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1.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(51)2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573990

ABSTRACT

The positive impact of meditation on human well-being is well documented, yet its molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. We applied a comprehensive systems biology approach starting with whole-blood gene expression profiling combined with multilevel bioinformatic analyses to characterize the coexpression, transcriptional, and protein-protein interaction networks to identify a meditation-specific core network after an advanced 8-d Inner Engineering retreat program. We found the response to oxidative stress, detoxification, and cell cycle regulation pathways were down-regulated after meditation. Strikingly, 220 genes directly associated with immune response, including 68 genes related to interferon signaling, were up-regulated, with no significant expression changes in the inflammatory genes. This robust meditation-specific immune response network is significantly dysregulated in multiple sclerosis and severe COVID-19 patients. The work provides a foundation for understanding the effect of meditation and suggests that meditation as a behavioral intervention can voluntarily and nonpharmacologically improve the immune response for treating various conditions associated with excessive or persistent inflammation with a dampened immune system profile.


Subject(s)
Immune System/metabolism , Meditation , Transcriptome , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Diet, Vegan , Female , Genome, Human , Humans , Male , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/metabolism , Protein Interaction Maps
2.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 36(1): 46-51, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517925

ABSTRACT

The study aims to test the effect of mindfulness breathing meditation on psychological well-being among nurses working for COVID-19 patients. A total of 50 nurses (25 each in the intervention and control groups) were included in the study. We found significant differences between the preintervention and postintervention mean scores of both groups, based on the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale Indonesian version.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Meditation , Mindfulness , Nurses , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/therapy
3.
J Holist Nurs ; 39(4): 312-313, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505823
4.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0256323, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502055

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has led to a mental health crisis on a global scale. Epidemiological studies have reported a drastic increase in mental health problems, such as depression and anxiety, increased loneliness and feelings of disconnectedness from others, while resilience levels have been negatively affected, indicating an urgent need for intervention. The current study is embedded within the larger CovSocial project which sought to evaluate longitudinal changes in vulnerability, resilience and social cohesion during the pandemic. The current second phase will investigate the efficacy of brief online mental training interventions in reducing mental health problems, and enhancing psychological resilience and social capacities. It further provides a unique opportunity for the prediction of intervention effects by individual biopsychosocial characteristics and preceding longitudinal change patterns during the pandemic in 2020/21. METHODS: We will examine the differential effects of a socio-emotional (including 'Affect Dyad') and a mindfulness-based (including 'Breathing Meditation') intervention, delivered through a web- and cellphone application. Participants will undergo 10 weeks of intervention, and will be compared to a retest control group. The effectiveness of the interventions will be evaluated in a community sample (N = 300), which is recruited from the original longitudinal CovSocial sample. The pre- to post-intervention changes, potential underlying mechanisms, and prediction thereof, will be assessed on a wide range of outcomes: levels of stress, loneliness, depression and anxiety, resilience, prosocial behavior, empathy, compassion, and the impact on neuroendocrine, immunological and epigenetic markers. The multi-method nature of the study will incorporate self-report questionnaires, behavioral tasks, ecological momentary assessment (EMA) approaches, and biological, hormonal and epigenetic markers assessed in saliva. DISCUSSION: Results will reveal the differential effectiveness of two brief online interventions in improving mental health outcomes, as well as enhancing social capacities and resilience. The present study will serve as a first step for future application of scalable, low-cost interventions at a broader level to reduce stress and loneliness, improve mental health and build resilience and social capacities in the face of global stressors. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial has been registered on May 17, 2020 with the ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04889508 registration number (clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04889508).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Internet-Based Intervention , Mindfulness , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Depression/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Meditation , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Behavior , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480759

