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1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 839844, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775672

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) possess profound immunomodulatory and regenerative properties that are of clinical use in numerous clinical indications with unmet medical need. Common sources of MSCs include among others, bone marrow (BM), fat, umbilical cord, and placenta-derived decidua stromal cells (DSCs). We here summarize our more than 20-years of scientific experience in the clinical use of MSCs and DSCs in different clinical settings. BM-MSCs were first explored to enhance the engraftment of autografts in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and osteogenesis imperfecta around 30 years ago. In 2004, our group reported the first anti-inflammatory use of BM-MSCs in a child with grade IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Subsequent studies have shown that MSCs appear to be more effective in acute than chronic GvHD. Today BM-MSC-therapy is registered for acute GvHD in Japan and for GvHD in children in Canada and New Zeeland. MSCs first home to the lung following intravenous injection and exert strong local and systemic immunomodulatory effects on the host immune system. Thus, they were studied for ameliorating the cytokine storm in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Both, MSCs and DSCs were used to treat SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus-induced disease 2019 (COVID-19)-induced ARDS. In addition, they were also used for other novel indications, such as pneumomediastinum, colon perforation, and radiculomyelopathy. MSC and DSCs trigger coagulation and were thus explored to stop hemorrhages. DSCs appear to be more effective for acute GvHD, ARDS, and hemorrhages, but randomized studies are needed to prove superiority. Stromal cell infusion is safe, well tolerated, and only gives rise to a slight fever in a limited number of patients, but no major side effects have been reported in multiple safety studies and metaanalysis. In this review we summarize current evidence from in vitro studies, animal models, and importantly our clinical experience, to support stromal cell therapy in multiple clinical indications. This encloses MSC's effects on the immune system, coagulation, and their safety and efficacy, which are discussed in relation to prominent clinical trials within the field.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Graft vs Host Disease , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Animals , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Graft vs Host Disease/etiology , Graft vs Host Disease/therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Stem Cell Res Ther ; 13(1): 134, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770571

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to their immunomodulatory properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed to have therapeutic potential to improve clinical outcomes in COVID-19. However, the safety and efficacy profile of MSC infusion therapy in patients with non-severe COVID-19 infection has not been completely established; there is, in particular, a substantial void in the literature on dose-dependent studies of MSC infusion in patients with low clinical risk COVID-19 infection. METHODS: This phase 1 double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial examines the safety, feasibility, and tolerability of 2 doses (high and low) of DW-MSC in patients with low clinical risk COVID-19. A total of 9 patients were enrolled in this study and randomized into low-dose (TL), high-dose (TH), and placebo (C) groups. Subjects in the TL and TH groups received single intravenous infusions of 5.0 × 107 cells and 1.0 × 108 cells, respectively. The main outcome was the occurrence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAE) during the 28-day study period. Vital signs and various inflammatory markers were also monitored weekly during the observation period. RESULTS: There were no apparent differences in clinical characteristics between study groups (TL, TH, and C) at baseline. All patients did not show the progression of severity during the study period. During the course of the study, 6 episodes of TEAE were observed in 5 subjects; however, none of the TEAEs were severe. During the follow-up period, 8 subjects recovered and were discharged from the hospital without complications. A subject exhibited abnormal liver function biomarkers at the end of the study period. Changes in inflammatory markers throughout the clinical course were not vastly different across study groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our clinical trial has provided reliable results regarding the safety of MSCs in low clinical risk COVID-19 subjects treated with MSCs. However, further confirmation of the therapeutic efficacy aspects of MSC will require large-scale randomized controlled trials in subjects with varying severity profiles for COVID-19. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04535856. Registered 2 September 2020, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04535856.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , COVID-19/therapy , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods
3.
Bull Exp Biol Med ; 172(2): 250-253, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544492

