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1.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 8(5): 444-450, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537216

ABSTRACT

Psychiatric disorders, and especially severe mental illness, are associated with an increased risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection and COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality. People with severe mental illness should therefore be prioritised in vaccine allocation strategies. Here, we discuss the risk for worse COVID-19 outcomes in this vulnerable group, the effect of severe mental illness and psychotropic medications on vaccination response, the attitudes of people with severe mental illness towards vaccination, and, the potential barriers to, and possible solutions for, an efficient vaccination programme in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunization Programs , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Immunization Programs/ethics , Immunization Programs/methods , Immunization Programs/organization & administration , Mental Disorders/psychology , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination Coverage , Vulnerable Populations/psychology
4.
Bull Menninger Clin ; 85(3): 254-270, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470682

ABSTRACT

Sleep problems among frontline medical staff during the COVID-19 epidemic require attention. A total of 249 frontline medical staff who were recruited to support Wuhan completed this cross-sectional study. A web-based questionnaire about insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue was used to assess mental health status. The prevalence of sleep disorders among frontline medical staff was 50.6%. More time spent in Wuhan and a history of insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue were associated with a higher risk of insomnia. People who stayed in Wuhan for a long time with a history of insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue symptoms might be at high risk of insomnia.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , China , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors
5.
Riv Psichiatr ; 55(6): 1-2, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463355

ABSTRACT

Scopo del presente lavoro è descrivere alcune reazioni umane e alcuni elementi di psicopatologia durante la pandemia. La pandemia ha messo in luce diversi aspetti dell'animo umano negli operatori sanitari, nei pazienti e nelle altre persone. Vi sono medici, infermieri, operatori che lavorano 24 ore su 24 per curare e assistere i malati, accompagnare chi non ce la fa. Incuranti del rischio di contagio, della fatica, dei propri bisogni hanno un'unica priorità : aiutare, fare il proprio dovere. Molti di loro si sono ammalati, molti sono morti. Tra loro vi è un alto tasso di contagiati, malati, qualcuno muore. Tutti sono stremati. Sono stati chiamati eroi, ma non tutti sono eroi. I nostri pazienti psichiatrici, inizialmente, sono i più adeguati, prudenti, saggi, responsabili. Con poche, semplici parole esprimono tanta consapevolezza e sana umanità. Al contrario, altre persone, quelle che normalmente si sentono "al di sopra delle cose", entrano nel panico Questa pandemia ci ha fatto capire (se ancora lo ignoravamo) che la vita è fragile, che tutto ciò che ci circonda e su cui costruiamo le nostre sicurezze è precario e incerto.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Italy , Mental Disorders/psychology , National Health Programs/standards , Psychopathology , Xenophobia
7.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 8(10): 929-936, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415873

ABSTRACT

Informal (unpaid) carers are an integral part of all societies and the health and social care systems in the UK depend on them. Despite the valuable contributions and key worker status of informal carers, their lived experiences, wellbeing, and needs have been neglected during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this Health Policy, we bring together a broad range of clinicians, researchers, and people with lived experience as informal carers to share their thoughts on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on UK carers, many of whom have felt abandoned as services closed. We focus on the carers of children and young people and adults and older adults with mental health diagnoses, and carers of people with intellectual disability or neurodevelopmental conditions across different care settings over the lifespan. We provide policy recommendations with the aim of improving outcomes for all carers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Health Policy/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Services Needs and Demand/legislation & jurisprudence , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Caregivers/economics , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Intellectual Disability/epidemiology , Intellectual Disability/psychology , Life Change Events , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Morbidity/trends , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Social Support , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
8.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 8(10): 853, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1414794
9.
Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry ; 110: 110330, 2021 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public health measures to contain the spread of COVID-19 have resulted in adverse effects, including high level of psychological distress, anxiety, and depression. AIMS: This study explored adolescent psychopathological profiles at age 17, and their role in predicting the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic at age 19. METHODS: The analyses used a sample of 904 participants (mean age = 19.17 years) from the Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) sweep 7 who completed the mental health questions from January 2018 to March 2019 (mean age = 17.18 years) and the COVID-19 Survey in May 2020. Adolescent psychopathological profiles were identified by means of latent class analysis. RESULTS: Four psychopathological profiles were identified: "low-symptom class" (60.17% of participants), "high-symptom class" (23.01% of participants), "substance/behavioural addictions class" (12.03% of participants), and "emotion-dysregulation class" (4.79% of participants). Adolescents in the high-symptom and emotional-dysregulation classes had the worst outcome during the lockdown. Specifically, they experienced more stress, conflict and loneliness, and lower levels of perceived social support than adolescents in the other psychopathological classes. Adolescents in the emotional-dysregulation class also consumed more alcohol and had worse financial situation during the lockdown compared to pre- lockdown period. CONCLUSION: Adolescent psychopathological profiles predicted mental health impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Psychological Distress , Psychopathology , Risk Factors , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
10.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(37)2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402174

