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1.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(4): e1009500, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197396

ABSTRACT

The high transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 is related to abundant replication in the upper airways, which is not observed for the other highly pathogenic coronaviruses SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. We here reveal features of the coronavirus spike (S) protein, which optimize the virus towards the human respiratory tract. First, the S proteins exhibit an intrinsic temperature preference, corresponding with the temperature of the upper or lower airways. Pseudoviruses bearing the SARS-CoV-2 spike (SARS-2-S) were more infectious when produced at 33°C instead of 37°C, a property shared with the S protein of HCoV-229E, a common cold coronavirus. In contrast, the S proteins of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV favored 37°C, in accordance with virus preference for the lower airways. Next, SARS-2-S-driven entry was efficiently activated by not only TMPRSS2, but also the TMPRSS13 protease, thus broadening the cell tropism of SARS-CoV-2. Both proteases proved relevant in the context of authentic virus replication. TMPRSS13 appeared an effective spike activator for the virulent coronaviruses but not the low pathogenic HCoV-229E virus. Activation of SARS-2-S by these surface proteases requires processing of the S1/S2 cleavage loop, in which both the furin recognition motif and extended loop length proved critical. Conversely, entry of loop deletion mutants is significantly increased in cathepsin-rich cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the D614G mutation increases SARS-CoV-2 stability, particularly at 37°C, and, enhances its use of the cathepsin L pathway. This indicates a link between S protein stability and usage of this alternative route for virus entry. Since these spike properties may promote virus spread, they potentially explain why the spike-G614 variant has replaced the early D614 variant to become globally predominant. Collectively, our findings reveal adaptive mechanisms whereby the coronavirus spike protein is adjusted to match the temperature and protease conditions of the airways, to enhance virus transmission and pathology.


Subject(s)
/metabolism , Respiratory System/metabolism , Respiratory System/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , /transmission , Coronavirus 229E, Human/metabolism , Furin/metabolism , Humans , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Peptide Hydrolases/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Temperature , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication/physiology
2.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(7): 9160-9185, 2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143934

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In this study, we collected open access data to analyze the mechanisms associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that apoptosis-related pathways were enriched in the cells after SARS-CoV-2 infection, and the results of differential expression analysis showed that biological functions related to endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and lipid metabolism were disordered. TMBIM6 was identified as a potential target for SARS-CoV-2 in host cells through weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) of the time course of expression of host and viral proteins. The expression and related functions of TMBIM6 were subsequently analyzed to illuminate how viral proteins interfere with the physiological function of host cells. The potential function of viral proteins was further analyzed by GEne Network Inference with Ensemble of trees (GENIE3). This study identified TMBIM6 as a target protein associated with the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2, which might provide a novel therapeutic approach for COVID-19 in the future.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , A549 Cells , Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/genetics , Caco-2 Cells , Gene Regulatory Networks , Genomics , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps , Viral Proteins/genetics
3.
mBio ; 12(2)2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138303

ABSTRACT

An emerging class of cellular inhibitory proteins has been identified that targets viral glycoproteins. These include the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that, among other functions, downregulate cell surface proteins involved in adaptive immunity. The RING-CH domain of MARCH proteins is thought to function by catalyzing the ubiquitination of the cytoplasmic tails (CTs) of target proteins, leading to their degradation. MARCH proteins have recently been reported to target retroviral envelope glycoproteins (Env) and vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G). However, the mechanism of antiviral activity remains poorly defined. Here we show that MARCH8 antagonizes the full-length forms of HIV-1 Env, VSV-G, Ebola virus glycoprotein (EboV-GP), and the spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), thereby impairing the infectivity of virions pseudotyped with these viral glycoproteins. This MARCH8-mediated targeting of viral glycoproteins requires the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the RING-CH domain. We observe that MARCH8 protein antagonism of VSV-G is CT dependent. In contrast, MARCH8-mediated targeting of HIV-1 Env, EboV-GP, and SARS-CoV-2 S protein by MARCH8 does not require the CT, suggesting a novel mechanism of MARCH-mediated antagonism of these viral glycoproteins. Confocal microscopy data demonstrate that MARCH8 traps the viral glycoproteins in an intracellular compartment. We observe that the endogenous expression of MARCH8 in several relevant human cell types is rapidly inducible by type I interferon. These results help to inform the mechanism by which MARCH proteins exert their antiviral activity and provide insights into the role of cellular inhibitory factors in antagonizing the biogenesis, trafficking, and virion incorporation of viral glycoproteins.IMPORTANCE Viral envelope glycoproteins are an important structural component on the surfaces of enveloped viruses that direct virus binding and entry and also serve as targets for the host adaptive immune response. In this study, we investigate the mechanism of action of the MARCH family of cellular proteins that disrupt the trafficking and virion incorporation of viral glycoproteins across several virus families. This research provides novel insights into how host cell factors antagonize viral replication, perhaps opening new avenues for therapeutic intervention in the replication of a diverse group of highly pathogenic enveloped viruses.


