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1.
J Prev Alzheimers Dis ; 9(2): 277-285, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Widespread lifestyle risk reduction at the community level is considered effective in decreasing Alzheimer's disease (AD). To address the limited use of risk deduction in AD, this study aimed to explore the feasibility of community-level implementation. Diverse older adults (60+) living in Richmond, VA, with incomes below $12,000/year and managing diabetic/cardiovascular symptoms were offered weekly lifestyle telephone-health coaching for 12-weeks in 2019-2020 (Phase 1). The health coaching sessions were framed to provide AD lifestyle risk reduction education, goal setting, and support: motivations and self-efficacy. The study sample (n=40, mean age 68 years (range: 60-76 years)) was 90% African American/Black (n=36), 100% Non-Hispanic, and 45% males (n=18). Twenty-five participants (60%) reported experiencing some/often memory problems in the last 12-months. Thirty-nine (95%) of subjects successfully participated in coaching sessions; on average, 11 (91.9%) sessions per subject were completed. Participants provided positive anecdotal feedback and stated the need for continued health coaching. Consequently, n=30 (75%) of the original sample consented to continued health coaching during the 2020-2021 COVID-19 pandemic (Phase 2). All study subjects were examined at baseline (Time 1), 3-month (Time 2), covid-baseline (Time 3), and 3-months postcovid-baseline (Time 4). Repeated Measures ANOVAs were done to examine Time and Time*Memory Status effects. RESULTS: There was a total risk reduction at Phase 1 (F=9.26; p=.004; effect size=.19). At Phase 2, alcohol use decreased (p=.05), quadratic time effects were observed in physical activity (p=.01-.02), and cubic time effects were observed in depression (p=.02). Overall, total risk reduction in Phase 2 was observed at F=5.05; p=.03 effect size=.16. Pre/post-test analyses indicated improvement in Memory Problem Time Interaction (p=.007), AD knowledge (p=.01-.03), and Tired Days (p=.04) across Phase 1. There was also improvement in Social Isolation Time Interaction (p=.03); Tobacco Addiction (p=.001); Poor Mental Health Days (p=.05), and Worried Days Time Interaction (p=.02-.01) across Phase 2. Between subject Memory Status effects, indicating poorer baseline levels for individuals reporting memory problems had greater improvement seen in memory complaints (p=.001), poor mental health days (.02), and tired days (.003-.01). CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary work creates the impetus for future large-scale lifestyle AD risk reduction investigations to mitigate and improve modifiable AD risk among low-income, diverse older adults, including individuals reporting memory problems. Our findings surrounding participant engagement and positive trends in AD risk reduction support the hypothesis that telephone-based health coaching is a practical and feasible AD risk reduction intervention.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , COVID-19 , Mentoring , Aged , Alzheimer Disease/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Telephone
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 359, 2022 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1840964

