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3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116056

ABSTRACT

In line with priorities set by the Italian Ministry of Health and international literature, the "Crisalide project" provides specific care pathways aimed at young adults (YA) with severe mental disorders (SMD). As described in Materials and Methods, it consists of three lines of activity: transition to adult mental health services (TSMREE/CSM 17-19); Diagnostic, Therapeutic, and Assistance Pathways for Young Adults (PDTA-YA); high-intensity treatment center for young adults "Argolab2 Potential Space". The aim of the study is to assess the results relating to the first three years of implementation of this clinical-organizational model (2018/2020) according to the process indicators identified by the ministry. Among the population aged 18-30 under treatment, results show increased prevalence (30%) and incidence (26%); 0% treatment conclusions due to the expiration of the conventional time limit; 0% involuntary hospitalizations (TSO); 0% STPIT hospitalizations; 0% repeated hospitalizations; 0% hospitalizations in the common mental disorders diagnostic group. Among the population of Argolab2 Potential Space, 45.4% have resumed studies; 40.9% have had a first work experience; 22.7% have obtained educational or training qualifications, and 18.2% live in independent houses. At a time when the academic literature underlines the terrible impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on this population, the present study confirms that specific treatment processes for young populations are a protective factor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Mental Health Services , Humans , Young Adult , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Community Mental Health Centers , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology
4.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 93: 97-102, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119837

ABSTRACT

Inequalities in mental healthcare and lack of social support during the COVID-19 pandemic have lowered quality of life and increased overall burden of disease in people with Parkinson's (PWP). Although the pandemic has brought attention to these inequalities, they are long standing and will persist unless addressed. Lack of awareness of mental health issues is a major barrier and even when recognized disparities based on race, gender, and socioeconomic factors limit access to already scarce resources. Stigma regarding mental illness is highly prevalent and is a major barrier even when adequate care exists. Limited access to mental healthcare during the pandemic and in general increases the burden on caregivers and families. Historically, initiatives to improve mental healthcare for PWP focused on interventions designed for specialty and academic centers generally located in large metropolitan areas, which has created unintended geographic disparities in access. In order to address these issues this point of view suggests a community-based wellness model to extend the reach of mental healthcare resources for PWP.


Subject(s)
Healthcare Disparities/trends , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health/trends , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Social Support/trends , Health Resources/trends , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/psychology , Social Support/psychology
5.
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci ; 31: e79, 2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106291

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Mental health-related stigma and discrimination are a complex and widespread issue with negative effects on numerous aspects of life of people with lived experience of mental health conditions. Research shows that social contact is the best evidence-based intervention to reduce stigma. Within the context of a rapid development of remote technology, and COVID-19-related restrictions for face-to-face contact, the aim of this paper is to categorise, compare and define indirect social contact (ISC) interventions to reduce stigma and discrimination in mental health in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). METHODS: MEDLINE, Global Health, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials (CENTRAL), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) were searched using a strategy including terms related to 'stigma and discrimination', 'intervention', 'indirect social contact', 'mental health' and 'low- and middle-income countries'. Relevant information on ISC interventions was extracted from the included articles, and a quality assessment was conducted. Emerging themes were coded using a thematic synthesis method, and a narrative synthesis was undertaken to present the results. RESULTS: Nine studies were included in the review overall. One study was ineffective; this was not considered for the categorisation of interventions, and it was considered separately for the comparison of interventions. Of the eight effective studies included in synthesis, interventions were categorised by content, combination of stigma-reducing strategies, medium of delivery, delivery agents, target condition and population, as well as by active or passive interaction and follow-up. Most of the interventions used education and ISC. Recovery and personal experience were important content components as all studies included either one or both. Cultural adaptation and local relevance were also important considerations. CONCLUSIONS: ISC interventions were effective in overall terms for both the general public and healthcare providers, including medical students. A new definition of ISC interventions in LMICs is proposed. More research and better reporting of intervention details are needed to explore the effectiveness of ISC strategies in LMICs, especially in regions where little relevant research has been conducted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Humans , Developing Countries , Social Stigma , Mental Health , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology
6.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 82(3)2021 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066783

