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1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 47, 2022 Jan 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622215

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2 has become the most threatening issue to all populations around the world. It is, directly and indirectly, affecting all of us and thus, is an emerging topic dealt in global health. To avoid the infection, various studies have been done and are still ongoing. COVID-19 cases are reported all over the globe, and among the millions of cases, genetic similarity may be seen. The genetical common features seen within confirmed cases may help outline the tendency of infection and degree severity of the disease. Here, we reviewed multiple papers on SNPs related to SARS-CoV-2 infection and analyzed their results. METHODS: The PubMed databases were searched for papers discussing SNPs associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection and severity. Clinical studies with human patients and statistically showing the relevance of the SNP with virus infection were included. Quality Assessment of all papers was done with Newcastle Ottawa Scale. RESULTS: In the analysis, 21 full-text literature out of 2956 screened titles and abstracts, including 63,496 cases, were included. All were human-based clinical studies, some based on certain regions gathered patient data and some based on big databases obtained online. ACE2, TMPRSS2, and IFITM3 are the genes mentioned most frequently that are related to SARS-CoV-2 infection. 20 out of 21 studies mentioned one or more of those genes. The relevant genes according to SNPs were also analyzed. rs12252-C, rs143936283, rs2285666, rs41303171, and rs35803318 are the SNPs that were mentioned at least twice in two different studies. CONCLUSIONS: We found that ACE2, TMPRSS2, and IFITM3 are the major genes that are involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection. The mentioned SNPs were all related to one or more of the above-mentioned genes. There were discussions on certain SNPs that increased the infection and severity to certain groups more than the others. However, as there is limited follow-up and data due to a shortage of time history of the disease, studies may be limited.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Population Health , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , RNA-Binding Proteins , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics
2.
Int J Mol Med ; 49(2)2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594678

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19) is mainly dependent on the underlying mechanisms that mediate the entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) into the host cells of the various human tissues/organs. Recent studies have indicated a higher order of complexity of the mechanisms of infectivity, given that there is a wide­repertoire of possible cell entry mediators that appear to co­localise in a cell­ and tissue­specific manner. The present study provides an overview of the 'canonical' SARS­CoV­2 mediators, namely angiotensin converting enzyme 2, transmembrane protease serine 2 and 4, and neuropilin­1, expanding on the involvement of novel candidates, including glucose­regulated protein 78, basigin, kidney injury molecule­1, metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2, ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (also termed tumour necrosis factor­α convertase) and Toll­like receptor 4. Furthermore, emerging data indicate that changes in microRNA (miRNA/miR) expression levels in patients with COVID­19 are suggestive of further complexity in the regulation of these viral mediators. An in silico analysis revealed 160 candidate miRNAs with potential strong binding capacity in the aforementioned genes. Future studies should concentrate on elucidating the association between the cellular tropism of the SARS­CoV­2 cell entry mediators and the mechanisms through which they might affect the clinical outcome. Finally, the clinical utility as a biomarker or therapeutic target of miRNAs in the context of COVID­19 warrants further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , /metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Viral Tropism
3.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597185

