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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(31): e26854, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191051

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Prompted by the need to measure the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 on main areas of quality of life related to mental health (MH), the COV-19-impact on quality of life (COV19-QoL) scale has been developed recently. We measured how patients seeking face-to-face MH care perceived the coronavirus disease 2019 impact on QoL and how socio-demographic factors, stress, and personality contributed to QoL in this diagnostically diverse population.Patients aged 18 to 65 years (n = 251) who came for the first time to the outpatient units during the 6-week index-period (May 21-July 1, 2020) were included. The cross-sectional assessment involved sociodemographic variables, working diagnosis, personality traits (7-dimension model, including HEXACO and DELTA), stress (list of threatening experiences and proximity to virus), and COV19-QoL.The perceived impact of the pandemic on QoL was above the theoretical mean of a 5-point scale (COV19-Qol = 3.1 ±â€Š1.2). No association between total COV19-QoL score, sociodemographic parameters, and working diagnoses was found in the present sample. After testing whether positional (threatening experiences), or dispositional (personality) factors were predominant in the perceived impact of COV-19 on QoL, significant predictors of the outcome were personality traits Disintegration (B = 0.52; P < .01) and Emotionality (B = 0.18; P < .05).It seems that pervasiveness and uncertainty of the pandemic threat triggers-especially in those high on Disintegration trait-a chain of mental events with the decrease of QoL as a final result. Present findings could be used to establish a profile of MH help seeking population in relation to this biological disaster, and to further explore QoL and personality in different contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Med J Aust ; 216(2): 78-79, 2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2155692
5.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1434, 2022 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139271

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the experience of receiving in-person and virtual clinical health care services during the COVID-19 pandemic for Canadian children with developmental disabilities and delays facing multiple layers of vulnerability (e.g., low income, low educational attainment families). We examined the relationship between socio-demographic factors and the receipt of these services (physical and mental health services) during COVID-19 for Canadian children with these conditions. METHODS: Data collected in Canada for the Global Report on Developmental Delays, Disorders and Disabilities were used. The survey: (1) was developed and disseminated in collaboration with caregivers of children with disabilities, (2) included topics such as response to the pandemic and receipt of services and supports, and (3) documented the experiences of a non-random convenience sample of caregivers of children (any age) with these conditions during and prior to the pandemic. We used four logistic regression models to assess the association between socio-demographic factors and receipt of services. RESULTS: Being a single parent, having low educational attainment (high school or less), having low income (making less than $40,000 per year), working less than full time (working part-time, working reduced hours due to COVID, retired, stay home parent or student), as well as male gender and older age of the child with disability were factors associated with decreased likelihood of receiving services. CONCLUSION: Our findings point to the need for tailoring services for families of children with disabilities, particularly low socioeconomic status families, to ensure continuity of care during public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Children , Mental Health Services , Child , Male , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Canada/epidemiology , Demography , Delivery of Health Care
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110106

ABSTRACT

Although endeavours to protect mental well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic were taken at national and regional levels, e.g., mental support in school, a COVID-19 emergency toll-free number for psychological support, these were sporadic conjunctural financing interventions. In this Communication, the authors conducted a systematic search for programmatic and policy documents and reports with a solid literature and policy analysis concerning the main objective, which is to analyse the appropriateness in implementing gender- and age-sensitive, integrated, youth-centred mental health services in Italy. The Italian National Action Plan for Mental Health reports a highly fragmented situation in the Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry services, in terms of an integrated and comprehensive regional network of services for the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of neuropsychological disorders in young people. Wide-ranging interventions, systemic actions should be implemented, funded, and included in an overall structural strengthening of the healthcare system, including those dedicated to transition support services. In this context, the National Recovery and Resilience Plan (NRRP), may represent an opportunity to leverage specific funds for mental health in general, and for youth in particular. Finally, mental health service governance should be harmonized at both national and regional EU levels-with the adoption of best practices implemented by other Member States. This includes, among others, health information system and data collection, which is critical for analysing epidemiological trends and for monitoring and evaluating services, to offer a public and integrated system for the care and protection of young people, in line with the Convention on the Rights of the Child.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Child , Adolescent , Humans , Public Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Policy Making
9.
Contrast Media Mol Imaging ; 2022: 7580008, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2121661

ABSTRACT

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a fatal infectious disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus, which poses a serious threat to human health. The contagion of AIDS has greatly increased the psychological pressure of frontline medical staff. The mental health service behavior of medical staff based on electrocardiograms is analyzed. Firstly, an automatic ECG analysis technique is employed to evaluate the mental health service behavior of medical staff. Then, in order to promote the relationship between doctors and patients, Holter's algorithm is applied to improve mental health services. Subsequently, the experiment based on ECG data is conducted to solve the problem of relieving the psychological pressure of medical staff. All samples are divided into high group (average score is 29.21), average group (average score is 31.43), and low group (average score is 34.85) according to the first 20%, middle 60%, and last 20%. The experimental results show that a considerable number of frontline medical personnel have psychological problems in AIDS surgery.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , Mental Health Services , Electrocardiography , Humans , Medical Staff
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(11): e39662, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118080

