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1.
Child Obes ; 18(3): 168-177, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806219

ABSTRACT

Background: Parent mentors are a potential community-based mechanism for delivering behavioral interventions. For communities at a higher risk of obesity and challenges with access to care, such as migrant and seasonal farm workers, this may be an effective intervention for obesity. This study examined the effect of parent mentors on weight outcomes. Methods: This randomized clinical trial assigned parents of 2- to 5 year-old children enrolled in Head Start 1:1:1 to control, a parent mentor teaching We Can!, or a parent mentor teaching an intervention derived from positive deviance methods. The parent mentor arms were designed to have weekly interactions and monthly community meetings over 6 months. The primary outcome was change in adiposity, as measured by body mass indices. Results: We randomized 188 parents, and 155 completed the 6-month visit. Most parents, 107 (58%), had less than a high school education, and 170 (90%) reported Latino ethnicity. In the intention-to-treat analysis, no difference between the groups was observed for change in percent distance from the median or BMI z-score. The median number of interactions was 14 (IQR 10-20) over 6 months for those who did engage, though 24 of 118 (20%) had no interaction. Those with no interactions in We Can! had a mean increase in change from median of 6.7 [standard deviation (SD) = 8.2]; those with higher participation experienced a 0.4 (SD = 9.2) change, p = 0.04. Conclusions: Parent mentors were not effective in changing the adiposity indices in this study overall, with some evidence of efficacy after accounting for participation. Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT03330743.


Subject(s)
Mentors , Pediatric Obesity , Body Mass Index , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Parents/education , Pediatric Obesity/prevention & control
2.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 31(2): 527-538, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788328

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to implement and track the outcomes of a yearlong, structured mentoring program aimed at enhancing the retention and success of underrepresented graduate and undergraduate students in speech-language pathology. METHOD: Student participants were recruited following an open application process and based on meeting eligibility requirements and committing to program completion. The focus of this program was to provide didactic training on leadership development, culturally responsive practice, and research methods used in speech-language pathology. This program emphasized participant needs assessments and goal-setting, access to one-on-one and group mentoring by peers and professionals, and a culminating experience in which participant teams completed a supervised clinical research project or a community outreach and education project. RESULTS: Forty-six participants in three cohorts completed the yearlong program in three consecutive years. Positive outcomes included program completion, degree completion, student perceptions of program benefit, completion of innovative community-engaged and research projects, and dissemination of scholarly work. CONCLUSION: Our findings from implementing this program and tracking its outcomes have implications for using innovative, equity-minded, and evidence-based strategies for retaining and mentoring minoritized students in speech-language pathology.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Speech-Language Pathology , Humans , Leadership , Mentors , Speech , Speech-Language Pathology/education , Students
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 749627, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775930

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a critical need to address mental health needs across the globe, especially in low and middle-income countries where mental health disparities are pervasive, including among children. The global mental health disparities suggest an imperative for culturally and contextually-congruent mental health services models that expand upon the existing services and interventions for these groups. Rigorous research is a key tool in providing the scientific evidence to inform public policy and practice efforts to effectively address these needs. Yet, there is a limited number of researchers, especially those from diverse backgrounds, who study these issues. In this paper, we describe the "Training LEAD ers to Accelerate Global Mental Health Disparities Research" (LEAD) program, a research training program funded by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities and focused on global mental health disparities research for early career researchers from under-represented minority groups. Methods: The LEAD program is designed as a two-phase training program for advanced pre-doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty from diverse backgrounds in the U.S., including groups underrepresented in biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social sciences research, interested in global mental health disparities research. Trainees are matched with mentors and participate in an intensive 12-week program. Discussion: The LEAD program seeks to provide a robust platform for the development, implementation and expansion of evidence-based culturally and contextually-congruent interventions and services models addressing global mental health disparities across the life cycle, especially in low-resource communities in the global context. By producing a sustainable network of well-trained investigators from underrepresented backgrounds, LEAD will potentially contribute to the shared lessons and efforts relevant to addressing global mental health disparities and improving care for vulnerable populations in low-resource settings.


