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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e059514, 2022 11 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108276

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The pandemic of COVID-19 disease has caused severe impact globally. Governments consider vaccination as an effective measure to control pandemic. However, many people have been hesitant to receive COVID-19 vaccine, particularly periconceptional and lactating women. Although research has indicated that pregnant women with COVID-19 are at a higher risk of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes, as well as severe illness. There appears to be a lack of systematic and comprehensive evidence of the prevalence and determinants of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among periconceptional and lactating women. As a result, it has been essential to investigate periconceptional and lactating women's vaccination views and behaviours. This study will review articles on vaccine hesitancy among periconceptional and lactating women to assess the impact of the COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy during the pandemic. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will systematically search observational studies from 1 November 2019 to 30 October 2021 in the following databases: Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EBSCO, WHO COVID-19 Database, CNKI and WanFang Database. The following medical subject headings and free-text terms will be used: "COVID-19 vaccines" AND "female" AND "vaccine hesitancy". Eligibility criteria are as follows: population (women of reproductive age); exposure (currently pregnant, lactational or trying to get pregnant); comparison (general women who are not in preconception, gestation or lactation) and outcome (the rate of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy). Article screening and data extraction will be undertaken independently by two reviewers, and any discrepancy will be resolved through discussion. We will use I2 statistics to assess heterogeneity and perform a meta-analysis when sufficiently homogeneous studies are provided. We will explore the potential sources of heterogeneity using subgroup and meta-regression analysis. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study will use published data, so ethical approval is not required. The findings will be disseminated by publication in peer-reviewed journal(s). PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021257511.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Lactation , Research Design , Pandemics , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
2.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266232, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As of July 2021, there has been more than 185 million documented cases of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infections and more than 4 million deaths globally. Despite more than 90% of documented cases being classified as "recovered" from SARS-CoV-2 infection, a proportion of patients reported a wide variety of persisting symptoms after the initial onset or acute phase of the infection, often referred to as "Long Covid". As data on the symptomatology of post-acute SARS-CoV-2 infection gradually becomes available, there is an urgent need to organise and synthesise the data in order to define what constitutes Long Covid and assist with its management in clinical and community settings. METHODS: This protocol follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines. A comprehensive literature search strategy will be developed in accordance with the Cochrane highly sensitive search guidelines. The following electronic databases will be searched for studies to include in the systematic review and meta-analysis: MEDLINE (via PubMed), Scopus, Google Scholar, Web of Science (Web of Knowledge), Science direct, EMBASE, Mednar, Psych INFO, and EBSCOhost. Dual screening will be applied at every screening stage. Two reviewers will independently screen titles, abstracts and full text of potentially eligible studies following the predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria in order to select studies to include in the review. As heterogeneity is anticipated between the included studies, data will be pooled in a meta-analysis using a random effects model. A clustering analytic approach will be applied to identify symptoms groupings and assign the symptoms into clusters. R statistical software will be used for the meta-analysis. Highly heterogenous data will be synthesised narratively. The studies will be assessed, for quality using quality assessment tools appropriate for each study design. Two reviewers will independently undertake the quality of studies assessments. DISSEMINATION PLANS: Findings of the systematic review will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication and presentation of findings at conferences, workshops and government and private sector stakeholder engagement meetings. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO registration number: CRD4202126589. https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?ID=CRD4202126589.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Meta-Analysis as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e063846, 2022 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097992