ABSTRACT

Stress and lack of quality sleep affect a large portion of the population around the globe, and the COVID-19 pandemic has genuinely brought attention to these problems. This study aimed to investigate whether using a virtual heart-based meditation program is associated with improved stress levels and quality of sleep among participants from the general population during the COVID-19 pandemic. We recruited 63 participants to receive an 8-week virtually conducted Heartfulness meditation program in a prospective pre-post single-arm intervention study from September 28 to November 22 2020. Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores were collected at baseline, at 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. Of the 63 participants enrolled in the study, 36 (57%) completed an 8-week Heartfulness meditation program. There was a significant decrease in PSS (mean difference of 6.68 with 95% C.I. 4.89-8.47, p < 0.0001) and in PSQI (mean difference of 2.05 with 95% C.I. 1.03-3.07, p < 0.0001) between week zero and week eight, regardless of Health Care Professional status. The qualitative thematic analysis strongly supported the survey results. A significant reduction in perceived stress score and improvement in sleep quality index was noted at the end of a virtual Heartfulness meditation program. Moreover, Heartfulness meditation practice may help cultivate the quality of empathy, acceptance, and individual peace. We conclude that the effects of virtually accessible Heartfulness meditation practice need to be explored further in larger studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Meditation , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
6.
BMC Psychol ; 9(1): 116, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1342827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are hundreds of mindfulness-based interventions in the form of structured and unstructured therapies, trainings, and meditation programs, mostly utilized in a clinical rather than a well-being perspective. The number of empirical studies on positive potentials of mindfulness is comparatively less, and their known status in academia is ambiguous. Hence, the current paper aimed to review the studies where mindfulness-based interventions had integrated positive psychology variables, in order to produce positive functioning. METHODS: Data were obtained from the databases of PubMed, Scopus, and PsycNet and manual search in Google Scholar. From the 3831 articles, irrelevant or inaccessible studies were eliminated, reducing the number of final articles chosen for review to 21. Interventions that contribute to enhancement of eudaimonia, hedonia, and other positive variables are discussed. RESULTS: Findings include the potential positive qualities of MBIs in producing specific positive outcomes within limited circumstances, and ascendancy of hedonia and other positive variables over eudaimonic enhancement. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, exigency of modifications in the existing MBIs to bring about exclusively positive outcomes was identified, and observed the necessity of novel interventions for eudaimonic enhancement and elevation of hedonia in a comprehensive manner.


Subject(s)
Meditation , Mindfulness , Empirical Research , Humans , Mammography , Psychology, Positive
7.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) ; 61(6): 703-708, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Student pharmacists and faculty exhibit high levels of stress, independent of the current coronavirus 2019 pandemic, and their path toward wellness, including a reduction in stress and anxiety, is of the utmost importance. Yoga and meditation are proven interventions to reduce stress and anxiety and increase wellness. Yin yoga is an adaptable, quiet practice ideal for those lacking previous yoga experience, flexibility, and time. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a 6-week yin yoga and meditation intervention on College of Pharmacy faculty and students' stress perception, anxiety levels, and mindfulness skills. METHODS: Faculty and students participated in a 6-week pilot program comprising a once-weekly yin yoga class followed by guided meditation. Yin yoga was selected for its quiet meditative style. Participants completed a pre- and postquestionnaire at 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months to evaluate potential changes in perceived stress scores, anxiety scores, and mindfulness skills. The questionnaire was composed of 3 self-reporting tools: Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Perceived Stress Scale, and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire. RESULTS: Twenty participants, 12 students and 8 faculty (ages 18-66 years), completed the study. Anxiety and stress scores decreased, and mindfulness increased at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months, with all changes reaching statistical significance. No participants reported being in the "high" category of anxiety after intervention using BAI categorical data, although this finding was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Faculty and students demonstrated a reduction in stress and anxiety levels and an increase in mindfulness after a 6-week yin yoga and meditation program. Outcomes suggest that inclusion of an adaptable, meditative practice, which may easily be replicated at home, for as little as once per week for 6 weeks may reduce stress and anxiety and increase mindfulness long term. Creating a culture of wellness should be a priority for all Colleges of Pharmacy.