ABSTRACT

Beta-3 adrenergic receptor activation via exercise or CL316,243 (CL) induces white adipose tissue (WAT) browning, improves glucose tolerance, and reduces visceral adiposity. Our aim was to determine if sex or adipose tissue depot differences exist in response to CL. Daily CL injections were administered to diet-induced obese male and female mice for two weeks, creating four groups: male control, male CL, female control, and female CL. These groups were compared to determine the main and interaction effects of sex (S), CL treatment (T), and WAT depot (D). Glucose tolerance, body composition, and energy intake and expenditure were assessed, along with perigonadal (PGAT) and subcutaneous (SQAT) WAT gene and protein expression. CL consistently improved glucose tolerance and body composition. Female PGAT had greater protein expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), while SQAT (S, p < 0.001) was more responsive to CL in increasing UCP1 (S×T, p = 0.011) and the mitochondrial biogenesis induction protein, PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) (S×T, p = 0.026). Females also displayed greater mitochondrial OXPHOS (S, p < 0.05) and adiponectin protein content (S, p < 0.05). On the other hand, male SQAT was more responsive to CL in increasing protein levels of PGC1α (S×T, p = 0.046) and adiponectin (S, p < 0.05). In both depots and in both sexes, CL significantly increased estrogen receptor beta (ERß) and glucose-related protein 75 (GRP75) protein content (T, p < 0.05). Thus, CL improves systemic and adipose tissue-specific metabolism in both sexes; however, sex differences exist in the WAT-specific effects of CL. Furthermore, across sexes and depots, CL affects estrogen signaling by upregulating ERß.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue, Brown/metabolism , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , PPAR gamma/genetics , Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Coactivator 1-alpha/genetics , Uncoupling Protein 1/genetics , Adipose Tissue/metabolism , Adipose Tissue, Brown/growth & development , Adipose Tissue, White/metabolism , Animals , Body Composition/genetics , Dioxoles/pharmacology , Energy Metabolism/genetics , Estrogen Receptor beta/genetics , Estrogens/genetics , Estrogens/metabolism , Female , Glucose Tolerance Test , Humans , Male , Mice , Mitochondria/genetics , Mitochondria/metabolism , Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-3/genetics , Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-3/metabolism , Sex Characteristics
5.
Immunity ; 54(11): 2632-2649.e6, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549842

ABSTRACT

The incidence and severity of sepsis is higher among individuals of African versus European ancestry. We found that genetic risk variants (RVs) in the trypanolytic factor apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1), present only in individuals of African ancestry, were associated with increased sepsis incidence and severity. Serum APOL1 levels correlated with sepsis and COVID-19 severity, and single-cell sequencing in human kidneys revealed high expression of APOL1 in endothelial cells. Analysis of mice with endothelial-specific expression of RV APOL1 and in vitro studies demonstrated that RV APOL1 interfered with mitophagy, leading to cytosolic release of mitochondrial DNA and activation of the inflammasome (NLRP3) and the cytosolic nucleotide sensing pathways (STING). Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of NLRP3 and STING protected mice from RV APOL1-induced permeability defects and proinflammatory endothelial changes in sepsis. Our studies identify the inflammasome and STING pathways as potential targets to reduce APOL1-associated health disparities in sepsis and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Apolipoprotein L1/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Sepsis/genetics , Animals , Apolipoprotein L1/blood , COVID-19/pathology , DNA, Mitochondrial/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/pathology , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Mitophagy/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Risk Factors , Sepsis/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , /statistics & numerical data
6.
Hum Mol Genet ; 29(6): 955-966, 2020 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455300

ABSTRACT

γ-secretase is a macromolecular complex that catalyzes intramembranous hydrolysis of more than 100 membrane-bound substrates. The complex is composed of presenilin (PS1 or PS2), anterior pharynx defect-1 (APH-1), nicastrin (NCT) and PEN-2 and early-onset; autosomal dominant forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by inheritance of mutations of PS. No mutations in genes encoding NCT, or PEN-2 have been identified to date that cause AD. In this regard, a large genetic meta-analysis of four cohorts consisting of more than 600 000 individuals identified a common missense variant, rs117618017 in the APH1B gene that results in a T27I mutation, as a novel genome-wide significant locus. In order to confirm the findings that rs117618017 is associated with risk of AD, we performed a genetic screen from deep whole genome sequencing of the large NIMH family-based Alzheimer's Disease (AD) dataset. In parallel, we sought to uncover potential molecular mechanism(s) by which APH-1B T27I might be associated with AD by generating stable HEK293 cell lines, wherein endogenous APH-1A and APH-1B expression was silenced and into which either the wild type APH-1B or the APH-1B T27I variant was stably expressed. We then tested the impact of expressing either the wild type APH-1B or the APH-1B T27I variant on γ-secretase processing of human APP, the murine Notch derivative mNΔE and human neuregulin-1. We now report that we fail to confirm the association of rs1047552 with AD in our cohort and that cells expressing the APH-1B T27I variant show no discernable impact on the γ-secretase processing of established substrates compared with cells expressing wild-type APH-1B.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/metabolism , Endopeptidases/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Alzheimer Disease/genetics , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mutation , Protein Binding
7.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4918, 2021 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397870

