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1.
Curr Opin Psychiatry ; 34(4): 351-356, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635161

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The COVID-19 pandemic and associated restrictions have uniquely and disproportionately affected vulnerable populations. This review summarizes recent evidence on the relationship between psychiatric disorders, substance use disorders and COVID-19, highlighting acute and long-term risks, pharmacotherapy interactions and implications regarding appropriate and timely evidence-based treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Evidence points to a complex relationship between psychiatric and substance use disorders and COVID-19. A range of risk factors associated with psychiatric and substance use disorders increases the risk of exposure to, and complications arising from, the COVID-19 virus. COVID-19 infection has been indicated as having acute and potential long-term impacts on both psychiatric and substance use disorders. Social disruption associated with restrictions imposed to curb transmission has also been identified as a risk factor for new onset of disorders and recurrence and exacerbation of existing conditions. SUMMARY: Early recognition and intervention are key to preventing chronic disability associated with psychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and their co-occurrence. It is critical that those most in need of services do not fall through the cracks of our healthcare systems. The pandemic has fast tracked the opportunity for widespread implementation of digital health interventions but ensuring these are accessible and available to all, including our most vulnerable, will be a critical task for our future health and social ecosystems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/psychology , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , Substance-Related Disorders/psychology , Drug Interactions , Humans , Mental Disorders/drug therapy , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Vulnerable Populations/psychology
3.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248009, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575841

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Since the start of the pandemic, millions of people have been infected, with thousands of deaths. Many foci worldwide have been identified in retirement nursing homes, with a high number of deaths. Our study aims were to evaluate the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the retirement nursing homes, the predictors to develop symptoms, and death. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a retrospective study enrolling all people living in retirement nursing homes (PLRNH), where at least one SARS-CoV-2 infected person was present. Medical and clinical data were collected. Variables were compared with Student's t-test or Pearson chi-square test as appropriate. Uni- and multivariate analyses were conducted to evaluate variables' influence on infection and symptoms development. Cox proportional-hazards model was used to evaluate 30 days mortality predictors, considering death as the dependent variable. We enrolled 382 subjects. The mean age was 81.15±10.97 years, and males were 140(36.7%). At the multivariate analysis, mental disorders, malignancies, and angiotensin II receptor blockers were predictors of SARS-CoV-2 infection while having a neurological syndrome was associated with a lower risk. Only half of the people with SARS-CoV-2 infection developed symptoms. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and neurological syndrome were correlated with an increased risk of developing SARS-CoV-2 related symptoms. Fifty-six (21.2%) people with SARS-CoV-2 infection died; of these, 53 died in the first 30 days after the swab's positivity. Significant factors associated with 30-days mortality were male gender, hypokinetic disease, and the presence of fever and dyspnea. Patients' autonomy and early heparin treatment were related to lower mortality risk. CONCLUSIONS: We evidenced factors associated with infection's risk and death in a setting with high mortality such as retirement nursing homes, that should be carefully considered in the management of PLRNH.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Dyspnea/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/pathology , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/pathology , Nursing Homes , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sex Factors , Survival Rate
6.
Australas Psychiatry ; 30(1): 23-25, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506206

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Managing mental health patients during the COVID-19 pandemic has been a global challenge. Current workforce arrangements tend to separate those skilled in caring for highly infectious medical patients from those whose specialism is in managing co-morbid mental health, substance misuse and/or behaviours of concern, including potential non-compliance with community or health care directives. This paper reports an innovative service development through the emergency establishment of a temporary COVID-positive mental health ward in response to a local outbreak in Melbourne. METHOD: A case study of service reorientation is presented, examining barriers and enablers to effective care of co-morbid mental illness, addiction and COVID-19. RESULTS: Establishing a skilled multidisciplinary workforce across mental health and infectious disease is the most important consideration in optimising care. Other issues included suitable physical space, security arrangements and inter-disciplinary communication. CONCLUSIONS: The paper holds insights for managing mental health care during potential future infectious disease outbreaks across the country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders/complications , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Comorbidity , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Patient Isolation , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Viruses ; 13(11)2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488765

