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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 375, 2023 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240087

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Mentorship is an essential component of research capacity building for young researchers in the health sciences. The mentorship environment in resource-limited settings is gradually improving. This article describes mentees' experiences in a mentorship program for junior academicians amid the COVID-19 pandemic in Tanzania. METHODS: This is a survey study that examined the experiences of mentees who participated in a mentorship program developed as part of the Transforming Health Education in Tanzania (THET) project. The THET project was funded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) under a consortium of three partnering academic institutions in Tanzania and two collaborating US-based institutions. Senior faculty members of respective academic institutions were designated as mentors of junior faculty. Quarterly reports submitted by mentees for the first four years of the mentorship program from 2018 to 2022 were used as data sources. RESULTS: The mentorship program included a total of 12 mentees equally selected from each of the three health training institutions in Tanzania. The majority (7/12) of the mentees in the program were males. All mentees had a master's degree, and the majorities (8/12) were members of Schools/Faculties of Medicine. Most mentors (9/10) were from Tanzania's three partnering health training institutions. All mentors had an academic rank of senior lecturer or professor. Despite the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular weekly meetings between mentors and mentees were not affected. By the fourth year of the mentorship program, more than three-quarters of mentees had published research related to the mentorship program in a peer-reviewed journal, over half had enrolled in Ph.D. studies, and half had applied for and won competitive grant awards. Almost all mentees reported being satisfied with the mentorship program and their achievements. CONCLUSION: The mentorship program enhanced the skills and experiences of the mentees as evidenced by the quality of their research outputs and their dissemination of research findings. The mentorship program encouraged mentees to further their education and enhanced other skills such as grant writing. These results support the initiation of similar mentorship programs in other institutions to expand their capacity in biomedical, social, and clinical research, especially in resource-limited settings, such as Sub-Saharan Africa.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentors , United States , Male , Humans , Female , Universities , Tanzania , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
2.
Nurs Adm Q ; 47(3): 269-276, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239003

ABSTRACT

In 2019, the National Academy of Science identified clinician burnout as a growing public health concern. The COVID-19 pandemic has only compounded this crisis and transformed it into an escalating fracture within the US health care system. Concurrently evolving with this emergency is a rise in the number of nurses who intend to leave the profession. Frontline nurse leaders are the lynchpin in ensuring health care systems function. These leaders have accountability over patient care and clinician well-being. Focused efforts must address clinician burnout. However, without addressing the well-being of frontline nurse leaders, the fault line in our health care system becomes a vast chasm. Recently, published literature began to emerge describing and addressing frontline clinician burnout. Unfortunately, only a few, if any, address issues related to leaders. The aim of this qualitative case study research was to explore and discover general themes in system chief nurse executive leadership practices that support, mentor, develop, and retain nurse leaders as a basis for future research. Three major themes were identified for future study and exploration: enhancing leadership development programs; improving leader work environments; and focusing on leader well-being and support. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these themes.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , Humans , Leadership , Mentors , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
3.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 21(1): 33, 2023 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318462

ABSTRACT

Despite the high burden of mental disorders in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), less than 25% of those in need have access to appropriate services, in part due to a scarcity of locally relevant, evidence-based interventions and models of care. To address this gap, researchers from India and the United States and the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) collaboratively developed a "Grantathon" model to provide mentored research training to 24 new principal investigators (PIs). This included a week-long didactic training, a customized web-based data entry/analysis system and a National Coordination Unit (NCU) to support PIs and track process objectives. Outcome objectives were assessed via scholarly output including publications, awards received and subsequent grants that were leveraged. Multiple mentorship strategies including collaborative problem-solving approaches were used to foster single-centre and multicentre research. Flexible, approachable and engaged support from mentors helped PIs overcome research barriers, and the NCU addressed local policy and day-to-day challenges through informal monthly review meetings. Bi-annual formal review presentations by all PIs continued through the COVID-19 pandemic, enabling interim results reporting and scientific review, also serving to reinforce accountability. To date, more than 33 publications, 47 scientific presentations, 12 awards, two measurement tools, five intervention manuals and eight research grants have been generated in an open-access environment. The Grantathon is a successful model for building research capacity and improving mental health research in India that could be adopted for use in other LMICs.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Humans , United States , Mentors , Pandemics , Biomedical Research/education , Mental Health
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(9)2023 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317446