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are characterized by tolerogenic potential and therefore, are used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) reactions after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation to improve the transplant functions, as well as for the therapy and prevention of cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients and some other conditions. However, MSC can exhibit proinflammatory activity, which causes risks for their clinical use. We studied the cytokine profile of bone marrow MSC culture and demonstrate intensive production of IL-6, IL-8, and chemokine MCP-1, which participate in the pathogenesis of cytokine storm and GVHD. At the same time, no anti-inflammatory IL-4 and IL-10 were detected. To reduce the risks of MSC application in the GVHD therapeutic protocols, further studies of the conditions promoting generation of MSC with tolerogenic potential and approved clinical standards of MSC use are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/analysis , Graft vs Host Disease/prevention & control , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , Bone Marrow Cells/immunology , Bone Marrow Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Cells, Cultured , Chemokine CCL2/analysis , Graft vs Host Disease/immunology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Interleukin-6/analysis , Interleukin-8/analysis , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transplantation, Homologous/adverse effects
4.
Int J Med Sci ; 18(13): 2849-2870, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524511

ABSTRACT

Lung disorders are a leading cause of morbidity and death worldwide. For many disease conditions, no effective and curative treatment options are available. Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapy is one of the cutting-edge topics in medical research today. It offers a novel and promising therapeutic option for various acute and chronic lung diseases due to its potent and broad-ranging immunomodulatory activities, bacterial clearance, tissue regeneration, and proangiogenic and antifibrotic properties, which rely on both cell-to-cell contact and paracrine mechanisms. This review covers the sources and therapeutic potential of MSCs. In particular, a total of 110 MSC-based clinical applications, either completed clinical trials with safety and early efficacy results reported or ongoing worldwide clinical trials of pulmonary diseases, are systematically summarized following preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, including acute/viral pulmonary disease, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), interstitial lung diseases (ILD), chronic pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and lung cancer. The results of recent clinical studies suggest that MSCs are a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of lung diseases. Nevertheless, large-scale clinical trials and evaluation of long-term effects are necessary in further studies.


Subject(s)
Lung Diseases/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/trends , Treatment Outcome
5.
Crit Care Med ; 48(5): e391-e399, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-661181

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the safety, feasibility, and possible adverse events of single-dose human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells in patients with moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. DESIGN: Prospective phase I clinical trial. SETTING: Medical center in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. PATIENTS: Moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome with a PaO2/FIO2 ratio less than 200. INTERVENTIONS: Scaling for doses was required by Taiwan Food and Drug Administration as follows: the first three patients received low-dose human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (1.0 × 10 cells/kg), the next three patients with intermediate dose (5.0 × 10 cells/kg), and the final three patients with high dose (1.0 × 10 cells/kg) between December 2017 and August 2019. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Nine consecutive patients were enrolled into the study. In-hospital mortality was 33.3% (3/9), including two with recurrent septic shock and one with ventilator-induced severe pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema. No serious prespecified cell infusion-associated or treatment-related adverse events was identified in any patient. Serial flow-cytometric analyses of circulating inflammatory biomarkers (CD14CD33/CD11b+CD16+/CD16+MPO+/CD11b+MPO+/CD14CD33+) and mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD26+CD45-/CD29+CD45-/CD34+CD45-/CD44+CD45-/CD73+CD45-/CD90+CD45-/CD105+CD45-/CD26+CD45-) were notably progressively reduced (p for trend < 0.001), whereas the immune cell markers (Helper-T-cell/Cytotoxity-T-cell/Regulatory-T-cell) were notably increased (p for trend < 0.001) after cell infusion. CONCLUSIONS: The result of this phase I clinical trial showed that a single-dose IV infusion of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells was safe with favorable outcome in nine acute respiratory distress syndrome patients.


