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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 359, 2022 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1840964

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The redeployment of mentors and restrictions on in-person face-to-face mentoring meetings during the COVID-19 pandemic has compromised mentoring efforts in Palliative Medicine (PM). Seeking to address these gaps, we evaluate the notion of a combined novice, peer-, near-peer and e-mentoring (CNEP) and interprofessional team-based mentoring (IPT) program. METHODS: A Systematic Evidence Based Approach (SEBA) guided systematic scoping review was carried out to study accounts of CNEP and IPT from articles published between 1st January 2000 and 28th February 2021. To enhance trustworthiness, concurrent thematic and content analysis of articles identified from structured database search using terms relating to interprofessional, virtual and peer or near-peer mentoring in medical education were employed to bring together the key elements within included articles. RESULTS: Fifteen thousand one hundred twenty one abstracts were reviewed, 557 full text articles were evaluated, and 92 articles were included. Four themes and categories were identified and combined using the SEBA's Jigsaw and Funnelling Process to reveal 4 domains - characteristics, mentoring stages, assessment methods, and host organizations. These domains suggest that CNEP's structured virtual and near-peer mentoring process complement IPT's accessible and non-hierarchical approach under the oversight of the host organizations to create a robust mentoring program. CONCLUSION: This systematic scoping review forwards an evidence-based framework to guide a CNEP-IPT program. At the same time, more research into the training and assessment methods of mentors, near peers and mentees, the dynamics of mentoring interactions and the longitudinal support of the mentoring relationships and programs should be carried out.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Palliative Medicine , Humans , Mentoring/methods , Mentors/education , Palliative Medicine/education , Pandemics
3.
Acad Med ; 96(11): 1580-1585, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501151

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Mentorship is valuable to medical students undergoing professional identity formation. Many institutions lack infrastructure to facilitate the personalized mentoring that supports students' integration of new professional identities with their personal identities and values. APPROACH: The authors developed a novel mentorship platform called Weave via a multistep, iterative design process, incorporating in-person and survey-based student and faculty feedback. Features of Weave include clear communication of mentorship offerings and expectations, plus opportunities to engage mentors based on professional and personal (identity-based) attributes. Faculty at Harvard Medical School who created a mentor profile within the first 3 months of launch and students who visited the website within the same period were invited to complete usability surveys in February 2019; students were invited to complete impact surveys in August 2020. OUTCOMES: Fifty-two of 132 invited faculty members (39.4%) and 80 of 185 students (43.2%) completed the usability surveys. Most of these faculty (86.5%) and students (73.8%) reported navigating the website was easy/very easy; 36 faculty (69.2%) created a mentor profile within 10 minutes. Key innovations highlighted by faculty and students were the listing of personal attributes and identities of diverse faculty; centralized, increased access to faculty mentors; ease of use; and provision of clear expectations. Nearly all students who completed the impact surveys agreed that Weave allowed them to connect with a faculty mentor whom they would not have found through other sources and to learn about the dimensions of diverse faculty. NEXT STEPS: Weave is a customizable online mentorship platform that fosters empowered vulnerability and increases dialogue between medical students and faculty based on professional and personal interests and identities. Weave may be expanded to other mentoring contexts and adapted for implementation at other institutions to help cultivate an institutional culture that values mentoring and to strengthen broader diversity and inclusion efforts.


Subject(s)
Faculty, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Mentoring/methods , Mentors/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Boston , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Communication , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Empowerment , Formative Feedback , Humans , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Social Identification , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Health Info Libr J ; 37 Suppl 1: 3-4, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360491

ABSTRACT

A personal appreciation of Shane Godbolt as a colleague and friend.