ABSTRACT

The National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) Strategic Empowerment Tailored for Health Equity Investigators (SETH) study evaluates the value of adding Developmental Network to Coaching in the career advancement of diverse Early-Stage Investigators (ESIs). Focused NIH-formatted Mock Reviewing Sessions (MRS) prior to the submission of grants can significantly enhance the scientific merits of an ESI's grant application. We evaluated the most prevalent design, analysis-related factors, and the likelihood of grant submissions and awards associated with going through MRS, using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, and logistic regression methods. A total of 62 out of 234 applications went through the MRS. There were 69.4% that pursued R grants, 22.6% career development (K) awards, and 8.0% other grant mechanisms. Comparing applications that underwent MRS versus those that did not (N = 172), 67.7% vs. 38.4% were submitted for funding (i.e., unadjusted difference of 29.3%; OR = 4.8, 95% CI = (2.4, 9.8), p-value < 0.0001). This indicates that, relative to those who did not undergo MRS, ESIs who did, were 4.8 times as likely to submit an application for funding. Also, ESIs in earlier cohorts (1-2) (a period that coincided with the pre COVID-19 era) as compared to those who were recruited at later cohorts (3-4) (i.e., during the peak of COVID-19 period) were 3.8 times as likely to submit grants (p-value < 0.0001). The most prevalent issues that were identified included insufficient statistical design considerations and plans (75%), conceptual framework (28.3%), specific aims (11.7%), evidence of significance (3.3%), and innovation (3.3%). MRS potentially enhances grant submissions for extramural funding and offers constructive feedback allowing for modifications that enhance the scientific merits of research grants.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Health Equity , Mentoring , Humans , United States , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mentors
5.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0283598, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302074

ABSTRACT

Employees with mental health problems often struggle to remain in employment. During the COVID-19 pandemic, these employees face multiple additional stressors, which are likely to worsen their mental health and work productivity. Currently, it is unclear how to best support employees with mental health problems (and their managers) to improve wellbeing and productivity. We aim to develop a new intervention (MENTOR) that will jointly involve employees, managers, and a new professional (mental health employment liaison worker, MHELW), to help employees who are still at work with a mental health condition and currently receiving professional support for their mental health. A feasibility pilot study will then be undertaken to examine the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention from the perspective of employees and line managers. The study involves a feasibility randomised controlled study comparing outcomes of participants randomised to receive the intervention (MENTOR) with wait-list controls. Participants allocated to the waitlist control group will receive the intervention after three months. We aim to randomise 56 employee-manager pairs recruited from multiple organisations in the Midlands region of England. An intervention including 10 sessions for employees and managers (3 individual sessions and 4 joint sessions) will be delivered over 12 weeks by trained MHELWs. Primary outcomes include measures of feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and work productivity. Secondary outcomes include mental health outcomes. Qualitative interviews will be undertaken with a purposively selected sub-sample of employees and line managers at three-month post-intervention assessment. To our knowledge, this will be the first trial with a joint employee-manager intervention delivered by MHELWs. Anticipated challenges are dual-level consent (employees and managers), participants' attrition, and recruitment strategies. If the intervention and trial processes are shown to be feasible and acceptable, the outcomes from this study will inform future randomised controlled trials. Trial registration: This trial is pre-registered with the ISRCTN registry, registration number: ISRCTN79256498. Protocol version: 3.0_March_2023. https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN79256498.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , Feasibility Studies , Mentors , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
6.
BMJ Lead ; 7(1): 9-11, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2273341

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: It is 20 years since the Institute of Medicine advocated a national approach to improve care and patient safety. Patient safety infrastructure has greatly improved in certain countries. In Ireland, patient safety infrastructure is in ongoing development. To contribute to this, the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland/International Society for Quality in Healthcare Scholar in Residence Programme was launched in 2016. This programme aims to improve patient safety and develop a movement of future clinician leaders to drive improvements in patient safety and the quality of care. METHODS: Doctors in postgraduate training complete a year-long immersive mentorship. This involves monthly group meetings with key patient safety opinion makers, one-on-one mentorship, leadership courses, conference attendance and presentations. Each scholar undertakes a quality improvement (QI) project. RESULTS: A QI project was associated with a decrease in caesarean section rates from 13.7% to 7.6% (p=0.0002) among women in spontaneous labour at term with a cephalic presentation. Other projects are ongoing. CONCLUSION: Medical error, patient safety and QI must be addressed comprehensively at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. We believe the Irish mentorship programme will help to change the paradigm and improve patient safety.