Subject(s)
Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Umbilical Cord/physiology , Adult , Aged , Drug Dosage Calculations , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Male , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/mortality , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/classification , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Clin Immunol ; 226: 108712, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118363

ABSTRACT

In the past year, an emerging disease called Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has been discovered in Wuhan, China, which has become a worrying pandemic and has challenged the world health system and economy. SARS-CoV-2 enters the host cell through a specific receptor (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2) expressed on epithelial cells of various tissues. The virus, by inducing cell apoptosis and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, generates as cytokine storm, which is the major cause of mortality in the patients. This type of response, along with responses by other immune cell, such as alveolar macrophages and neutrophils causes extensive damage to infected tissue. Newly, a novel cell-based therapy by Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) as well as by their exosomes has been developed for treatment of COVID-19 that yielded promising outcomes. In this review study, we discuss the characteristics and benefits of MSCs therapy as well as MSC-secreted exosome therapy in treatment of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Exosomes/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Precision Medicine/methods , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Drug Carriers/metabolism , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
7.
Trials ; 22(1): 9, 2021 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011237

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: 1. To assess the efficacy of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) versus a control arm as described in the primary endpoint. 2. To evaluate the effects of MSC on the secondary efficacy endpoints. 3. To evaluate the safety and tolerability profiles of MSC. 4. To study soluble and cellular biomarkers that might be involved in the course of the disease and the response to the investigational product. TRIAL DESIGN: A double-blind, randomized, controlled, trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of MSC intravenous administration in patients with COVID-induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) compared to a control arm. PARTICIPANTS: The trial is being conducted at a third level hospital, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, in Majadahonda, Madrid (Spain). Inclusion criteria 1. Informed consent prior to performing study procedures (witnessed oral consent with written consent by representatives will be accepted to avoid paper handling). Written consent by patient or representatives will be obtained whenever possible. 2. Adult patients ≥18 years of age at the time of enrolment. 3. Laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection as determined by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), in oropharyngeal swabs or any other relevant specimen obtained during the course of the disease. Alternative tests (e.g., rapid antigen tests) are also acceptable as laboratory confirmation if their specificity has been accepted by the Sponsor. 4. Moderate to severe ARDS (PaO2/FiO2 ratio equal or less than 200 mmHg) for less than 96 hours at the time of randomization. 5. Patients requiring invasive ventilation are eligible within 72 hours from intubation. 6. Eligible for ICU admission, according to the clinical team. Exclusion criteria 1. Imminent and unavoidable progression to death within 24 hours, irrespective of the provision of treatments (in the opinion of the clinical team). 2. "Do Not Attempt Resuscitation" order in place. 3. Any end-stage organ disease or condition, which in the investigator's opinion, makes the patient an unsuitable candidate for treatment. 4. History of a moderate/severe lung disorder requiring home-based oxygen therapy. 5. Patient requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO), haemodialysis or hemofiltration at the time of treatment administration. 6. Current diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. 7. Active neoplasm, except carcinoma in situ or basalioma. 8. Known allergy to the products involved in the allogeneic MSC production process. 9. Current pregnancy or lactation (women with childbearing potential should have a negative pregnancy test result at the time of study enrolment). 10. Current participation in a clinical trial with an experimental treatment for COVID-19 (the use of any off-label medicine according to local treatment protocols is not an exclusion criteria). 11. Any circumstances that in the investigator's opinion compromises the patient's ability to participate in the clinical trial. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: - Experimental treatment arm: Allogeneic MSC (approximately 1 x 106 cells/kg). - Control arm: placebo solution (same composition as the experimental treatment, without the MSC). One single intravenous dose of the assigned treatment will be administered on Day 0 of the study. All trial participants will receive standard of care (SOC). In the context of the current worldwide pandemic, SOC can include medicines that are being used in clinical practice (e.g. lopinavir/ritonavir; hydroxy/chloroquine, tocilizumab, etc.), as well as those authorised for COVID (e.g., remdesivir). MAIN OUTCOMES: Primary endpoint: Change in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio from baseline to day 7 of treatment administration, or to the last available PaO2/FiO2 ratio if death occurs before day 7. Secondary endpoints: - All-cause mortality on days 7, 14, and 28 after treatment. - PaO2/FiO2 ratio at baseline and days 2, 4, 7, 14 and 28 after treatment. - Oxygen saturation (by standardized measurement) at baseline, daily until day 14, and on day 28 after treatment. - Time to PaO2/FiO2 ratio greater than 200 mmHg. - Subjects' clinical status on the WHO 7-point ordinal scale at baseline, daily until day 14, and on day 28 after treatment. - Time to an improvement of one category from admission on the WHO 7-point ordinal scale. - Percentage of patients that worsen at least one category on the WHO 7-point ordinal scale. - Percentage of patients that improve at least one category (maintained 48h) on the WHO 7-point ordinal scale. - Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scale at baseline and days 2, 4, 7, 14 and 28 after treatment. - Duration of hospitalization (days). - Duration of ICU stay (days). - Oxygen therapy-free days in the first 28 days after treatment. - Duration of supplemental oxygen. - Incidence of and duration of non-invasive and invasive mechanical ventilation in the first 28 days after treatment. - Mechanical ventilation-free days in the first 28 days after treatment. - Ventilation parameters. - Incidence of new onset pulmonary fibrosis at 3 and 12 months after treatment, based on CT scan and pulmonary function tests. - Survival at 3 and 12 months. - Cumulative incidence of Serious Adverse events (SAEs) and Grade 3 and 4 Adverse Events (AEs). - Cumulative incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADR) in the experimental treatment arm. - Cumulative incidence of AEs of special interest. - Levels of analytical markers (C-Reactive Protein, lymphocyte and neutrophil counts, lymphocyte subpopulations, LDH, ferritin, D-dimer, coagulation tests and cytokines...) at baseline and days 2, 4, 7, 14 and 28 after treatment. - Other soluble and cellular biomarkers that might be involved in the course of the disease and the response to MSC. RANDOMISATION: The assignment to treatment will be carried out randomly and blinded, with a 1:1 allocation. Randomization will be done through a centralized system embedded in the electronic Case Report Form (CRF). BLINDING (MASKING): To ensure blinding, treatments will be prepared for administration at the Cell Production Unit and the administration of the treatment will be masked, not allowing the identification of the Investigational Medicinal Product (IMP). NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): A total of 20 participants are planned to be randomized, 10 to each treatment group. TRIAL STATUS: Protocol version: 1.2, dated October 14th, 2020 Start of recruitment: 01/10/2020 End of recruitment (estimated): December 2020. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT Number: 2020-002193-27 , registered on July 14th, 2020. NCT number: NCT04615429 , registered on November 4th, 2020. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Combined Modality Therapy/adverse effects , Combined Modality Therapy/methods , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Spain , Standard of Care , Transplantation, Homologous/adverse effects , Transplantation, Homologous/methods
8.
Stem Cells Transl Med ; 10(5): 660-673, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1008163

