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1.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 946, 2023 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233856

ABSTRACT

Sport participation and volunteering can make important contributions to good health. Sporting organisations need volunteers to deliver their participation opportunities and for many years the sector has faced challenges to volunteer recruitment and retention, especially due to the increased bureaucratic and compliance demands in operating community sports clubs. As sporting organisations pivot to adapt to COVID-safe sport we can learn about their experiences to inform volunteer recruitment and retention policies and practices. This research examined volunteer intentions and motivations in coaching and officiating in basketball and explored factors influencing their decision to return to COVID-safe basketball. Data was collected via an online survey that drew on theoretical frameworks of volunteer motivations (i.e. modified Volunteer Functions Inventory VFI) in sport as well as sport policies related to COVID-safe guidelines for return to sport. Data was collected in Victoria Australia during July 2020 before basketball had the chance to return from the first Australian-wide COVID-19 lockdown. Volunteers had positive intentions to return to basketball following COVID-19 restrictions because it was fun, to help others, or because friends/family were involved. Volunteers were most concerned that others will not comply with COVID-safe policies particularly around isolating when feeling unwell (95%), but also reported concerns about the inconveniences of some COVID-safe policies introduced to return to organised sport (e.g. social distancing, density limits, and enforcing rule changes). Understanding these volunteer intentions, motivations and factors influencing the decision to return to COVID-safe basketball can help inform recruitment and retention strategies to support volunteers in sport. Practical implications for sport policy and practice are discussed.


Subject(s)
Basketball , COVID-19 , Mentoring , Humans , Motivation , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Victoria , Volunteers , Policy
2.
Dementia (London) ; 22(6): 1241-1258, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322592

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of dementia is growing as the population and longevity increase. Caregivers of adults with dementia report stress and fatigue and often neglect their health. They also indicate the need for information to address health-related issues, including nutritional problems, of their family members with dementia (FMWD). This study examined the impact of coaching to improve family caregiver (FCG) stress and well-being and to increase the protein intake of both FCGs and their FMWD. All participants received nutrition education including a protein prescription (1.2 g/kg body weight/day) and FCGs received stress-reduction materials. Coached-group randomized participants also received weekly diet coaching and stress-reduction coaching. At baseline and 8 weeks, anthropometrics, a mini-nutritional assessment questionnaire, and diet (protein intake) were assessed in FCGs and FMWD; well-being, fatigue and strain were assessed in FCGs. Repeated two words measures analysis of variance and Fisher's exact tests examined within group and intervention effects. Twenty-five FCGs (13 coached group, 12 not-coached group) and 23 FMWD (12 coached group, 11 not-coached group) completed the study. No significant differences were found between coached and not-coached FCGs and FMWD at baseline. After 8- weeks, FCGs' protein intake significantly increased from 1.00 ± 0.17 to 1.35 ± 0.23 g/kg/body weight in the coached group and from 0.91 ± 0.19 to 1.01 ± 0.33 g/kg/body weight in the not-coached group; there was also an intervention effect (p=.01, η2 = .24). The percentage of FCGs with baseline protein intake less than prescription guidelines and with an end-of-study protein intake meeting/exceeding the prescription significantly differed, with 60% of coached FCGs versus 10% of not coached FCGs meeting the prescription. No intervention effects were shown for protein intake in FMWD or for well-being, fatigue or strain among FCGs. Diet coaching with nutrition education successfully assisted FCGs with improving their protein intake versus nutrition education alone.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Mentoring , Telemedicine , Adult , Humans , Body Weight , Caregivers/education , Dietary Proteins , Family , Fatigue
3.
OTJR (Thorofare N J) ; 43(3): 531-539, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319424