Subject(s)
Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Cells, Cultured , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interferons/pharmacology , Intracellular Space/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Mutation , RNA Viruses/classification , RNA Viruses/metabolism , Species Specificity , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/chemistry , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Virion/metabolism , Virus Replication
4.
Viruses ; 13(3)2021 02 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122331

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) utilizes host proteases, including a plasma membrane-associated transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) to cleave and activate the virus spike protein to facilitate cellular entry. Although TMPRSS2 is a well-characterized type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP), the role of other TTSPs on the replication of SARS-CoV-2 remains to be elucidated. Here, we have screened 12 TTSPs using human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-expressing HEK293T (293T-ACE2) cells and Vero E6 cells and demonstrated that exogenous expression of TMPRSS11D and TMPRSS13 enhanced cellular uptake and subsequent replication of SARS-CoV-2. In addition, SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 share the same TTSPs in the viral entry process. Our study demonstrates the impact of host TTSPs on infection of SARS-CoV-2, which may have implications for cell and tissue tropism, for pathogenicity, and potentially for vaccine development.


Subject(s)
/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Serine Proteases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , /metabolism , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization
5.
J Virol ; 95(9)2021 04 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1075938

ABSTRACT

The cellular entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronaviruses types 1 and 2 (SARS-CoV-1 and -2) requires sequential protease processing of the viral spike glycoprotein. The presence of a polybasic cleavage site in SARS-CoV-2 spike at the S1/S2 boundary has been suggested to be a factor in the increased transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 compared to SARS-CoV-1 by facilitating maturation of the spike precursor by furin-like proteases in the producer cells rather than endosomal cathepsins in the target. We investigate the relevance of the polybasic cleavage site in the route of entry of SARS-CoV-2 and the consequences this has for sensitivity to interferons (IFNs) and, more specifically, the IFN-induced transmembrane (IFITM) protein family that inhibit entry of diverse enveloped viruses. We found that SARS-CoV-2 is restricted predominantly by IFITM2, rather than IFITM3, and the degree of this restriction is governed by route of viral entry. Importantly, removal of the cleavage site in the spike protein renders SARS-CoV-2 entry highly pH and cathepsin dependent in late endosomes, where, like SARS-CoV-1 spike, it is more sensitive to IFITM2 restriction. Furthermore, we found that potent inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 replication by type I but not type II IFNs is alleviated by targeted depletion of IFITM2 expression. We propose that the polybasic cleavage site allows SARS-CoV-2 to mediate viral entry in a pH-independent manner, in part to mitigate against IFITM-mediated restriction and promote replication and transmission. This suggests that therapeutic strategies that target furin-mediated cleavage of SARS-CoV-2 spike may reduce viral replication through the activity of type I IFNs.IMPORTANCE The furin cleavage site in the spike protein is a distinguishing feature of SARS-CoV-2 and has been proposed to be a determinant for the higher transmissibility between individuals, compared to SARS-CoV-1. One explanation for this is that it permits more efficient activation of fusion at or near the cell surface rather than requiring processing in the endosome of the target cell. Here, we show that SARS-CoV-2 is inhibited by antiviral membrane protein IFITM2 and that the sensitivity is exacerbated by deletion of the furin cleavage site, which restricts viral entry to low pH compartments. Furthermore, we find that IFITM2 is a significant effector of the antiviral activity of type I interferons against SARS-CoV-2 replication. We suggest that one role of the furin cleavage site is to reduce SARS-CoV-2 sensitivity to innate immune restriction, and thus, it may represent a potential therapeutic target for COVID-19 treatment development.