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in COVID-19 is associated with high mortality. Mesenchymal stem cells are known to exert immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects and could yield beneficial effects in COVID-19 ARDS. The objective of this study was to determine safety and explore efficacy of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) infusions in subjects with COVID-19 ARDS. A double-blind, phase 1/2a, randomized, controlled trial was performed. Randomization and stratification by ARDS severity was used to foster balance among groups. All subjects were analyzed under intention to treat design. Twenty-four subjects were randomized 1:1 to either UC-MSC treatment (n = 12) or the control group (n = 12). Subjects in the UC-MSC treatment group received two intravenous infusions (at day 0 and 3) of 100 ± 20 × 106 UC-MSCs; controls received two infusions of vehicle solution. Both groups received best standard of care. Primary endpoint was safety (adverse events [AEs]) within 6 hours; cardiac arrest or death within 24 hours postinfusion). Secondary endpoints included patient survival at 31 days after the first infusion and time to recovery. No difference was observed between groups in infusion-associated AEs. No serious adverse events (SAEs) were observed related to UC-MSC infusions. UC-MSC infusions in COVID-19 ARDS were found to be safe. Inflammatory cytokines were significantly decreased in UC-MSC-treated subjects at day 6. Treatment was associated with significantly improved patient survival (91% vs 42%, P = .015), SAE-free survival (P = .008), and time to recovery (P = .03). UC-MSC infusions are safe and could be beneficial in treating subjects with COVID-19 ARDS.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Cytokines/blood , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Male , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Umbilical Cord/cytology
9.
Chem Phys Lipids ; 234: 105009, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919718