Subject(s)
Cesarean Section , Quality Improvement , United States , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Clinical Competence , Delivery of Health Care , Mentors
7.
Hum Resour Health ; 21(1): 24, 2023 03 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2273083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the quest to ensure that quality healthcare is provided to all citizens through building healthcare worker capacity and extending reach for expert services, Zambia's Ministry of Health (MoH) in collaboration with its partners PEPFAR through the CDC and HRSA, began to implement the Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) tele-mentoring program across the country through the Health Workers for the 21st Century (HW21) Project and University Teaching Hospital HIV/AIDS Project (UTH-HAP). This ECHO tele-mentoring approach was deemed pivotal in helping to improve the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) service delivery capacity of health care workers. METHOD: The study used a mixed method, retrospective program evaluation to examine ECHO participants' performance in the management of HIV/AIDS patients in all the 10 provinces of Zambia. CASE PRESENTATION: A phenomenological design was applied in order to elicit common experiences of ECHO users through focus group discussions using semi-structured facilitation guides in four provinces (Eastern, Lusaka, Southern and Western) implementing ECHO tele-mentoring approach. These provinces were purposively selected for this study. From which, only participants that had a monthly frequency of ECHO attendance of ten (10) and above were selected. The participants were purposively selected based on the type of cadre as well as facility type so that the final sample consisted of Doctors, Nurses, Midwives, Clinical Officers, Medical Licentiates, Pharmacy and Laboratory Personnel. All sessions were audio recorded and transcribed by the data collectors. A thematic content analysis approach was adopted for analyzing content of the interview's transcripts. RESULTS: Enhanced knowledge and skills of participants on HIV/TB improved by 46/70 (65.7%) in all provinces, while 47/70 (67.1%) of the participants reported that ECHO improved their clinical practice. Further, 12/70 (17.1%) of participants in all provinces reported that presenter/presentation characteristics facilitated ECHO implementation and participation. While, 15/70(21.4%) of the participants reported that ownership of the program had contributed to ECHO implementation and participation. Coordination, another enabler accounted for 14/70 (20%). Inclusiveness was reported as a barrier by 16/70 (22.8%) of the participants while 6/70 (8.6%) of them reported attitudes as a barrier (8.6%) to ECHO participation. In addition, 34/70 (48.6%) reported poor connectivity as a barrier to ECHO implementation and participation while 8/70 (11.5%) of the participants reported that the lack of ownership of the ECHO program was a barrier. 22/70 (31.4%) reported that increased workload was also a barrier to the program's implementation. CONCLUSION: Consistent with its logical pathway model, healthcare providers' participation in ECHO sessions and onsite mentorship contributed to improved knowledge on HIV/TB among health care providers and patient health outcomes. In addition, barriers to ECHO implementation were intrinsic to the program its self, such as coordination, presenter and presentation characteristics other barriers were extrinsic to the program such as poor connectivity, poor infrastructure in health facilities and negative attitudes towards ECHO. Improving on intrinsic factors and mitigating extrinsic factors may help improve ECHO outcomes and scale-up plans.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Mentoring , Humans , Health Facilities , HIV , HIV Infections/therapy , Mentors , Program Evaluation , Retrospective Studies , Zambia
8.
Ann Plast Surg ; 90(6S Suppl 5): S645-S653, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2269638