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 catalyzed telehealth practice creating opportunities for clients and providers to discern best applications. Parent satisfaction with services supports partnership within therapy processes, potentially augmenting outcomes. We examined parent satisfaction levels and experiences with the telehealth approach of a parent coaching intervention for families of children with special health care needs (CSHCNs). We used a mixed-methods descriptive design. Fifteen parents completed the Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ) and a semistructured interview. We analyzed TUQ ratings using descriptive statistics, and we thematically analyzed participants' telehealth experiences. Parents found telehealth useful, easy to use, effective, reliable, and satisfactory. Parents described that telehealth addressed needs conveniently, enhanced parent-provider communication, and fostered shared parent involvement. Telehealth appears to be a satisfactory occupational therapy service delivery approach for parents of CSHCN. Findings build preliminary evidence for understanding for whom telehealth is well suited, supporting determination of relevant, fundable telehealth services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Parents , Personal Satisfaction
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(9)2023 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317446

ABSTRACT

The National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) Strategic Empowerment Tailored for Health Equity Investigators (SETH) study evaluates the value of adding Developmental Network to Coaching in the career advancement of diverse Early-Stage Investigators (ESIs). Focused NIH-formatted Mock Reviewing Sessions (MRS) prior to the submission of grants can significantly enhance the scientific merits of an ESI's grant application. We evaluated the most prevalent design, analysis-related factors, and the likelihood of grant submissions and awards associated with going through MRS, using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, and logistic regression methods. A total of 62 out of 234 applications went through the MRS. There were 69.4% that pursued R grants, 22.6% career development (K) awards, and 8.0% other grant mechanisms. Comparing applications that underwent MRS versus those that did not (N = 172), 67.7% vs. 38.4% were submitted for funding (i.e., unadjusted difference of 29.3%; OR = 4.8, 95% CI = (2.4, 9.8), p-value < 0.0001). This indicates that, relative to those who did not undergo MRS, ESIs who did, were 4.8 times as likely to submit an application for funding. Also, ESIs in earlier cohorts (1-2) (a period that coincided with the pre COVID-19 era) as compared to those who were recruited at later cohorts (3-4) (i.e., during the peak of COVID-19 period) were 3.8 times as likely to submit grants (p-value < 0.0001). The most prevalent issues that were identified included insufficient statistical design considerations and plans (75%), conceptual framework (28.3%), specific aims (11.7%), evidence of significance (3.3%), and innovation (3.3%). MRS potentially enhances grant submissions for extramural funding and offers constructive feedback allowing for modifications that enhance the scientific merits of research grants.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Health Equity , Mentoring , Humans , United States , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mentors
5.
Nurs Open ; 10(6): 4044-4054, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316968

ABSTRACT

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to gain insight into the experiences and needs of certified nursing assistants regarding their coaching by bachelor-educated registered nurses in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: Certified nursing assistants are key in providing day-to-day nursing home care. They are, however, not trained to meet the increasingly complex needs of nursing home residents. For certified nursing assistants to respond to high-complexity care, coaching by bachelor-educated registered nurses may be appropriate. Yet, knowledge of how bachelor-educated registered nurses can provide valid coaching is lacking. DESIGN: An explorative qualitative design was adopted. METHODS: Certified nursing assistants (n = 13) were purposively selected from 10 Dutch nursing homes. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2020 and 2021, and thematic analysis was applied. RESULTS: Two main themes emerged: connecting with certified nursing assistants, and the coaching activities themselves. Certified nursing assistants deemed several aspects important for bachelor-educated registered nurses to connect with them: respecting the autonomy of certified nursing assistants, being visible and reachable, adapting communication, clarifying own job description, and participating in care. Certified nursing assistants perceived coaching by bachelor-educated registered nurses as valuable when they fulfil their needs through activities such as empowering, teaching, and mediating between management and certified nursing assistants. CONCLUSIONS: Valid coaching of certified nursing assistants appears possible and requires specific competencies of bachelor-educated registered nurses. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Coaching certified nursing assistants is one way of addressing complex care needs in nursing homes, and coaching can contribute to both professional and team development. As coaching requires specific competencies of bachelor-educated registered nurses, nursing education profiles should be enriched with this most important role. Management can facilitate coaching by providing bachelor-educated registered nurses with a clear job description. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Experts on coaching in nursing home settings informed the topic list. Furthermore, member check was performed.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Nurses , Nursing Assistants , Humans , Nursing Homes , Qualitative Research
6.
Acta Paediatr ; 112(8): 1783-1789, 2023 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312147