ABSTRACT

There are no commercially available effective antiviral medications or vaccines to deal with novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Hence there is a substantial unmet medical need for new and efficacious treatment options for COVID-19. Most COVID-19 deaths result from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This virus induces excessive and aberrant inflammation so it is important to control the inflammation as soon as possible. To date, results of numerous studies have been shown that mesenchymal stem cells and their derivatives can suppress inflammation. Exosomes function as intercellular communication vehicles to transfer bioactive molecules (based on their origins), between cells. In this review, the recent exosome-based clinical trials for the treatment of COVID-19 are presented. Potential therapy may include the following items: First, using mesenchymal stem cells secretome. Second, incorporating specific miRNAs and mRNAs into exosomes and last, using exosomes as carriers to deliver drugs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Exosomes/transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , SARS-CoV-2 , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Exosomes/chemistry , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Treatment Outcome
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(14)2020 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910461

ABSTRACT

Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) containing adipose stem cells (ASCs) has been used for many years in regenerative plastic surgery for autologous applications, without any focus on their potential allogenic role. Allogenic SVF transplants could be based on the possibility to use decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) as a scaffold from a donor then re-cellularized by ASCs of the recipient, in order to develop the advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) in fully personalized clinical approaches. A systematic review of this field has been realized in accordance with the Preferred Reporting for Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses-Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines. Multistep research of the PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, Pre-MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Clinicaltrials.gov, Scopus database, and Cochrane databases has been conducted to identify articles and investigations on human allogenic ASCs transplant for clinical use. Of the 341 articles identified, 313 were initially assessed for eligibility on the basis of the abstract. Of these, only 29 met all the predetermined criteria for inclusion according to the PICOS (patients, intervention, comparator, outcomes, and study design) approach, and 19 have been included in quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis). Ninety-one percent of the studies previously screened (284 papers) were focused on the in vitro results and pre-clinical experiments. The allogenic use regarded the treatment of perianal fistulas, diabetic foot ulcers, knee osteoarthritis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, refractory rheumatoid arthritis, pediatrics disease, fecal incontinence, ischemic heart disease, autoimmune encephalomyelitis, lateral epicondylitis, and soft tissue defects. The information analyzed suggested the safety and efficacy of allogenic ASCs and ECM transplants without major side effects.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue/transplantation , Extracellular Matrix , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Regenerative Medicine , Tissue Scaffolds , Adipose Tissue/cytology , Animals , Extracellular Matrix/ultrastructure , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Regenerative Medicine/methods , Tissue Engineering/methods , Tissue Scaffolds/chemistry , Transplantation, Homologous/adverse effects , Transplantation, Homologous/methods
11.
Drug Des Devel Ther ; 14: 3995-4001, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-836051

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic continues and antiviral agents and vaccines are currently under investigation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy can be a suitable option for management of patients with COVID-19 at the urgent time of virus outbreak. Currently, MSCs are being explored against the novel infectious disease due to their therapeutic properties of anti-inflammation, immunomodulation and tissue repair and regeneration, albeit the precise mechanisms of MSC action toward COVID-19 remain unclear. To date, rigorous results from clinical trials using MSCs in human have been weakly positive. The pervasive uncertainty of using MSC therapeutic products as an effective combatant against COVID-19 requires rigorous resolution on several fronts, including MSC fate after infusion, safety issue, homing capability, and MSC resistance to the disease microenvironment. Focusing on these facets, a few important ones will be critically analyzed and addressed in this article for the development of safe and effective MSC-based therapies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , Animals , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
12.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1091, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-589811

