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1.
Acta Psychol (Amst) ; 222: 103459, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560918

ABSTRACT

Imagining being stranded in the grasslands of an unknown territory without basic survival materials and subsequently rating the relevance of words for this situation leads to exceptionally good memory for these words. This survival processing effect has received much attention, primarily because it has been argued to disclose the evolutionary foundations of human memory. So far, only fictitious scenarios were used to demonstrate this effect. To provide a fairer test of emotional response against richness-of-encoding explanations of the effect, we aimed at increasing everyday relevance and realism of the survival scenarios. For this purpose, we created two new Covid-19 scenarios, one focusing on emotional response (Covid-19-emotion) and the other on survival strategy (Covid-19-strategy). Both new scenarios were compared to the classical grassland and moving scenarios typically used to investigate the survival processing effect. In Experiment 1, we observed better memory for the grassland and Covid-19-strategy scenarios compared to the other two, but no significant difference between the former. A descriptively similar result pattern emerged in Experiment 2 for the number of ideas generated on how to use objects in the four scenarios. Theoretical implications are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Recall , Humans , Memory , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival
2.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0259094, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496528

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We read, see and hear news from various media sources every day. A large majority of the news is negative. A previous study from our laboratory showed that reading negative news is associated with both increased stress reactivity (measured via the stress hormone cortisol) and recall of the negative news segments in women. OBJECTIVES: The present study investigated the effects of positive news on cortisol stress reactivity, memory and affect using a methodology highly similar to the study on negative news that was previously used by our team. METHODS: Sixty-two healthy participants aged between 18 and 35 years (81% women) were randomly exposed to either positive or neutral news segments, followed by a laboratory stressor. We assessed participants' affect three times during the procedure and measured cortisol in saliva eight times (at 10-minute intervals). Twenty-four hours later, participants were contacted by phone to assess their recall of the news segments. RESULTS: Results showed that exposure to positive news, relative to neutral news, did not modulate participants' cortisol levels in response to the laboratory stressor. Positive news had no impact on memory recall of the news and did not change participants' positive or negative affect. Bayes factors suggested that these nonsignificant results are not attributable to low statistical power. CONCLUSION: Contrary to negative news, positive and neutral news do not modulate stress reactivity, memory and affect. These results suggest that people can stay informed without physiological and psychological costs when the news to which they are exposed adopt a positive or neutral approach.


Subject(s)
Cognition/physiology , Emotions/physiology , Hydrocortisone/analysis , Mass Media , Memory/physiology , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Saliva/chemistry , Young Adult
3.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 33(7): 2043-2051, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adherence to protective behaviors is central to limiting the spread of COVID-19 and associated risk of serious illness and mortality in older populations. Whether cognition predicts adherence to protective behaviors has not been examined in older adults. AIMS: To examine whether specific cognitive abilities predict adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors in older adults, independent of other relevant factors. METHODS: Data from 431 older adults (i.e., ≥ 65 years) who took part in the COVID-19 module of the Health and Retirement Study were included in the present study. Separate binary logistic regression models were used to examine whether performance on measures of immediate and delayed recall and working memory predicted adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors, controlling for demographics, level of COVID-19 concern, depressive symptoms, and medical conditions. RESULTS: For every unit increase in immediate and delayed recall, the probability of adhering to COVID-19 protective behaviors increased by 47% and 69%, respectively. There was no association between the measure of working memory and adherence. DISCUSSION: It is of public interest to understand the factors that reduce adherence to protective behaviors so that we can better protect those most vulnerable and limit community spread. Our findings demonstrate that reduced memory predicts non-adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors, independent of virus concern, and other relevant demographic and health factors. CONCLUSIONS: Public health strategies aimed at increasing adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors in community dwelling older adults, should account for the role of reduced cognitive function in limiting adherence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Cognition , Humans , Independent Living , Memory , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Pastoral Care Counsel ; 75(1): 72-73, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176170

ABSTRACT

This reflection heightens the value of the role of chaplain during the time of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Chaplaincy Service, Hospital , Clergy/psychology , Pastoral Care , Humans , Male , Memory , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Microb Biotechnol ; 14(1): 51-58, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307660

ABSTRACT

This Crystal Ball speculates on the potential of molecular decoys for prevention and therapy in infectious diseases. It is dedicated to the memory of Singh Chhatwal, who pioneered research on disguises and decoys produced by Streptococcus, and so much more.


Subject(s)
Microbiota , Streptococcus , Memory , Tropism
6.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 33(7): 2043-2051, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270564

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adherence to protective behaviors is central to limiting the spread of COVID-19 and associated risk of serious illness and mortality in older populations. Whether cognition predicts adherence to protective behaviors has not been examined in older adults. AIMS: To examine whether specific cognitive abilities predict adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors in older adults, independent of other relevant factors. METHODS: Data from 431 older adults (i.e., ≥ 65 years) who took part in the COVID-19 module of the Health and Retirement Study were included in the present study. Separate binary logistic regression models were used to examine whether performance on measures of immediate and delayed recall and working memory predicted adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors, controlling for demographics, level of COVID-19 concern, depressive symptoms, and medical conditions. RESULTS: For every unit increase in immediate and delayed recall, the probability of adhering to COVID-19 protective behaviors increased by 47% and 69%, respectively. There was no association between the measure of working memory and adherence. DISCUSSION: It is of public interest to understand the factors that reduce adherence to protective behaviors so that we can better protect those most vulnerable and limit community spread. Our findings demonstrate that reduced memory predicts non-adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors, independent of virus concern, and other relevant demographic and health factors. CONCLUSIONS: Public health strategies aimed at increasing adherence to COVID-19 protective behaviors in community dwelling older adults, should account for the role of reduced cognitive function in limiting adherence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Cognition , Humans , Independent Living , Memory , SARS-CoV-2
7.
JAMA ; 325(19): 1939-1940, 2021 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1251863
8.
West J Nurs Res ; 42(10): 783, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-791053