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: For some people, COVID-19 infection leads to negative health impacts that can last into the medium or long term. The long-term sequelae of COVID-19 infection, or 'long COVID', negatively affects not only physical health, but also mental health, cognition or psychological well-being. Complex, integrated interventions are recommended for long COVID, including psychological components; however, the effectiveness of such interventions has yet to be critically evaluated. This protocol describes a systematic review to be conducted of scientific literature reporting on clinical trials of interventions to promote mental health, cognition or psychological well-being among individuals with long COVID. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines will be followed. A health sciences librarian will identify the relevant literature through comprehensive systematic searches of Medline, Embase, APA PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, medRxiv, PsyArXiv, China National Knowledge Internet and WANFANG Data databases, as well as The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, clinicaltrials.gov and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Studies will be selected through a title and abstract review, followed by a full-text review using inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extracted will include intervention descriptions and efficacy metrics. Data will be narratively synthesised; if the data allow, a meta-analysis will be conducted. Risk of bias assessment will be conducted using the Cochrane Risk of Bias 2.0 tool. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval for systematic reviews is not required. As researchers and clinicians respond to the new clinical entity that long COVID represents, this review will synthesise a rapidly emerging evidence base describing and testing interventions to promote mental health, cognition or psychological well-being. Results will therefore be disseminated through an open-access peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations to inform research and clinical practice. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42022318678.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , COVID-19/complications , Cognition , Humans , Knowledge , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(43): e31447, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: From the end of 2019 to now, COVID-19 is still prevalent, which poses a great threat to international public health. With the increasing number of people infected, the number of patients with COVID-19 sequelae is also increasing, but there is no specific drug for COVID-19 sequelae. In China, traditional Chinese medicine combined with acupuncture has been widely used in COVID-19 sequelae, but there is still a lack of evidence-based medicine evaluation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese medicine combined with moxibustion in the treatment of COVID-19 sequelae. METHODS: According to the retrieval strategy, the "long COVID" randomized controlled trial of traditional Chinese medicine combined with moxibustion will be search in eight databases composed of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, China National knowledge Infrastructure Database, China Biomedical Database and China Science and Technology Journal Database, regardless of publication date or language. The study was screened according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and the Cochrane risk bias assessment tool was used to evaluate the quality of the study. Meta-analysis was carried out using RevMan5.3 and STATA12.0 software. Finally, the level of evidence of the results will be evaluated. RESULTS: This study will evaluate whether traditional Chinese medicine combined with moxibustion can effectively treat the symptoms of COVID-19 sequelae. CONCLUSION: This study will provide evidence whether there is benefit of traditional Chinese medicine combined with moxibustion in the treatment of COVID-19 sequelae. At the same time, our research results will provide a reference for clinical decision-making and guiding development in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Moxibustion , Humans , Moxibustion/methods , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , COVID-19/therapy , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Research Design
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(43): e31234, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097511

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dry eye disease (DED) is a condition occurring worldwide. Studies have found that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients may have persistent dry eye symptoms for weeks and months after recovery, and the prevalence of dry eye is higher in COVID-19 patients than in people without COVID-19 infection. As one of the common ophthalmic diseases, the clinical application of acupuncture in the treatment of DED is not widely used nowadays. METHODS: According to the retrieval strategies, randomized controlled trials (RCT) on the acupuncture for DED after recovery from COVID-19 were obtained from Embase, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese Science and Technology Periodical database, The WanFang database. Studies were screened based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, and the Cochrane risk bias assessment tool was used to evaluate the quality of the studies. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager (RevMan 5.3) and STATA 14.2 software. Ultimately, the evidentiary grade for the results will be evaluated. RESULTS: The study will provide a high-quality and convincing assessment of the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for DED after recovery from COVID-19 and will be published in peer-reviewed journals. CONCLUSION: Our findings will provide references for future clinical decision and guidance development.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , COVID-19 , Dry Eye Syndromes , Humans , COVID-19/therapy , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Dry Eye Syndromes/therapy , Research Design
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(43): e31162, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097510

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In recent years, many studies have found possible links between gene polymorphisms and venous thromboembolism (VTE). By identifying genetic risk factors before facing environmental risk factors such as surgical interventions and COVID-19 vaccination, we could rapidly respond to the risk of VTE. The aim of this study was to perform an umbrella review of genetic variants related to VTE. Integrative gene analysis of VTE was performed to identify critical genetic variations. METHODS: This study conducted an umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. All included studies were selected from the PubMed/MEDLINE database. To select eligible studies, the following variables were extracted: first author name; effect size of each study genetic variant; year of publication; the number of studies included in each article; ethnicity, sample size, P values, and heterogeneity estimates. To assess cumulative evidence in genetic epidemiology about effects of gene polymorphisms on VTE, Human Genome Epidemiology Network's Venice criteria were used. Methodological quality assessment was conducted with JBI Critical Appraisal Checklist for Systematic Reviews and Research Syntheses. RESULTS: Genes provided in the present study with genetic variants associated with VTE were FVL (G1691A), Prothrombin (G20210A), MTHFR (C677T, A1298C), PAI-1 (4G/5G), factor VII activating protease (1601G > A), and endothelial protein C receptor (g.6936A_G, c.4600A_G). Among them, variants in FVL, Prothrombin, MTHFR, and PAI-1 showed high significance. Particularly, variants in Prothrombin (G20210A), MTHFR (C677T), and PAI-1 (4G/5G) had more than 2 types of model significance. CONCLUSION: The present study performed a systematic review of genetic variants associated with VTE. Our results could lead to a more comprehensive understanding of VTE etiology. These results could give a strategy of prediagnosis about evaluating individual risks of VTE who might be exposed to environmental risk factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thromboembolism , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)/genetics , Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1/genetics , Prothrombin/genetics , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/genetics , Meta-Analysis as Topic
7.
Arq Neuropsiquiatr ; 80(7): 741-758, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096903