ABSTRACT

Numerous clinical trials of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) as a new treatment for coronavirus-induced disease (COVID-19) have been registered recently, most of them based on intravenous (IV) infusion. There is no approved effective therapy for COVID-19, but MSC therapies have shown first promise in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) pneumonia, inflammation, and sepsis, which are among the leading causes of mortality in COVID-19 patients. Many of the critically ill COVID-19 patients are in a hypercoagulable procoagulant state and at high risk for disseminated intravascular coagulation, thromboembolism, and thrombotic multi-organ failure, another cause of high fatality. It is not yet clear whether IV infusion is a safe and effective route of MSC delivery in COVID-19, since MSC-based products express variable levels of highly procoagulant tissue factor (TF/CD142), compromising the cells' hemocompatibility and safety profile. Of concern, IV infusions of poorly characterized MSC products with unchecked (high) TF/CD142 expression could trigger blood clotting in COVID-19 and other vulnerable patient populations and further promote the risk for thromboembolism. In contrast, well-characterized products with robust manufacturing procedures and optimized modes of clinical delivery hold great promise for ameliorating COVID-19 by exerting their beneficial immunomodulatory effects, inducing tissue repair and organ protection. While the need for MSC therapy in COVID-19 is apparent, integrating both innate and adaptive immune compatibility testing into the current guidelines for cell, tissue, and organ transplantation is critical for safe and effective therapies. It is paramount to only use well-characterized, safe MSCs even in the most urgent and experimental treatments. We here propose three steps to mitigate the risk for these vulnerable patients: (1) updated clinical guidelines for cell and tissue transplantation, (2) updated minimal criteria for characterization of cellular therapeutics, and (3) updated cell therapy routines reflecting specific patient needs.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Transplantation Immunology , Administration, Intravenous , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19 , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy/methods , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Injections, Intramuscular , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology
13.
Trials ; 21(1): 462, 2020 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-505744