ABSTRACT

AIM: The Covid-19 pandemic necessitated virtual adaptation of the neonatal resuscitation programme Helping Babies Breathe (HBB). This study assessed one such virtually mentored and flipped classroom modification in Madagascar. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in September 2021 and May 2022. Healthcare providers were identified by local collaborating organisations. United States-based master trainers collaborated with local trainers on virtually mentored trainings followed by independent trainings. Master trainers were available for consultation via Zoom during the virtual training. A flipped classroom modification and traditional didactic method were compared. Primary outcomes were knowledge and skill acquisition, evaluated by written assessments and objective structured clinical examinations. RESULTS: Overall, 97 providers completed the curriculum. Written assessment scores improved in both training models (traditional-74.8% vs 91.5%, p < 0.001; flipped classroom-89.7% vs 93.6%, p < 0.05). There was no significant difference among written assessment scores (92.8% vs 91.5%, p = 0.62) and significantly higher objective structured clinical examination scores (97.3% vs 89.5%, p < 0.001) for the independent training compared to the virtually mentored training. CONCLUSION: The virtually mentored HBB training was followed by a successful independent training as measured by participant knowledge and skill acquisition, supporting the efficacy of virtual dissemination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Madagascar , Pandemics , Resuscitation/education , Clinical Competence , Curriculum
7.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1057586, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298535

ABSTRACT

Background: The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is one of the largest providers of telehealth in the United States and continues to lead the way in transforming healthcare services. VHA has been implementing its Whole Health (WH) initiative since 2018, a proactive practice empowering patients to take charge of their health and well-being. A key facilitator of the WH initiative is the WH coach who partners with Veterans to achieve their health-related goals. A gap exists in the literature regarding the understanding of WH coaches' use of telehealth to engage rural-residing Veterans. COVID-19 unexpectedly interrupted in-person VHA delivery of care, including WH coaching which primarily relied on in-person delivery and focused less on telehealth. During the pandemic, WH coaches had to adapt and integrate different modalities to engage their Veteran patients. We examined WH coaches' approaches to extending coaching to rural Veterans via technology, emphasizing the advantages of telehealth, existing gaps in telehealth delivery, and opportunities for telehealth as a coaching modality. Methods: This project was implemented as part of a larger mixed methods evaluation regarding WH coaching for rural Veterans; this manuscript presents the findings from the qualitative data from the larger study. The qualitative dataset is comprised of data collected using three different qualitative methods: four focus groups (n = 11; 3-4 participants per group), in-depth individual interviews (n = 9), and open-ended responses from a national web-based survey (n = 140). Focus group, in-depth interview, and open-ended survey data were collected sequentially and separately analyzed following each wave of data collection. Findings from the three analyses were then collaboratively merged, compared, reorganized, and refined by the evaluation team to create final themes. Results: Three final themes that emerged from the merged data were: (1) Advantages of Telehealth; (2) Telehealth Gaps for Rural Veterans, and (3) Strategies for Bridging Telehealth Gaps. Themes explicate telehealth advantages, gaps, and opportunities for rural Veteran WH coaching. Conclusion: Findings highlight that video telehealth alone is not sufficient for meeting the needs of rural Veterans. Digital technologies hold promise for equalizing health access gaps; however, both human factors and broadband infrastructure constraints continue to require WH coaches to use a mix of modalities in working with rural Veterans. To overcome challenges and bridge gaps, WH coaches should be ready to adopt a blended approach that integrates virtual, in-person, and lower-tech options.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Telemedicine , Veterans , Humans , United States , COVID-19/epidemiology , Telemedicine/methods , Rural Health
8.
Clin Interv Aging ; 18: 143-155, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292546