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the second cycle impacted by COVID-19, the 2022 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (PRS) Match maintained virtual interviews while offering a modest lift of subinternship restrictions. The residency application process continues to evolve, with changes such as pass/fail United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 reporting prompting programs to reconsider metrics of applicant success. It is critical to address the impact of board scores, mentorship, and resource availability on a diverse applicant population in the PRS Match. METHODS: A survey was electronically administered to students applying to a single institutional PRS residency program. The survey inquired about demographics, application statistics, mentorship experience, and match outcomes. Logistic regressions were modeled to assess for odds of matching into plastic surgery. RESULTS: In total, 151 responses were analyzed, a 49.7% response rate. Most participants were female (52.3%), White (68.9%), and not Hispanic/Latino (84.8%). The largest percentage of respondents had a faculty mentor only from their home institution (55.0%) and a resident mentor from only their home institution (32.3%). Participants with a faculty mentor from both a home and outside institution had 7.4 times the odds of matching into PRS ( P = 0.02) than students with no faculty mentorship. Students with dual-institution resident mentorship had 18.5 times higher the odds of matching compared with students with no resident mentorship ( P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Subjective metrics, rather than objective scores, had the most influence on successfully matching into plastic surgery. As the PRS Match continues to become increasingly competitive, it behooves programs to provide equitable access to resources such as mentorship.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Plastic Surgery Procedures , Surgery, Plastic , Humans , Female , United States , Male , Mentors , Surgery, Plastic/education , COVID-19/epidemiology
10.
Ann Emerg Med ; 82(1): 47-54, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2281989

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Studies of mentorship in emergency medicine show that mentored residents are twice as likely to describe their career preparation as excellent as compared to nonmentored peers. There has been significant interest in the mentor-mentee relationship in medicine; however, there is minimal guidance and published literature specific to emergency medicine residents. METHODS: In this narrative review, we described the emergency medicine mentor-mentee relationship, discussed alternatives to the traditional dyadic model, and highlighted current barriers to effective mentorship. We conducted a structured literature review to identify relevant published articles regarding the mentoring of emergency medicine residents. Additional studies from general mentoring literature were included based on relevancy. RESULTS: We identified 39 studies in emergency medicine literature based on our search criteria. Additional studies from general medicine literature were included based on relevancy to this review. Based on the limited available literature, we recommend maximizing the resident mentoring relationship by developing formal mentoring programs, supporting the advancement of women and underrepresented minority mentors, and moving toward team mentoring, including peer, near-peer, and collaborative mentorship. The development of a mentoring network is a logical strategy for residents to work with a diverse group of individuals to maximize benefits in multiple areas. CONCLUSION: Alternative approaches to the traditional and hierarchal dyadic mentoring style (eg, team mentoring) are effective methods that residencies may promote to increase effective mentoring. Future efforts in mentoring emergency medicine residents emphasize these strategies, which are increasingly beneficial given the constraints and use of technology highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medicine , Internship and Residency , Humans , Female , Mentors , Pandemics
11.
Clin Sports Med ; 42(2): 281-289, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2281351

ABSTRACT

The still-evolving global pandemic has accelerated changes in how we work, how we lead, and how we interact. The power dynamic that once drove institutions has shifted to an infrastructure and operating framework encouraging new employee expectations, including the humanization of leadership from those in power. Trends in the corporate world show organizations have shifted to operational frameworks with humanized leadership models: leader-as-coach and leader-as-mentor.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Mentors , Humans , Leadership , Delivery of Health Care
12.
J Surg Educ ; 80(5): 726-730, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2280334

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic rapidly altered the landscape of medical education, particularly disrupting the residency application process and highlighting the need for structured mentorship programs. This prompted our institution to develop a virtual mentoring program to provide tailored, one-on-one mentoring to medical students applying to general surgery residency. The aim of this study was to examine general surgery applicant perception of a pilot virtual mentoring curriculum. DESIGN: The mentorship program included student-tailored mentoring and advising in 5 domains: resume editing, personal statement composition, requesting letters of recommendation, interview skills, and residency program ranking. Electronic surveys were administered following ERAS application submission to participating applicants. The surveys were distributed and collected via a REDCap database. RESULTS: Eighteen out of 19 participants completed the survey. Confidence in a competitive resume (p = 0.006), interview skills (p < 0.001), obtaining letters of recommendation (p = 0.002), personal statement drafting (p < 0.001), and ranking residency programs (p < 0.001) were all significantly improved following completion of the program. Overall utility of the curriculum and likelihood to participate again and recommend the program to others was rated a median 5/5 on the Likert scale (5 [IQR 4-5]). Confidence in the matching carried a premedian 66.5 (50-65) and a postmedian 84 (75-91) (p = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Following the completion of the virtual mentoring program, participants were found to be more confident in all 5 targeted domains. In addition, they were more confident in their overall ability to match. General Surgery applicants find tailored virtual mentoring programs to be a useful tool allowing for continued program development and expansion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Surgery , Internship and Residency , Mentoring , Students, Medical , Humans , Mentors , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , General Surgery/education
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(6)2023 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2250843