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Access to mental health treatment across Canada remains a challenge, with many reporting unmet care needs. National and provincial e-Mental health (eMH) programs have been developed over the past decade across Canada, with many more emerging during COVID-19 in an attempt to reduce barriers related to geography, isolation, transportation, physical disability, and availability. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with the utilization of eMH services across Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic using Andersen and Newman's framework of health service utilization. METHODS: This study used data gathered from the 2021 Canadian Digital Health Survey, a cross-sectional, web-based survey of 12,052 Canadians aged 16 years and older with internet access. Bivariate associations between the use of eMH services and health service utilization factors (predisposing, enabling, illness level) of survey respondents were assessed using χ2 tests for categorical variables and t tests for the continuous variable. Logistic regression was used to predict the probability of using eMH services given the respondents' predisposing, enabling, and illness-level factors while adjusting for respondents' age and gender. RESULTS: The proportion of eMH service users among survey respondents was small (883/12,052, 7.33%). Results from the logistic regression suggest that users of eMH services were likely to be those with regular family physician access (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, P=.02), living in nonrural communities (OR 1.08, P<.001), having undergraduate (OR 1.40, P=.001) or postgraduate (OR 1.48, P=.003) education, and being eHealth literate (OR 1.05, P<.001). Those with lower eMH usage were less likely to speak English at home (OR 0.06, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides empirical evidence on the impact of individual health utilization factors on the use of eMH among Canadians during the COVID-19 pandemic. Given the opportunities and promise of eMH services in increasing access to care, future digital interventions should both tailor themselves toward users of these services and consider awareness campaigns to reach nonusers. Future research should also focus on understanding the reasons behind the use and nonuse of eMH services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Humans , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Canada/epidemiology
11.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0276834, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117962

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Gain insight into the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors of mental health problems among the Dutch general population and different age groups in November-December 2020, compared with the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors in the same period in 2018 and 2019. More specifically, the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors of anxiety and depression symptoms, sleep problems, fatigue, impaired functioning due to health problems, and use of medicines for sleep problems, medicines for anxiety and depression, and mental health service. METHODS: We extracted data from the Longitudinal Internet studies for the Social Sciences (LISS) panel that is based on a probability sample of the Dutch population of 16 years and older by Statistics Netherlands. We focused on three waves of the longitudinal Health module in November-December 2018 (T1), November-December 2019 (T2), and November-December 2020 (T3), and selected respondents who were 18 years and older at T1. In total, 4,064 respondents participated in all three surveys. Data were weighted using 16 demographics profiles of the Dutch adult population. The course of mental health problems was examined using generalized estimating equations (GEE) for longitudinal ordinal data and differences in incidence with logistic regression analyses. In both types of analyses, we controlled for sex, age, marital status, employment status, education level, and physical disease. RESULTS: Among the total study sample, no significant increase in the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms, sleep problems, fatigue, impaired functioning due to health problems, use of medicines for sleep problems, of medicines for anxiety and depression, and of mental health service in November-December 2020 was observed, compared with the prevalence in November-December 2018 and 2019 (T3 did not differ from T1 and T2). Among the four different age categories (18-34, 35-49, 50-64, and 65 years old and older respondents), 50-64 years respondents had a significantly lower prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms at T3 than at T1 and T2, while the prevalence at T1 and T2 did not differ. A similar pattern among 65+ respondents was found for mental health service use. We found no indications that the incidence of examined health problems at T2 (no problems at T1, problems at T2) and T3 (no problems at T2, problems at T3) differed. Risk factors for mental health problems at T2 were mostly similar to risk factors at T3; sex and age were less/not a risk factor for sleep problems at T3 compared with at T2. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence, incidence, and risk factors of the examined mental health problems examined nine months after the COVID-19 outbreak appear to be very stable across the end of 2018, 2019, and 2020 among the Dutch adult population and different age categories, suggesting that the Dutch adult population in general is rather resilient given all disruptions due to this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Pandemics , Prevalence , Mental Health , Incidence , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/psychology , Risk Factors , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology
12.
Trials ; 23(1): 942, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117899