ABSTRACT

Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) are highly unstable and susceptible to rearrangement due to their repetitive nature and active transcriptional status. Sequestration of rDNA in the nucleolus suppresses uncontrolled recombination. However, broken repeats must be first released to the nucleoplasm to allow repair by homologous recombination. Nucleolar release of broken rDNA repeats is conserved from yeast to humans, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently unknown. Here we show that DNA damage induces phosphorylation of the CLIP-cohibin complex, releasing membrane-tethered rDNA from the nucleolus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Downstream of phosphorylation, SUMOylation of CLIP-cohibin is recognized by Ufd1 via its SUMO-interacting motif, which targets the complex for disassembly through the Cdc48/p97 chaperone. Consistent with a conserved mechanism, UFD1L depletion in human cells impairs rDNA release. The dynamic and regulated assembly and disassembly of the rDNA-tethering complex is therefore a key determinant of nucleolar rDNA release and genome integrity.


Subject(s)
Cell Nucleolus/genetics , DNA Repair , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/genetics , Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier Proteins/genetics , Valosin Containing Protein/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cell Nucleolus/metabolism , DNA Damage , DNA, Ribosomal/metabolism , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mutation , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Phosphorylation , Protein Binding , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolism , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/metabolism , Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier Proteins/metabolism , Sumoylation , Two-Hybrid System Techniques , Valosin Containing Protein/metabolism
8.
EMBO J ; 40(3): e106501, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389834

ABSTRACT

Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) restrict infections by many viruses, but a subset of IFITMs enhance infections by specific coronaviruses through currently unknown mechanisms. We show that SARS-CoV-2 Spike-pseudotyped virus and genuine SARS-CoV-2 infections are generally restricted by human and mouse IFITM1, IFITM2, and IFITM3, using gain- and loss-of-function approaches. Mechanistically, SARS-CoV-2 restriction occurred independently of IFITM3 S-palmitoylation, indicating a restrictive capacity distinct from reported inhibition of other viruses. In contrast, the IFITM3 amphipathic helix and its amphipathic properties were required for virus restriction. Mutation of residues within the IFITM3 endocytosis-promoting YxxФ motif converted human IFITM3 into an enhancer of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and cell-to-cell fusion assays confirmed the ability of endocytic mutants to enhance Spike-mediated fusion with the plasma membrane. Overexpression of TMPRSS2, which increases plasma membrane fusion versus endosome fusion of SARS-CoV-2, attenuated IFITM3 restriction and converted amphipathic helix mutants into infection enhancers. In sum, we uncover new pro- and anti-viral mechanisms of IFITM3, with clear distinctions drawn between enhancement of viral infection at the plasma membrane and amphipathicity-based mechanisms used for endosomal SARS-CoV-2 restriction.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Differentiation/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Mice , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases , Virus Internalization
9.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4584, 2021 07 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387354

ABSTRACT

Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs 1, 2 and 3) can restrict viral pathogens, but pro- and anti-viral activities have been reported for coronaviruses. Here, we show that artificial overexpression of IFITMs blocks SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, endogenous IFITM expression supports efficient infection of SARS-CoV-2 in human lung cells. Our results indicate that the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein interacts with IFITMs and hijacks them for efficient viral infection. IFITM proteins were expressed and further induced by interferons in human lung, gut, heart and brain cells. IFITM-derived peptides and targeting antibodies inhibit SARS-CoV-2 entry and replication in human lung cells, cardiomyocytes and gut organoids. Our results show that IFITM proteins are cofactors for efficient SARS-CoV-2 infection of human cell types representing in vivo targets for viral transmission, dissemination and pathogenesis and are potential targets for therapeutic approaches.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Antigens, Differentiation/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Amino Acid Sequence , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antigens, Differentiation/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Interferon-beta/pharmacology , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Attachment/drug effects
11.
J Biol Chem ; 295(36): 12686-12696, 2020 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387615

