Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259583, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505858

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infectious disease outbreaks like COVID-19 and their mitigation measures can exacerbate underlying gender disparities, particularly among adolescents and young adults in densely populated urban settings. METHODS: An existing cohort of youth ages 16-26 in Nairobi, Kenya completed a phone-based survey in August-October 2020 (n = 1217), supplemented by virtual focus group discussions and interviews with youth and stakeholders, to examine economic, health, social, and safety experiences during COVID-19, and gender disparities therein. RESULTS: COVID-19 risk perception was high with a gender differential favoring young women (95.5% vs. 84.2%; p<0.001); youth described mixed concern and challenges to prevention. During COVID-19, gender symmetry was observed in constrained access to contraception among contraceptive users (40.4% men; 34.6% women) and depressive symptoms (21.8% men; 24.3% women). Gender disparities rendered young women disproportionately unable to meet basic economic needs (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.21; p<0.05) and in need of healthcare during the pandemic (aOR = 1.59; p<0.001). At a bivariate level, women had lower full decisional control to leave the house (40.0% vs. 53.2%) and less consistent access to safe, private internet (26.1% vs. 40.2%), while men disproportionately experienced police interactions (60.1%, 55.2% of which included extortion). Gender-specific concerns for women included menstrual hygiene access challenges (52.0%), increased reliance on transactional partnerships, and gender-based violence, with 17.3% reporting past-year partner violence and 3.0% non-partner sexual violence. Qualitative results contextualize the mental health impact of economic disruption and isolation, and, among young women, privacy constraints. IMPLICATIONS: Youth and young adults face gendered impacts of COVID-19, reflecting both underlying disparities and the pandemic's economic and social shock. Economic, health and technology-based supports must ensure equitable access for young women. Gender-responsive recovery efforts are necessary and must address the unique needs of youth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Cohort Studies , Contraception/methods , Contraception Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Hygiene , Kenya/epidemiology , Male , Menstruation/physiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Urban Population , Young Adult
2.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258314, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477534

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As war and famine are population level stressors that have been historically linked to menstrual cycle abnormalities, we hypothesized that the COVID-19 pandemic could similarly affect ovulation and menstruation among women. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a retrospective cohort study examining changes in ovulation and menstruation among women using the Natural Cycles mobile tracking app. We compared de-identified cycle data from March-September 2019 (pre-pandemic) versus March-September 2020 (during pandemic) to determine differences in the proportion of users experiencing anovulation, abnormal cycle length, and prolonged menses, as well as population level changes in these parameters, while controlling for user-reported stress during the pandemic. FINDINGS: We analyzed data from 214,426 cycles from 18,076 app users, primarily from Great Britain (29.3%) and the United States (22.6%). The average user was 33 years of age; most held at least a university degree (79.9%). Nearly half (45.4%) reported more pandemic-related stress. Changes in average cycle and menstruation lengths were not clinically significant, remaining at 29 and 4 days, respectively. Approximately 7.7% and 19.5% of users recorded more anovulatory cycles and abnormal cycle lengths during the pandemic, respectively. Contrary to expectation, 9.6% and 19.6% recorded fewer anovulatory cycles and abnormal cycle lengths, respectively. Women self-reporting more (32.0%) and markedly more (13.6%) stress during the pandemic were not more likely to experience cycle abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: The COVD-19 pandemic did not induce population-level changes to ovulation and menstruation among women using a mobile app to track menstrual cycles and predict ovulation. While some women experienced abnormalities during the pandemic, this proportion was smaller than that observed prior to the pandemic. As most app users in this study were well-educated women over the age of 30 years, and from high-income countries, their experience of the COVID-19 pandemic might differ in ways that limit the generalizability of these findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Menstruation , Mobile Applications , Ovulation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Female , Humans , Middle Aged
5.
Reprod Biomed Online ; 43(4): 769, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364423
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244012

ABSTRACT

The availability of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services is a key prerequisite for quality care and infection prevention and control in health care facilities (HCFs). In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the importance and urgency of enhancing WASH coverage to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission and other healthcare-associated infections. As a part of COVID-19 preparedness and response interventions, the Government of Zimbabwe, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), and civil society organizations conducted WASH assessments in 50 HCFs designated as COVID-19 isolation facilities. Assessments were based on the Water and Sanitation for Health Facility Improvement Tool (WASH FIT), a multi-step framework to inform the continuous monitoring and improvement of WASH services. The WASH FIT assessments revealed that one in four HCFs did not have adequate services across the domains of water, sanitation, health care waste, hand hygiene, facility environment, cleanliness and disinfection, and management. The sanitation domain had the largest proportion of health care facilities with poor service coverage (42%). Some of the recommendations from this assessment include the provision of sufficient water for all users, Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM)- and disability-friendly sanitation facilities, handwashing facilities, waste collection services, energy for incineration or waste treatment facilities, cleaning supplies, and financial resources for HCFs. WASH FIT may be a useful tool to inform WASH interventions during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sanitation , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hand Disinfection , Health Facilities , Humans , Hygiene , Menstruation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Water , Water Supply , Zimbabwe
8.
Reprod Biomed Online ; 42(1): 260-267, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065548