Subject(s)
Librarians/education , Mentoring/standards , COVID-19 , Humans , Librarians/psychology , Mentoring/methods , Mentoring/trends , United Kingdom
5.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 68, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325927

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced a new look (or modernization) for both the obligations and approaches to achieve best-practices in global health learning. These best-practices have moved beyond traditional, face-to-face (F2F), classroom-based didactics to the use of innovative online, asynchronous and synchronous instructional design and the information and communication technology (ICT) tools to support it. But moving to this higher level of online in-service and pre-service training, key obligations (e.g., stopping neocolonialization, cultural humility, reversing brain drain, gender equity) must guide the modernization of instructional design and the supporting ICT. To positively impact global health training, educators must meet the needs of learners where they are. Purpose: We describe a set of multi-communication methods, e-Learning principles, strategies, and ICT approaches for educators to pivot content delivery from traditional, F2F classroom didactics into the modern era. These best-practices in both the obligations and approaches utilize thoughtful, modern strategies of instructional design and ICT. Approach: We harnessed our collective experiences in global health training to present thoughtful insights on the guiding principles, strategies, and ICT environment central to develop learning curricula that meet trainee needs and how they can be actualized. Specifically, we describe five strategies: 1. Individualized learning; 2. Provide experiential learning; 3. Mentor … Mentor … Mentor; 4. Reinforce learning through assessment; and 5. Information and communication technology and tools to support learning. Discussion: We offer a vision, set of guiding principles, and five strategies for successful curricula delivery in the modern era so that global health training can be made available to a wider audience more efficiently and effectively.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Global Health/education , Learning , Mentoring/methods , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Humans , International Cooperation
6.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 61, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325924

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The changing global landscape of disease and public health crises, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, call for a new generation of global health leaders. As global health leadership programs evolve, many have incorporated experiential learning and mentoring (ELM) components into their structure. However, there has been incomplete consideration on how ELM activities are deployed, what challenges they face and how programs adapt to meet those challenges. This paper builds on the co-authors' experiences as trainees, trainers, organizers and evaluators of six global health leadership programs to reflect on lessons learned regarding ELM. We also consider ethics, technology, gender, age and framing that influence how ELM activities are developed and implemented. Findings: Despite the diverse origins and funding of these programs, all six are focused on training participants from low- and middle-income countries drawing on a diversity of professions. Each program uses mixed didactic approaches, practice-based placements, competency and skills-driven curricula, and mentorship via various modalities. Main metrics for success include development of trainee networks, acquisition of skills and formation of relationships; programs that included research training had specific research metrics as well. Common challenges the programs face include ensuring clarity of expectations of all participants and mentors; maintaining connection among trainees; meeting the needs of trainee cohorts with different skill sets and starting points; and ensuring trainee cohorts capture age, gender and other forms of diversity. Conclusions: ELM activities for global health leadership are proving even more critical now as the importance of effective individual leaders in responding to crises becomes evident. Future efforts for ELM in global health leadership should emphasize local adaptation and sustainability. Practice-based learning and established mentoring relationships provide the building blocks for competent leaders to navigate complex dynamics with the flexibility and conscientiousness needed to improve the health of global populations. Key Takeaways: Experiential learning and mentorship activities within global health leadership programs provide the hands-on practice and support that the next generation of global health leaders need to address the health challenges of our times.Six global health leadership programs with experiential learning and mentorship components are showcased to highlight differences and similarities in their approaches and capture a broad picture of achievements that can help inform future programs.Emphasis on inter-professional training, mixed-learning approaches and mentorship modalities were common across programs. Both individual capacity building and development of trainees' professional networks were seen as critical, reflecting the value of inter-personal connections for long-term leadership success.During program design, future programs should recognize the "frame" within which the program will be incorporated and intentionally address diversity-in all its forms-during recruitment as well as consider North-South ethics, leadership roles, hierarchies and transition plans.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Global Health/education , Leadership , Mentoring/methods , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Clinical Competence , Developing Countries , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , International Cooperation , Mentoring/organization & administration , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , Program Development/methods
7.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(2): 181-192, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303281

ABSTRACT

Innovations in surgical education follow advancing clinical technology. New surgical methods have prompted demand for systematic methods to leverage computing power and internet tools to achieve proficiency-based training goals. Virtual reality, high-fidelity patient simulation, web-based resources to facilitate performance assessment, and telementoring have become mainstream practices, although patient outcomes benefits are not well studied. Remote virtual meeting and mentoring have had transformative effects on resident experiences, the full effects of which remain to be seen.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Educational Technology , General Surgery/education , Inventions , Simulation Training/methods , Educational Measurement , Humans , Mentoring/methods , United States , Virtual Reality
8.
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol ; 51(3): 304-307, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260984