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We compared two different strategies providing professional coaching to administer an exercise program for women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (POP): individual training (IT) at home with trainer's supervision provided by telephone contacts at regular time-intervals or group training (GT) with trainer's live supervision. Our working hypothesis was that IT is a valid alternative to GT when GT is not feasible. Patients and Methods: This was a single-blind, randomized study. We recruited 52 women with POP, without significant comorbidity, and no participation in any structured exercise program within the previous 6 months. They were assigned randomly to IT or GT groups (n = 26 each). Distribution of age (IT: 68±4, GT: 67±8 years) and body mass index (IT: 23.0±2.5, GT: 21.4±5.1) was similar between groups. Each group performed the exercise program in two 1-hour sessions per week for 18 months. Primary outcome measure was Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), as measured by the Short Osteoporosis Quality of Life Questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures focused on domains acknowledged to influence HRQoL (disability, fear of falling, weekly physical activity, physical function) or the effectiveness of the exercise program (retention, adherence, and safety). Significance level was set at p < 0.05. Results: No significant differences were observed between IT and GT groups for any domain. Retention, adherence, and safety were also similar. HRQoL, disability and fear of falling did not change between baseline and follow-up for either group. However, for both groups, physical function (knee flexion, shoulder mobility) and functional capacity (6-minute walking test) improved. Weekly physical activity levels increased from moderate range at baseline to intense at final assessment for both groups. Conclusion: IT and GT supervised exercise programs for women with POP provide similar effectiveness, participation and safety. Hence, both modalities should be considered for future translation in clinical practice of exercise recommendations for POP.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal , Osteoporosis , Humans , Female , Aged , Exercise Therapy , Quality of Life , Single-Blind Method , Postmenopause , Fear , Exercise , Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal/therapy
9.
OTJR (Thorofare N J) ; 43(3): 360-367, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301793

ABSTRACT

Telehealth is effective for service delivery in pediatric occupational therapy across ages and diagnoses. Remote parent coaching provides unique benefits for both parents and infants. As a result of COVID-19, practitioners and researchers pivoted to remote assessment and intervention without much preparation or training. It is critical that we evaluate the quality of these telehealth services. One important component of remote evaluations is assessment fidelity. To examine assessment fidelity of a telehealth-delivered observational autism screening tool for infants. An assessment fidelity checklist was applied as the primary outcome measure. Parents conducted assessments with 82% adherence to the fidelity checklist. Implications: A parent coaching telehealth approach may be valid for assessment in pediatric telehealth. Continually monitoring the assessment fidelity of a tool is critical for the valid administration of remote services.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Autistic Disorder , COVID-19 , Mentoring , Telemedicine , Humans , Child , Infant , Parents , Autism Spectrum Disorder/therapy
10.
Langenbecks Arch Surg ; 407(7): 2763-2767, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2273370

