staff only, including some that included staff working across different care homes. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 positivity was significantly higher among staff working across different care homes than those who were working in the same care home. We found local clusters of SARS-CoV-2 infection between staff only, including those with minimal resident contact. Infection control should be extended for all contact, including those between staff, whilst on care home premises.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Homes for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , England/epidemiology , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Infection Control/methods , London/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Whole Genome Sequencing
10.
Zhejiang Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 49(4): 474-479, 2020 Aug 25.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-801477

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the psychological and behavior status of minor children of medical staff in Hubei province during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted through WeChat from March 13 to 15, 2020, which included a general data questionnaire and Conners parental assessment questionnaire (PSQ). The questionnaires received from outside of Hubei province were excluded through IP address, and the questionnaires with answer time <150 s were also excluded. The influence of parental work status on the psychological behavior was analyzed in children of different age groups. RESULTS: A total of 391 valid questionnaires were collected, there were 207 males (52.9%) and 184 females (47.1%); 91 (23.3%) aged 3 to 6, 183 (46.8%) aged 6 to 10, and 117 (29.9%) aged 10 to 16. Both parents were medical staff in 87 participants(22.3%), one parent was medical staff in 139(35.5%) participants, and no parents were medical staff in 165 (42.2%) participants. In 3-<6 years group, there was no significant difference in the PSQ scores of the children in each factor level (all P>0.05) between children with parents as medical staff and those without. In 6-<10 years group, children with both parents as medical staff had higher hyperactivity-impulse factor score, learning problem factor score and total score than those without parents as medical staff (all P<0.05), while they had higher learning problem factor score than those with one parent as medical staff (P<0.05); the anxiety score of children with one or both parents as medical staff was higher than that of those without parents as medical staff (all P<0.05). In 10 to 16 years group, the behavior problems, learning problems, hyperactivity-impulse, more dynamic index and the total score in children with one parent as medical staff were lower than those with both parents as medical staff or without parents as medical staff (P<0.05 or P<0.01); while there were no significant differences in psychosomatic problems, anxiety factor scores between children with one parent as medical staff and other two groups (all P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: s During COVID-19 epidemic period, the psychological and behavior status of minor children of Hubei medical staff with different ages shows differences with those without parents as medical staff, particularly in 6-<10 years and 10 to 16 year groups. It is necessary to pay attention to the psychological and behavioral status of children of medical staff in these age groups.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Medical Staff , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
J Affect Disord ; 278: 144-148, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-746020

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is well known that unexpected pandemic has led to an increase in mental health problems among a variety of populations. METHODS: In this study, an online non-probability sample survey was used to anonymously investigate the anxiety and depression symptoms among medical staff under the COVID-19 outbreak. The questionnaire included Perceived Stress Scale-10 (PSS-10), Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Scale (GAD-7) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Factors associated with anxiety and depression symptoms were estimated by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 1090 medical staff were investigated in this study. The estimated self-reported rates of anxiety symptoms, depression symptoms and both of the two were 13.3%, 18.4% and 23.9% respectively. Factors associated with self-reported anxiety symptoms include married status (OR=2.3, 95%CI: 1.2, 4.4), not living alone (OR=0.4, 95%CI: 0.2, 0.7), never confiding their troubles to others (OR=2.2, 95%CI: 1.4, 3.5) and higher stress (OR=14.4, 95%CI: 7.8, 26.4). Factors associated with self-reported depression symptoms include not living alone (OR=0.4, 95%CI: 0.3, 0.7), sometimes/often getting care from neighbours (OR=0.6, 95%CI: 0.4, 0.9), never confiding their troubles to others (OR=2.0, 95%CI: 1.3, 3.0) and higher stress (OR=9.7, 95%CI: 6.2, 15.2). LIMITATIONS: The study was a non-probability sample survey. Besides, scales used in this study can only identify mental health states. CONCLUSIONS: Under outbreak of COVID-19, self-reported rates of anxiety symptoms and depression symptoms were high in investigated medical staff. Psychological interventions for those at high risk with common mental problems should be integrated into the work plan to fight against the epidemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Medical Staff/psychology , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Prevalence
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(14)2020 07 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638414