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of the study is to assess the safety of a single intravenous infusion of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) in patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID-19. Secondary objectives are to determine the effects of MSCs on important clinical outcomes, as described below. TRIAL DESIGN: REALIST COVID 19 is a randomised, placebo-controlled, triple blinded trial. PARTICIPANTS: The study will be conducted in Intensive Care Units in hospitals across the United Kingdom. Patients with moderate to severe ARDS as defined by the Berlin definition, receiving invasive mechanical ventilation and with a diagnosis of COVID-19 based on clinical diagnosis or PCR test will be eligible. Patients will be excluded for the following reasons: more than 72 hours from the onset of ARDS; age < 16 years; patient known to be pregnant; major trauma in previous 5 days; presence of any active malignancy (other than non-melanoma skin cancer); WHO Class III or IV pulmonary hypertension; venous thromboembolism currently receiving anti-coagulation or within the past 3 months; patient receiving extracorporeal life support; severe chronic liver disease (Child-Pugh > 12); Do Not Attempt Resuscitation order in place; treatment withdrawal imminent within 24 hours; prisoners; declined consent; non-English speaking patients or those who do not adequately understand verbal or written information unless an interpreter is available; previously enrolled in the REALIST trial. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Intervention: Allogeneic donor CD362 enriched human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stromal cells (REALIST ORBCEL-C) supplied as sterile, single-use cryopreserved cell suspension of a fixed dose of 400 x106 cells in 40ml volume, to be diluted in Plasma-Lyte 148 to a total volume of 200mls for administration. Comparator (placebo): Plasma-Lyte 148 Solution for Infusion (200mls). The cellular product (REALIST ORBCEL-C) was developed and patented by Orbsen Therapeutics. MAIN OUTCOMES: The primary safety outcome is the incidence of serious adverse events. The primary efficacy outcome is Oxygenation Index (OI) at day 7. Secondary outcomes include: OI at days 4 and 14; respiratory compliance, driving pressure and PaO2/FiO2 ratio (PF ratio) at days 4, 7 and 14; Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at days 4, 7 and 14; extubation and reintubation; ventilation free days at day 28; duration of mechanical ventilation; length of ICU and hospital stay; 28-day and 90-day mortality. RANDOMISATION: After obtaining informed consent, patients will be randomised via a centralised automated 24-hour telephone or web-based randomisation system (CHaRT, Centre for Healthcare Randomised Trials, University of Aberdeen). Randomisation will be stratified by recruitment centre and by vasopressor use and patients will be allocated to REALIST ORBCEL-C or placebo control in a 1:1 ratio. BLINDING (MASKING): The investigator, treating physician, other members of the site research team and participants will be blinded. The cell therapy facility and clinical trials pharmacist will be unblinded to facilitate intervention and placebo preparation. The unblinded individuals will keep the treatment information confidential. The infusion bag will be masked at the time of preparation and will be administered via a masked infusion set. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): A sample size of 60 patients with 30 patients randomised to the intervention and 30 to the control group. If possible, recruitment will continue beyond 60 patients to provide more accurate and definitive trial results. The total number of patients recruited will depend on the pandemic and be guided by the data monitoring and ethics committee (DMEC). TRIAL STATUS: REALIST Phase 1 completed in January 2020 prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. This was an open label dose escalation study of REALIST ORBCEL-C in patients with ARDS. The COVID-19 pandemic emerged as REALIST Phase 2 was planned to commence and the investigator team decided to repurpose the Phase 2 trial as a COVID-19 specific trial. This decision was discussed and approved by the Trial Steering Committee (TSC) and DMEC. Submissions were made to the Research Ethics Committee (REC) and MHRA to amend the protocol to a COVID-19 specific patient population and the protocol amendment was accepted by the REC on 27th March 2020 and MHRA on 30th March 2020 respectively. Other protocol changes in this amendment included an increase in the time of onset of ARDS from 48 to 72 hours, inclusion of clinical outcomes as secondary outcomes, the provision of an option for telephone consent, an indicative sample size and provision to continue recruitment beyond this indicative sample size. The current protocol in use is version 4.0 23.03.2020 (Additional file 1). Urgent Public Health status was awarded by the NIHR on 2 April 2020 and the trial opened to recruitment and recruited the first participant the same day. At the time of publication the trial was open to recruitment at 5 sites across the UK (Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, King's College London, Guys and St Thomas' Hospital London, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham) and 12 patients have been recruited across these sites. Additional sites are planned to open and appropriate approvals for these are being obtained. It is estimated recruitment will continue for 6 months. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03042143 (Registered 3 Feb 2017). EudraCT 2017-000585-33 (Registered 28 Nov 2017). FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol (version 4.0 23.03.2020) is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest of expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol. The study protocol has been reported in accordance with the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Clinical Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines (Additional file 2).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Lung/virology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Recovery of Function , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Transplantation, Homologous , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom
14.
Stem Cells Transl Med ; 9(9): 1007-1022, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-428111

ABSTRACT

Severe cases of COVID-19 infection, often leading to death, have been associated with variants of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is a potential treatment for COVID-19 ARDS based on preclinical and clinical studies supporting the concept that MSCs modulate the inflammatory and remodeling processes and restore alveolo-capillary barriers. The authors performed a systematic literature review and random-effects meta-analysis to determine the potential value of MSC therapy for treating COVID-19-infected patients with ARDS. Publications in all languages from 1990 to March 31, 2020 were reviewed, yielding 2691 studies, of which nine were included. MSCs were intravenously or intratracheally administered in 117 participants, who were followed for 14 days to 5 years. All MSCs were allogeneic from bone marrow, umbilical cord, menstrual blood, adipose tissue, or unreported sources. Combined mortality showed a favorable trend but did not reach statistical significance. No related serious adverse events were reported and mild adverse events resolved spontaneously. A trend was found of improved radiographic findings, pulmonary function (lung compliance, tidal volumes, PaO2 /FiO2 ratio, alveolo-capillary injury), and inflammatory biomarker levels. No comparisons were made between MSCs of different sources.