Subject(s)
Meditation , Mindfulness , Yoga , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Faculty, Pharmacy , Humans , Middle Aged , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Students , Young Adult
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374408

ABSTRACT

Realist evaluation offers a valuable way to understand how interventions function and thus how they can be improved and locally adapted. Consequently, realist evaluation is increasingly conducted in parallel with intervention trials. It comprises a clear philosophical foundation and view of causality, pragmatic mixed data collection methods, and a theory-driven approach in which hypothesised program theories are tested and refined. However, detailed methods for data analysis are seldom well-described in realist studies and no clear method for analysing and presenting realist evaluation data has yet emerged. In this methodological paper we use the worked example of our realist process evaluation of the SAGE yoga trial to illustrate an applied process of data analysis and presentation of findings. We show how we drew on other realist studies for ideas, provide examples of six key tasks involved in conducting a realist process evaluation (including coding data and structuring results) and describe strategies that did not work and our rationale for rejecting them. This detailed account of the decisions and methods that worked for us is intended to provide a practical and informed point of departure for researchers conducting a realist evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Meditation , Yoga , Humans , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 35(5): 257-263, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361815

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) epidemic is associated with impaired sleep quality in nurses for several reasons. The present study aimed to determine the effect of an online mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program on improving the sleep quality of nurses working in the COVID-19 care units. In this randomized controlled clinical trial study, all nurses in the 2 COVID-19 patient care units were randomly assigned to the control and intervention groups. The MBSR program was implemented online for 7 weeks for the intervention group by a trainer. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was completed online by the participants in both groups before and after the intervention. The results of the data analysis indicated that the intervention improved the scores of subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, and sleep efficiency in the intervention group. In the control group, there was a significant increase in the scores of subjective sleep quality, daily performance, and the total index score in the posttest. Besides, there was a significant difference between the 2 groups in only 2 components of sleep latency and subjective sleep quality. The MBSR program can be an effective intervention to improve the sleep quality of nurses working in COVID-19 intensive care units who are at risk of sleep quality disorders in stressful situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Internet-Based Intervention , Mindfulness , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Program Evaluation , Sleep , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adult , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Meditation , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Latency
10.
Psychosom Med ; 83(6): 497-502, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313928

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: We are at a difficult time in history with societal increases in stress, loneliness, and psychopathology, along with high rates of obesity, sedentary lifestyles, and chronic pain. Mindfulness interventions offer promise to address these societal issues. However, in order to make best use of the opportunities revealed by our current challenges, we must: (1) tackle these issues head-on with inclusive, innovative, and creative experimental designs and interventions, and (2) collectively adhere to rigorous, high quality methods so as to provide an evidence-based integration of mindfulness interventions into mainstream medicine and public health.We find there are several areas for which important advances are happening, including sampling socially diverse populations, examining mechanisms of action, pain management, and health behaviors. Furthermore, rigorous methods, including measurement, causal inference from control groups, delivery and scalability of mindfulness interventions, and effect modifiers to determine who mindfulness programs work best for are also gaining traction. This special issue on Mindfulness: Biobehavioral Mechanisms and Health Outcomes attends to many of these issues, several of which are highlighted in this editorial perspective.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Meditation , Mindfulness , Humans , Pain Management , Pandemics
12.
Work ; 69(2): 331-349, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 and its associated measures has resulted in a sizeable working population transitioning to working from home (WFH), bringing additional challenges, and increasing work-related stress. Research has indicated that yoga has promising potential in reducing stress in the workplace. However, there are very few studies exploring the impact of online streamed yoga on stress management for people-WFH. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility and outcome of an online streamed yoga intervention on stress and wellbeing of people-WFH during COVID-19. METHODS: A six-week pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) yoga intervention was designed with yoga (n = 26) and a wait-list control group (n = 26). A mixed two-way ANOVA was used to assess changes in standardised outcome measures at baseline and post-intervention. Likert and open-ended questions assessed enjoyment, acceptability and perceived benefits of the program, which were analysed thematically. RESULTS: Compared with the control, the yoga group reported significant improvements in perceived stress, mental wellbeing, depression and coping self-efficacy, but not stress and anxiety. Participants experienced physical and mental health benefits and reported high acceptability and enjoyment of the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: An online yoga intervention can help people WFH manage stress and enhance wellbeing and coping abilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Meditation , Yoga , Feasibility Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 20: 15347354211019111, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243783