Subject(s)
Global Health , Mental Health , Research Personnel , Child , Humans , Mentors , Minority Groups , Research Personnel/education
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 206, 2022 Mar 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since 2014, the Government of Bihar and CARE India have implemented a nurse mentoring program that utilizes PRONTO International's simulation and team trainings to improve obstetric and neonatal care. Together they trained simulation educators known as Nurse Mentor Supervisors to conduct simulation trainings in rural health facilities across the state. Sustaining the knowledge and engagement of these simulation educators at a large-scale has proven difficult and resource intensive. To address this, the University of Utah with PRONTO International and with input from the University of California San Francisco, created an interactive, virtual education module based on a comic superhero named Super Divya to reinforce simulation educator concepts. This study examined the perceptions of Nurse Mentor Supervisors on Super Divya's accessibility, usefulness, and potential after implementation of Super Divya: Origin Story. METHODS: We conducted qualitative interviews with 17 Nurse Mentor Supervisors in Bihar, India. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, interviews were conducted virtually via Zoom™ using a semi-structured interview guide in Hindi and English. Participants were identified with strict inclusion criteria and convenience sampling methods. Interviews were analyzed using a framework analysis. RESULTS: Nurse Mentor Supervisors found Super Divya to be engaging, innovative, relatable, and useful in teaching tips and tricks for simulation training. Supervisors thought the platform was largely accessible with some concerns around internet connectivity and devices. The majority reacted positively to the idea of distributing Super Divya to other simulation educators in the nurse mentoring program and had suggestions for additional clinical and simulation educator training topics. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the potential of Super Divya to engage simulation educators in continuous education. At a time when virtual education is increasingly important and in-person training was halted by the COVID-19 pandemic, Super Divya engaged Supervisors in the nurse mentoring program. We have incorporated suggestions for improvement of Super Divya into future modules. Further research can help understand how knowledge from Super Divya can improve simulation facilitation skills and behaviors, and explore potential for reinforcing clinical skills via this platform. ETHICAL APPROVAL: This study was approved by the institutional review board at the University of California San Francisco (IRB # 20-29902).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Simulation Training , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Learning , Mentors , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Simulation Training/methods
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736901

ABSTRACT

To improve the quality of intrapartum care in public health facilities of Bihar, India, a statewide quality improvement program was implemented. Nurses participated in simulation sessions to improve their clinical, teamwork, and communication skills. Nurse mentors, tasked with facilitating these sessions, received training in best practices. To support the mentors in the on-going facilitation of these trainings, we developed a digital, interactive, comic series starring "Super Divya", a simulation facilitation superhero. The objective of these modules was to reinforce key concepts of simulation facilitation in a less formal and more engaging way than traditional didactic lessons. This virtual platform offers the flexibility to watch modules frequently and at preferred times. This pilot study involved 205 simulation educators who were sent one module at a time. Shortly before sending the first module, nurses completed a baseline knowledge survey, followed by brief surveys after each module to assess change in knowledge. Significant improvements in knowledge were observed across individual scores from baseline to post-survey. A majority found Super Divya modules to be acceptable and feasible to use as a learning tool. However, a few abstract concepts in the modules were not well-understood, suggesting that more needs to be done to communicate their core meaning of these concepts.


Subject(s)
Mentors , Simulation Training , Communication , Humans , Pilot Projects , Quality Improvement
7.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258660, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702809

ABSTRACT

Due to COVID-19 precautions, the Vanderbilt University summer biomedical undergraduate research program, the Vanderbilt Summer Science Academy (VSSA), rapidly transitioned from offering an in-person training program to a virtual seminar format. Our program typically supports undergraduate development through research and/or clinical experience, meeting with individuals pursuing postgraduate training, and providing career development advice. Evidence supports the idea that summer programs transform undergraduates by clarifying their interest in research and encouraging those who haven't previously considered graduate studies. We were interested in exploring whether a virtual, synchronous program would increase participants' scientific identity and clarify postgraduate career planning. Rather than create a virtual research exposure, our 5-week "Virtual VSSA" program aimed to simulate the casual connections that would naturally be made with post-undergraduate trainees during a traditional summer program. In seminars, presenters discussed 1) their academic journey, explaining their motivations, goals, and reasons for pursuing a career in science as well as 2) a professional story that illustrated their training. Seminars included Vanderbilt University and Medical School faculty, M.D., MD/Ph.D., as well as Ph.D. students from diverse scientific and personal backgrounds. In addition, weekly informational sessions provided an overview of the nature of each degree program along with admissions advice. Through pre-and post-program surveys, we found that students who registered for this experience already strongly identified with the STEMM community (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine). However, participation in the Virtual VSSA increased their sense of belonging. We also uncovered a gap in participants' understanding of postgraduate pathways prior to participation and found that our program significantly increased their self-reported understanding of postgraduate programs. It also increased their understanding of why someone would pursue a Ph.D. or Ph.D./MD versus M.D. These changes did not uniformly impact participants' planned career paths. Overall, by providing personal, tangible stories of M.D., MD/Ph.D., and Ph.D. training, the Virtual VSSA program offered seminars that positively impacted students' sense of belonging with and connection to the STEMM disciplines.