ABSTRACT

This study identified factors associated with hospital admission among people with laboratory-diagnosed COVID-19 cases in British Columbia. The study used data from the BC COVID-19 Cohort, which integrates data on all COVID-19 cases with data on hospitalizations, medical visits, emergency room visits, prescription drugs, chronic conditions and deaths. The analysis included all laboratory-diagnosed COVID-19 cases in British Columbia to 15 January 2021. We evaluated factors associated with hospital admission using multivariable Poisson regression analysis with robust error variance. Of the 56,874 COVID-19 cases included in the analysis, 2298 were hospitalized. Factors associated with increased hospitalization risk were as follows: male sex (adjusted risk ratio (aRR) = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.17-1.37), older age (p-trend < 0.0001 across age groups increasing hospitalization risk with increasing age [aRR 30-39 years = 3.06; 95% CI = 2.32-4.03, to aRR 80+ years = 43.68; 95% CI = 33.41-57.10 compared to 20-29 years-old]), asthma (aRR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.04-1.26), cancer (aRR = 1.19; 95% CI = 1.09-1.29), chronic kidney disease (aRR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.19-1.47), diabetes (treated without insulin aRR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.03-1.25, requiring insulin aRR = 5.05; 95% CI = 4.43-5.76), hypertension (aRR = 1.19; 95% CI = 1.08-1.31), injection drug use (aRR = 2.51; 95% CI = 2.14-2.95), intellectual and developmental disabilities (aRR = 1.67; 95% CI = 1.05-2.66), problematic alcohol use (aRR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.43-1.85), immunosuppression (aRR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.09-1.53), and schizophrenia and psychotic disorders (aRR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.23-1.82). In an analysis restricted to women of reproductive age, pregnancy (aRR = 2.69; 95% CI = 1.42-5.07) was associated with increased risk of hospital admission. Older age, male sex, substance use, intellectual and developmental disability, chronic comorbidities, and pregnancy increase the risk of COVID-19-related hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Health , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , British Columbia/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Young Adult
9.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 65: 102859, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415178

ABSTRACT

Administering medical treatment or managing quarantine for a patient is particularly difficult when a patient harming others or causing self-harm because of severe depression, a manic state, or psychomotor agitation is also infected with COVID-19. Kanazawa University Hospital is the only facility able to manage such difficult cases occurring in Ishikawa prefecture, a local administrative area in Japan. The hospital has arranged a negative pressure apparatus in a psychiatric ward with two protection rooms. This report describes an urgently established but viable system in one prefecture of Japan for treating COVID-19-infected patients with severe psychiatric symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Hospitalization , Humans , Japan , Local Government , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 143(2): 206-209, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388169