ABSTRACT

Mentorship plays an important role in academic medicine and research. This article describes the implementation of a near-peer mentoring program for radiology residents at a single institution and assesses its utility. Of all invited residents, 100% elected to participate. Among the surveyed participants, 63.8% reported that COVID-19 restrictions resulted in feelings of isolation at work, higher in junior residents (74%) as compared to senior residents (50%). Eighty-three percent of residents agreed that the mentorship program allowed them to engage with residents that they would not routinely spend time with, and nearly all (95.7%) of surveyed residents indicated that they would recommend deployment of this mentorship program at other institutions. Together, these findings demonstrate that near-peer mentoring groups in radiology residency are a valuable addition to the training program, serve to increased resident engagement and sense of community, and provide and internal reference for guidance across resident-related issues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Mentoring , Radiology , Humans , Mentoring/methods , Mentors , Radiology/education , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Health Secur ; 19(S1): S72-S77, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258744

ABSTRACT

Within higher education, underrepresented students continue to face inequalities and discrimination, with unique challenges surfacing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mentoring through formal or informal channels is one way to offer assistance to such students. During COVID-19 lockdowns, as classes and work moved online, mentoring also transitioned online. Electronic mentoring, or e-mentoring, was implemented formally by some universities and informally by independent researchers. This article describes the informal mentoring experiences of the lead author with 8 female student researchers, 6 of whom were mentored online. The students represented different racial and ethnic backgrounds, offering a collection of e-mentoring case studies during the pandemic. These independent field reports should not be assumed to represent any of the students' 6 universities, but they are a sample of what can be achieved by invested e-mentors. By sharing these anecdotal experiences, the authors call on all researchers of underrepresented groups to consider e-mentoring to support underrepresented student researchers and diversify the public health research field.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mentoring/methods , Minority Groups/education , Minority Groups/psychology , Social Support , Students, Public Health/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , /psychology , Female , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Students, Public Health/statistics & numerical data
10.
Acad Med ; 96(7): 974-978, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153257

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted medical research, pushing mentors and mentees to decide if COVID-19 research would be germane to the early career investigator's developing research portfolio. With COVID-19 halting hundreds of federal trials involving non-COVID-19 research, mentors and mentees must also consider the broader moral calling of contributing to COVID-19 research. At the time of writing, the National Institutes of Health had responded to the pandemic with significant funding for COVID-19 research. However, because this pandemic is a new phenomenon, few mentors have expertise in the disease and relevant established resources. As a result, many mentors are unable to provide insight on COVID-19 research to early career investigators considering a pivot toward research related to this disease. The authors suggest 4 ways for mentees and mentors to respond to the changes the pandemic has brought to research funding and opportunities: (1) include COVID-19 research in existing portfolios to diversify intellectual opportunities and reduce funding risks; (2) negotiate the mentor-mentee relationship and roles and expectations early in project discussions-considering, as relevant, the disproportionate burden of home responsibilities often borne by early career faculty members who are women and/or from a minority group; (3) address any mentor limitations in content expertise; and (4) if the decision is to pivot to COVID-19 research, select projects with implications generalizable beyond this pandemic to other infectious outbreaks or to the redesign of health care delivery. Mentors and mentees must weigh the relevance of COVID-19 research projects to the postpandemic world and the amount of available funding against the developing interests of early career investigators. Academic medical centers nationwide must enable seasoned and early career researchers to contribute meaningfully to COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 research.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Career Choice , Decision Making , Faculty, Medical , Mentoring , Mentors , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/methods , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Mentoring/methods , Mentoring/organization & administration , Mentors/psychology , Research Support as Topic , United States
11.
Clin Teach ; 17(4): 430-432, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-679760
12.
J Appl Behav Anal ; 54(2): 566-581, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1086368

ABSTRACT

Children with autism spectrum disorder often display deficits in daily living skills. Behavior analysts can use telehealth, such as videoconferencing technology, to deliver interventions to families of these children. Given the COVID-19 pandemic and the common barriers to accessing behavioral interventions, it is imperative to evaluate the effectiveness and practicality of delivering behavioral interventions via telehealth. This study evaluated the efficacy of a parent-implemented intervention with coaching via telehealth to improve daily living skills. Children ranging in age from 5 to 9 years participated in the study with 1 or 2 of their parents serving as the primary implementer(s). Parents implemented the intervention with fidelity and the intervention yielded increases in independent daily living skill completion for all 4 participants.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/therapy , Education, Nonprofessional/methods , Mentoring/methods , Parents/education , Telemedicine/methods , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Parents/psychology
13.
JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 147(4): 389-394, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064296