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The acceptability of videoconferencing delivery of yoga interventions in the advanced cancer setting is relatively unexplored. The current report summarizes the challenges and solutions of the transition from an in-person (ie, face-to-face) to a videoconference intervention delivery approach in response to the Coronavirus Disease pandemic. METHOD: Participants included patient-family caregiver dyads who were enrolled in ongoing yoga trials and 2 certified yoga therapists who delivered the yoga sessions. We summarized their experiences using recordings of the yoga sessions and interventionists' progress notes. RESULTS: Out of 7 dyads participating in the parent trial, 1 declined the videoconferenced sessions. Participants were between the ages of 55 and 76 and mostly non-Hispanic White (83%). Patients were mainly male (83%), all had stage III or IV cancer and were undergoing radiotherapy. Caregivers were all female. Despite challenges in the areas of technology, location, and setting, instruction and personal connection, the overall acceptability was high among patients, caregivers, and instructors. Through this transition process, solutions to these challenges were found, which are described here. CONCLUSION: Although in-person interventions are favored by both the study participants and the interventionists, videoconference sessions were deemed acceptable. All participants had the benefit of a previous in-person experience, which was helpful and perhaps necessary for older and advanced cancer patients requiring practice modifications. In a remote setting, the assistance of caregivers seems particularly beneficial to ensure practice safety. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT03948100; NCT02481349.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers , Neoplasms/therapy , Videoconferencing , Yoga , Adult , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Meditation/methods , Meditation/psychology , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Perception , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Treatment Outcome , Yoga/psychology
15.
J Complement Integr Med ; 18(3): 637-640, 2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219500

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Covid-19 Pandemic has affected everyone's mental health. In addition to several preventive measures such as wearing a mask, using sanitizer, measures also need to be taken to prevent anxiety and depressive disorders due to this unexpected crisis situation. Practicing yoga is one of the simple, scientific methods to combat stress and prevent anxiety among children. METHODS: The scientific evidence and anecdotal experiences on benefits of yoga is described in this paper, highlighting the importance of yoga in nurturing the mental well-being in children. RESULTS: Scientifically designed and conducted studies as part of the research programs by health professionals objectively conclude that mental health parameters improve significantly with yoga as an intervention. In addition to mental health, yoga will also improve the physical health and boost immunity among children which will also help in reducing the infection rate in children. CONCLUSIONS: As a way forward, authors strongly recommend establishing yoga as a curriculum at scale to cover the vast vulnerable population of young children who are the future of the nation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Meditation , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Mental Health , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Yoga , Adolescent , Adolescent Health , Anxiety , Anxiety Disorders , Child , Child Health , Depression , Depressive Disorder , Humans , Mental Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology
16.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 71: 76-81, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219479