Subject(s)
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Lung/physiology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 203, 2020 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-291146

ABSTRACT

In late 2019, a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in Wuhan, capital city of Hubei province in China. Cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection quickly grew by several thousand per day. Less than 100 days later, the World Health Organization declared that the rapidly spreading viral outbreak had become a global pandemic. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is typically associated with fever and respiratory symptoms. It often progresses to severe respiratory distress and multi-organ failure which carry a high mortality rate. Older patients or those with medical comorbidities are at greater risk for severe disease. Inflammation, pulmonary edema and an over-reactive immune response can lead to hypoxia, respiratory distress and lung damage. Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) possess potent and broad-ranging immunomodulatory activities. Multiple in vivo studies in animal models and ex vivo human lung models have demonstrated the MSC's impressive capacity to inhibit lung damage, reduce inflammation, dampen immune responses and aid with alveolar fluid clearance. Additionally, MSCs produce molecules that are antimicrobial and reduce pain. Upon administration by the intravenous route, the cells travel directly to the lungs where the majority are sequestered, a great benefit for the treatment of pulmonary disease. The in vivo safety of local and intravenous administration of MSCs has been demonstrated in multiple human clinical trials, including studies of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recently, the application of MSCs in the context of ongoing COVID-19 disease and other viral respiratory illnesses has demonstrated reduced patient mortality and, in some cases, improved long-term pulmonary function. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASC), an abundant type of MSC, are proposed as a therapeutic option for the treatment of COVID-19 in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. Additionally, when proven to be safe and effective, ASC treatments may reduce the demand on critical hospital resources. The ongoing COVID-19 outbreak has resulted in significant healthcare and socioeconomic burdens across the globe. There is a desperate need for safe and effective treatments. Cellular based therapies hold great promise for the treatment of COVID-19. This literature summary reviews the scientific rationale and need for clinical studies of adipose-derived stem cells and other types of mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of patients who suffer with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Animals , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Stem Cells Dev ; 29(12): 747-754, 2020 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-209923

ABSTRACT

This prospective nonrandomized open-label cohort study addresses the safety and efficacy of exosomes (ExoFlo™) derived from allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as treatment for severe COVID-19. During April 2020, ExoFlo was provided to 24 SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction-positive patients at a single hospital center, all of whom met criteria for severe COVID-19 as well as moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Patients received a single 15 mL intravenous dose of ExoFlo and were evaluated for both safety and efficacy from days 1 to 14 post-treatment. All safety endpoints were met with no adverse events observed within 72 h of ExoFlo administration. A survival rate of 83% was observed. In total, 17 of 24 (71%) patients recovered, 3 of 24 (13%) patients remained critically ill though stable, and 4 of 24 (16%) patients expired for reasons unrelated to the treatment. Overall, after one treatment, patients' clinical status and oxygenation improved with an average pressure of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen ratio (PaO2/FiO2) increase of 192% (P < 0.001). Laboratory values revealed significant improvements in absolute neutrophil count [mean reduction 32% (P value <0.001)] and lymphopenia with average CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ lymphocyte counts increasing by 46% (P < 0.05), 45% (P < 0.05), and 46% (P < 0.001), respectively. Likewise, acute phase reactants declined, with mean C-reactive protein, ferritin, and D-dimer reduction of 77% (P < 0.001), 43% (P < 0.001), and 42% (P < 0.05), respectively. In conclusion, owing to its safety profile, capacity to restore oxygenation, downregulate cytokine storm, and reconstitute immunity, ExoFlo is a promising therapeutic candidate for severe COVID-19. Future randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are needed to determine ExoFlo therapeutic potential.


Subject(s)
Bone Marrow Cells/cytology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Exosomes/transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Cell-Derived Microparticles/transplantation , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Critical Illness/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/ultrastructure , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
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