Subject(s)
Engineering/education , Mathematics/education , Technology/education , Academies and Institutes , Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Faculty/education , Humans , Knowledge , Mentors/education , Minority Groups/education , Schools, Medical , Students , Universities
9.
Anesth Analg ; 133(6): 1497-1509, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607763

ABSTRACT

Research has shown that women have leadership ability equal to or better than that of their male counterparts, yet proportionally fewer women than men achieve leadership positions and promotion in medicine. The Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative (WELI) was founded within the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) in 2018 as a multidimensional program to help address the significant career development, leadership, and promotion gender gap between men and women in anesthesiology. Herein, we describe WELI's development and implementation with an early assessment of effectiveness at 2 years. Members received an anonymous, voluntary survey by e-mail to assess whether they believed WELI was beneficial in several broad domains: career development, networking, project implementation and completion, goal setting, mentorship, well-being, and promotion and leadership. The response rate was 60.5% (92 of 152). The majority ranked several aspects of WELI to be very or extremely valuable, including the protégé-advisor dyads, workshops, nomination to join WELI, and virtual facilitated networking. For most members, WELI helped to improve optimism about their professional future. Most also reported that WELI somewhat or absolutely contributed to project improvement or completion, finding new collaborators, and obtaining invitations to be visiting speakers. Among those who applied for promotion or leadership positions, 51% found WELI to be somewhat or absolutely valuable to their application process, and 42% found the same in applying for leadership positions. Qualitative analysis of free-text survey responses identified 5 main themes: (1) feelings of empowerment and confidence, (2) acquisition of new skills in mentoring, coaching, career development, and project implementation, (3) clarification and focus on goal setting, (4) creating meaningful connections through networking, and (5) challenges from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the inability to sustain the advisor-protégé connection. We conclude that after 2 years, the WELI program has successfully supported career development for the majority of protégés and advisors. Continued assessment of whether WELI can meaningfully contribute to attainment of promotion and leadership positions will require study across a longer period. WELI could serve as a programmatic example to support women's career development in other subspecialties.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists , Empowerment , Gender Equity , Leadership , Pediatricians , Physicians, Women , Sexism , Women, Working , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Career Mobility , Female , Humans , Male , Mentors , Program Evaluation , Staff Development , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1905918, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1576028

ABSTRACT

In the USA, numerous summer programs are available for undergraduate students that seek to increase the number of individuals from groups underrepresented in medicine (URM) that matriculate to medical school. These programs have typically been conducted at research-focused institutions, involving hands-on-research and various enrichment experiences. For 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the suspension of on-campus student activities at American universities, necessitating a switch to a virtual format for these URM-focused programs. Outcomes, however, from these programs conducted virtually, necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic, have not been reported. The Penn Access Summer Scholars (PASS) program at the Perelman School of Medicine (PSOM) targets URM undergraduates, providing two consecutive summers of mentored research and enrichment experiences, with the goal of enabling participants' matriculation to PSOM. PASS has been an 8 week on-campus experience, but during summer 2020, virtual programming of 6 weeks was provided due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants in the 2020 virtual offering of PASS completed pre- and post-program surveys that included 5-point Likert-style and open-ended questions to determine the impact of the programing on self-assessments of research skills, familiarity with the physician identity, and preparedness to be a PSOM student. Post-program, participants also assessed program administration and content. With respect to program objectives, participants reported significant increases in their self-reported confidence in conducting research, understanding of physician identity, and sense of preparedness for medical school. The educational value of the program content, their level of engagement in the program and the overall quality of the program were rated as excellent or outstanding by large majorities of respondents. Content analyses of participant comments were consistent with these quantitative results. Therefore, a premedical summer enrichment program targeting URM undergraduates can be successfully conducted virtually to achieve program objectives and may increase the availability to these initiatives.


Subject(s)
Mentors , Minority Groups , Research/education , Students, Premedical , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pennsylvania , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical , Self Report , Universities
12.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1886029, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573628

ABSTRACT

In view of limited resources during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is an urgent need to create novel programs to meet the changing demands of trainees towards developing and strengthening their skills in healthcare research. During the COVID-19 pandemic, digital learning has become an invaluable tool by providing more learning opportunities. Through the use of platforms available for distant learning, we made our pre-existing online research program more interactive. Through collaboration in small groups, the trainees developed their research and mentorship skills and were able to meet the goal of submitting their research projects as abstracts. All of the abstracts were accepted for publication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Health Services Research/organization & administration , Humans , Learning , Mentors , Motivation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 305(3): 661-670, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549416