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The redeployment of mentors and restrictions on in-person face-to-face mentoring meetings during the COVID-19 pandemic has compromised mentoring efforts in Palliative Medicine (PM). Seeking to address these gaps, we evaluate the notion of a combined novice, peer-, near-peer and e-mentoring (CNEP) and interprofessional team-based mentoring (IPT) program. METHODS: A Systematic Evidence Based Approach (SEBA) guided systematic scoping review was carried out to study accounts of CNEP and IPT from articles published between 1st January 2000 and 28th February 2021. To enhance trustworthiness, concurrent thematic and content analysis of articles identified from structured database search using terms relating to interprofessional, virtual and peer or near-peer mentoring in medical education were employed to bring together the key elements within included articles. RESULTS: Fifteen thousand one hundred twenty one abstracts were reviewed, 557 full text articles were evaluated, and 92 articles were included. Four themes and categories were identified and combined using the SEBA's Jigsaw and Funnelling Process to reveal 4 domains - characteristics, mentoring stages, assessment methods, and host organizations. These domains suggest that CNEP's structured virtual and near-peer mentoring process complement IPT's accessible and non-hierarchical approach under the oversight of the host organizations to create a robust mentoring program. CONCLUSION: This systematic scoping review forwards an evidence-based framework to guide a CNEP-IPT program. At the same time, more research into the training and assessment methods of mentors, near peers and mentees, the dynamics of mentoring interactions and the longitudinal support of the mentoring relationships and programs should be carried out.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Palliative Medicine , Humans , Mentoring/methods , Mentors/education , Palliative Medicine/education , Pandemics
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the greatest challenges faced by people following a spinal cord injury is reintegrating into the community. Peer mentors are people who have had shared experiences of disadvantage and distress and have successfully navigated their way through the associated challenges to lead meaningful lives. Historically, peer mentoring services have been predominantly delivered via face-to-face interactions. Little is known about the experience of people with spinal cord injury engaging in online peer support services, and what the challenges and benefits are of this mode of delivery. METHODS: An anonymous online survey consisting of closed and open response questions was used to collect data. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively and qualitative data were analysed using inductive content analysis. RESULTS: Positive benefits of engaging in peer support via videoconferencing included convenience and social connectedness. The main barriers were problems with Wi-Fi and internet connections, inconsistencies between platforms and having to learn new platforms. Even though responses were mixed when comparing videoconferencing to face-to-face peer support, most participants felt socially connected. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing barriers through the provision of appropriate technology, and targeted and individualised assistance, is important to facilitate uptake of online peer support for people with spinal cord injury.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Spinal Cord Injuries , Humans , Mentors , Peer Group , Spinal Cord Injuries/therapy , Videoconferencing
4.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 31(2): 527-538, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788328

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to implement and track the outcomes of a yearlong, structured mentoring program aimed at enhancing the retention and success of underrepresented graduate and undergraduate students in speech-language pathology. METHOD: Student participants were recruited following an open application process and based on meeting eligibility requirements and committing to program completion. The focus of this program was to provide didactic training on leadership development, culturally responsive practice, and research methods used in speech-language pathology. This program emphasized participant needs assessments and goal-setting, access to one-on-one and group mentoring by peers and professionals, and a culminating experience in which participant teams completed a supervised clinical research project or a community outreach and education project. RESULTS: Forty-six participants in three cohorts completed the yearlong program in three consecutive years. Positive outcomes included program completion, degree completion, student perceptions of program benefit, completion of innovative community-engaged and research projects, and dissemination of scholarly work. CONCLUSION: Our findings from implementing this program and tracking its outcomes have implications for using innovative, equity-minded, and evidence-based strategies for retaining and mentoring minoritized students in speech-language pathology.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Speech-Language Pathology , Humans , Leadership , Mentors , Speech , Speech-Language Pathology/education , Students
5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 748307, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775924

ABSTRACT

End-user involvement constitutes an essential goal during the development of innovative solution, not only for the evaluation, but also in codesign, following a user-centered strategy. Indeed, it is a great asset of research to base the work in a user-centered approach, because it allows to build a platform that will respond to the real needs of users. The aims of this work are to present the methodology adopted to involve end-users (i.e., neurological patients, healthy elderly, and health professionals) in the evaluation of a novel virtual coaching system based on the personalized clinical pathways and to present the results obtained from these preliminary activities. Specific activities involving end-users were planned along the development phases and are referred to as participatory design. The user experience of participatory design is constituted by the two different phases: the "end-user's perspective" phase where the user involvement in experiential activities is from an observational point of view, whereas the "field study" phase is the direct participation in these activities. Evaluation tools (i.e., scales, questionnaires, and interviews) were planned to assess different aspects of the system. Thirty patients [14 with poststroke condition and 16 with Parkinson's disease (PD)], 13 healthy elderly, and six health professionals were enrolled from two clinical centers during the two phases of participatory design. Results from "end-user's perspective" phase showed globally a positive preliminary perception of the service. Overall, a positive evaluation (i.e., UEQ median score > 1) was obtained for each domain of the scale in both groups of patients and healthy subjects. The evaluation of the vCare system during the "field study" phase was assessed as excellent (>80 points) from the point of view of both patients and health professionals. According to the majority of patients, the rehabilitation service through the solution was reported to be interesting, engaging, entertaining, challenging and useful for improving impaired motor functions, and making patients aware of their cognitive abilities. Once refined and fine-tuned in the aspects highlighted in the this work, the system will be clinically tested at user's home to measure the real impact of the rehabilitative coaching services.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Aged , Humans , Motivation , Surveys and Questionnaires , User-Computer Interface
6.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 75: 83-87, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701735