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lockdown due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic became a challenge to maintain care for patients with epilepsy; we aimed to find out how the pandemic affected them. METHODS: We sent an online 22-item questionnaire to patients from our outpatient clinic, a reference centre in Spain for drug-resistant epilepsy, inquiring about the effects of lockdown, from March to May 2020. RESULTS: We sent the survey to 627 patients; 312 (58% women) sent a complete response and were included. Of all respondents, 57% took >2 antiseizure medications. One-third of respondents (29%) declared an associated cognitive or motor disability. A minority had confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 (1.92%). Seizure frequency remained like usual in 56% of patients, while 31.2% reported an increase. Less than 10% needed emergent assistance. Almost half reported anxiety or depression, and 25% increased behavioural disorders. Mood (F: 5.40; p: 0.002) and sleep disorders (F = 2.67; p: 0.05) were associated with increase in seizure frequency. Patients were able to contact their physicians when needed and were open to a future telematic approach to follow-up visits. CONCLUSIONS: Seizure frequency and severity remained unchanged in most patients during the lockdown. Mood and sleep disorders were common and associated with seizure worsening. Patients were open to telematic care in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy/therapy , Pandemics , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Anxiety/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognition Disorders/complications , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/complications , Disabled Persons , Epilepsy/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Motor Disorders/complications , Outpatients , Seizures/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/classification , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
11.
Psychosomatics ; 61(6): 662-671, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with psychiatric illnesses are particularly vulnerable to highly contagious, droplet-spread organisms such as SARS-CoV-2. Patients with mental illnesses may not be able to consistently follow up behavioral prescriptions to avoid contagion, and they are frequently found in settings with close contact and inadequate infection control, such as group homes, homeless shelters, residential rehabilitation centers, and correctional facilities. Furthermore, inpatient psychiatry settings are generally designed as communal spaces, with heavy emphasis on group and milieu therapies. As such, inpatient psychiatry services are vulnerable to rampant spread of contagion. OBJECTIVE: With this in mind, the authors outline the decision process and ultimate design and implementation of a regional inpatient psychiatry unit for patients infected with asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 and share key points for consideration in implementing future units elsewhere. CONCLUSION: A major takeaway point of the analysis is the particular expertise of trained experts in psychosomatic medicine for treating patients infected with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hospital Design and Construction/methods , Hospital Units , Hospitalization , Infection Control/methods , Mental Disorders/therapy , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Involuntary Commitment , Mental Disorders/complications , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Psychiatric Department, Hospital , Psychotherapy, Group/methods , Recreation , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilation/methods , Visitors to Patients
12.
Chest ; 160(3): e279-e283, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379053

ABSTRACT

CASE PRESENTATION: A 24-year-old previously healthy woman was brought to the hospital for acute altered mental status. One week prior to presentation, she had developed a sore throat, nausea, and vomiting. At that time, SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction and rapid streptococcal pharyngitis test results were both negative. On the day prior to presentation, the patient had developed an erythematous painful rash on her left arm. The following day she was noted to be agitated, combative, and having trouble communicating, prompting ED evaluation. In the ED, the patient was tachycardic to 108 beats/min and tachypneic to 30 breaths/min but normotensive and afebrile. Her initial workup was notable for leukocytosis with bandemia, acute liver injury with coagulopathy, and acute renal failure. She was intubated, transferred to our hospital, and admitted to the MICU. The patient's medical history was notable for obesity and oral contraceptive use. She had no family history of autoimmune, rheumatologic, or hematologic disorders. She was a student and worked part time in retail. She had no recent travel or outdoor exposure. The patient's family was unaware of any tobacco or drug use but did report that she drank socially.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Health , Acute Disease , Biopsy , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Mental Disorders/complications , Multiple Organ Failure/complications , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Young Adult
13.
Rom J Morphol Embryol ; 61(4): 1007-1022, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366011

ABSTRACT

Patients with serious mental illness are a high-risk category of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Patients with schizophrenia are not participatory and have increased mortality and morbidity, patients with dementia cannot be cared for while depression, anxiety, bipolar tubing are associated with low immune status. Social stress is amplified by social isolation, amplifying depression and the mechanisms of decreased immunity. Hygiene measures and prophylactic behavior are impossible to put into practice in conditions of chronic mental illness. In coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the risk for severe development is associated with the presence of comorbidities and immune system deficiency. Prothrombotic status, cytokine storm and alveolar destruction are mechanisms that aggravate the evolution of patients, especially in the context in which they have dysfunction of the autonomic system. The activity of proinflammatory cytokines is accentuated by hyperglutamatergia, which potentiates oxidative stress and triggers the mechanisms of neural apoptosis by stimulating microglial activation. Activation of M1-type microglia has an important role in pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders, such as major depression, schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, and may associate hippocampal atrophy and disconnection of cognitive structures. Memantine and Amantadine, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor inhibitors, have demonstrated, through their pharmacological profile, psychotropic effects but also antiviral properties. In the conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic, based on these arguments, we suggest that they can be associated with the therapy with the basic psychotropics, Memantine or Amantadine, for the control of neuropsychiatric symptoms but also as adjuvants with antiviral action.