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The development of fast internet connection has stimulated different types of video-assisted teaching programs. However, a remote mentoring with the proctor not on site has never been reported in bariatric surgery. We described our experiences with remote telementoring for laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. METHODS: A qualified general surgeon at the beginning of his bariatric practice performed a series of 8 laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomies (LSG) while tutored by an experienced bariatric surgeon connected from a different city through a specific videoconferencing platform. Data on demographics at baseline, operative time, hospital stay, intraoperative early, and late complications were collected. RESULTS: Mean age and BMI of patients were 36.9 ± 9.6 years old and 41.8 ± 1.7 kg/m2. All procedures were carried out without conversion to open or complications. Mean operative time was 112.4 ± 21.9 min while the hospital stay was 3.5 ± 0.5 days. Operative time significantly decreased after the fourth operation. CONCLUSIONS: Remote coaching appears to be possible and safe for LSG.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Mentoring , Obesity, Morbid , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Weight Loss , Body Mass Index , Gastrectomy , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology
11.
Hum Resour Health ; 21(1): 24, 2023 03 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2273083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the quest to ensure that quality healthcare is provided to all citizens through building healthcare worker capacity and extending reach for expert services, Zambia's Ministry of Health (MoH) in collaboration with its partners PEPFAR through the CDC and HRSA, began to implement the Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) tele-mentoring program across the country through the Health Workers for the 21st Century (HW21) Project and University Teaching Hospital HIV/AIDS Project (UTH-HAP). This ECHO tele-mentoring approach was deemed pivotal in helping to improve the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) service delivery capacity of health care workers. METHOD: The study used a mixed method, retrospective program evaluation to examine ECHO participants' performance in the management of HIV/AIDS patients in all the 10 provinces of Zambia. CASE PRESENTATION: A phenomenological design was applied in order to elicit common experiences of ECHO users through focus group discussions using semi-structured facilitation guides in four provinces (Eastern, Lusaka, Southern and Western) implementing ECHO tele-mentoring approach. These provinces were purposively selected for this study. From which, only participants that had a monthly frequency of ECHO attendance of ten (10) and above were selected. The participants were purposively selected based on the type of cadre as well as facility type so that the final sample consisted of Doctors, Nurses, Midwives, Clinical Officers, Medical Licentiates, Pharmacy and Laboratory Personnel. All sessions were audio recorded and transcribed by the data collectors. A thematic content analysis approach was adopted for analyzing content of the interview's transcripts. RESULTS: Enhanced knowledge and skills of participants on HIV/TB improved by 46/70 (65.7%) in all provinces, while 47/70 (67.1%) of the participants reported that ECHO improved their clinical practice. Further, 12/70 (17.1%) of participants in all provinces reported that presenter/presentation characteristics facilitated ECHO implementation and participation. While, 15/70(21.4%) of the participants reported that ownership of the program had contributed to ECHO implementation and participation. Coordination, another enabler accounted for 14/70 (20%). Inclusiveness was reported as a barrier by 16/70 (22.8%) of the participants while 6/70 (8.6%) of them reported attitudes as a barrier (8.6%) to ECHO participation. In addition, 34/70 (48.6%) reported poor connectivity as a barrier to ECHO implementation and participation while 8/70 (11.5%) of the participants reported that the lack of ownership of the ECHO program was a barrier. 22/70 (31.4%) reported that increased workload was also a barrier to the program's implementation. CONCLUSION: Consistent with its logical pathway model, healthcare providers' participation in ECHO sessions and onsite mentorship contributed to improved knowledge on HIV/TB among health care providers and patient health outcomes. In addition, barriers to ECHO implementation were intrinsic to the program its self, such as coordination, presenter and presentation characteristics other barriers were extrinsic to the program such as poor connectivity, poor infrastructure in health facilities and negative attitudes towards ECHO. Improving on intrinsic factors and mitigating extrinsic factors may help improve ECHO outcomes and scale-up plans.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Mentoring , Humans , Health Facilities , HIV , HIV Infections/therapy , Mentors , Program Evaluation , Retrospective Studies , Zambia
12.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 14: 21501319231158285, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276716