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: By forcing closure of schools, curtailing outpatient services, and imposing strict social distancing, the COVID-19 pandemic has abruptly affected the daily life of millions worldwide, with still unclear consequences for mental health. This study aimed to evaluate if and how child and adolescent psychiatric visits to hospital emergency departments (EDs) changed during the pandemic lockdown, which started in Italy on February 24, 2020. METHODS: We examined all ED visits by patients under 18 years of age in the 7 weeks prior to February 24, 2020, and in the subsequent 8 weeks of COVID-19 lockdown at two urban university hospitals, in Turin and Rome, Italy. ED visits during the corresponding periods of 2019 served as a comparison using Poisson regression modeling. The clinician's decision to hospitalize or discharge home the patient after the ED visit was examined as an index of clinical severity. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 lockdown, there was a 72.0% decrease in the number of all pediatric ED visits (3,395) compared with the corresponding period in 2019 (12,128), with a 46.2% decrease in psychiatric visits (50 vs 93). The mean age of psychiatric patients was higher in the COVID-19 period (15.7 vs 14.1 years). No significant changes were found in hospitalization rate or in the prevalence distribution of the primary reason for the psychiatric ED visit (suicidality, anxiety/mood disorders, agitation). CONCLUSIONS: In the first 8 weeks of the COVID-19-induced social lockdown, the number of child and adolescent psychiatric ED visits significantly decreased, with an increase in patient age. This decrease does not appear to be explained by severity-driven self-selection and might be due to a reduction in psychiatric emergencies or to the implementation of alternative ways of managing acute psychopathology.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Emergencies/epidemiology , Emergency Services, Psychiatric , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders , Physical Distancing , Adolescent , Age Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Education, Distance , Emergency Services, Psychiatric/organization & administration , Emergency Services, Psychiatric/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 81(6)2020 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066788

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In light of the current evolving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and the need to learn from past infectious disease outbreaks to provide better psychological support for our frontline health care workers (HCW), we conducted a rapid review of extant studies that have reported on both psychological and coping responses in HCW during recent outbreaks. DATA SOURCES: We performed a systematic search of the available literature using PubMed, MEDLINE (Ovid), and Web of Science, combining key terms regarding recent infectious disease outbreaks and psychological and coping responses. Papers published from database inception to April 20, 2020, were considered for inclusion. Only studies in the English language and papers from peer-reviewed journals were included. STUDY SELECTION: We identified 95 (PubMed) and 49 papers (Web of Science) from the database search, of which 23 papers were eventually included in the review. DATA EXTRACTION: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were used for data extraction. The McMaster University critical appraisal tool was used to appraise quantitative studies. Guidelines by Higginbotham and colleagues were used to appraise qualitative studies. Only studies exploring the combined psychological and coping responses of HCW amid infectious diseases were included. RESULTS: Salient psychological responses that can persist beyond the outbreaks included anxiety/fears, stigmatization, depression, posttraumatic stress, anger/frustration, grief, and burnout, but also positive growth and transformation. Personal coping methods (such as problem solving, seeking social support, and positive thinking) alongside workplace measures (including infection control and safety, staff support and recognition, and clear communication) were reported to be helpful. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological support for HCW in the current COVID-19 pandemic and future outbreaks should focus on both individual (eg, psychoeducation on possible psychological responses, self-care) and institutional (eg, clear communication, providing access to resources for help, recognition of efforts of HCW) measures.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Global Health , Humans , Infection Control , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Mental Disorders/psychology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support
10.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(Suppl 8): 238-245, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2044437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The stigmatization by healthcare professionals (HP) of patients suffering from mental disorders is an important problem that interferes with the delivery of medical assistance. Social distancing by HP is an integral part of stigmatization, which differs between various mental disorders, as well as between psychiatrists (PSY) versus nonpsychiatrist healthcare professionals (NPHP). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study included 141 HP: PSY (n=20; 36.2±4.2 y.o.) and NPHP (n=121; 25.9±2.2 y.o.). The NPHP group included general practitioners (GP)/physicians (n=29; 20.6%), surgeons (n=19; 13.5%), obstetrician-gynecologists (n=26; 18.4%), neurologists (n=11; 7.8%), pediatricians (n=6; 4.3%), and other subspecialists (including urologists, tuberculosis specialists, ophthalmologists and dermatologists) (n=30; 21.3%). The modified Bogardus Social Distance Self-Assessment Scale (BSDS) was used to evaluate the indicators of social distance phenomena. The assessment was performed by HP for the following groups of patients with the following mental disorders: alcohol use disorder, bipolar disorder, depression, drug addiction, epilepsy, mental retardation, personality disorder, schizophrenia. All statistical calculations were performed using IBM SPSS-27 software (IBM Corp. 2021, licensed to Samara State Medical University). P-value ≤0.05 was determined as significant for the between-group (PSY vs NPHP) comparisons using a nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test. RESULTS: Our data analysis showed that HP achieved varying social distance scores for patients depending on the type of mental disorder, but with common trends among PSY and NPHPs. The mean (SD) scores of social distance ranged from 3.65(1.50) for depression to 5.25 (1.74) for drug addiction in the PSY, versus 3.44 (1.69), 6.19 (1.37) in NPHP, respectively. As compared to PSY, mean BSDS total scores were greater in the NPHP group, notably in the obstetricians-gynecologist - 6.27(1.40), and GP - 6.62 (0.90) groups, with similar trends of differing attitudes appeared among pediatricians - 7.00 (0.01) - regarding drug addiction, whereas the neurologists demonstrated a tendency towards lower social distance in relation to patients with depression - 2.27 (1.68), and epilepsy - 2.82 (1.47). CONCLUSIONS: Social distance measures by PSY and NPHP groups in contemporary Russia were highest in relation to patients with drug addiction, and lowest scores for depression and epilepsy. Stigmatization among HPs seems to influence health care delivery to certain categories of patients, which calls for further investigation. Higher social distance scores for patients with drug addiction might be related to higher stigma and lack of compassion toward these patients. Conversely, lower scores of social distance and corresponding emotional acceptance of people with depression by HP might interfere in the timely diagnosis and availability of appropriate care at an early stage amenable to treatment. This might reflect the cultural context of depressive mentality in Russia, or elevated prevalence of depressive states among HP. We propose interventions aiming to destigmatize mental disorders by targeting particular subgroups of vulnerable patients and also certain representatives of HP community.