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore experiences of receiving collegial support from the department of psychiatry at an acute care hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: The Resilience Coaching program launched in April 2020, with the aim of offering a timely response to supporting psychosocial needs of healthcare workers (HCWs), leveraging collegial relationships and mental health training to offer support. Twenty-four HCWs were interviewed about their experiences receiving support from resilience coaches. RESULTS: Participants reported that Resilience Coaching offered hospital staff opportunities for connection, encouragement to attend to personal wellness, and avenues to learn practical skills to assist with coping. Coaching also assisted HCWs in accessing clinical mental health support when that was requested by staff. CONCLUSIONS: Resilience Coaching is a model for supporting colleagues in an acute care hospital during a pandemic. It is generally regarded positively by participants. Further study is warranted to determine how best to engage some occupational subcultures within the hospital, and whether the model is feasible for other healthcare contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 21: e210018, 2021. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1703801

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 impacts on the activities of researchers in the field of Oral Medicine (OM) and Oral Pathology (OP). To assess the research activities and training of human resources by Brazilian productivity fellows in research (BPFR) in OM and OP in the COVID-19 Era. Material and Methods Thirty-six BPFR in OM and OP areas, funded by National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), received a virtual structured questionnaire by e-mail, on the Google Forms (Google®) platform, with questions regarding research activities and training of human resources (supervision of undergraduate and postgraduate students), during the COVID-19 pandemic. From the thirty-six BPFR in OM and OP, twenty-seven (75.0%) answered the questionnaire. Results Most of them were males (n=20; 74.1%) and were distributed in four Brazilian regions and ten states of the federation, including the Federal District. Twenty-four (88.9%) BPFR reported having suspended clinical activities, while sixteen (59.3%) answered that histopathology practices are suspended. Twenty-five (92.6%) BPFR mentioned difficulties in conducting research projects and 55.5% stated having no difficulties in the supervision of undergraduates, master's and PhD students. Conclusion The current scenario may significantly impact the diagnosis of oral diseases in Brazil. Moreover, a decrease in the scientific production of BPFR in OM and OP in the coming years is also considered.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Pathology, Oral , Research Support as Topic , Training Support , Brazil/epidemiology , Oral Medicine , COVID-19 , Research , Technological Development , Surveys and Questionnaires , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Workforce , Mentoring
10.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 18(1): e1009719, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662438

ABSTRACT

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the power to improve our lives through a wide variety of applications, many of which fall into the healthcare space; however, a lack of diversity is contributing to limitations in how broadly AI can help people. The UCSF AI4ALL program was established in 2019 to address this issue by targeting high school students from underrepresented backgrounds in AI, giving them a chance to learn about AI with a focus on biomedicine, and promoting diversity and inclusion. In 2020, the UCSF AI4ALL three-week program was held entirely online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, students participated virtually to gain experience with AI, interact with diverse role models in AI, and learn about advancing health through AI. Specifically, they attended lectures in coding and AI, received an in-depth research experience through hands-on projects exploring COVID-19, and engaged in mentoring and personal development sessions with faculty, researchers, industry professionals, and undergraduate and graduate students, many of whom were women and from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds. At the conclusion of the program, the students presented the results of their research projects at the final symposium. Comparison of pre- and post-program survey responses from students demonstrated that after the program, significantly more students were familiar with how to work with data and to evaluate and apply machine learning algorithms. There were also nominally significant increases in the students' knowing people in AI from historically underrepresented groups, feeling confident in discussing AI, and being aware of careers in AI. We found that we were able to engage young students in AI via our online training program and nurture greater diversity in AI. This work can guide AI training programs aspiring to engage and educate students entirely online, and motivate people in AI to strive towards increasing diversity and inclusion in this field.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Biomedical Research , Computational Biology , Cultural Diversity , Mentoring , Adolescent , Biomedical Research/education , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Computational Biology/education , Computational Biology/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Minority Groups , Students
11.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(1): 30-32, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631750