ABSTRACT

The Brazilian Practice Guidelines for Stroke Rehabilitation - Part II, developed by the Scientific Department of Neurological Rehabilitation of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology (Academia Brasileira de Neurologia, in Portuguese), focuses on specific rehabilitation techniques to aid recovery from impairment and disability after stroke. As in Part I, Part II is also based on recently available evidence from randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and other guidelines. Part II covers disorders of communication, dysphagia, postural control and balance, ataxias, spasticity, upper limb rehabilitation, gait, cognition, unilateral spatial neglect, sensory impairments, home rehabilitation, medication adherence, palliative care, cerebrovascular events related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, the future of stroke rehabilitation, and stroke websites to support patients and caregivers. Our goal is to provide health professionals with more recent knowledge and recommendations for better rehabilitation care after stroke.


As Diretrizes Brasileiras de Reabilitação do Acidente Vascular Cerebral (AVC) - Parte II, desenvolvida pelo Departamento Científico de Reabilitação Neurológica da Academia Brasileira de Neurologia é voltada para intervenções específicas de técnicas de reabilitação de déficits neurológicos e incapacidades. Seguindo o mesmo modelo da Parte I, a Parte II também se baseia em estudos randomizados, revisões sistemáticas, metanálises e outras diretrizes sobre o mesmo tema. A segunda parte aborda os distúrbios da comunicação, disfagia, controle postural e equilíbrio, ataxias, espasticidade, reabilitação do membro superior, marcha, cognição, negligência espacial unilateral, déficits sensoriais, reabilitação domiciliar, aderência ao uso de medicamentos, cuidados paliativos, o futuro da reabilitação no AVC, e websites de orientação sobre AVC para pacientes e cuidadores. Nosso objetivo é fornecer aos profissionais envolvidos na reabilitação conhecimento atualizado e recomendações para um melhor cuidado no pós-AVC.


Subject(s)
Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke , Humans , Brazil , COVID-19 , Stroke/complications , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090148

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a well-established treatment for patients with chronic lung disease; however, its role in patients with COVID-19 has not been systematically studied. We provide a protocol outlining the methods and analyses that will be used in the systematic review. METHODS: The methodology of this systematic review protocol has been filed in PROSPERO under the registration number CRD42022301418. Five electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EBSCO, and CNKI databases) will be searched from 2019 to 28 July 2022, using pre-determined search terms. Eligibility criteria will be defined using a PICOS framework. Pulmonary function, exercise capacity, and health-related quality of life will be the primary outcomes. Quantitative findings will be narratively synthesized, whilst argument synthesis combined with refutational analysis will be employed to synthesize qualitative data. RESULTS: The results will be presented by both meta-analysis and qualitative analysis. CONCLUSION: This protocol describes what will be the first systematic review to conduct a worldwide assessment of the effect of PR in patients with COVID-19. Because this is a systematic review and meta-analysis, no ethical approval is needed. The systematic review and meta-analysis will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated both electronically and in print.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Quality of Life , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Research Design
9.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0272839, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079726

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has been the most important public health concern worldwide since 2020. Several vaccines are now available to help in controlling COVID-19 associated morbidity and mortality. This study will aim to provide the global and regional prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection as well as an estimate of disease severity among COVID-19 vaccinated individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In order to determine the global burden of SARS-CoV-2 infection among vaccinated individuals, we will systematically extract and review papers from PubMed/MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Science direct and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). All the studies describing the prevalence and/or disease severity (hospitalization and case fatality rate) data of COVID-19 among individuals who received a partial or complete dose of WHO-approved COVID-19 vaccines will be eligible. A random effect model will be used to calculate the pooled prevalence and to estimate the disease severity. Subgroup analysis will be performed to explore the association between the number of vaccine doses received and the COVID-19 burdens. DISCUSSION: This systematic review and meta-analysis will provide the global estimate data on pooled prevalence, hospitalization and case fatality rates of COVID-19 among vaccinated individuals. Moreover, the factors associated with reinfection and disease severity will be equally investigated in the meta-analysis. The results of this study will contribute in the understanding and estimation of the global burden of COVID-19 among vaccinated individuals. Findings will provide meaningful information for the success of the current global rollout of COVID-19 vaccination strategies and pave the way for future interventions. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: CRD42021273074.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Hospitalization , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Systematic Reviews as Topic
10.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(41): e30992, 2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077957