ABSTRACT

Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a group of enzymes participating in diverse biological processes. Some members of the TTSP family are implicated in viral infection. TMPRSS11A is a TTSP expressed on the surface of airway epithelial cells, which has been shown to cleave and activate spike proteins of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronaviruses (CoVs). In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying the activation cleavage of TMPRSS11A that converts the one-chain zymogen to a two-chain enzyme. By expression in human embryonic kidney 293, esophageal EC9706, and lung epithelial A549 and 16HBE cells, Western blotting, and site-directed mutagenesis, we found that the activation cleavage of human TMPRSS11A was mediated by autocatalysis. Moreover, we found that TMPRSS11A activation cleavage occurred before the protein reached the cell surface, as indicated by studies with trypsin digestion to remove cell surface proteins, treatment with cell organelle-disturbing agents to block intracellular protein trafficking, and analysis of a soluble form of TMPRSS11A without the transmembrane domain. We also showed that TMPRSS11A was able to cleave the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. These results reveal an intracellular autocleavage mechanism in TMPRSS11A zymogen activation, which differs from the extracellular zymogen activation reported in other TTSPs. These findings provide new insights into the diverse mechanisms in regulating TTSP activation.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Proteolysis , Serine Proteases/metabolism , A549 Cells , Cells, Cultured , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Membrane Proteins/chemistry , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Mutation , Protein Domains , Protein Transport , Respiratory Mucosa/cytology , Serine Proteases/chemistry , Serine Proteases/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Trypsin/metabolism
12.
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol ; 65(3): 300-308, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381187

ABSTRACT

Endothelial dysfunction is implicated in the thrombotic events reported in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19), but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. Circulating levels of the coagulation cascade activator PAI-1 are substantially higher in patients with COVID-19 with severe respiratory dysfunction than in patients with bacterial sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Indeed, the elevation of PAI-1 is recognized as an early marker of endothelial dysfunction. Here, we report that the rSARS-CoV-2-S1 (recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 [SARS-CoV-2] viral envelope spike) glycoprotein stimulated robust production of PAI-1 by human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). We examined the role of protein degradation in this SARS-CoV-2-S1 induction of PAI-1 and found that the proteasomal degradation inhibitor bortezomib inhibited SARS-CoV-2-S1-mediated changes in PAI-1. Our data further show that bortezomib upregulated KLF2, a shear-stress-regulated transcription factor that suppresses PAI-1 expression. Aging and metabolic disorders are known to increase mortality and morbidity in patients with COVID-19. We therefore examined the role of ZMPSTE24 (zinc metallopeptidase STE24), a metalloprotease with a demonstrated role in host defense against RNA viruses that is decreased in older individuals and in metabolic syndrome, in the induction of PAI-1 in HPMECs by SARS-CoV-2-S1. Indeed, overexpression of ZMPSTE24 blunted enhancement of PAI-1 production in spike protein-exposed HPMECs. In addition, we found that membrane expression of the SARS-CoV-2 entry receptor ACE2 was reduced by ZMPSTE24-mediated cleavage and shedding of the ACE2 ectodomain, leading to accumulation of ACE2 decoy fragments that may bind SARS-CoV-2. These data indicate that decreases in ZMPSTE24 with age and comorbidities may increase vulnerability to vascular endothelial injury by SARS-CoV-2 viruses and that enhanced production of endothelial PAI-1 might play role in prothrombotic events in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Metalloendopeptidases/metabolism , Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1/metabolism , Pulmonary Artery/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Aging , COVID-19/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/virology , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Metalloendopeptidases/genetics , Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1/genetics , Proteolysis , Pulmonary Artery/metabolism , Pulmonary Artery/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
13.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5376-5389, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363676