Subject(s)
Interferon Type I/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Proteolysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication , A549 Cells , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
6.
Cell ; 184(1): 120-132.e14, 2021 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064914

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has claimed the lives of over one million people worldwide. The causative agent, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a member of the Coronaviridae family of viruses that can cause respiratory infections of varying severity. The cellular host factors and pathways co-opted during SARS-CoV-2 and related coronavirus life cycles remain ill defined. To address this gap, we performed genome-scale CRISPR knockout screens during infection by SARS-CoV-2 and three seasonal coronaviruses (HCoV-OC43, HCoV-NL63, and HCoV-229E). These screens uncovered host factors and pathways with pan-coronavirus and virus-specific functional roles, including major dependency on glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) signaling, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis, as well as a requirement for several poorly characterized proteins. We identified an absolute requirement for the VMP1, TMEM41, and TMEM64 (VTT) domain-containing protein transmembrane protein 41B (TMEM41B) for infection by SARS-CoV-2 and three seasonal coronaviruses. This human coronavirus host factor compendium represents a rich resource to develop new therapeutic strategies for acute COVID-19 and potential future coronavirus pandemics.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study , /physiology , A549 Cells , Cell Line , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/physiology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/physiology , Gene Knockout Techniques , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/drug effects , Protein Interaction Mapping
8.
Cell ; 184(1): 133-148.e20, 2021 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-987228

ABSTRACT

Flaviviruses pose a constant threat to human health. These RNA viruses are transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes and ticks and regularly cause outbreaks. To identify host factors required for flavivirus infection, we performed full-genome loss of function CRISPR-Cas9 screens. Based on these results, we focused our efforts on characterizing the roles that TMEM41B and VMP1 play in the virus replication cycle. Our mechanistic studies on TMEM41B revealed that all members of the Flaviviridae family that we tested require TMEM41B. We tested 12 additional virus families and found that SARS-CoV-2 of the Coronaviridae also required TMEM41B for infection. Remarkably, single nucleotide polymorphisms present at nearly 20% in East Asian populations reduce flavivirus infection. Based on our mechanistic studies, we propose that TMEM41B is recruited to flavivirus RNA replication complexes to facilitate membrane curvature, which creates a protected environment for viral genome replication.


Subject(s)
Flavivirus Infections/genetics , Flavivirus/physiology , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Asian Continental Ancestry Group/genetics , Autophagy , /metabolism , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Cell Line , Flavivirus Infections/immunology , Flavivirus Infections/metabolism , Flavivirus Infections/virology , Gene Knockout Techniques , Genome-Wide Association Study , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Virus Replication , Yellow fever virus/physiology , Zika Virus/physiology
10.
J Proteome Res ; 19(11): 4455-4469, 2020 11 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889124