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders pose a significant threat to the clinical rehabilitation of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Tai Chi is a therapeutic exercise that can be used to treat anxiety disorders. We aim to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of Tai Chi for treating patients with anxiety disorders caused by COVID-19. METHODS: The PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature, Wan Fang, and Chinese Clinical Trial Registry databases will be searched for reports of randomized controlled trials on Tai Chi for the treatment of anxiety disorders caused by COVID-19, published from December 1, 2019, to August 22, 2022. Two researchers will screen the articles and extract the relevant information. RESULTS: The results will provide a systematic overview of the current evidence on the use of Tai Chi to treat anxiety disorders caused by COVID-19 among patients. CONCLUSION: The conclusions of this study will help clarify whether Tai Chi is effective and safe for treating anxiety disorders caused by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tai Ji , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , China , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Tai Ji/methods
11.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(41): e30929, 2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has drastically challenged the safety of on esophageal cancer (EC) surgery during COVID-19. The study aimed to evaluate the safety of EC surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This systematic review was performed in accordance with the PRISMA-P 2015 guidelines and registered in PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42022335164). A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Medline, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, Chinese Scientific Journal database, and Wan Fang database was conducted to identify potentially relevant publications from January 2020 to May 2022. All data were independently extracted by two researchers. We will apply a fixed-effect model or random effect model basis on the heterogeneity test and employ with RevMan 5.4.1 software for data synthesis. The dichotomous surgical outcomes used risk ratios or risk differences, and for continuous surgical outcomes, mean differences (MD) or standardized MD, both with 95% confidence intervals were used. The primary outcomes were postoperative complications, anastomotic leaks, and mortality. The secondary outcomes were total hospital stay, postoperative stay, preoperative waiting, operation time, blood loss, transfusion, postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) stay, number of patients needing ICU stay, and 30-day readmission. RESULTS: This study will comprehensively summarize the high-quality trials to determine the safety of EC surgery during COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Our systematic review and meta-analysis will present evidence for the safety of EC surgery during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Esophageal Neoplasms , Esophageal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Systematic Reviews as Topic
12.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0270150, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054310

ABSTRACT

We urgently need answers to basic epidemiological questions regarding SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant and postpartum women and its effect on their newborns. While many national registries, health facilities, and research groups are collecting relevant data, we need a collaborative and methodologically rigorous approach to better combine these data and address knowledge gaps, especially those related to rare outcomes. We propose that using a sequential, prospective meta-analysis (PMA) is the best approach to generate data for policy- and practice-oriented guidelines. As the pandemic evolves, additional studies identified retrospectively by the steering committee or through living systematic reviews will be invited to participate in this PMA. Investigators can contribute to the PMA by either submitting individual patient data or running standardized code to generate aggregate data estimates. For the primary analysis, we will pool data using two-stage meta-analysis methods. The meta-analyses will be updated as additional data accrue in each contributing study and as additional studies meet study-specific time or data accrual thresholds for sharing. At the time of publication, investigators of 25 studies, including more than 76,000 pregnancies, in 41 countries had agreed to share data for this analysis. Among the included studies, 12 have a contemporaneous comparison group of pregnancies without COVID-19, and four studies include a comparison group of non-pregnant women of reproductive age with COVID-19. Protocols and updates will be maintained publicly. Results will be shared with key stakeholders, including the World Health Organization (WHO) Maternal, Newborn, Child, and Adolescent Health (MNCAH) Research Working Group. Data contributors will share results with local stakeholders. Scientific publications will be published in open-access journals on an ongoing basis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
BMJ Open ; 12(10): e065588, 2022 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053224

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to concerns about potential adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with infection, resulting in intensive research. Numerous studies have attempted to examine whether COVID-19 is associated with an increased risk of pregnancy loss. However, studies and reviews to date have drawn differing conclusions. The aim of this systematic review is to provide a summary of all quantitative research on the relationship between pregnancy loss and COVID-19 infection and, if appropriate, to synthesise the evidence into an overall effect estimate. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Three publication databases (Embase, PubMed and Cochrane) and four preprint databases (medRxiv, Lancet Preprint, Gates Open Research and Wellcome Open Research) will be searched. Boolean logic will be used to combine terms associated with pregnancy loss and COVID-19. The population of interest are pregnant women. Retrieved results will be assessed in two phases: (1) abstract screening and (2) full text evaluation. All studies which compare pregnancy loss outcomes in women who had COVID-19 versus those who did not quantitatively will be included. Narrative and non-English studies will be excluded. Two reviewers will screen independently, with results compared and discrepancies resolved by the study team. Study quality and risk of bias will be assessed using a quality appraisal tool. Results will be summarised descriptively and where possible synthesised in a meta-analysis. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This systematic review requires no ethical approval. This review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and provide an important update in a rapidly evolving field of research. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42022327437.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous , COVID-19 , Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Research Design , Stillbirth/epidemiology , Systematic Reviews as Topic
14.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e063855, 2022 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053218