ABSTRACT

The suppression of types I and III interferon (IFN) responses by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) contributes to the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The strategy used by SARS-CoV-2 to evade antiviral immunity needs further investigation. Here, we reported that SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b inhibited types I and III IFN production by targeting multiple molecules of innate antiviral signaling pathways. SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b impaired the induction of types I and III IFNs by Sendai virus and poly (I:C). SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b inhibited the activation of types I and III IFNs induced by the components of cytosolic dsRNA-sensing pathways of RIG-I/MDA5-MAVS signaling, including RIG-I, MDA-5, MAVS, TBK1, and IKKε, rather than IRF3-5D, which is the active form of IRF3. SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b also suppressed the induction of types I and III IFNs by TRIF and STING, which are the adaptor protein of the endosome RNA-sensing pathway of TLR3-TRIF signaling and the adaptor protein of the cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway of cGAS-STING signaling, respectively. A mechanistic analysis revealed that the SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b protein interacted with RIG-I, MDA-5, MAVS, TRIF, STING, and TBK1 and impeded the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3. In addition, SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b facilitated the replication of the vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, the results showed that SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b negatively regulates antiviral immunity and thus facilitates viral replication. This study contributes to our understanding of the molecular mechanism through which SARS-CoV-2 impairs antiviral immunity and provides an essential clue to the pathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Immune Evasion/genetics , Interferons/immunology , Nucleotidyltransferases/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 3/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/immunology , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , I-kappa B Kinase/genetics , I-kappa B Kinase/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , Interferons/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/immunology , Nucleotidyltransferases/genetics , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Plasmids/chemistry , Plasmids/metabolism , /immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Transfection , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/immunology
14.
J Virol ; 95(14): e0011121, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358015

ABSTRACT

The current fears of a future influenza pandemic have resulted in an increased emphasis on the development and testing of novel therapeutic strategies against the virus. Fundamental to this is the ferret model of influenza infection, which is critical in examining pathogenesis and treatment. Nevertheless, a precise evaluation of the efficacy of any treatment strategy in ferrets is reliant on understanding the immune response in this model. Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) are interferon-stimulated proteins shown to be critically important in the host immune response against viral infections. These proteins confer intrinsic innate immunity to pH-dependent viruses such as influenza viruses and can inhibit cytosolic entry of such viruses to limit the severity of infection following interferon upregulation. Mutations in IFITM genes in humans have been identified as key risk factors for worsened disease progression, particularly in the case of avian influenza viruses such as H7N9. While the IFITM genes of humans and mice have been well characterized, no studies have been conducted to classify the IFITM locus and interferon-driven upregulation of IFITMs in ferrets. Here, we show the architecture of the ferret IFITM locus and its synteny to the IFITM locus of other mammalian and avian species. Furthermore, we show that ferret IFITM1, -2, and -3 are functionally responsive to both interferon-α (IFN-α) and influenza virus stimulation. Thus, we show that ferret IFITMs exhibit interferon-stimulated properties similar to those shown in other species, furthering our knowledge of the innate immune response in the ferret model of human influenza virus infections. IMPORTANCE IFITM proteins can prevent the entry of several pH-dependent viruses, including high-consequence viruses such as HIV, influenza viruses, and SARS-coronaviruses. Mutations in these genes have been associated with worsened disease outcomes with mutations in their IFITM genes, highlighting these genes as potential disease risk factors. Ferrets provide a valuable tool to model infectious diseases; however, there is a critical shortage of information regarding their interferon-stimulated genes. We identified the putative ferret IFITM genes and mapped their complete gene locus. Thus, our study fills a critical gap in knowledge and supports the further use of the ferret model to explore the importance of IFITMs in these important diseases.


Subject(s)
Ferrets , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Interferon-alpha/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Animals , Cell Line , Conserved Sequence , Disease Models, Animal , Ferrets/immunology , Ferrets/metabolism , Ferrets/virology , Humans , Models, Molecular , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/metabolism , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sequence Analysis, Protein , Up-Regulation
15.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 366, 2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351981

ABSTRACT

GFP fusion-based fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) has been widely employed for membrane protein expression screening. However, fused GFP itself may occasionally affect the expression and/or stability of the targeted membrane protein, leading to both false-positive and false-negative results in expression screening. Furthermore, GFP fusion technology is not well suited for some membrane proteins, depending on their membrane topology. Here, we developed an FSEC assay utilizing nanobody (Nb) technology, named FSEC-Nb, in which targeted membrane proteins are fused to a small peptide tag and recombinantly expressed. The whole-cell extracts are solubilized, mixed with anti-peptide Nb fused to GFP for FSEC analysis. FSEC-Nb enables the evaluation of the expression, monodispersity and thermostability of membrane proteins without the need for purification but does not require direct GFP fusion to targeted proteins. Our results show FSEC-Nb as a powerful tool for expression screening of membrane proteins for structural and functional studies.