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly taxed scientific research and seems to have exacerbated existing inequities within the research field, particularly for early-stage investigators (ESIs). This study examines the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on traditionally underrepresented ESIs enrolled in an NIH-supported study evaluating the effectiveness of developmental networks, grant writing coaching, and mentoring on research career advancement. The survey consisted of 24 closed-ended (quantitative) and 4 open-ended questions (qualitative) linked to a participant's ability to meet grant submission deadlines, research and professional development disruptions, stress level, career transition level, self-efficacy and management of scholarly tasks, and familial responsibilities. Results from 32 respondents (53%) suggest that COVID-19 adversely impacted the continuity of research (81%) and grant submissions (63%). On average, grant submissions were delayed by 6.69 months (i.e., greater than one grant cycle). We also conducted additional analyses characterizing nonresponse and found that there were no significant predictors of nonresponse, indicating a limited threat to the validity of our findings. The disruption caused by COVID-19 to the careers of ESIs from underrepresented groups in the biomedical workforce has been profound in the short term. The long-term consequences to the future success of these groups are unknown but is a worthwhile area of research and potential innovation.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Health Equity , Mentoring , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mentoring/methods , Mentors
14.
J Nurs Educ ; 62(3): 183-186, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262891

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the current ongoing nurse faculty shortage, mentorship can aid in career advancement, promotion, and retention for clinical assistant professors (CAPs) when hiring clinical-track faculty. METHOD: The organization, experiences, and outcomes of a CAP mentorship workgroup within a multi-campus research-intensive college of nursing are described. RESULTS: The CAP mentorship workgroup was guided by senior faculty and met monthly to provide CAPs with a better understanding of the promotion process, motivation to pursue scholarship, and peer support. Through this workgroup, seven CAPs have completed their probationary review process, two CAPs are in the process of being promoted to clinical associate professors, and more than 90% of CAPs have been retained. CONCLUSION: Mentorship for clinical-track faculty can positively influence faculty productivity and aid in CAP retention, which contributes to the success of nursing programs. [J Nurs Educ. 2023;62(3):183-186.].


Subject(s)
Faculty, Nursing , Mentoring , Humans , Mentors , Motivation , Personnel Selection
15.
J Nurs Educ ; 62(2): 83-88, 2023 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255268

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mentoring is recommended as a strategy to improve satisfaction and retention of novice nurse faculty to help address the current faculty shortage. However, the meaning of academic mentoring varies among faculty, which can detract from the development of effective mentoring relationships in academia. This article details the meaning of mentoring as characterized by novice nurse faculty. METHOD: Semistructured interviews were conducted with novice nurse faculty (n = 21) who participated in a mentoring relationship with experienced colleagues. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes detailing the meaning of mentoring as described by the participants. RESULTS: The thematic analysis revealed an overarching theme of mentoring-as-partnership and three subthemes: (a) authentic communication, (b) enriching support, and (c) sharing knowledge. CONCLUSION: To strengthen mentoring relationships in academic nursing, focus should be placed on supporting mentoring partnerships marked by mutuality and clearly defined goals, roles, and responsibilities. [J Nurs Educ. 2023;62(2):83-88.].


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Humans , Faculty, Nursing , Mentors
16.
Med Dosim ; 48(2): 98-104, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2238953

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic affected the United States in early 2020, and many universities began offering their curriculum remotely. The majority of medical dosimetry programs started to offer both didactic and clinical education in a virtual setting. With COVID-19 social distancing and patient protective measures, many clinical medical dosimetrists also began to work in a remote or hybrid setting. Medical dosimetry students interact and learn from their clinical mentors in this remote clinical environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perspective of medical dosimetry mentors concerning the effectiveness of virtual clinical education for medical dosimetry students as a result of COVID-19. The Medical Dosimetry Mentor Perspective on Virtual Clinical Education (MedDos_VCE) survey measured medical dosimetry mentors' perceptions of the students' virtual clinical experience during the COVID-19 pandemic. The subject of the study was medical dosimetry mentors who participated in a remote clinic due to the COVID-19 pandemic since March 2020. The MedDos_VCE questionnaire measured (1) the mentors' assessment of instructional quality in remote clinical education; (2) opportunities for and quality of interaction between students and medical dosimetry mentors; and (3) suggestions for success from medical dosimetry mentors for students and other mentors who are participating in virtual clinical education. The majority of the clinical mentors were satisfied with the quality of virtual clinical education and students' learning outcomes. They felt that students experienced a good mix of patients, problems, and clinical experience and engaged in the day-to-day activities of a medical dosimetrist. Challenges exist and mentors offered practical suggestions for success for students and mentors in the virtual clinical environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentors , Humans , United States , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Nurs Clin North Am ; 58(1): 59-75, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2231136