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The use of fibrinolytic therapy has been proposed in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). During the COVID-19 pandemic, anticoagulation has received special attention due to the frequent findings of microthrombi and fibrin deposits in the lungs and other organs. Therefore, the use of fibrinolysis has been regarded as a potential rescue therapy in these patients. In this prospective meta-analysis, we plan to synthesise evidence from ongoing clinical trials and thus assess whether fibrinolytic therapy can improve the ventilation/perfusion ratio in patients with severe COVID-19-caused ARDS as compared with standard of care. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This protocol was registered in PROSPERO. All randomised controlled trials and prospective observational trials that compare fibrinolytic therapy with standard of care in adult patients with COVID-19 and define their primary or secondary outcome as improvement in oxygenation and/or gas exchange, or mortality will be considered eligible. Safety outcomes will include bleeding event rate and requirement for transfusion. Our search on 25 January 2022 identified five eligible ongoing clinical trials. A formal search of MEDLINE (via PubMed), Embase, CENTRAL will be performed every month to identify published results and to search for further trials that meet our eligibility criteria. DISSEMINATION: This could be the first qualitative and quantitative synthesis summarising evidence of the efficacy and safety of fibrinolytic therapy in critically ill patients with COVID-19. We plan to publish our results in peer-reviewed journals. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021285281.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Adult , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Critical Illness/therapy , Fibrin , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Observational Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy , Treatment Outcome
15.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e060690, 2022 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053209

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Major advancements in technology have led to considerations how telemedicine (TM) and other technology platforms can be meaningfully integrated in treatment for psychiatric disorders. The COVID-19 pandemic has placed a further focus on use of TM in psychiatry. Despite the widespread use of TM, little is known about its effect compared with traditional in-person (IP) consultation. The objective of this systematic review is to examine if individual psychiatric outpatient interventions for adults using TM are comparable to IP in terms of (1) psychopathology outcomes, (2) levels of patient satisfaction, (3) working alliance and (4) dropout from treatment. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This review will only include randomised controlled trials for adult participants with mood disorders, anxiety or personality disorders. The primary outcome is psychopathology, and secondary outcomes include patient satisfaction, treatment alliance and dropout rate. Systematic searches were conducted in MEDLINE, APA PsycINFO, Embase, Web of Science and CINAHL. The inverse-variance method will be used to conduct the meta-analysis. Effect sizes will be calculated as standardised mean difference (Hedges' g) for the primary outcome, mean difference for patient satisfaction and working alliance, and risk ratio for the dropout rate. Effect sizes will be supplemented with 95% CI. We will calculate the I² statistic to quantify heterogeneity and Chi-square statistic (χ²) to test for heterogeneity for the primary outcome. Potential clinical and methodological heterogeneity moderators will be assessed in subgroup and sensitivity analysis. The risk of bias will be assessed by Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool V.2, and confidence in cumulative evidence will be assessed by Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No ethical approval is required for this systematic review protocol. Data sets will be deposited in the Zenodo repository. The findings of this study will be published in a peer-review scientific journal. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021256357.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Adult , Anxiety , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Personality Disorders/therapy , Referral and Consultation , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(39): e30844, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: From the end of 2019 to now, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has put enormous strain on the world's health systems. As a characteristic sign of COVID-19 patient, olfactory dysfunction (OD) poses considerable problems for patients. In China, acupuncture has been widely used to treat OD caused by COVID-19, but there is still a lack of evidence-based medical evaluation. This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of COVID-19 OD. METHODS: According to the retrieval strategies, randomized controlled trials on the acupuncture for COVID-19 OD were obtained from Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, the Chinese Scientific Journal Database and the Wanfang Database, regardless of publication date, or language. Studies were screened based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, and the Cochrane risk bias assessment tool was used to evaluate the quality of the studies. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager (RevMan 5.3) and STATA 14.2 software. Ultimately, the evidentiary grade for the results will be evaluated. RESULTS: The results of this meta-analysis will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. CONCLUSION: This study will provide up-to-date summary proof for evaluating the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for COVID-19 OD.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , COVID-19 , Olfaction Disorders , Acupuncture Therapy/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Progression , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
17.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(38): e30770, 2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a group of diseases that cannot be explained after routine clinical examination, and is characterized by postprandial fullness, early satiety, and upper abdominal pain or burning. According to the statistics, FD continues to become one of the high-risk sequelae of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), affecting patients' quality of life, increasing psychological burden and increasing economic costs. However, its optimal treatment is still an urgent problem. A large number of studies have shown that acupuncture and moxibustion is effective and safe in the treatment of FD caused by sequelae of COVID-19, which is of research value. Therefore, based on the current literatures, the effectiveness and safety of different acupuncture and moxibustion methods were systematically evaluated to provide possible alternative therapy on FD. METHODS: Studies search for eligible randomized controlled trials that use different acupuncture and moxibustion methods as the sole treatment on FD and their data extraction will be done by 2 researchers. In case of disagreement, a third researcher will be introduced for arbitration. Mean difference or relative risk with fixed or random effect model in terms of 95% confidence interval will be adopted for the data synthesis. To evaluate the risk of bias, the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool will be utilized. The sensitivity or subgroup analysis will also be conducted when meeting high heterogeneity (I2 > 50%). RESULTS: This meta-analysis will provide an authentic synthesis of different acupuncture and moxibustion methods on FD caused by sequelae of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis will evaluate the effect of acupuncture and moxibustion on FD caused by sequelae of COVID-19, providing evidence as to the treatment in these patients.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , COVID-19 , Dyspepsia , Moxibustion , Acupuncture Therapy/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Dyspepsia/etiology , Dyspepsia/therapy , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Moxibustion/methods , Quality of Life , Systematic Reviews as Topic
18.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(8): e37952, 2022 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022386