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 beta coronavirus is the etiological driver of COVID-19 disease, which is primarily characterized by shortness of breath, persistent dry cough, and fever. Because they transport oxygen, red blood cells (RBCs) may play a role in the severity of hypoxemia in COVID-19 patients. The present study combines state-of-the-art metabolomics, proteomics, and lipidomics approaches to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on RBCs from 23 healthy subjects and 29 molecularly diagnosed COVID-19 patients. RBCs from COVID-19 patients had increased levels of glycolytic intermediates, accompanied by oxidation and fragmentation of ankyrin, spectrin beta, and the N-terminal cytosolic domain of band 3 (AE1). Significantly altered lipid metabolism was also observed, in particular, short- and medium-chain saturated fatty acids, acyl-carnitines, and sphingolipids. Nonetheless, there were no alterations of clinical hematological parameters, such as RBC count, hematocrit, or mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, with only minor increases in mean corpuscular volume. Taken together, these results suggest a significant impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on RBC structural membrane homeostasis at the protein and lipid levels. Increases in RBC glycolytic metabolites are consistent with a theoretically improved capacity of hemoglobin to off-load oxygen as a function of allosteric modulation by high-energy phosphate compounds, perhaps to counteract COVID-19-induced hypoxia. Conversely, because the N-terminus of AE1 stabilizes deoxyhemoglobin and finely tunes oxygen off-loading and metabolic rewiring toward the hexose monophosphate shunt, RBCs from COVID-19 patients may be less capable of responding to environmental variations in hemoglobin oxygen saturation/oxidant stress when traveling from the lungs to peripheral capillaries and vice versa.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Erythrocytes , Membrane Lipids , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Erythrocytes/chemistry , Erythrocytes/cytology , Erythrocytes/pathology , Humans , Lipidomics , Membrane Lipids/analysis , Membrane Lipids/chemistry , Membrane Lipids/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/analysis , Membrane Proteins/chemistry , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Metabolome/physiology , Models, Molecular , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Proteome/analysis , Proteome/chemistry , Proteome/metabolism
11.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 319(4): L670-L674, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-798131

ABSTRACT

The severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is linked to an increasing number of risk factors, including exogenous (environmental) stimuli such as air pollution, nicotine, and cigarette smoke. These three factors increase the expression of angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a key receptor involved in the entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-the etiological agent of COVID-19-into respiratory tract epithelial cells. Patients with severe COVID-19 are managed with oxygen support, as are at-risk individuals with chronic lung disease. To date, no study has examined whether an increased fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) may affect the expression of SARS-CoV-2 entry receptors and co-receptors, including ACE2 and the transmembrane serine proteases TMPRSS1, TMPRSS2, and TMPRSS11D. To address this, steady-state mRNA levels for genes encoding these SARS-CoV-2 receptors were assessed in the lungs of mouse pups chronically exposed to elevated FiO2, and in the lungs of preterm-born human infants chronically managed with an elevated FiO2. These two scenarios served as models of chronic elevated FiO2 exposure. Additionally, SARS-CoV-2 receptor expression was assessed in primary human nasal, tracheal, esophageal, bronchial, and alveolar epithelial cells, as well as primary mouse alveolar type II cells exposed to elevated oxygen concentrations. While gene expression of ACE2 was unaffected, gene and protein expression of TMPRSS11D was consistently upregulated by exposure to an elevated FiO2. These data highlight the need for further studies that examine the relative contribution of the various viral co-receptors on the infection cycle, and point to oxygen supplementation as a potential risk factor for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Serine Proteases/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Animals , Betacoronavirus , Cells, Cultured , Female , Humans , Male , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Oxygen/analysis , Pandemics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Risk Factors , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Proteases/genetics , Severity of Illness Index
12.
J Biol Chem ; 295(36): 12686-12696, 2020 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-648454

ABSTRACT

Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a group of enzymes participating in diverse biological processes. Some members of the TTSP family are implicated in viral infection. TMPRSS11A is a TTSP expressed on the surface of airway epithelial cells, which has been shown to cleave and activate spike proteins of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronaviruses (CoVs). In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying the activation cleavage of TMPRSS11A that converts the one-chain zymogen to a two-chain enzyme. By expression in human embryonic kidney 293, esophageal EC9706, and lung epithelial A549 and 16HBE cells, Western blotting, and site-directed mutagenesis, we found that the activation cleavage of human TMPRSS11A was mediated by autocatalysis. Moreover, we found that TMPRSS11A activation cleavage occurred before the protein reached the cell surface, as indicated by studies with trypsin digestion to remove cell surface proteins, treatment with cell organelle-disturbing agents to block intracellular protein trafficking, and analysis of a soluble form of TMPRSS11A without the transmembrane domain. We also showed that TMPRSS11A was able to cleave the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. These results reveal an intracellular autocleavage mechanism in TMPRSS11A zymogen activation, which differs from the extracellular zymogen activation reported in other TTSPs. These findings provide new insights into the diverse mechanisms in regulating TTSP activation.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Proteolysis , Serine Proteases/metabolism , A549 Cells , Cells, Cultured , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Membrane Proteins/chemistry , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Mutation , Protein Domains , Protein Transport , Respiratory Mucosa/cytology , Serine Proteases/chemistry , Serine Proteases/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Trypsin/metabolism
13.
Protein Sci ; 29(10): 2038-2042, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725698