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the context of COVID-19, NHS Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) and other children's mental health services have faced major challenges in providing psychological treatments that (i) work when delivered remotely and (ii) can be delivered efficiently to manage increases in referrals as social distancing measures have been relaxed. Anxiety problems are a common reason for referral to CAMHS, children with pre-existing anxiety problems are particularly vulnerable in the context of COVID-19, and there were concerns about increases in childhood anxiety as schools reopened. The proposed research will evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a brief online parent-led cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) delivered by the OSI (Online Support and Intervention for child anxiety) platform with remote support from a CAMHS therapist compared to 'COVID-19 treatment as usual' (C-TAU) in CAMHS and other children's mental health services throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We will conduct a two-arm, multi-site, randomised controlled non-inferiority trial to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of OSI with therapist support compared to CAMHS and other child mental health services 'COVID-19 treatment as usual' (C-TAU) during the COVID-19 outbreak and to explore parent and therapists' experiences. DISCUSSION: If non-inferiority is shown, the research will provide (1) a solution for efficient psychological treatment for child anxiety disorders while social distancing (for the COVID-19 context and future pandemics); (2) an efficient means of treatment delivery as 'normal service' resumes to enable CAMHS to cope with the anticipated increase in referrals; and (3) a demonstration of rapid, high-quality evaluation and application of online interventions within NHS CAMHS to drive forward much-needed further digital innovation and evaluation in CAMHS settings. The primary beneficiaries will be children with anxiety disorders and their families, NHS CAMHS teams, and commissioners who will access a potentially effective, cost-effective, and efficient treatment for child anxiety problems. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN ISRCTN12890382 . Registered prospectively on 23 October 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Humans , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Pandemics , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Parents/psychology , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/therapy , United Kingdom , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
13.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1360, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has not only impacted intensive care units, but all healthcare services generally. This PsyGipo2C project specifically investigates how psychiatry and mental health professionals have been affected by the reorganizations and constraints imposed, which have reshaped their often already difficult working conditions. METHODS: Our research combined quantitative and qualitative methods, surveying and interviewing health professionals of all occupations working in psychiatric and mental health services. A questionnaire was completed by 1241 professionals from 10 European countries, and 13 group interviews were conducted across 5 countries. In addition to this, 31 individual interviews were conducted in Belgium and France. RESULTS: Among the questionnaire respondents, 70.2% felt that their workload had increased, particularly due to their tasks being diversified and due to increased complexity in the provision of care. 48.9% felt that finding a work-life balance had become more difficult, and 59.5% felt their health had been affected by the crisis. The impact of the health crisis nevertheless varied across professions: our data provides insight into how the health measures have had a differential impact on professional tasks and roles across the various categories of occupations, obliging professionals to make various adaptations. The distress incurred has been linked not only to these new constraints in their work, but also to the combination of these with other pressures in their personal lives, which has consequently compromised their well-being and their ability to cope with multiple demands. DISCUSSION: The COVID-19 health crisis has had varying impacts depending on the profession and access to remote work, sometimes leading to conflicts within the teams. The suffering expressed by the professionals was tied to their values and patterns of investment in work. Our research also highlights how these professionals made little use of the psychological supports offered, probably due to a reluctance to acknowledge that their mental health was affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Anxiety , Europe/epidemiology
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116056

ABSTRACT

In line with priorities set by the Italian Ministry of Health and international literature, the "Crisalide project" provides specific care pathways aimed at young adults (YA) with severe mental disorders (SMD). As described in Materials and Methods, it consists of three lines of activity: transition to adult mental health services (TSMREE/CSM 17-19); Diagnostic, Therapeutic, and Assistance Pathways for Young Adults (PDTA-YA); high-intensity treatment center for young adults "Argolab2 Potential Space". The aim of the study is to assess the results relating to the first three years of implementation of this clinical-organizational model (2018/2020) according to the process indicators identified by the ministry. Among the population aged 18-30 under treatment, results show increased prevalence (30%) and incidence (26%); 0% treatment conclusions due to the expiration of the conventional time limit; 0% involuntary hospitalizations (TSO); 0% STPIT hospitalizations; 0% repeated hospitalizations; 0% hospitalizations in the common mental disorders diagnostic group. Among the population of Argolab2 Potential Space, 45.4% have resumed studies; 40.9% have had a first work experience; 22.7% have obtained educational or training qualifications, and 18.2% live in independent houses. At a time when the academic literature underlines the terrible impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on this population, the present study confirms that specific treatment processes for young populations are a protective factor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Mental Health Services , Humans , Young Adult , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Community Mental Health Centers , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology
15.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1350, 2022 Nov 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115845