ABSTRACT

This article describes how coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) health disparities relate to the social determinants of health and reviews the importance of a diverse nursing workforce prepared to advance social justice. The article reviews recommendations from the National Academy of Medicine and highlights practical strategies to promote diversity and social justice, including mentoring nurses from underrepresented backgrounds, amplifying diverse nursing voices, and leveraging the power of coalitions. In highlighting the interwoven impact of COVID-19 and demand for social change throughout 2020 to 2022, the article strives to move beyond the acute COVID-19 crisis to sustained social justice in health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Humans , Delivery of Health Care , Mentors
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 71, 2023 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2224166

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric pain is a complex health challenge requiring a multi-modal management approach. It is critical that healthcare providers (HCPs) have access to ongoing, flexible education and mentorship specific to pediatric pain. However, there are significant gaps in available pain education and a need for more opportunities to support interprofessional training. Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (Project ECHO®) is a model for delivering online HCP education and cultivating a virtual community of practice. Within the pediatric pain setting, ECHO® has potential to improve local access to specialized pain knowledge, particularly among the physicians, nurses, and allied health providers who primarily manage these cases in community and hospital settings across rural and urban environments. The purpose of this study was three-fold. First, to evaluate the feasibility (participation levels, acceptability) of implementing Project ECHO® in the context of pediatric pain. Second, to measure preliminary program impacts on HCP knowledge, self-efficacy, and clinical practice. Third, to characterize HCP program engagement levels before and after onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A needs assessment was conducted to identify interprofessional education gaps and inform the program curriculum. The no-cost Pediatric ECHO® for Pain program offered TeleECHO sessions (didactic and case-based learning) as well as foundational education. Surveys were distributed at baseline and 6 months to assess outcomes using 7-point Likert scales. Participant engagement was assessed for periods prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted. RESULTS: Eighty-five TeleECHO sessions were hosted, with a mean attendance of 34.1 ± 23.4 HCPs. Acceptability scores at 6 months (n = 33) ranged from 5.0 ± 1.4 to 6.5 ± 0.5. Participants reported statistically significant (p < 0.05) improvements in knowledge (7 out of 7 topics) and self-efficacy (8 out of 9 skills). Most participants reported positive practice impacts, including improved satisfaction with managing children with pain. Exploratory analyses showed a trend of greater engagement from ECHO® learners after onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Project ECHO® is a feasible and impactful model for virtual education of interprofessional HCPs in managing pediatric pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Pain , Pain Management/methods , Pandemics , Education, Distance , Mentors
19.
Int J Aging Hum Dev ; 96(1): 91-105, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2214286

ABSTRACT

Mentoring underrepresented students in aging research during the COVID-19 pandemic affords many opportunities for innovation and learning, for both students and program leaders. Here, we describe lessons learned from an Advancing Diversity in Aging Research (ADAR) program at a women-centered, minority-serving undergraduate institution. We share program elements and assessment results related to scholars' education in aging, support through community-building and mentorship, and research experiences in gerosciences. Notably, we highlight lessons learned for retaining and training undergraduate students as graduate school-ready researchers: 1) draw students into a community focused on social justice, 2) show students that geroscience is inclusive and integrative, 3) model professionalism with flexibility, 4) keep open lines of communication, and 5) build a team of mentors around each scholar. By sharing insights from our community of practice in geroscience research and education, we hope to model best practices for URM student support in aging research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Female , Humans , Geroscience , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mentors , Mentoring/methods , Minority Groups
20.
BMJ ; 380: 75, 2023 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2193713

Subject(s)
Mentoring , Humans , Mentors , Learning
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