ABSTRACT

The Envelope protein (E) is one of the four structural proteins encoded by the genome of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 Coronaviruses. It is an integral membrane protein, highly expressed in the host cell, which is known to have an important role in Coronaviruses maturation, assembly and virulence. The E protein presents a PDZ-binding motif at its C-terminus. One of the key interactors of the E protein in the intracellular environment is the PDZ containing protein PALS1. This interaction is known to play a key role in the SARS-CoV pathology and suspected to affect the integrity of the lung epithelia. In this paper we measured and compared the affinity of peptides mimicking the E protein from SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 for the PDZ domain of PALS1, through equilibrium and kinetic binding experiments. Our results support the hypothesis that the increased virulence of SARS-CoV-2 compared to SARS-CoV may rely on the increased affinity of its Envelope protein for PALS1.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Nucleoside-Phosphate Kinase/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/metabolism , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Binding Sites , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Membrane Proteins/chemistry , Models, Molecular , Nucleoside-Phosphate Kinase/chemistry , PDZ Domains , Pandemics , Peptides/chemistry , Peptides/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Binding , SARS Virus/chemistry , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Viral Envelope Proteins/chemistry
14.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 1567-1579, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-707709

ABSTRACT

Diverse SARS-like coronaviruses (SL-CoVs) have been identified from bats and other animal species. Like SARS-CoV, some bat SL-CoVs, such as WIV1, also use angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) from human and bat as entry receptor. However, whether these viruses can also use the ACE2 of other animal species as their receptor remains to be determined. We report herein that WIV1 has a broader tropism to ACE2 orthologs than SARS-CoV isolate Tor2. Among the 9 ACE2 orthologs examined, human ACE2 exhibited the highest efficiency to mediate the infection of WIV1 pseudotyped virus. Our findings thus imply that WIV1 has the potential to infect a wide range of wild animals and may directly jump to humans. We also showed that cell entry of WIV1 could be restricted by interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs). However, WIV1 could exploit the airway protease TMPRSS2 to partially evade the IFITM3 restriction. Interestingly, we also found that amphotericin B could enhance the infectious entry of SARS-CoVs and SL-CoVs by evading IFITM3-mediated restriction. Collectively, our findings further underscore the risk of exposure to animal SL-CoVs and highlight the vulnerability of patients who take amphotericin B to infection by SL-CoVs, including the most recently emerging (SARS-CoV-2).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Chiroptera/virology , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Rats , SARS Virus/physiology , Viverridae
15.
Mol Cell Endocrinol ; 515: 110917, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-661768

ABSTRACT

Obesity patients are more susceptible to develop COVID-19 severe outcome due to the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in the viral infection. ACE2 is regulated in the human cells by different genes associated with increased (TLR3, HAT1, HDAC2, KDM5B, SIRT1, RAB1A, FURIN and ADAM10) or decreased (TRIB3) virus replication. RNA-seq data revealed 14857 genes expressed in human subcutaneous adipocytes, including genes mentioned above. Irisin treatment increased by 3-fold the levels of TRIB3 transcript and decreased the levels of other genes. The decrease in FURIN and ADAM10 expression enriched diverse biological processes, including extracellular structure organization. Our results, in human subcutaneous adipocytes cell culture, indicate a positive effect of irisin on the expression of multiple genes related to viral infection by SARS-CoV-2; furthermore, translatable for other tissues and organs targeted by the novel coronavirus and present, thus, promising approaches for the treatment of COVID-19 infection as therapeutic strategy to decrease ACE2 regulatory genes.