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic restricting clinical practice and exacerbating the lack of medical staff. There is currently a lack of young residents who are deciding on further training in gynecology and obstetrics. DESIGN: review and prospective, cross-sectional study. SETTING: the aim of this study was to investigate if structured mentoring programs can counteract this deficiency. POPULATION: medical students took part from Germany in the clinical phase. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was developed and distributed to students from January to October 2020. Epidemiological data, questions about mentoring experiences, necessity and their expected influence on career planning were collected and statistically evaluated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: structured mentoring-programs can influence the choice of subject. In particular, men are still underrepresented. Research on the topic of mentoring during in the field of gynaecology and obstetrics is completely lacking. RESULTS: A representative number of 927 medical students took part in the survey. 22% (170/906) of the students had already participated in a mentoring program with a significantly higher proportion of men (69%; 117/170; p < 0.001). Of these, 94% (453/170) said this was helpful. 6% (55/906) wanted to pursue a career in gynecology and obstetrics. When asked about their appreciation for structured mentoring programs in gynecology and obstetrics, 95% (880/906) would participate and 94% agreed (871/906) that this could have an impact on their choice of specialist and career planning. CONCLUSIONS: An active provision of mentoring programs and more content can be a way of counteracting the shortage of residents in gynecology and obstetrics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Gynecology/education , Humans , Male , Mentors , Obstetrics/education , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Abdom Radiol (NY) ; 46(12): 5485-5488, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520333

ABSTRACT

As in any field, radiologists may face a number of challenges as they navigate their early careers. Because with experience comes wisdom, early-career radiologists may find helpful the advice and perspectives of mid- and late-career radiologists. The Society of Abdominal Radiology recognizes the value of this pool of knowledge and experience, prompting the establishment of the Early Career Committee. This group is designed to support early-career radiologists by sharing the experiences and insights of leaders in the field. In this series, the authors interview trailblazers Matthew S. Davenport, MD; Jonathan B. Kruskal, MD, PhD; Katherine E. Maturen, MD, MS; David B. Larson, MD, MBA; and Desiree E. Morgan, MD. This perspective explores a wide range of subjects, including personal values in medicine, the role of teleradiology, diversity of backgrounds in radiology, how to navigate workplace conflict, and lifelong learning in medicine. Beyond conveying these pearls of wisdom, the aim of this perspective is to highlight for early-career radiologists the value that mid- and late-career mentors can provide in navigating careers in medicine.


Subject(s)
Mentors , Radiology , Humans , Radiography , Radiologists
15.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258660, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511817

ABSTRACT

Due to COVID-19 precautions, the Vanderbilt University summer biomedical undergraduate research program, the Vanderbilt Summer Science Academy (VSSA), rapidly transitioned from offering an in-person training program to a virtual seminar format. Our program typically supports undergraduate development through research and/or clinical experience, meeting with individuals pursuing postgraduate training, and providing career development advice. Evidence supports the idea that summer programs transform undergraduates by clarifying their interest in research and encouraging those who haven't previously considered graduate studies. We were interested in exploring whether a virtual, synchronous program would increase participants' scientific identity and clarify postgraduate career planning. Rather than create a virtual research exposure, our 5-week "Virtual VSSA" program aimed to simulate the casual connections that would naturally be made with post-undergraduate trainees during a traditional summer program. In seminars, presenters discussed 1) their academic journey, explaining their motivations, goals, and reasons for pursuing a career in science as well as 2) a professional story that illustrated their training. Seminars included Vanderbilt University and Medical School faculty, M.D., MD/Ph.D., as well as Ph.D. students from diverse scientific and personal backgrounds. In addition, weekly informational sessions provided an overview of the nature of each degree program along with admissions advice. Through pre-and post-program surveys, we found that students who registered for this experience already strongly identified with the STEMM community (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine). However, participation in the Virtual VSSA increased their sense of belonging. We also uncovered a gap in participants' understanding of postgraduate pathways prior to participation and found that our program significantly increased their self-reported understanding of postgraduate programs. It also increased their understanding of why someone would pursue a Ph.D. or Ph.D./MD versus M.D. These changes did not uniformly impact participants' planned career paths. Overall, by providing personal, tangible stories of M.D., MD/Ph.D., and Ph.D. training, the Virtual VSSA program offered seminars that positively impacted students' sense of belonging with and connection to the STEMM disciplines.