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The Covid-19 pandemic limited educational and career development opportunities for medical students, requiring innovative programs to accelerate professional identity formation and clinical skills acquisition. METHODS: We developed a brief coaching intervention that took place over the advanced (sub-internship) emergency medicine rotation at our institution. We trained coaches using a newly developed workshop, who met with students for an average of 4.5 hours over 3 weeks. IMPACT/EFFECTIVENESS: We showed that this coaching program was both feasible and impactful for faculty coaches and medical students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medicine , Mentoring , Students, Medical , Clinical Competence , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542566

ABSTRACT

The prevention strategies used by tennis coaches when delivering tennis lessons during the COVID-19 pandemic were analyzed in this study. An ad hoc questionnaire collected data from 655 Spanish and Portuguese speaking tennis coaches working in Latin America and Europe. Differences in the prevention measures were analyzed according to the continent, the coaches' experience, and the type of facility they worked in. Results showed that coaches used information provided from local and national organizations more than from international ones. Hand hygiene, communication of preventive strategies, and changes in the coaching methodology were the most used prevention measures. Latin American coaches and those working in public facilities implemented the measures more often than their European colleagues or those working in private venues. Finally, more experienced coaches showed a greater awareness of the adoption of the measures than their less experienced counterparts. The data provided by this research may assist in developing new specific guidelines, protocols, and interventions to help better understand the daily delivery of tennis coaching in this challenging context.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Tennis , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Int J Med Educ ; 12: 179-180, 2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526943
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(22)2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523958

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Adding developmental networks (DN) to grant-writing coaching can significantly enhance ESIs' research careers. Herein, we present study design, ESIs' characteristics and encountered challenges/lessons learned and their resolutions when deploying/implementing (a) NCR algorithm(s), (b) recruitment/retention and (c) implementing DN intervention. Methods: Nested Cluster Randomization (NCR) design governs this study implementation. The sample size is 220 ESIs intending to submit an NIH K, R, U, and/or Minority Supplement application(s). Primary outcome: intensity/sustainability of grant submission(s)/funding(s), measured by time to/between application(s). Outcome(s) analyses modes: summaries, Kaplan Meir and Cox proportional hazard models as a function of randomization groups and other predictors of outcomes. Results: In the present study, we recruited two cohorts of ESIs (N = 85): 39% African Americans, 18% Latinx, 18% Whites, 20% Asians and 6% Hawaiian/Pacific Islander/other ethnicities; 65% are women; 73% are assistant professors, 4% are Associate Professors and 23% are instructors/scientists/post-doctoral. Participants' disciplines: 32% basic/biomedical, 36% clinical/translational and 32% social/behavioral. Proposal(s) mechanisms: 61% research grants (R series), 31% career development (K series), 7% support of competitive research (SCORE) and 1% National Science Foundation applications. NCR did produce balance in the distribution of ESIs' demographics, sex at birth, ethnicity, professional appointments, background disciplines, and mechanism of sought funding. Lessons learned/challenges: NCR implementation was methodologically challenged during implementation by added constraints (e.g., assigning coaches to the same randomization arm of their participants as well as blinding them to ESIs' randomization group). Recruitment and retention were hampered by the COVID-19 pandemic and more progressive and innovative strategies were needed to heighten the visibility and outreach of this program. DN delivery was also affected by the pandemic and monitoring of ESIs' engagement and facilitation of communications interventions were needed. Resolution of these challenges effectively reconfigured NCR algorithms, recruitment/retention plans, and DN intervention delivery. We intend to recruit an additional 135 ESIs focusing on underrepresented scholars from RCMIs, CTSAs, and other programs. COVID-19 rendered this program 100% virtual, with recruitment/retention challenges and substantial disruption of ESIs' research. We may extend the grant writing period, coaching, and Mock Study Section support.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Mentoring , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 21: e210018, 2021. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1511868