Subject(s)
Adipocytes/drug effects , Fibronectins/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , ADAM10 Protein/genetics , ADAM10 Protein/metabolism , Adipocytes/cytology , Adipocytes/metabolism , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/genetics , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Fibronectins/genetics , Fibronectins/metabolism , Furin/genetics , Furin/metabolism , Gene Ontology , Histone Acetyltransferases/genetics , Histone Acetyltransferases/metabolism , Histone Deacetylase 2/genetics , Histone Deacetylase 2/metabolism , Humans , Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/genetics , Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Models, Biological , Molecular Sequence Annotation , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Obesity/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics , Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Repressor Proteins/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Sirtuin 1/genetics , Sirtuin 1/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 3/metabolism , rab1 GTP-Binding Proteins/genetics , rab1 GTP-Binding Proteins/metabolism
17.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 180: 114122, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617879

ABSTRACT

An unprecedented biological function of natural cardenolides independent of their membrane target Na+/K+-ATPase is disclosed. Previously, we reported that cardenolides impart anti-transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (anti-TGEV) activity through the targeting of Na+/K+-ATPase and its associated PI3K_PDK1_RSK2 signaling. Swine testis cells with Na+/K+-ATPase α1 knocked down exhibited decreased susceptibility to TGEV infectivity and attenuated PI3K_PDK1_RSK2 signaling. Herein, we further explored a Na+/K+-ATPase-independent signaling axis induced by natural cardenolides that also afforded significant anti-coronaviral activity for porcine TGEV and human HCoV-OC43. Using pharmacological inhibition and gene silencing techniques, we found that this anti-TGEV or anti-HCoV-OC43 activity was caused by JAK1 proteolysis and mediated through upstream activation of Ndfip1/2 and its effector NEDD4. This study provides novel insights into the pharmacological effects of natural cardenolides, and is expected to inform their future development as antiviral agents.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cardenolides/pharmacology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Janus Kinase 1/metabolism , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/metabolism , Transmissible gastroenteritis virus/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Carrier Proteins/metabolism , Cell Line , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Female , Gene Knockdown Techniques , Humans , Leupeptins , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Nedd4 Ubiquitin Protein Ligases/metabolism , Ouabain/pharmacology , Phosphorylation , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Proteolysis , STAT1 Transcription Factor/metabolism , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Swine
18.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 202(6): 812-821, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614625

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a global threat to health. Its inflammatory characteristics are incompletely understood.Objectives: To define the cytokine profile of COVID-19 and to identify evidence of immunometabolic alterations in those with severe illness.Methods: Levels of IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and sTNFR1 (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1) were assessed in plasma from healthy volunteers, hospitalized but stable patients with COVID-19 (COVIDstable patients), patients with COVID-19 requiring ICU admission (COVIDICU patients), and patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia requiring ICU support (CAPICU patients). Immunometabolic markers were measured in circulating neutrophils from patients with severe COVID-19. The acute phase response of AAT (alpha-1 antitrypsin) to COVID-19 was also evaluated.Measurements and Main Results: IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, and sTNFR1 were all increased in patients with COVID-19. COVIDICU patients could be clearly differentiated from COVIDstable patients, and demonstrated higher levels of IL-1ß, IL-6, and sTNFR1 but lower IL-10 than CAPICU patients. COVID-19 neutrophils displayed altered immunometabolism, with increased cytosolic PKM2 (pyruvate kinase M2), phosphorylated PKM2, HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1α), and lactate. The production and sialylation of AAT increased in COVID-19, but this antiinflammatory response was overwhelmed in severe illness, with the IL-6:AAT ratio markedly higher in patients requiring ICU admission (P < 0.0001). In critically unwell patients with COVID-19, increases in IL-6:AAT predicted prolonged ICU stay and mortality, whereas improvement in IL-6:AAT was associated with clinical resolution (P < 0.0001).Conclusions: The COVID-19 cytokinemia is distinct from that of other types of pneumonia, leading to organ failure and ICU need. Neutrophils undergo immunometabolic reprogramming in severe COVID-19 illness. Cytokine ratios may predict outcomes in this population.