ABSTRACT

Several studies have been devoted to establishing the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health across gender, age, and ethnicity. However, much less attention has been paid to the differential effect of COVID-19 according to different personalities. We do this using the UK Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS), a large-scale panel survey representative of the UK population. The UKHLS allows us to assess the mental health of the same respondent before and during the COVID-19 period based on their "Big Five" personality traits and cognitive skills. We find that during the COVID-19 period, individuals who have more extravert and open personality traits report a higher mental health deterioration, while those scoring higher in agreeableness are less affected. The effect of openness is particularly strong: One more SD predicts up to 0.23 more symptoms of mental health deterioration in the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) test during the COVID-19 period. In particular, for females, cognitive skills and openness are strong predictors of mental health deterioration, while for non-British White respondents, these predictors are extraversion and openness. Neuroticism strongly predicts worse mental health cross-sectionally, but it does not lead to significantly stronger deterioration during the pandemic. The study's results are robust to the inclusion of potential confounding variables such as changes in physical health, household income, and job status (like unemployed or furloughed).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Mental Health , Pandemics , Personality , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Middle Aged , United Kingdom/epidemiology
11.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 50(3): 225-231, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401810

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The crisis situation generated by COVID-19 and the measures adopted have generated social changes in the normal dynamics of the general population and especially for health workers, who find themselves caring for patients with suspected or confirmed infection. Recent studies have detected in them depression and anxiety symptoms and burnout syndrome, with personal and social conditions impacting their response capacity during the health emergency. Our aim was to generate recommendations for the promotion and protection of the mental health of health workers and teams in the first line of care in the health emergency due to COVID-19. METHODS: A rapid literature search was carried out in PubMed and Google Scholar, and an iterative expert consensus and through electronic consultation, with 13 participants from the areas of psychology, psychiatry and medicine; the grading of its strength and directionality was carried out according to the international standards of the Joanna Briggs Institute. RESULTS: Thirty-one recommendations were generated on self-care of health workers, community care among health teams, screening for alarm signs in mental health and for health institutions. CONCLUSIONS: The promotion and protection activities in mental health to face the health emergency generated by COVID-19 worldwide can include coordinated actions between workers, health teams and health institutions as part of a comprehensive, community care, co-responsible and sustained over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/therapy , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Occupational Health Services/methods , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/standards , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Occupational Health Services/standards , Preventive Health Services/methods , Preventive Health Services/standards , Self Care/methods , Self Care/standards
12.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256406, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398932

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic brought about large increases in mental distress. The uptake of COVID-19 vaccines is expected to significantly reduce health risks, improve economic and social outcomes, with potential benefits to mental health. PURPOSE: To examine short-term changes in mental distress following the receipt of the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. METHODS: Participants included 8,003 adults from the address-based sampled, nationally representative Understanding America Study (UAS), surveyed at regular intervals between March 10, 2020, and March 31, 2021 who completed at least two waves of the survey. Respondents answered questions about COVID-19 vaccine status and self-reported mental distress as measured with the four-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4). Fixed-effects regression models were used to identify the change in PHQ-4 scores and categorical indicators of mental distress resulting from the application of the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. RESULTS: People who were vaccinated between December 2020 and March 2021 reported decreased mental distress levels in the surveys conducted after receiving the first dose. The fixed-effects estimates show an average effect of receiving the vaccine equivalent to 4% of the standard deviation of PHQ-4 scores (p-value<0.01), a reduction in 1 percentage point (4% reduction from the baseline level) in the probability of being at least mildly depressed, and of 0.7 percentage points (15% reduction from the baseline level) in the probability of being severely depressed (p-value = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: Getting the first dose of COVID-19 resulted in significant improvements in mental health, beyond improvements already achieved since mental distress peaked in the spring of 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Health Questionnaire/statistics & numerical data , Psychological Distress , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 15828, 2021 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343475