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 impacts on the activities of researchers in the field of Oral Medicine (OM) and Oral Pathology (OP). To assess the research activities and training of human resources by Brazilian productivity fellows in research (BPFR) in OM and OP in the COVID-19 Era. Material and Methods Thirty-six BPFR in OM and OP areas, funded by National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), received a virtual structured questionnaire by e-mail, on the Google Forms (Google®) platform, with questions regarding research activities and training of human resources (supervision of undergraduate and postgraduate students), during the COVID-19 pandemic. From the thirty-six BPFR in OM and OP, twenty-seven (75.0%) answered the questionnaire. Results Most of them were males (n=20; 74.1%) and were distributed in four Brazilian regions and ten states of the federation, including the Federal District. Twenty-four (88.9%) BPFR reported having suspended clinical activities, while sixteen (59.3%) answered that histopathology practices are suspended. Twenty-five (92.6%) BPFR mentioned difficulties in conducting research projects and 55.5% stated having no difficulties in the supervision of undergraduates, master's and PhD students. Conclusion The current scenario may significantly impact the diagnosis of oral diseases in Brazil. Moreover, a decrease in the scientific production of BPFR in OM and OP in the coming years is also considered.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Pathology, Oral , Research Support as Topic , Training Support , Brazil/epidemiology , Oral Medicine , COVID-19 , Research , Technological Development , Surveys and Questionnaires , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Workforce , Mentoring
18.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3182-3183, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505577

ABSTRACT

Gregory Quirk has worked in New York, Honduras, and Puerto Rico with a decades-long commitment to mentorship and the global promotion of neuroscience. In an interview with Neuron, he talks about his upcoming move to the University of the Philippines and how virtual meetings are making us rethink collaborations and interactions with members of the community.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic , Mentoring , Mentors , Neurosciences , Videoconferencing , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Acad Med ; 96(11): 1580-1585, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501151

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Mentorship is valuable to medical students undergoing professional identity formation. Many institutions lack infrastructure to facilitate the personalized mentoring that supports students' integration of new professional identities with their personal identities and values. APPROACH: The authors developed a novel mentorship platform called Weave via a multistep, iterative design process, incorporating in-person and survey-based student and faculty feedback. Features of Weave include clear communication of mentorship offerings and expectations, plus opportunities to engage mentors based on professional and personal (identity-based) attributes. Faculty at Harvard Medical School who created a mentor profile within the first 3 months of launch and students who visited the website within the same period were invited to complete usability surveys in February 2019; students were invited to complete impact surveys in August 2020. OUTCOMES: Fifty-two of 132 invited faculty members (39.4%) and 80 of 185 students (43.2%) completed the usability surveys. Most of these faculty (86.5%) and students (73.8%) reported navigating the website was easy/very easy; 36 faculty (69.2%) created a mentor profile within 10 minutes. Key innovations highlighted by faculty and students were the listing of personal attributes and identities of diverse faculty; centralized, increased access to faculty mentors; ease of use; and provision of clear expectations. Nearly all students who completed the impact surveys agreed that Weave allowed them to connect with a faculty mentor whom they would not have found through other sources and to learn about the dimensions of diverse faculty. NEXT STEPS: Weave is a customizable online mentorship platform that fosters empowered vulnerability and increases dialogue between medical students and faculty based on professional and personal interests and identities. Weave may be expanded to other mentoring contexts and adapted for implementation at other institutions to help cultivate an institutional culture that values mentoring and to strengthen broader diversity and inclusion efforts.


Subject(s)
Faculty, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Mentoring/methods , Mentors/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Boston , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Communication , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Empowerment , Formative Feedback , Humans , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Social Identification , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1996923, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493438

ABSTRACT

In this paper, Mixed Reality (MR) has been exploited in the operating rooms to perform laparoscopic and open surgery with the aim of providing remote mentoring to the medical doctors under training during the Covid-19 pandemic. The employed architecture, which has put together MR smartglasses, a Digital Imaging Player, and a Mixed Reality Toolkit, has been used for cancer surgery at the IRCCS Hospital 'Giovanni Paolo II' in southern Italy. The feasibility of using the conceived platform for real-time remote mentoring has been assessed on the basis of surveys distributed to the trainees after each surgery.


Subject(s)
Augmented Reality , COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Mentoring , Neoplasms , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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