Subject(s)
Amantadine/therapeutic use , Antiparkinson Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Memantine/therapeutic use , Mental Disorders/complications , Antiparkinson Agents/pharmacology , Comorbidity , Humans , Mental Disorders/virology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
14.
Scand J Work Environ Health ; 47(7): 509-520, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359380

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: High-quality longitudinal evidence exploring the mental health risk associated with low-quality employment trajectories is scarce. We therefore aimed to investigate the risk of being diagnosed with common mental disorders, substance use disorders, or suicide attempt according to low-quality employment trajectories. METHODS: A longitudinal register-study based on the working population of Sweden (N=2 743 764). Employment trajectories (2005-2009) characterized by employment quality and pattern (constancy, fluctuation, mobility) were created. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models for first incidence (2010-2017) diagnosis of common mental disorders, substance use disorders and suicide attempt as dependent on employment trajectories. RESULTS: We identified 21 employment trajectories, 10 of which were low quality (21%). With the exception of constant solo self-employment, there was an increased risk of common mental disorders (HR 1.07-1.62) and substance use disorders (HR 1.05-2.19) for all low-quality trajectories. Constant solo self-employment increased the risk for substance use disorders among women, while it reduced the risk of both disorders for men. Half of the low-quality trajectories were associated with a risk increase of suicide attempt (HR 1.08-1.76). CONCLUSIONS: Low-quality employment trajectories represent risk factors for mental disorders and suicide attempt in Sweden, and there might be differential effects according to sex - especially in terms of self-employment. Policies ensuring and maintaining high-quality employment characteristics over time are imperative. Similar prospective studies are needed, also in other contexts, which cover the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic as well as the mechanisms linking employment trajectories with mental health.


Subject(s)
Employment/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders , Suicide, Attempted/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Incidence , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Disorders/complications , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/etiology , Sweden/epidemiology
15.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 8(9): 797-812, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313512

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mental disorders might be a risk factor for severe COVID-19. We aimed to assess the specific risks of COVID-19-related mortality, hospitalisation, and intensive care unit (ICU) admission associated with any pre-existing mental disorder, and specific diagnostic categories of mental disorders, and exposure to psychopharmacological drug classes. METHODS: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched Web of Science, Cochrane, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases between Jan 1, 2020, and March 5, 2021, for original studies reporting data on COVID-19 outcomes in patients with psychiatric disorders compared with controls. We excluded studies with overlapping samples, studies that were not peer-reviewed, and studies written in languages other than English, Danish, Dutch, French, German, Italian, and Portuguese. We modelled random-effects meta-analyses to estimate crude odds ratios (OR) for mortality after SARS-CoV-2 infection as the primary outcome, and hospitalisation and ICU admission as secondary outcomes. We calculated adjusted ORs for available data. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic, and publication bias was tested with Egger regression and visual inspection of funnel plots. We used the GRADE approach to assess the overall strength of the evidence and the Newcastle Ottawa Scale to assess study quality. We also did subgroup analyses and meta-regressions to assess the effects of baseline COVID-19 treatment setting, patient age, country, pandemic phase, quality assessment score, sample sizes, and adjustment for confounders. This study is registered with PROSPERO, CRD42021233984. FINDINGS: 841 studies were identified by the systematic search, of which 33 studies were included in the systematic review and 23 studies in the meta-analysis, comprising 1 469 731 patients with COVID-19, of whom 43 938 had mental disorders. The sample included 130 807 females (8·9% of the whole sample) and 130 373 males (8·8%). Nine studies provided data on patient race and ethnicity, and 22 studies were rated as high quality. The presence of any mental disorder was associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 mortality (OR 2·00 [95% CI 1·58-2·54]; I2=92·66%). This association was also observed for psychotic disorders (2·05 [1·37-3·06]; I2=80·81%), mood disorders (1·99 [1·46-2·71]; I2=68·32%), substance use disorders (1·76 [1·27-2·44]; I2=47·90%), and intellectual disabilities and developmental disorders (1·73 [1·29-2·31]; I2=90·15%) but not for anxiety disorders (1·07 [0·73-1·56]; I2=11·05%). COVID-19 mortality was associated with exposure to antipsychotics (3·71 [1·74-7·91]; I2=90·31%), anxiolytics (2·58 [1·22-5·44]; I2=96·42%), and antidepressants (2·23 [1·06-4·71]; I2=95·45%). For psychotic disorders, mood disorders, antipsychotics, and anxiolytics, the association remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, and other confounders. Mental disorders were associated with increased risk of hospitalisation (2·24 [1·70-2·94]; I2=88·80%). No significant associations with mortality were identified for ICU admission. Subgroup analyses and meta-regressions showed significant associations of baseline COVID-19 treatment setting (p=0·013) and country (p<0·0001) with mortality. No significant associations with mortality were identified for other covariates. No evidence of publication bias was found. GRADE assessment indicated high certainty for crude mortality and hospitalisation, and moderate certainty for crude ICU admission. INTERPRETATION: Pre-existing mental disorders, in particular psychotic and mood disorders, and exposure to antipsychotics and anxiolytics were associated with COVID-19 mortality in both crude and adjusted models. Although further research is required to determine the underlying mechanisms, our findings highlight the need for targeted approaches to manage and prevent COVID-19 in at-risk patient groups identified in this study. FUNDING: None. TRANSLATIONS: For the Italian, French and Portuguese translations of the abstract see Supplementary Materials section.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Mental Disorders/complications , Risk Factors
16.
Transl Behav Med ; 11(7): 1359-1364, 2021 07 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280133