ABSTRACT

For individuals aspiring to a career in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, mentorship can shape destiny. Mentorship helps assure safe passage into the specialty, and it influences the arc of professional development across the career continuum. Even before the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, technology and social networking were transforming mentorship in otolaryngology. Now, in an increasingly virtual world, where in-person interactions are the exception, mentorship plays an even more pivotal role. Mentors serve as trusted guides, helping learners navigate accelerating trends toward early specialization, competency-based assessments, and key milestones. However, several structural barriers render the playing field unlevel. For medical students, cancellation of visiting clerkships, in-person rotations, and other face-to-face interactions may limit access to mentors. The pandemic and virtual landscape particularly threaten the already-leaky pipeline for underrepresented medical students. These challenges may persist into residency and later career stages, where structural inequities continue to subtly influence opportunities and pairings of mentors and mentees. Hence, overreliance on serendipitous encounters can exacerbate disparities, even amid societal mandates for equity. The decision to take deliberate steps toward mentoring outreach and engagement has profound implications for what otolaryngology will look like in years to come. This article introduces the concept of new age mentoring, shining a light on how to modernize practices. The key shifts are from passive to active engagement; from amorphous to structured relationships; and from hierarchical dynamics to bidirectional mentoring. Success is predicated on intentional outreach and purposefulness in championing diversity, equity, and inclusion in the progressively technology-driven landscape.


Subject(s)
Mentoring/trends , Minority Groups/education , Otolaryngology/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Humans , Internship and Residency , Mentoring/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc72, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966910

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic caused drastic changes in medical education and might affect students' mental health and perception of study conditions. Mentoring may have mediating effects by enhancing social support. The University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE) offers a voluntary general mentoring program (g-mentoring) for all interested students and a mentoring program for students with excellent course results and scientific interest (e-mentoring) We aimed to investigate the mental burden and views of their study situation during COVID-19 among students who did or did not participate in one of the formal mentoring programs. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey (May 2020) examining students' mental burden using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4), and assessing their perception of study conditions and digital teaching using self-developed items. Results: Of 1193 invited students, 543 (45.5%) completed the survey. 35% of those participated in the g-mentoring and 7% in the e-mentoring. 59% did not participate in any program. More e-mentees than g-mentees and nonparticipants reported clinically unproblematic levels of anxiety and depression symptoms. The majority of students (55%) was somewhat worried about the impact of the pandemic on their study situation. Regarding digital teaching students did not feel overburdened by the lack of a fixed schedule and structure, e-mentees even less than g-mentees and nonparticipants. Both g-mentees and nonparticipants were significantly more appreciative of the possible repeated use of the digital teaching materials than e-mentees (both groups M=5.7 vs. M=5.4 in e-mentees, p=.045). Conclusion: The results indicate that while students feel substantially burdened by the situation and the majority worries about the impact of the pandemic on their studies, they also seem to cope well with the digital course format. Study motivation during COVID-19 decreased among the majority of students with and without mentoring. These aspects may be important to address by medical schools interested in developing effective interventions to support students during a pandemic and continuous online teaching.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mentoring/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Motivation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
15.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 56(12)2020 Dec 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-953393

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Real-time remote tele-mentored echocardiography (RTMUS echo) involves the transmission of clinical ultrasound (CU) cardiac images with direct feedback from a CU expert at a different location. In this review, we summarize the current uses of RTMUS to diagnose and manage cardiovascular dysfunction and discuss expanded and future uses. Materials and Methods: We performed a literature search (PubMed and EMBase) to access articles related to RTMUS echo. We reviewed articles for selection using Covidence, a web-based tool for managing systematic reviews and data were extracted using a separate standardized collection form. Results: Our search yielded 15 articles. Twelve of these articles demonstrated the feasibility of having a novice sonographer mentored by a tele-expert in obtaining a variety of cardiac ultrasound views. The articles discussed different technological specifications for the RTMUS system, but all showed that adequate images were able to be obtained. Overall, RTMUS echo was found to be a positive intervention that contributed to patient care. Conclusion: RTMUS echo allows for rapid access to diagnostic imaging in various clinical settings. RTMUS echo can help in assessing patients that may require a higher level of isolation precautions or in other resource-constrained environments. In the future, identifying the least expensive way to utilize RTMUS echo will be important.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Computer Systems , Echocardiography/methods , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Mentoring/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Anesthesiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiology , Critical Care , Emergency Medicine , Humans , Patient Isolation , Point-of-Care Systems , Remote Consultation , Ultrasonography/methods
16.
Behav Modif ; 45(2): 251-271, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949203