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Stanford Youth Diabetes Coaching Program (SYDCP) is an evidence-based program led by health care professionals to teach healthy youth who then coach family members with diabetes or other chronic conditions. This purpose of this study is to evaluate a Community Health Worker (CHW)-led implementation of the SYDCP for low-income Latinx students from underserved agricultural communities. METHOD: CHWs were trained and virtually led 10 training sessions virtually during the COVID-19 for Latinx students who were recruited from high schools in agricultural regions of Washington state. Feasibility measures include recruitment, retention, class attendance, and successful coaching of a family member or friend. Acceptability was measured by responses on the post-training survey. Effectiveness was evaluated by pre-post changes in measures used in prior studies of the SYDCP such as level of activation and diabetes knowledge. RESULTS: Thirty-four students were recruited, 28 completed the training and 23 returned both pre- and post-surveys. Over 80% of students attended 7 or more classes. All met with a family or friend and 74% met with them weekly. Approximately 80% of the students rated the program's usefulness as "very good" or "excellent." Pre-post increases in diabetes knowledge, nutrition-related behaviors, resilience, and activation were significant and similar to those observed in prior published studies of the SYDCP. CONCLUSIONS: Findings support the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a CHW-led implementation of the SYDCP in underserved Latinx communities using a virtual remote model.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Mentoring , Adolescent , Humans , Community Health Workers/education , Diabetes Mellitus/prevention & control , Hispanic or Latino
14.
Clin Sports Med ; 42(2): 281-289, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2281351

ABSTRACT

The still-evolving global pandemic has accelerated changes in how we work, how we lead, and how we interact. The power dynamic that once drove institutions has shifted to an infrastructure and operating framework encouraging new employee expectations, including the humanization of leadership from those in power. Trends in the corporate world show organizations have shifted to operational frameworks with humanized leadership models: leader-as-coach and leader-as-mentor.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Mentors , Humans , Leadership , Delivery of Health Care
15.
J Surg Educ ; 80(5): 726-730, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2280334

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic rapidly altered the landscape of medical education, particularly disrupting the residency application process and highlighting the need for structured mentorship programs. This prompted our institution to develop a virtual mentoring program to provide tailored, one-on-one mentoring to medical students applying to general surgery residency. The aim of this study was to examine general surgery applicant perception of a pilot virtual mentoring curriculum. DESIGN: The mentorship program included student-tailored mentoring and advising in 5 domains: resume editing, personal statement composition, requesting letters of recommendation, interview skills, and residency program ranking. Electronic surveys were administered following ERAS application submission to participating applicants. The surveys were distributed and collected via a REDCap database. RESULTS: Eighteen out of 19 participants completed the survey. Confidence in a competitive resume (p = 0.006), interview skills (p < 0.001), obtaining letters of recommendation (p = 0.002), personal statement drafting (p < 0.001), and ranking residency programs (p < 0.001) were all significantly improved following completion of the program. Overall utility of the curriculum and likelihood to participate again and recommend the program to others was rated a median 5/5 on the Likert scale (5 [IQR 4-5]). Confidence in the matching carried a premedian 66.5 (50-65) and a postmedian 84 (75-91) (p = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Following the completion of the virtual mentoring program, participants were found to be more confident in all 5 targeted domains. In addition, they were more confident in their overall ability to match. General Surgery applicants find tailored virtual mentoring programs to be a useful tool allowing for continued program development and expansion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Surgery , Internship and Residency , Mentoring , Students, Medical , Humans , Mentors , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , General Surgery/education
16.
Clin Sports Med ; 42(2): 209-217, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2251979

ABSTRACT

From the increase in telehealth to the expansion of private investors to the growth of transparency (both price and patient outcomes) and value-based care initiatives, health-care delivery is rapidly changing. At the same time, demand for musculoskeletal care continues to rapidly increase, with more than 1.7 billion people globally suffering from musculoskeletal conditions, yet burnout is a major concern and growing since the onset COVID-19 global pandemic. When taken together, these factors have a major impact on the health-care delivery environment and pose enormous challenges and increased stressors on orthopedic surgeons and their teams. Coaching can help.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Mentoring , Orthopedic Procedures , Orthopedics , Humans
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(6)2023 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2250843