ABSTRACT

Behavioral health has the opportunity to lead the way in using lifestyle interventions to address obesity and health disparities in people with serious mental illness (SMI) in the COVID-19 era. Evidence-based interventions for weight loss in individuals with SMI exist, and the field has developed strategies for implementing these interventions in real-world mental health care settings. In addition to promoting weight loss, lifestyle interventions have the potential to address social isolation and loneliness and other patient-centered outcomes among individuals with SMI, which will be especially valuable for mitigating the growing concerns about loneliness attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions on in-person encounters. In this commentary, we discuss practice, policy, and research implications related to using evidence-based lifestyle interventions for individuals with SMI during the COVID-19 pandemic and sustaining these programs in the long-term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Humans , Life Style , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/prevention & control , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Acad Consult Liaison Psychiatry ; 62(5): 493-500, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246006

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the science of consultation-liaison psychiatry advances, the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry's Guidelines and Evidence-Based Medicine Subcommittee reviews articles of interest to help academy members remain familiar with the latest in evidence-based practice. OBJECTIVE: We identify the 10 most important articles for clinical practice in consultation-liaison psychiatry from 2020 using the new Importance and Quality instrument for assessing scientific literature. METHODS: The subcommittee published annotated abstracts for 97 articles on the academy website in 2020. Reviewers then rated all articles on clinical importance to practice and quality of scholarship using the Importance and Quality instrument. We describe the 10 articles with the highest aggregate scores and analyze the reliability of Importance and Quality instrument. RESULTS: Twenty-four raters identified the top 10 scoring articles of 2020. These articles provide practical guidance on key areas of consultation-liaison psychiatry including management of COVID-19, lithium treatment for complex patients, medical risks among patients with severe mental illness, and substance use disorders in medical settings. The assessment instrument demonstrated good to excellent interrater reliability. CONCLUSION: These articles offer valuable guidance for consultation-liaison psychiatrists regardless of their practice area. Collaborative literature reviews with standardized assessments help clinicians deliver evidence-based care and foster a high standard of practice across the specialty.