Subject(s)
Engineering/education , Mathematics/education , Technology/education , Academies and Institutes , Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Faculty/education , Humans , Knowledge , Mentors/education , Minority Groups/education , Schools, Medical , Students , Universities
16.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3182-3183, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505577

ABSTRACT

Gregory Quirk has worked in New York, Honduras, and Puerto Rico with a decades-long commitment to mentorship and the global promotion of neuroscience. In an interview with Neuron, he talks about his upcoming move to the University of the Philippines and how virtual meetings are making us rethink collaborations and interactions with members of the community.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic , Mentoring , Mentors , Neurosciences , Videoconferencing , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Acad Med ; 96(11): 1580-1585, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501151

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Mentorship is valuable to medical students undergoing professional identity formation. Many institutions lack infrastructure to facilitate the personalized mentoring that supports students' integration of new professional identities with their personal identities and values. APPROACH: The authors developed a novel mentorship platform called Weave via a multistep, iterative design process, incorporating in-person and survey-based student and faculty feedback. Features of Weave include clear communication of mentorship offerings and expectations, plus opportunities to engage mentors based on professional and personal (identity-based) attributes. Faculty at Harvard Medical School who created a mentor profile within the first 3 months of launch and students who visited the website within the same period were invited to complete usability surveys in February 2019; students were invited to complete impact surveys in August 2020. OUTCOMES: Fifty-two of 132 invited faculty members (39.4%) and 80 of 185 students (43.2%) completed the usability surveys. Most of these faculty (86.5%) and students (73.8%) reported navigating the website was easy/very easy; 36 faculty (69.2%) created a mentor profile within 10 minutes. Key innovations highlighted by faculty and students were the listing of personal attributes and identities of diverse faculty; centralized, increased access to faculty mentors; ease of use; and provision of clear expectations. Nearly all students who completed the impact surveys agreed that Weave allowed them to connect with a faculty mentor whom they would not have found through other sources and to learn about the dimensions of diverse faculty. NEXT STEPS: Weave is a customizable online mentorship platform that fosters empowered vulnerability and increases dialogue between medical students and faculty based on professional and personal interests and identities. Weave may be expanded to other mentoring contexts and adapted for implementation at other institutions to help cultivate an institutional culture that values mentoring and to strengthen broader diversity and inclusion efforts.


Subject(s)
Faculty, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Mentoring/methods , Mentors/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Boston , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Communication , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Empowerment , Formative Feedback , Humans , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Social Identification , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e052560, 2021 10 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480254

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: It is known that women are under-represented in senior positions within the health and medical research sector. The Franklin Women Mentoring Programme (Programme) is a professionally facilitated, cross-organisational initiative designed to support career development for mid-career women. The objective of this study was to evaluate Programme outcomes reported by participants 12 months following its formal conclusion. DESIGN: Explanatory sequential mixed-methods study design using a cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interviews. SETTING: Health and medical research institutes in Sydney, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Health and medical researchers from the 2018 Programme. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in knowledge, skills, behaviours and research metrics directly attributed to Programme participation. RESULTS: A total of 50 mentors and mentees participated in the cross-sectional survey (68% of the total cohort) and 14 mentors and mentees participated in the interviews. All reported changes to their knowledge, skills, behaviours and research metrics which were directly attributed to participation in the Programme. This included changes in knowledge and skills to be more inclusive (96% mentees, 83% mentors), resilience (88% mentees, 67% mentors), ability to have difficult workplace conversations (88% mentees, 71% mentors) and improvements in supervisory and team management (82% mentees, 75% mentors) skills. Positive impacts on promotions and grant opportunities were also reported. All evaluation participants believed this Programme was a worthwhile initiative for their workplaces to invest in. CONCLUSION: Participation in this cross-organisational, professionally facilitated, structured mentoring programme has led to positive outcomes for mentees, as well as mentors. Reported outcomes indicate the Programme is meeting its aims to support the career development of mid-career women in health and medical research, while facilitating a more inclusive workforce.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Mentoring , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Mentors , Program Evaluation
19.
Intern Med J ; 51(10): 1741-1747, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476258

ABSTRACT

In March 1961 the University of New South Wales enrolled the first students into the new faculty of medicine that is now ranked 4th in Australia and 59th in the world. The author was fortunate to be a member of that pioneering group and looks back in gratitude to all the visionary and committed academics and mentors, who made this happen. Many of the foundation academics were fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, with two becoming University of New South Wales deans of medicine. One-quarter of the foundation year's graduates became fellows of the college and the first PhD medical graduate, Professor John Chalmers AC, became president of the college.


Subject(s)
Anniversaries and Special Events , Schools, Medical , Humans , Mentors , Pandemics , Universities
20.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3193-3195, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472107

ABSTRACT

In an interview with Neuron, Greg Stuart discusses the COVID-19 pandemic effects on the Australian research landscape and recounts how early influencers shaped him as both a neuroscientist and mentor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Laboratory Science/methods , Mentors/education , Neurosciences/education , Neurosciences/methods , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Male
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