Subject(s)
Chromatography, Gel , Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Nanotechnology , Peptides/metabolism , Single-Domain Antibodies/immunology , Animals , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Cysteine Loop Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Receptors/genetics , Cysteine Loop Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Receptors/immunology , Cysteine Loop Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Receptors/metabolism , Fish Proteins/genetics , Fish Proteins/immunology , Fish Proteins/metabolism , Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics , Green Fluorescent Proteins/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/immunology , Oryzias/genetics , Oryzias/metabolism , Peptides/genetics , Peptides/immunology , Protein Stability , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/immunology , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spectrometry, Fluorescence , Temperature , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/immunology , Viral Proteins/metabolism
16.
Nat Cell Biol ; 23(8): 846-858, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309445

ABSTRACT

The integral membrane protein ATG9A plays a key role in autophagy. It displays a broad intracellular distribution and is present in numerous compartments, including the plasma membrane (PM). The reasons for the distribution of ATG9A to the PM and its role at the PM are not understood. Here, we show that ATG9A organizes, in concert with IQGAP1, components of the ESCRT system and uncover cooperation between ATG9A, IQGAP1 and ESCRTs in protection from PM damage. ESCRTs and ATG9A phenocopied each other in protection against PM injury. ATG9A knockouts sensitized the PM to permeabilization by a broad spectrum of microbial and endogenous agents, including gasdermin, MLKL and the MLKL-like action of coronavirus ORF3a. Thus, ATG9A engages IQGAP1 and the ESCRT system to maintain PM integrity.


Subject(s)
Autophagy-Related Proteins/metabolism , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Vesicular Transport Proteins/metabolism , Autophagosomes/metabolism , Autophagy-Related Proteins/genetics , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , Immunoblotting , Immunoprecipitation , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Microscopy, Confocal , Protein Transport/physiology , Vesicular Transport Proteins/genetics
17.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jul 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304672

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular diseases have attracted our full attention not only because they are the main cause of mortality and morbidity in many countries but also because the therapy for and cure of these maladies are among the major challenges of the medicine in the 21st century [...].


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Animals , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Complement C3/genetics , Complement C3/metabolism , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Genetic Markers , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Models, Cardiovascular , Myosin Light Chains/genetics , Myosin Light Chains/metabolism , Risk Factors
18.
Bioengineered ; 12(1): 2836-2850, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297360

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin I-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), type II transmembrane serine protease 2 and 4 (TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4) are important receptors for SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this study, the full-length tree shrewACE2 gene was cloned and sequenced, and its biological information was analyzed. The expression levels of ACE2, TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 in various tissues or organs of the tree shrew were detected. The results showed that the full-length ACE2 gene in tree shrews was 2,786 bp, and its CDS was 2,418 bp, encoding 805 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis based on the CDS of ACE2 revealed that tree shrews were more similar to rabbits (85.93%) and humans (85.47%) but far from mice (82.81%) and rats (82.58%). In silico analysis according to the binding site of SARS-CoV-2 with the ACE2 receptor of different species predicted that tree shrews had potential SARS-CoV-2 infection possibility, which was similar to that of rabbits, cats and dogs but significantly higher than that of mice and rats. In addition, various tissues or organs of tree shrews expressed ACE2, TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4. Among them, the kidney most highly expressed ACE2, followed by the lung and liver. The esophagus, lung, liver, intestine and kidney had relatively high expression levels of TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4. In general, we reported for the first time the expression of ACE2, TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 in various tissues or organs in tree shrews. Our results revealed that tree shrews could be used as a potential animal model to study the mechanism underlying SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/etiology , Membrane Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Tupaiidae/genetics , Tupaiidae/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Bioengineering , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/genetics , Computational Biology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Male , Membrane Proteins/chemistry , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Phylogeny , Protein Structure, Tertiary , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Serine Endopeptidases/chemistry , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Structural Homology, Protein , Tissue Distribution , Tupaiidae/virology
19.
J Virol ; 95(14): e0011121, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287245