Subject(s)
General Practitioners , Mental Disorders , Substance-Related Disorders , Adult , Delivery of Health Care , Depression/psychology , Humans , Mental Disorders/psychology , Physical Distancing , Psychological Distance , Social Stigma , Young Adult
11.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(5)2022 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2040080

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the psychological impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and associated lockdown on patients with psychiatric illness.Methods: An online survey-based cross-sectional study was conducted among patients receiving follow-up treatment at a tertiary care center from January to March 2020. The data were collected using a questionnaire about the possible challenges in 3 broad areas: treatment-related challenges, psychosocial difficulties, and concerns related to COVID-19.Results: The majority of patients (72.6%) reported a positive impact due to the increased availability of family support. Patients with depression and anxiety disorders (39.0%) experienced a more negative impact compared to those with psychotic disorders. Many of the psychiatric patients (22.6%) stopped medications and had difficulties accessing health services. Patients also experienced increased interpersonal conflict, sleep difficulties, and a surge in screen time.Conclusions: The findings highlight the difficulties faced by patients with psychiatric illnesses and emphasize the importance of family cohesion during times of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Outpatients , Pandemics
12.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1722, 2022 09 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with Mental Illness experience vast sexual and reproductive health challenges due to the affected mental health. Globally, prevalence of mental illness is on the rise with subsequent increase in the number of people with sexual and reproductive challenges warranting urgent public health intervention. However, information on the perceptions and experiences of mental health workers, the key health care providers for this population is generally lacking yet it's essential for formulation of appropriate policies and public health interventions. AIM: To explore Ugandan mental health care worker's perspectives and experiences on the sexual and reproductive health of people living with mental illness in Uganda in order to generate recommendations to the ministry of health on how it can be improved. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Qualitative study design was employed with utilization of phone call semi-structured in-depth interviews to collect data from 14 mental health workers from Uganda's National mental referral hospital, Butabika. Purposive sampling and convenience recruitment was done and the collected data was analyzed using Thematic content analysis. RESULTS: Four themes were generated which included people with Mental illness having normal sexual needs, mental illness effect on sexuality and relationships, practices for safeguarding sexuality of people with mental illness and the barriers encountered in the provision of sexual and reproductive health services at a mental hospital. CONCLUSION: People with mental illness experience a multitude of sexual and reproductive health challenges that need public health interventions. However, the integration of sexual and reproductive health services in a mental hospital are not yet successful making people with mental illness to remain with unaddressed health challenges. Policies should therefore be developed and implemented to ensure successful integration of sexual and reproductive health at all mental health service care provision points.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Sexual Health , Health Personnel , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Reproductive Health , Uganda/epidemiology
13.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1688, 2022 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038703