Subject(s)
Acute-Phase Reaction/immunology , Carrier Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Cytokines/immunology , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Lactic Acid/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Thyroid Hormones/metabolism , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/immunology , Acute-Phase Reaction/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Blotting, Western , Case-Control Studies , Community-Acquired Infections/immunology , Community-Acquired Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Pandemics , Phosphorylation , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/metabolism
19.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 1514-1522, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611844

ABSTRACT

We previously made the hypothesis that STING contributes to COVID-19. The present review detail new arguments for over-activation of STING pathways in COVID-19, following the description of hyper-coagulability and Kawasaki-like diseases in children. Indeed, Kawasaki disease is induced by overreaction of innate cells following exposition to various viruses, including herpes viruses which trigger STING. It predisposes to diffuse vasculitis and aneurysms, whereas STING is over-expressed in arterial aneurisms. The redness at the inoculation site of bacillus Calmette-Guérin, a specific feature of Kawasaki disease, is reproduced by activation of the STING pathway, which is inhibited upstream by aspirin, intravenous immunoglobulins, and Vitamin-D. SARS-CoV2 binding to ACE2 can lead to excessive angiotensin II signaling, which activates the STING pathway in mice. Over-activation of the STING-pathway promotes hyper-coagulability through release of interferon-ß and tissue factor by monocytes-macrophages. Aspirin and dipyridamole, besides their anti-platelet activity, also reduce tissue factor procoagulant activity, and aspirin inhibits the STING pathway upstream of STING. Aspirin and dipyridamole may be used, in combination with drugs blocking downstream the activation of the STING pathway, like inhibitors of IL-6R and JAK/STAT pathways. The risk of bleeding should be low as bleeding has not been reported in severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Animals , Aspirin/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/metabolism , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Dipyridamole/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Interferons/metabolism , Mice , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/metabolism , Pandemics , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/virology
20.
Prog Biophys Mol Biol ; 155: 29-35, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611000

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, an atypical pneumonia invaded the city of Wuhan, China, and the causative agent of this disease turned out to be a new coronavirus. In January 2020, the World Health Organization named the new coronavirus 2019-nCoV and subsequently it is referred to as SARS-CoV2 and the related disease as CoViD-19 (Lai et al., 2020). Very quickly, the epidemic led to a pandemic and it is now a worldwide emergency requiring the creation of new antiviral therapies and a related vaccine. The purpose of this article is to review and investigate further the molecular mechanism by which the SARS-CoV2 virus infection proceeds via the formation of a hetero-trimer between its protein S, the ACE2 receptor and the B0AT1 protein, which is the "entry receptor" for the infection process involving membrane fusion (Li et al., 2003). A reverse engineering process uses the formalism of the Hill function to represent the functions related to the dynamics of the biochemical interactions of the viral infection process. Then, using a logical evaluation of viral density that measures the rate at which the cells are hijacked by the virus (and they provide a place for the virus to replicate) and considering the "time delay" given by the interaction between cell and virus, the expected duration of the incubation period is predicted. The conclusion is that the density of the virus varies from the "exposure time" to the "interaction time" (virus-cells). This model can be used both to evaluate the infectious condition and to analyze the incubation period. BACKGROUND: The ongoing threat of the new coronavirus SARS-CoV2 pandemic is alarming and strategies for combating infection are highly desired. This RNA virus belongs to the ß-coronavirus genus and is similar in some features to SARS-CoV. Currently, no vaccine or approved medical treatment is available. The complex dynamics of the rapid spread of this virus can be demonstrated with the aid of a computational framework. METHODS: A mathematical model based on the principles of cell-virus interaction is developed in this manuscript. The amino acid sequence of S proein and its interaction with the ACE-2 protein is mimicked with the aid of Hill function. The mathematical model with delay is solved with the aid of numerical solvers and the parametric values are obtained with the help of MCMC algorithm. RESULTS: A delay differential equation model is developed to demonstrate the dynamics of target cells, infected cells and the SARS-CoV2. The important parameters and coefficients are demonstrated with the aid of numerical computations. The resulting thresholds and forecasting may prove to be useful tools for future experimental studies and control strategies. CONCLUSIONS: From the analysis, I is concluded that control strategy via delay is a promising technique and the role of Hill function formalism in control strategies can be better interpreted in an inexpensive manner with the aid of a theoretical framework.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Cell Membrane/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/metabolism , Cell Membrane Permeability , Humans , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Pandemics , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism
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