ABSTRACT

RESEARCH QUESTION: Does SARS-CoV-2 infection have an effect on ovarian reserve, sex hormones and menstruation of women of child-bearing age? DESIGN: This is a retrospective, cross-sectional study in which clinical and laboratory data from 237 women of child-bearing age diagnosed with COVID-19 were retrospectively reviewed. Menstrual data from 177 patients were analysed. Blood samples from the early follicular phase were tested for sex hormones and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH). RESULTS: Among 237 patients with confirmed COVID-19, severely ill patients had more comorbidities than mildly ill patients (34% versus 8%), particularly for patients with diabetes, hepatic disease and malignant tumours. Of 177 patients with menstrual records, 45 (25%) patients presented with menstrual volume changes, and 50 (28%) patients had menstrual cycle changes, mainly a decreased volume (20%) and a prolonged cycle (19%). The average sex hormone and AMH concentrations of women of child-bearing age with COVID-19 were not different from those of age-matched controls. CONCLUSIONS: Average sex hormone concentrations and ovarian reserve did not change significantly in COVID-19 women of child-bearing age. Nearly one-fifth of patients exhibited a menstrual volume decrease or cycle prolongation. The menstruation changes of these patients might be the consequence of transient sex hormone changes caused by suppression of ovarian function that quickly resume after recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gonadal Steroid Hormones/blood , Menstruation/physiology , Reproduction/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Gonadal Steroid Hormones/analysis , Humans , Menstrual Cycle/physiology , Middle Aged , Ovarian Reserve/physiology , Ovary/physiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
9.
Clin Transl Med ; 11(2): e297, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1049592

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was identified in December 2019 and has subsequently spread worldwide. Currently, there is no effective method to cure COVID-19. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) may be able to effectively treat COVID-19, especially for severe and critical patients. Menstrual blood-derived MSCs have recently received much attention due to their superior proliferation ability and their lack of ethical problems. Forty-four patients were enrolled from January to April 2020 in a multicenter, open-label, nonrandomized, parallel-controlled exploratory trial. Twenty-six patients received allogeneic, menstrual blood-derived MSC therapy, and concomitant medications (experimental group), and 18 patients received only concomitant medications (control group). The experimental group was treated with three infusions totaling 9 × 107 MSCs, one infusion every other day. Primary and secondary endpoints related to safety and efficacy were assessed at various time points during the 1-month period following MSC infusion. Safety was measured using the frequency of treatment-related adverse events (AEs). Patients in the MSC group showed significantly lower mortality (7.69% died in the experimental group vs 33.33% in the control group; P = .048). There was a significant improvement in dyspnea while undergoing MSC infusion on days 1, 3, and 5. Additionally, SpO2 was significantly improved following MSC infusion, and chest imaging results were improved in the experimental group in the first month after MSC infusion. The incidence of most AEs did not differ between the groups. MSC-based therapy may serve as a promising alternative method for treating severe and critical COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Menstruation , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Allografts , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
10.
Health Place ; 66: 102431, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796013

ABSTRACT

A growing literature attests to menstrual management difficulties of girls, women and other people who menstruate. Largely ignored are the menstruation-management needs of people experiencing homelessness. We explored these realities in New York City through in-depth interviews with individuals living on the street and in shelters (n = 22), key informant interviews with staff at government agencies, shelters and service provider organizations (n = 15), and field audits of public toilets. This paper explores both pragmatic difficulties presented by inadequate access to toilets, bathing spaces, and laundering services, and pervasive menstrual stigma. Amplifying the difficulties was near-constant pressure "to pass," as someone who was not homeless in order to enable increased access to toilets, and as someone who was not menstruating, in order to engage in the activities of daily living. Our findings highlight the need for improved quality and accessibility of bathrooms for sheltered and street-dwelling homeless, and expedited access to bathing and laundering. Such actions are essential given the steady increase in homelessness in NYC and - under the long shadow of COVID - especially timely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Homeless Persons , Activities of Daily Living , Female , Humans , Menstruation , New York City , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...