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) considers that the heterogeneity of concepts and definitions of migrants is an obstacle to obtaining evidence to inform public health policies. There is no recent data on the health status of only asylum seekers who have recently arrived in their Western host country. The purpose of this study was to determine the health status of asylum seekers and search for explanatory factors for this health status. METHODS: This cross-sectional observational study screened the mental and somatic health of adult asylum seekers who had arrived in France within the past 21 days and went to the Marseille single center between March 1 and August 31, 2021. In order to study the explanatory factors of the asylum seekers' health status, a multivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression model to predict the health status. Factors taken into account were those significantly associated with outcome (level < 0.05) in univariate analysis. RESULTS: In total, 419 asylum seekers were included and 96% CI95%[93;97.3] had at least one health disorder. Concerning mental health, 89% CI95% [85.1;91.4] had a mental disorder and in terms of somatic health exclusively, 66% CI95% [61.4;70.6] had at least one somatic disorder. Women were more likely to have a somatic disease OR = 1.80 [1.07; 3.05]. We found a statistically significant association between the presence of at least one disorder and sleeping in a public space OR = 3.4 [1.02;11.28] p = 0.046. This association is also found for mental disorders OR = 2.36 [1.16;4.84], p = 0.018. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the high prevalence of health disorders our study found, asylum seekers are a population with many care needs when they arrive in their host country. The main factors linked to a poor health status seem to be related to a person's sex, geographical origin and sleeping in a public space.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Refugees , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Status , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Health , Refugees/psychology
14.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 619, 2022 09 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038691

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Home treatment (HT) is a treatment modality for patients with severe mental illness (SMI) in acute mental crises. It is frequently considered equivalent to psychiatric inpatient treatment in terms of treatment outcome. Peer Support (PS) means that people with lived experience of a mental illness are trained to support others on their way towards recovery. While PS is growing in international importance and despite a growing number of studies supporting its benefits, it is still not comprehensively implemented into routine care. The HoPe (Home Treatment with Peer Support) study investigates a combination of both - HT and PS - to provide further evidence for a recovery-oriented treatment of psychiatric patients. METHODS: In our randomized controlled trial (RCT), HT with PS is compared with HT without PS within a network of eight psychiatric clinical centers from the North, South and East of Germany. We investigate the effects of a combination of both approaches with respect to the prevention of relapse/recurrence defined as first hospitalization after randomization (primary outcome), disease severity, general functioning, self-efficacy, psychosocial health, stigma resistance, recovery support, and service satisfaction (secondary outcomes). A sample of 286 patients will be assessed at baseline after admission to HT care (data point t0) and randomized into the intervention (HT + PS) and control arm (HT). Follow-Up assessments will be conducted 2, 6 and 12 months after admission (resulting in three further data points, t1 to t3) and will be analyzed via intention-to-treat approach. DISCUSSION: This study may determine the positive effects of PS added to HT, prove additional evidence for the efficacy of PS and thereby facilitate its further implementation into psychiatric settings. The aim is to improve quality of mental health care and patients' recovery as well as to reduce the risk of relapses and hospitalizations for patients with SMI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04336527 , April 7, 2020.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Mental Health , Counseling/methods , Humans , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Personal Satisfaction , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome
15.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol ; 57(12): 2445-2455, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2035021