ABSTRACT

Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often have deficits in interpersonal skills due to limited social-communication opportunities. Knowing how to engage in "small talk" or simple social conversational exchanges can be beneficial in postsecondary schooling, employment sites, community environments, and social gatherings. Recently, covert audio coaching (CAC) showed a positive impact on increasing conversational exchanges. As the COVID-19 pandemic increased the need for remote delivery tools, we explored the effectiveness of remote audio coaching (RAC) to teach this skill to college students with IDD. We used a multiple baseline design across participants to examine whether RAC might increase on-topic, small talk conversational exchanges. Results demonstrated that RAC effectively increased small talk skills between participants and a confederate. Upon removal of RAC, all participants still performed above their baselines, with two participants maintaining near mastery levels 2 weeks after the intervention was removed. Limitations and future research are discussed.


Subject(s)
Communication , Education of Intellectually Disabled/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Mentoring/methods , Social Skills , Adult , Developmental Disabilities , Female , Humans , Intellectual Disability , Male , Program Evaluation , Southeastern United States , Students , Teaching , Universities , Young Adult
17.
J Am Med Inform Assoc ; 28(2): 365-370, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-923385

ABSTRACT

Peer mentors have been proven to improve diabetes outcomes, especially among diverse patients. Delivering peer mentoring via remote strategies (phone, text, mobile applications) is critical, especially in light of the recent pandemic. We conducted a real-world evaluation of a remote diabetes intervention in a safety-net delivery system in New York. We summarized the uptake, content, and pre-post clinical effectiveness for English- and Spanish-speaking participants. Of patients who could be reached, 71% (n = 690/974) were enrolled, and 90% of those (n = 618/690) participated in coaching. Patients and mentors had a mean of 32 check-ins, and each patient set an average of 10 goals. 29% of the participants accessed the program via the smartphone application. Among participants with complete hemoglobin A1c data (n = 179), there was an absolute 1.71% reduction (P < .01). There are multiple lessons for successful implementation of remote peer coaching into settings serving diverse patients, including meaningful patient-mentor matching and addressing social determinants.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Mentoring/methods , Peer Group , Safety-net Providers , Academic Medical Centers , Aged , Delivery of Health Care , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York , Smartphone , Telephone
18.
Telemed J E Health ; 26(10): 1304-1307, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639940

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and is an acute respiratory illness. Although most infected persons are asymptomatic or have only mild symptoms, some patients progress to devastating disease; such progression is difficult to predict or identify in a timely manner. COVID-19 patients who do not require hospitalization can self-isolate at home. Calls from one disease epicenter identify the need for homebased isolation with telemedicine surveillance to monitor for impending deterioration. Methodology: Although the dominant approach for these asymptomatic/paucisymptomatic patients is to monitor oxygen saturation, we suggest additionally considering the potential merits and utility of home-based imaging. Chest computed tomography is clearly impractical, but ultrasound has shown comparable sensitivity for lung involvement, with major advantages of short and simple procedures, low cost, and excellent repeatability. Thoracic ultrasound may thus allow remotely identifying the development of pneumonitis at an early stage of illness and potentially averting the risk of insidious deterioration to severe pneumonia and critical illness while in home isolation. Conclusions: Lung sonography can be easily performed by motivated nonmedical caregivers when directed and supervised in real time by experts. Remote mentors could thus efficiently monitor, counsel, and triage multiple home-based patients from their "control center." Authors believe that this approach deserves further attention and study to reduce delays and failures in timely hospitalization of home-isolated patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnostic imaging , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Occupational Health , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Remote Consultation/methods , Ultrasonography, Doppler/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/physiopathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/virology , Male , Mentoring/methods , Pandemics , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Quality Improvement , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/diagnostic imaging
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