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The ongoing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV-2 pandemic has expanded globally. The aim of the current study is to investigate the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of health care professionals in Greece towards SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: From 10-25 February 2020, 500 health care workers were approached. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards SARS-CoV-2 were assessed via a personal interview questionnaire. For knowledge, each correct answer was given 1 point; attitudes, or concerns aimed at prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and practices, or behaviors towards performing preventive practices, were assigned 1 point each. Points were summed and a score for each category was calculated. RESULTS: A total of 461 health care workers returned the questionnaire and were included in the analysis (mean age ± SD: 44.2 ± 10.78 years, 74% females). The majority were nurses (47.5%), followed by physicians (30.5%) and paramedics (19%). The majority of subjects (88.28%) had a good level of knowledge (knowledge score equal to 4, or more). The majority of participants (71%) agreed with the temporary traveling restrictions ban. The uptake of a future vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 was estimated at 43%. Knowledge score was significantly associated with both attitudes score (p = 0.011) and practices score (p < 0.001), indicating that subjects with a high knowledge score demonstrated a more positive perception on preventive measures and would practice more preventive measures. Attitudes score was significantly associated with practices score (p = 0.009) indicating that subjects with a higher attitudes score are more likely to perform practices towards the prevention of SARS-CoV-2 transmission. CONCLUSION: There is a high level of knowledge concerning SARS-CoV-2 pandemic among Greek health care workers and this is significantly associated with positive attitudes and practices towards preventive health measures. The high level of knowledge of health professionals about SARS-CoV-2 may have contributed considerably to the successful management of the pandemic in Greece. Tailored educational campaigns aiming to increase the proportion of health care workers willing to accept a potential SARS-CoV-2 vaccine could be of paramount importance in future proactive vaccine educational campaigns.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Greece , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/psychology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Viral Vaccines
14.
Int J Infect Dis ; 98: 390-397, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-623744

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: In 2019, a small HAdV55-associated outbreak of adenovirus infection occurred among the intensive care unit (ICU) staff in Xiangya Hospital of Central South University in Hunan Province, China, during the treatment of a patient. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the characteristics of a nosocomial adenovirus outbreak in an ICU. METHODS: We evaluated all the patients treated and the medical staff working in the ICU from August 1 to September 4, 2019. We further performed an epidemiological and molecular analysis for this outbreak from patient to healthcare workers and between healthcare workers. After the outbreak, we adopted exposure prevention and droplet prevention measures based on standard precautions. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Between August 1 and August 27, 2019, 27 cases of human adenovirus cross-infection were reported in our institution. Among the cases, eleven were doctors (41%), eleven were nurses (41%), three were respiratory therapists (11%), and two were caregivers (7%). The attack rate was 28.4%, and the fatality rate was 0. The results showed that contact with the index case, lack of hand hygiene or gloving adherence were risk factors for infection after adenovirus exposure. After taking specific precautions, no new cases of infection have appeared since August 27. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that HAdV55 in a single patient had strong transmission potential in an intensive care unit with adequate facilities and standardized operation. We provide convincing evidence indicating that attention could be highlighted on the role of standard and specific precautions for controlling the spread of adenovirus in ICUs.


Subject(s)
Adenovirus Infections, Human/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Adenovirus Infections, Human/prevention & control , Adenovirus Infections, Human/virology , Adenoviruses, Human/classification , Adenoviruses, Human/genetics , Adenoviruses, Human/isolation & purification , Adenoviruses, Human/physiology , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross Infection/virology , Female , Hand Hygiene , Hospitals, Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Phylogeny , Tertiary Healthcare/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
15.
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol ; 258(10): 2271-2274, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-609513

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate the risk of transmission of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) after exposure to a COVID-19+ physician in a retina clinic. METHODS: A retrospective observational study. Records of 142 patients and 11 staff members from a single retina clinic that were exposed to a COVID-19+ ophthalmologist were reviewed. All 153 individuals were placed in quarantine for 14 days. They were contacted after the quarantine period to inquire about symptoms consistent with COVID-19, and the results of diagnostic test for SARS-CoV-2 when performed. RESULTS: All patients (n = 142) were contacted successfully. The mean age was 72.8 ± 13.6 years; 54.2% (n = 77) were females. Twenty-three patients (16.2%) were exposed during an ophthalmic exam, 111 (78.2%) during intraocular injection, 4 (2.8%) underwent exam and injection, 3 (2.1%) underwent surgery, and one patient (0.7%) had laser photocoagulation. Half of the patients (50%; n = 71) were in contact with the COVID-19+ physician while he was symptomatic. Forty-four patients (31%) wore a mask on the day of their visit. 11.3% (n = 16) of the patients, and all involved staff had been tested for the virus and all were negative. One patient (0.7%) reported transient cough and sore throat, and the remaining 141 (99.3%) patients and 11 (100%) staff did not develop symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Low risk for SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the ophthalmic setting was observed when universal safety measures such as social distancing, meticulous hand hygiene, enlarged breath shields, and mask wear during procedures were taken.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/statistics & numerical data , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Contact Tracing , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Quarantine , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Protective Devices , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
17.
Eur Heart J Acute Cardiovasc Care ; 9(3): 241-247, 2020 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-133576

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented challenge for society. Supporting the mental health of medical staff and affiliated healthcare workers (staff) is a critical part of the public health response. This paper details the effects on staff and addresses some of the organisational, team and individual considerations for supporting staff (pragmatically) during this pandemic. Leaders at all levels of health care organisations will find this a valuable resource.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Medical Staff/psychology , Mental Health/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , COVID-19 , Communication , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Crisis Intervention/organization & administration , Critical Care/psychology , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Empowerment , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humanism , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Interpersonal Relations , Leadership , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute/psychology
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