Subject(s)
Psychiatry , Referral and Consultation , COVID-19/psychology , Cannabis/adverse effects , Delirium/classification , Encephalitis , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans , Lithium Compounds/adverse effects , Lithium Compounds/therapeutic use , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/mortality , Mindfulness , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/psychology , Reproducibility of Results , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
18.
Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract ; 25(2): 142-146, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221414

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Psychiatric patients are at increased risk of contamination, morbidity, and mortality associated with COVID-19, together with potentially more pronounced adverse effects. We present and discuss the adverse effects observed in an acute psychiatric clinic that has admitted COVID-19 patients during the first three months of the pandemic in Turkey. METHODS: The COVID-19 treatment schemes were formed in accordance with the national and regional guidelines at the time of admittance, which were mainly based on the use of hydroxychloroquine and other drugs. The sample consisted exclusively of inpatients, and all patients were enrolled in the study regardless of their specific diagnosis or treatment schemes. RESULTS: 4 out of 23 patients (17.4%) had experienced adverse effects, two of which had mild hepatic enzyme elevation and one had mild sinus bradycardia. Of note is that we haven't encountered any serious complications or life-threatening events during inpatient treatment. The most emphasised adverse effect in the literature, namely QTc prolongation and ECG changes, were not observed in our sample. The adverse effects were not found to be significantly associated with patient-related factors nor dose of antipsychotic medication. CONCLUSIONS: From our point of view, non-cardiac adverse effects should not be overlooked while treating comorbid psychiatric and COVID-19 patients.KEY POINTSAcute inpatient psychiatric treatment of patients who have comorbid COVID-19 is a complex situation requiring multidisciplinary action.Adverse drug reactions, which may or not result from the interaction of psychiatric and COVID-19 treatment, should be of concern for this patient group.While there is controversy over the benefits of some of the off-label COVID-19 medications, there should also be discussion over safety and concomitant medication use.In order to be adequately prepared for future escalations of COVID-19 pandemic, psychiatric services should thoroughly evaluate their initial experience with COVID-19, including from the point of drug effectiveness and safety.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/etiology , Mental Disorders/drug therapy , Psychotropic Drugs/adverse effects , Adult , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Drug Interactions , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals, Psychiatric/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/complications , Middle Aged , Psychotropic Drugs/administration & dosage , Psychotropic Drugs/therapeutic use
19.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(6): 1443-1445, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206423

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has spread throughout the world, affecting many vulnerable populations including patients with severe mental illness (SMI). Recent studies have found that patients with SMI compared to the general population could have a greater risk of morbidity and mortality from COVID-19 due to cognitive impairment, poor awareness of risk, and difficulties in complying with infection control measures. Although some researchers have suggested that patients with SMI should be prioritized for COVID-19 vaccination to reduce the risk of infection, this issue remains controversial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Priorities , Mental Disorders , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Global Health ; 17(1): 44, 2021 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175330

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The possibility of psychopathological symptoms and related risk factors among normal persons and patients infected during the outbreak of COVID-19 has been widely investigated. The mental health outcomes of the second wave of the pandemic remain unclear, especially those of patients with an infection. Thus, this study aims to explore the prevalence of and related risk factors associated with psychopathological symptoms among patients infected with COVID-19 during the second wave. METHOD: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five isolated wards of a designated hospital in Beijing, China, from July 1 to July 15, 2020. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was conducted to assess psychiatric disorders, and a series of scales were used to measure self-reported psychopathological symptoms and psychosomatic factors. Multivariate regression analysis was used to analyze the risk factors associated with psychopathological symptoms. RESULTS: Among 119 participants with infections, the prevalence of generalized anxiety symptoms (51.3%), depressive symptoms (41.2%), and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS)/posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms (33.6%) was observed. Loneliness, hope, coping strategies, and history of mental disorders were the shared risk or protective factors across several psychopathological symptoms. The perceived impact of COVID-19 is the specific risk factor associated with state anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of symptoms of depression, anxiety, and PTSS/PTSD is high among patients with infections during the second wave of the pandemic in Beijing. Clinical doctors must realize that these patients will probably experience depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and PTSS/PTSD, as well as some neuropsychiatric syndromes. Specific mental health care is urgently required to help patients manage the virus during the second wave of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Pandemics , Adult , Beijing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/psychology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
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