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Use of virtual reality (VR) in healthcare has expanded in recent years. The challenges faced by patients with prolonged COVID-19-related hospitalizations - social isolation, disability, neurologic sequelae, adjustment-related anxiety, depression, and stress - may be mitigated by the novel use of VR as one modality of a comprehensive rehabilitation plan. This descriptive study aimed to understand patient satisfaction and perceived benefit of virtual reality on a COVID-19 recovery unit, as well as the logistical and operational feasibility of providing VR content for patients and staff. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the COVID-19 surge in New York City in 2020, the COVID-19 Recovery Unit (CRU) of a large academic hospital invited patients and staff to participate in VR sessions with three categories of experience: (1) Guided meditation, (2) Exploration of natural environments, (3) Cognitive stimulation games. Patients and staff were surveyed about satisfaction and perceived benefit. RESULTS: 13 patients and 11 staff were surveyed, with median patient satisfaction scores of 9 out of 10, with ten representing "extremely satisfied," and median staff satisfaction scores of 10. 13/13 patients answered "yes" to recommending the therapy to others, and 12/13 answered "yes" to perceived enhancement of their treatment. 11/11 staff answered "yes" to recommending the therapy to others, and 11/11 answered "yes" to perceived enhancement of their wellbeing. DISCUSSION: A VR program implemented on a COVID-19 rehabilitation unit for patients and healthcare providers was rated as highly satisfactory with perceived benefit by survey respondents. Participants commented that the use of VR was useful in coping with isolation and loneliness, and could be implemented within the context of clinical care for COVID-19 patients as part of a comprehensive rehabilitation model. The use of VR was also logistically and operationally feasible on the CRU. Future work to compare benefits of VR to standard neuropsychological rehabilitation is needed.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Depression/psychology , Patient Satisfaction , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Virtual Reality , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Feasibility Studies , Hospital Units , Hospitalization , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital , Meditation , Nature , New York City , Nursing Staff, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Video Games
17.
Obstet Gynecol ; 137(6): 1032-1040, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217911

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a consumer-based mobile meditation application (app) on wellness in outpatient obstetric and gynecology patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial at a university outpatient clinic of obstetric and gynecology patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Women were randomly assigned to the intervention group, who was prescribed a mobile meditation app for 30 days, or the control group, which received standard care. The primary outcome was self-reported perceived stress. Secondary outcomes included self-reported depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and satisfaction with the meditation app. A sample size of 80 participants (40 per group) was calculated to achieve 84% power to detect a 3-point difference in the primary outcome. RESULTS: From April to May 2020, 101 women were randomized in the study-50 in the meditation app group and 51 in the control group. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Most characteristics were similar between groups. Perceived stress was significantly less in the intervention group at days 14 and 30 (mean difference 4.27, 95% CI 1.30-7.24, P=.005, d=0.69 and mean difference 4.28, 95% CI 1.68-6.88, P=.002, d=0.69, respectively). Self-reported depression and anxiety were significantly less in the intervention group at days 14 and 30 (depression: P=.002 and P=.04; anxiety: P=.01, and P=.04, respectively). Sleep disturbance was significantly less in the intervention group at days 14 and 30 (P=.001 and P=.02, respectively). More than 80% of those in the intervention group reported high satisfaction with the meditation app, and 93% reported that mindfulness meditation improved their stress. CONCLUSION: Outpatient obstetric and gynecology patients who used the prescribed consumer-based mobile meditation app during the COVID-19 pandemic had significant reductions in perceived stress, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance compared with standard care. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04329533.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Pregnancy/psychology , Prenatal Care/methods , Primary Health Care/methods , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Gynecology , Humans , Meditation/psychology , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Obstetrics , Pandemics
18.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 9(5): e26037, 2021 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rural and urban differences in health outcomes and behaviors have been well-documented, with significant rural health disparities frequently highlighted. Mobile health (mHealth) apps, such as meditation apps, are a novel method for improving health and behaviors. These apps may be a critical health promotion strategy during the COVID-19 pandemic and could potentially be used to address rural health disparities. However, limited research has assessed whether meditation app health outcomes are associated with rural and urban residence, and it is unclear whether disparities in health and behaviors between rural and urban populations would persist among meditation app users. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to explore associations between rural or urban status, psychological outcomes, and physical activity among users of a mobile meditation app. We further aimed to explore associations between rural or urban status and perceived effects of COVID-19 on stress, mental health, and physical activity, and to explore changes in these outcomes in rural versus urban app users over time. METHODS: This study was a secondary analysis of a national survey conducted among subscribers to the meditation app Calm. Eligible participants completed online baseline surveys from April to June 2020, and follow-up surveys from June to September 2020, assessing demographics, psychological outcomes, physical activity, and perceived effects of COVID-19 on stress, mental health, and physical activity. RESULTS: Participants (N=8392) were mostly female (7041/8392, 83.9%), non-Hispanic (7855/8392, 93.6%), and White (7704/8392, 91.8%); had high socioeconomic status (income ≥US $100,000: 4389/8392, 52.3%; bachelor's degree or higher: 7251/8392, 86.4%); and resided in a metropolitan area core (rural-urban commuting area code 1: 7192/8392, 85.7%). Rural or urban status was not associated with baseline stress, depression, anxiety, pre-COVID-19 and current physical activity, or perceived effects of COVID-19 on stress, mental health, and physical activity. Repeated-measures models showed overall decreases in depression, anxiety, and perceived effects of COVID-19 on physical activity from baseline to follow-up, and no significant changes in stress or perceived effects of COVID-19 on stress and mental health over time. Models also showed no significant main effects of rural or urban status, COVID-19 statewide prevalence at baseline, or change in COVID-19 statewide prevalence. CONCLUSIONS: We did not find associations between rural or urban status and psychological outcomes (ie, stress, depression, and anxiety), physical activity, or perceived effects of COVID-19 on stress, mental health, and physical activity. Rural or urban status does not appear to drive differences in outcomes among meditation app users, and the use of mHealth apps should continue to be explored as a health promotion strategy in both rural and urban populations. Furthermore, our results did not show negative cumulative effects of COVID-19 on psychological outcomes and physical activity among app users in our sample, the majority of whom were urban, White, female, and of high socioeconomic status. Further research is needed to investigate meditation app use as a health promotion strategy in rural and urban populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Meditation , Mobile Applications , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
J Altern Complement Med ; 27(8): 706-709, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174858