ABSTRACT

Precise remote evaluation of both suicide risk and psychiatric disorders is critical for suicide prevention as well as for psychiatric well-being. Using questionnaires is an alternative to labor-intensive diagnostic interviews in a large general population, but previous models for predicting suicide attempts suffered from low sensitivity. We developed and validated a deep graph neural network model that increased the prediction sensitivity of suicide risk in young adults (n = 17,482 for training; n = 14,238 for testing) using multi-dimensional questionnaires and suicidal ideation within 2 weeks as the prediction target. The best model achieved a sensitivity of 76.3%, specificity of 83.4%, and an area under curve of 0.878 (95% confidence interval, 0.855-0.899). We demonstrated that multi-dimensional deep features covering depression, anxiety, resilience, self-esteem, and clinico-demographic information contribute to the prediction of suicidal ideation. Our model might be useful for the remote evaluation of suicide risk in the general population of young adults for specific situations such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/psychology , Neural Networks, Computer , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide, Attempted/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Area Under Curve , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Prognosis , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Republic of Korea , Resilience, Psychological , Risk Factors , Self Concept , Sensitivity and Specificity , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
Am J Health Behav ; 45(4): 771-784, 2021 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339701

ABSTRACT

Objectives: COVID-19 has become a global concern, affecting both physical and mental health. In this study, we measured knowledge, fear, anxiety, and psychological distress related to COVID-19 among residents of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: A total of 1053 adult participants completed a Web-based cross-sectional survey. Results: Our data revealed 75.7% of the sample to be knowledgeable about COVID-19, 15.3% had experienced anxiety and 50.4%, psychological distress about COVID-19. Being knowledgeable about COVID-19 was significantly associated with having spent one to 2 hours reading about COVID-19. There was also an association between being knowledgeable about COVID-19 and low levels of anxiety and psychological distress. Psychological distress was associated with a history of mental illness (76.2%), anxiety (85.1%), and fear of COVID-19 (21±6.6). Age, history of mental illness (OR = 3.70, 95% CI = 2.35-5.82, p < .001), and COVID-19 anxiety (OR = 2.48, 95% CI = 1.48-4.13, p < .001) and fear (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.14-1.20, p < .001) were risk factors for psychological distress. Conclusion: Our results showed significant psychological distress in the UAE population. Providing pre-recorded workshops and continuous telemedicine on biopsychosocial perspectives of COVID-19 may enhance the COVID-19 insight and reduce the COVID-19 anxiety and psychological distress.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Fear/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Mental Disorders/psychology , Psychological Distress , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , United Arab Emirates
17.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 13(1): e1-e3, 2021 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339651

ABSTRACT

During the start of the first wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, two family physicians in Tshwane, South Africa, reviewed the people at high-risk within their Health Catchment Area. The largest residential mental health care facility in Gauteng fell under their care, and they were responsible for providing care and support to this facility. Family physicians have to lead the primary care team and simultaneously take care of the well-being of their team members. This report discusses how these family physicians used digital platforms and virtual care to successfully coordinate and manage the response to an outbreak of COVID-19 at this mental healthcare facility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Continuity of Patient Care , Mental Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , Physicians, Family , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa/epidemiology
18.
Przegl Epidemiol ; 75(1): 51-57, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337909

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study was conducted to examine the effect of quarantine caused by COVID-19 on people's mental health and social trust. METHOD: In this study, the sample size covers 2919 people in the southwest of Iran that was selected cluster sample method and was evaluated online using tools of social trust and a checklist of mental disorder syndrome. RESULTS: Due to the results, COVID-19 affected all people's mental health negatively, but there was a significant difference between the rates of COVID-19 caused anxiety and the dimensions of the psychological problems and social trust different between men and women and married and single people, and also the education level. There was no significant relationship between any of the demographic variables and social trust variables, corona anxiety, and dimensions of psychological problems. And there was a negative and significant relationship between the dimensions of social trust and the dimensions of psychological problems. Moreover, the social trust rate in the subjects was desirable. Based on the results and the cutoff point of 2.5 as a border of healthy and unhealthy psychological dimensions, 4.5% had pathological anxiety, 7.3% had pathological depression, 5% had aggression, and 5.9 % had pathological obsessive-compulsive disorder. Depression had the highest scores, and aggression had the lowest scores. CONCLUSION: Due to this study's results, policymakers should consider measures that should be taken in crisis to support all people, especially vulnerable people in psychological, economic, social, spiritual, and psychological fields. On the other hand, the government must train the public through the mass media to cope with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/psychology , Trust , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Status , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Poland , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
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