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly taxed scientific research and seems to have exacerbated existing inequities within the research field, particularly for early-stage investigators (ESIs). This study examines the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on traditionally underrepresented ESIs enrolled in an NIH-supported study evaluating the effectiveness of developmental networks, grant writing coaching, and mentoring on research career advancement. The survey consisted of 24 closed-ended (quantitative) and 4 open-ended questions (qualitative) linked to a participant's ability to meet grant submission deadlines, research and professional development disruptions, stress level, career transition level, self-efficacy and management of scholarly tasks, and familial responsibilities. Results from 32 respondents (53%) suggest that COVID-19 adversely impacted the continuity of research (81%) and grant submissions (63%). On average, grant submissions were delayed by 6.69 months (i.e., greater than one grant cycle). We also conducted additional analyses characterizing nonresponse and found that there were no significant predictors of nonresponse, indicating a limited threat to the validity of our findings. The disruption caused by COVID-19 to the careers of ESIs from underrepresented groups in the biomedical workforce has been profound in the short term. The long-term consequences to the future success of these groups are unknown but is a worthwhile area of research and potential innovation.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Health Equity , Mentoring , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mentoring/methods , Mentors
18.
J Nurs Educ ; 62(3): 183-186, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262891

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the current ongoing nurse faculty shortage, mentorship can aid in career advancement, promotion, and retention for clinical assistant professors (CAPs) when hiring clinical-track faculty. METHOD: The organization, experiences, and outcomes of a CAP mentorship workgroup within a multi-campus research-intensive college of nursing are described. RESULTS: The CAP mentorship workgroup was guided by senior faculty and met monthly to provide CAPs with a better understanding of the promotion process, motivation to pursue scholarship, and peer support. Through this workgroup, seven CAPs have completed their probationary review process, two CAPs are in the process of being promoted to clinical associate professors, and more than 90% of CAPs have been retained. CONCLUSION: Mentorship for clinical-track faculty can positively influence faculty productivity and aid in CAP retention, which contributes to the success of nursing programs. [J Nurs Educ. 2023;62(3):183-186.].


Subject(s)
Faculty, Nursing , Mentoring , Humans , Mentors , Motivation , Personnel Selection
19.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1068293, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265089

ABSTRACT

Swift social and economic environmental changes such as COVID-19 pandemic have led to increased job insecurity. The current study examines the intermediating mechanism (i.e., mediator) and its contingent factor (i.e., moderator) in the association between job insecurity and employee's turnover intention, especially from the perspective of positive psychology. By establishing a moderated mediation model, this research hypothesizes that the degree of employee meaningfulness in work may mediate the relationship between job insecurity and turnover intention. In addition, coaching leadership may play a buffering role to positively moderate the harmful impact of job insecurity on meaningfulness of work. With three-wave time-lagged data that was collected from 372 employees in South Korean organizations, the current study not only demonstrated that meaningfulness of work mediates the job insecurity-turnover intention relationship, but also that coaching leadership functions as a buffering factor in reducing the harmful influence of job insecurity on meaningfulness of work. The results of this research suggest that the level of meaningfulness of work (as a mediator) as well as coaching leadership (as a moderator) are the underlying processes and the contingent factor in the job insecurity-turnover intention link.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , Job Satisfaction
20.
J Nurs Educ ; 62(2): 83-88, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255268

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mentoring is recommended as a strategy to improve satisfaction and retention of novice nurse faculty to help address the current faculty shortage. However, the meaning of academic mentoring varies among faculty, which can detract from the development of effective mentoring relationships in academia. This article details the meaning of mentoring as characterized by novice nurse faculty. METHOD: Semistructured interviews were conducted with novice nurse faculty (n = 21) who participated in a mentoring relationship with experienced colleagues. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes detailing the meaning of mentoring as described by the participants. RESULTS: The thematic analysis revealed an overarching theme of mentoring-as-partnership and three subthemes: (a) authentic communication, (b) enriching support, and (c) sharing knowledge. CONCLUSION: To strengthen mentoring relationships in academic nursing, focus should be placed on supporting mentoring partnerships marked by mutuality and clearly defined goals, roles, and responsibilities. [J Nurs Educ. 2023;62(2):83-88.].


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Humans , Faculty, Nursing , Mentors
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