Subject(s)
Knowledge , Memory , Humans
10.
Perspect Psychol Sci ; 16(1): 175-187, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067155

ABSTRACT

In the battle for control of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), we have few weapons. Yet contact tracing is among the most powerful. Contact tracing is the process by which public-health officials identify people, or contacts, who have been exposed to a person infected with a pathogen or another hazard. For all its power, though, contact tracing yields a variable level of success. One reason is that contact tracing's ability to break the chain of transmission is only as effective as the proportion of contacts who are actually traced. In part, this proportion turns on the quality of the information that infected people provide, which makes human memory a crucial part of the efficacy of contact tracing. Yet the fallibilities of memory, and the challenges associated with gathering reliable information from memory, have been grossly underestimated by those charged with gathering it. We review the research on witnesses and investigative interviewing, identifying interrelated challenges that parallel those in contact tracing, as well as approaches for addressing those challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Contact Tracing/methods , Memory , Public Health/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 43(2): e299-e300, 2021 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066392

ABSTRACT

Recent correspondence highlighted the complicated process of grief in the time of COVID-19 where some family members and the dying person too are undergoing distress. New rituals can lighten the process of coping with grief or death, one may find it difficult to hurdle such situation and move on without first redirecting one's perception on the different realities of life. There are things that we can control but at the same time, things that are beyond our reach. With these realities, acceptance plays a key role to handle the situation. Acceptance is a person's assent to life's realities. Creativity in accepting grief or death is finding ways to lighten the heavy emotion of the 'ones left and the one leaving' through a preservation of memory. This is done through safeguarding and reliving the memories of the dead with various programs and advocacies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Grief , Humans , Memory , Perception , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Memory ; 29(1): 90-97, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-977321

ABSTRACT

In the absence of an effective vaccine or treatment, the current best defence against COVID-19 is social distancing - staying at home as much as possible, keeping distance from others, and avoiding large gatherings. Although social distancing improves physical health in terms of helping to reduce viral transmission, its psychological consequences are less clear, particularly its effects on memory. In this research, we investigated the effect of social distancing duration on negative moods and memory. The relation between social distancing duration and both negative mood and memory errors followed the same U-shaped function: negative moods and memory errors initially decreased as social distancing duration increased, and then at approximately 30 days, they began to increase. Subsequent analyses indicated that memory errors were mediated by lonely mood in particular. Thus, short-term social distancing might benefit psychological well-being and memory performance, but extended social distancing has a negative impact on mood and memory.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Memory/physiology , Physical Distancing , Humans
14.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 18241, 2020 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892044

ABSTRACT

This study examines publicly available online search data in China to investigate the spread of public awareness of the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak. We found that cities that had previously suffered from SARS (in 2003-04) and have greater migration ties to Wuhan had earlier, stronger and more durable public awareness of the outbreak. Our data indicate that 48 such cities developed awareness up to 19 days earlier than 255 comparable cities, giving them an opportunity to better prepare. This study suggests that it is important to consider memory of prior catastrophic events as they will influence the public response to emerging threats.


Subject(s)
Awareness , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Interpersonal Relations , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Blogging , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Memory , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media
15.
Percept Mot Skills ; 127(5): 960-979, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-626367

ABSTRACT

As the Covid 19 crisis has revealed, the internet is a first-line tool for learning critical health-related information. However, internet searches are a complex and dynamic process that can be fraught with subtleties and potential error. The mechanics of searching for and using electronic health (eHealth) information is ostensibly cognitively demanding; yet we know little about the role of neurocognitive abilities in this regard. Fifty-six young adults completed two naturalistic eHealth search tasks: fact-finding (eHealth Fact) and symptom-diagnosis (eHealth Search). Participants also completed neurocognitive tests of attention, psychomotor speed, learning/memory, and executive functions. Shorter eHealth symptom-diagnosis search time was related to better executive functions, while better eHealth symptom-diagnosis search accuracy was related to better episodic and prospective memory. In contrast, neither eHealth Fact search time nor its accuracy were related to any of the neurocognitive measures. Our findings suggest a differential relationship between neurocognitive abilities and eHealth search behaviors among young adults such that higher-order abilities may be implicated in eHealth searches requiring greater synthesis of information. Future work should examine the cognitive architecture of eHealth search in persons with neurocognitive disorders, as well as that of other aspects of eHealth search behaviors (e.g., search term generation, website reliability, and decision-making).


Subject(s)
Aptitude , Attention , Cognition , Consumer Health Information , Executive Function , Information Seeking Behavior , Internet , Memory , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Decision Making , Female , Health Behavior , Health Literacy , Humans , Learning , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Psychomotor Performance , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Young Adult
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