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global COVID-19 pandemic necessitated rapid adoption of remote provision across child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). The study aimed to understand young people's, parents'/carers', and professionals' experiences of remote provision across CAMHS in one NHS Trust in the North West of England to inform future recovery practice so that remote sessions can continue where they have been well received but re-thought or replaced where they have not. METHODS: The study sample comprised three groups: (i) young people, (ii) parents/carers, and (iii) clinical staff. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were used to collect data. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Three overarching themes were identified: 'Remote therapeutic experiences'; 'Spaces and places of therapy'; and 'Future of CAMHS'. Although remote appointments increased flexibility within the service, the quality of the relational experience was altered, typically for the worse. Clinicians felt less able to examine vital forms of non-verbal communication, which were considered instrumental in assessing and engaging people experiencing difficulties, leaving some questioning their professionalism. Although some young people suggested that remote provision increased comfort levels, others felt their place of comfort and safety was invaded. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced travel time for both clinicians and families may increase capacity, enabling the service to meet the increased demand if clinical effectiveness can be preserved. In considering future models of provision, assessing clinical need, patient and family preference, and access to space and hardware are all critical when deciding which modality to use for the best outcomes for each individual.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Health Services , COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Humans , Adolescent , Child , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parents/psychology
16.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(1): 25-31, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100748

ABSTRACT

Deep emotional traumas in societies overwhelmed by large-scale human disasters, like, global pandemic diseases, natural disasters, man-made tragedies, war conflicts, social crises, etc., can cause massive stress-related disorders. Motivated by the ongoing global coronavirus pandemic, the article provides an overview of scientific evidence regarding adverse impact of diverse human disasters on mental health in afflicted groups and societies. Following this broader context, psychosocial impact of COVID-19 as a specific global human disaster is presented, with an emphasis on disturbing mental health aspects of the ongoing pandemic. Limited resources of mental health services in a number of countries around the world are illustrated, which will be further stretched by the forthcoming increase in demand for mental health services due to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Mental health challenges are particularly important for the Republic of Croatia in the current situation, due to disturbing stress of the 2020 Zagreb earthquake and the high pre-pandemic prevalence of chronic Homeland-War-related posttraumatic stress disorders. Comprehensive approach based on digital psychiatry is proposed to address the lack of access to psychiatric services, which includes artificial intelligence, telepsychiatry and an array of new technologies, like internet-based computer-aided mental health tools and services. These tools and means should be utilized as an important part of the whole package of measures to mitigate negative mental health effects of the global coronavirus pandemic. Our scientific and engineering experiences in the design and development of digital tools and means in mitigation of stress-related disorders and assessment of stress resilience are presented. Croatian initiative on enhancement of interdisciplinary research of psychiatrists, psychologists and computer scientists on the national and EU level is important in addressing pressing mental health concerns related to the ongoing pandemic and similar human disasters.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Disasters , Mental Health Services , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychiatry , Telemedicine , Artificial Intelligence , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Croatia , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , Psychiatry/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/trends , User-Computer Interface
17.
BMJ ; 379: o2122, 2022 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097957
18.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(2): 99-107, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096529

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global health emergency, the scale, speed and nature of which is beyond anything most of us have experienced in our lifetimes. The mental health burden associated with this pandemic is also likely to surpass anything we have previously experienced. In this editorial, we seek to anticipate the nature of this additional mental health burden and make recommendations on how to mitigate against and prepare for this significant increase in mental health service demand.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Humans , Ireland/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Secondary Care
19.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(2): 145-153, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096526

ABSTRACT

Swift medically led scientifically informed responses to the Covid-19 epidemic nationally have been demonstrably superior to other, non-scientific approaches. In forensic psychiatry and across all psychiatric services, urgent and clinically led responses have underlined redundancies and confusions in the governance of mental health services and a vacuum in policy makers. For the future, a greater emphasis on services for patients with schizophrenia and other severe, enduring mental disorders must aim at reducing standardised mortality ratios, managing risk of violence and improving hard outcomes such as symptomatic remission, functional recovery and forensic recovery of autonomy. This will require more use of information technology at service level and at national level where Scandinavian-style population-based data linkage research must now become legally sanctioned and necessary. A national research and development centre for medical excellence in forensic psychiatry is urgently required and is complimentary to and different from quality management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Schizophrenia , Forensic Psychiatry , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(3): 214-219, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096525

ABSTRACT

In the last three decades, early intervention for psychosis (EIP) services have been established worldwide and have resulted in superior symptomatic and functional outcomes for people affected by psychotic disorders. These improved outcomes are a result of reducing delays to treatment and the provision of specialised, holistic interventions. The COVID-19 pandemic poses significant challenges to the delivery of these services, such as undetected cases or long delays to treatment. Furthermore, the COVID-19 pandemic will likely increase the mental health needs of communities, including the incidence of psychotic disorders. In this perspective piece, we provide suggestions as to how EIP services can adapt within this environment, such as utilising novel technologies. Finally, we argue that despite the economic consequences of the pandemic, the funding for mental health services, including EI services, should be increased in line with the need for these services during and beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Psychotic Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Psychotic Disorders/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
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