ABSTRACT

The current fears of a future influenza pandemic have resulted in an increased emphasis on the development and testing of novel therapeutic strategies against the virus. Fundamental to this is the ferret model of influenza infection, which is critical in examining pathogenesis and treatment. Nevertheless, a precise evaluation of the efficacy of any treatment strategy in ferrets is reliant on understanding the immune response in this model. Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) are interferon-stimulated proteins shown to be critically important in the host immune response against viral infections. These proteins confer intrinsic innate immunity to pH-dependent viruses such as influenza viruses and can inhibit cytosolic entry of such viruses to limit the severity of infection following interferon upregulation. Mutations in IFITM genes in humans have been identified as key risk factors for worsened disease progression, particularly in the case of avian influenza viruses such as H7N9. While the IFITM genes of humans and mice have been well characterized, no studies have been conducted to classify the IFITM locus and interferon-driven upregulation of IFITMs in ferrets. Here, we show the architecture of the ferret IFITM locus and its synteny to the IFITM locus of other mammalian and avian species. Furthermore, we show that ferret IFITM1, -2, and -3 are functionally responsive to both interferon-α (IFN-α) and influenza virus stimulation. Thus, we show that ferret IFITMs exhibit interferon-stimulated properties similar to those shown in other species, furthering our knowledge of the innate immune response in the ferret model of human influenza virus infections. IMPORTANCE IFITM proteins can prevent the entry of several pH-dependent viruses, including high-consequence viruses such as HIV, influenza viruses, and SARS-coronaviruses. Mutations in these genes have been associated with worsened disease outcomes with mutations in their IFITM genes, highlighting these genes as potential disease risk factors. Ferrets provide a valuable tool to model infectious diseases; however, there is a critical shortage of information regarding their interferon-stimulated genes. We identified the putative ferret IFITM genes and mapped their complete gene locus. Thus, our study fills a critical gap in knowledge and supports the further use of the ferret model to explore the importance of IFITMs in these important diseases.


Subject(s)
Ferrets , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Interferon-alpha/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Animals , Cell Line , Conserved Sequence , Disease Models, Animal , Ferrets/immunology , Ferrets/metabolism , Ferrets/virology , Humans , Models, Molecular , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/metabolism , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sequence Analysis, Protein , Up-Regulation
20.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287278

ABSTRACT

Host plasma membrane protein SERINC5 is incorporated into budding retrovirus particles where it blocks subsequent entry into susceptible target cells. Three structurally unrelated proteins encoded by diverse retroviruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef, equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) S2, and ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) GlycoGag, disrupt SERINC5 antiviral activity by redirecting SERINC5 from the site of virion assembly on the plasma membrane to an internal RAB7+ endosomal compartment. Pseudotyping retroviruses with particular glycoproteins, e.g., vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV G), renders the infectivity of particles resistant to inhibition by virion-associated SERINC5. To better understand viral determinants for SERINC5-sensitivity, the effect of SERINC5 was assessed using HIV-1, MLV, and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) virion cores, pseudotyped with glycoproteins from Arenavirus, Coronavirus, Filovirus, Rhabdovirus, Paramyxovirus, and Orthomyxovirus genera. SERINC5 restricted virions pseudotyped with glycoproteins from several retroviruses, an orthomyxovirus, a rhabdovirus, a paramyxovirus, and an arenavirus. Infectivity of particles pseudotyped with HIV-1, amphotropic-MLV (A-MLV), or influenza A virus (IAV) glycoproteins, was decreased by SERINC5, whether the core was provided by HIV-1, MLV, or M-PMV. In contrast, particles pseudotyped with glycoproteins from M-PMV, parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5), or rabies virus (RABV) were sensitive to SERINC5, but only with particular retroviral cores. Resistance to SERINC5 did not correlate with reduced SERINC5 incorporation into particles, route of viral entry, or absolute infectivity of the pseudotyped virions. These findings indicate that some non-retroviruses may be sensitive to SERINC5 and that, in addition to the viral glycoprotein, the retroviral core influences sensitivity to SERINC5.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins , Virion/metabolism , Viruses/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , HIV-1/metabolism , Humans , Leukemia Virus, Murine/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/immunology , Retroviridae/classification , Retroviridae/metabolism , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology , Virion/genetics , Virus Internalization , Viruses/chemistry , Viruses/classification , Viruses/genetics
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