ABSTRACT

AIM: Evidence indicates most people were resilient to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health. However, evidence also suggests the pandemic effect on mental health may be heterogeneous. Therefore, we aimed to identify groups of trajectories of common mental disorders' (CMD) symptoms assessed before (2017-19) and during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020-2021), and to investigate predictors of trajectories. METHODS: We assessed 2,705 participants of the ELSA-Brasil COVID-19 Mental Health Cohort study who reported Clinical Interview Scheduled-Revised (CIS-R) data in 2017-19 and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) data in May-July 2020, July-September 2020, October-December 2020, and April-June 2021. We used an equi-percentile approach to link the CIS-R total score in 2017-19 with the DASS-21 total score. Group-based trajectory modeling was used to identify CMD trajectories and adjusted multinomial logistic regression was used to investigate predictors of trajectories. RESULTS: Six groups of CMD symptoms trajectories were identified: low symptoms (17.6%), low-decreasing symptoms (13.7%), low-increasing symptoms (23.9%), moderate-decreasing symptoms (16.8%), low-increasing symptoms (23.3%), severe-decreasing symptoms (4.7%). The severe-decreasing trajectory was characterized by age < 60 years, female sex, low family income, sedentary behavior, previous mental disorders, and the experience of adverse events in life. LIMITATIONS: Pre-pandemic characteristics were associated with lack of response to assessments. Our occupational cohort sample is not representative. CONCLUSION: More than half of the sample presented low levels of CMD symptoms. Predictors of trajectories could be used to detect individuals at-risk for presenting CMD symptoms in the context of global adverse events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Cohort Studies , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology
16.
J Affect Disord ; 318: 393-399, 2022 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031407

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and public life restrictions may have a negative impact on people's mental health. Therefore, we analyzed whether this condition affected the occurrence of suicide attempts (SA) over 20 months during the pandemic period. METHODS: We included patient records according to DSM-5 criteria for suicidal behavior disorders (n = 825) between Jan 1, 2017, and Dec 31, 2021. We applied interrupted time-series Poisson regression models to investigate the effect of the pandemic on SA occurrence, time trends, and seasonal patterns in the whole group of patients as well as stratified by age and gender. RESULTS: There was no significant effect of the pandemic on the occurrence of SA in the overall group. However, we observed a significant impact of the pandemic on the seasonal pattern of SA, also the variance differed significantly (pre-pandemic mean ± variance: 13.33 ± 15.75, pandemic: mean ± variance: 13.86 ± 7.26), indicating less periodic variation in SA during the pandemic. Male patients and young adults mainly contributed to this overall effect. Subgroup analysis revealed a significant difference in SA trends during the pandemic in older adults (>55 years) compared with younger adults (18-35 years); SA numbers increased in older adults and decreased in younger adults as the pandemic progressed. LIMITATIONS: A few patients may have received initial care in an emergency department after SA without being referred to psychiatry. CONCLUSIONS: In general, the COVID-19 pandemic and related measures did not significantly affect the occurrence of SA but did significantly affect the dynamics. In addition, the pandemic appeared to affect suicidal behavior differently across age groups as it progressed. Particularly for the older adult group, negative long-term effects of the pandemic on suicidal behavior can be derived from the present results, indicating the need to strengthen suicide prevention for the elderly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/psychology , Pandemics , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Young Adult
17.
18.
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being ; 17(1): 2122135, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008459

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: People with severe mental ill-health (SMI) experience profound health inequalities. The Optimizing Wellbeing in Self-isolation study (OWLS) explored the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions on people with SMI, including how and why their physical and mental health may have changed during the pandemic. METHODS: The OLWS study comprised two surveys and two nested qualitative studies. Of 367 people recruited to the study, 235 expressed interest in taking part in a qualitative interview. In the first qualitative study eighteen interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of participants. RESULTS: We identified six factors which influenced peoples' health, positively and negatively: Staying Physically Active; Maintaining a Balanced and Healthy Diet; Work or Not Working; Daily Routine and Good Sleep; Staying Connected to Family, Friends and the Local Community; and Habits, Addictions and Coping with Anxiety Created by the Pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Different aspects of lifestyle are highly interconnected. For people with SMI, loss of routine and good sleep, poor diet and lack of exercise can compound each other, leading to a decline in physical and mental health. If people are supported to understand what helps them stay well, they can establish their own frameworks to draw on during difficult times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Humans , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
19.
Biol Psychiatry ; 92(7): 528-529, 2022 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2003887
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