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The authors explored the feasibility of virtual yoga-based breathwork and meditation among health care workers (HCW) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Consented employees of a large cancer center accessed a video of breathwork called "Simha Kriya" to be practiced for 4 weeks. Results: Of 217 participants who expressed interest within 2 weeks, 90 were recruited to the study in 1 month and 100 in 2 months. Of 69 participants who provided data between weeks 1 and 4, 77% perceived the intervention as useful. Conclusions: Yoga-based breathing practices were feasible and acceptable among HCW in the setting of a pandemic. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT04482647.


Subject(s)
Breathing Exercises , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Meditation/methods , Yoga , Adult , Aged , Cancer Care Facilities , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Texas , Video Recording
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(5)2021 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1129699

ABSTRACT

(1) Background. This research examined the feasibility, acceptability and outcomes of delivering a 6-week yoga-based meditation intervention to clinical teams of hospice professionals (HPs) at a large non-profit hospice organization. The intervention was designed to increase mind-body integration and combat burnout. This article was written for different audiences, including research scientists who study interoception, burnout, meditation, or yoga, designers of meditation interventions, and hospice organizations looking for ways to mitigate HP burnout. (2) Methods. The intervention was launched within clinical teams, beginning with a half-hour online introduction to the program and exposure to the week 1 meditation at each team's monthly all-staff meeting. Throughout the program, HPs could access the meditations on their own via their workplace computers, tablets, and smartphones. Online pre- and post-intervention surveys were submitted by 151 HPs, 76 of whom were exposed to the intervention and completed both surveys. The surveys assessed burnout using the Professional Fulfillment Index and mind-body integration using the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness scales. (3) Results. Two-thirds of HPs who were present at a staff meeting where the program was introduced went on to do a meditation on their own at least once. Half of HPs expressed a desire to continue with access to the meditations after the 6-week program ended. Due to COVID-19 work from home restrictions, three-fourth of HPs did a meditation at home, 29% in a car between patient visits (not while driving), and 23% at the office. Higher interoceptive awareness was significantly related to lower burnout, particularly lower work exhaustion. Meditation frequency was significantly related to higher interoceptive awareness but not to burnout. Interpersonal disengagement was rare and temporary. (4) Conclusions. Findings showed that the yoga-based meditation intervention was feasible and acceptable and associated with higher interoceptive awareness. The results point to a role for interoceptive awareness in reducing the risk for burnout.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospices , Meditation , Yoga , Feasibility Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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