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The adoption and use of technology have significantly changed health care delivery. Patient experience has become a significant factor in the entire spectrum of patient-centered health care delivery. Digital health facilitates further improvement and empowerment of patient experiences. Therefore, the design of digital health is served by insights into the barriers to and facilitators of digital patient experience (PEx). OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to systematically review the influencing factors and design considerations of PEx in digital health from the literature and generate design guidelines for further improvement of PEx in digital health. METHODS: We performed an umbrella systematic review following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) methodology. We searched Scopus, PubMed, and Web of Science databases. Two rounds of small random sampling (20%) were independently reviewed by 2 reviewers who evaluated the eligibility of the articles against the selection criteria. Two-round interrater reliability was assessed using the Fleiss-Cohen coefficient (k1=0.88 and k2=0.80). Thematic analysis was applied to analyze the extracted data based on a small set of a priori categories. RESULTS: The search yielded 173 records, of which 45 (26%) were selected for data analysis. Findings and conclusions showed a great diversity; most studies presented a set of themes (19/45, 42%) or descriptive information only (16/45, 36%). The digital PEx-related influencing factors were classified into 9 categories: patient capability, patient opportunity, patient motivation, intervention technology, intervention functionality, intervention interaction design, organizational environment, physical environment, and social environment. These can have three types of impacts: positive, negative, or double edged. We captured 4 design constructs (personalization, information, navigation, and visualization) and 3 design methods (human-centered or user-centered design, co-design or participatory design, and inclusive design) as design considerations. CONCLUSIONS: We propose the following definition for digital PEx: "Digital patient experience is the sum of all interactions affected by a patient's behavioral determinants, framed by digital technologies, and shaped by organizational culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care channeling digital health." In this study, we constructed a design and evaluation framework that contains 4 phases-define design, define evaluation, design ideation, and design evaluation-and 9 design guidelines to help digital health designers and developers address digital PEx throughout the entire design process. Finally, our review suggests 6 directions for future digital PEx-related research.


Subject(s)
Telemedicine , Delivery of Health Care , Digital Technology , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Reproducibility of Results , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Telemedicine/methods , User-Centered Design
19.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273693, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021936

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Several teaching methods have been used in clinical nursing teaching to increase quality and efficiency, but disagreements over their effects persist. This study will evaluate the effects of five teaching methods in clinical nursing on nursing students' knowledge, skill scores, learning satisfaction, and patients' satisfaction. METHODS: We will conduct searches in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI), China Biological literature database (CBM), Wanfang Database, and China Science and Technology Journal Database (CSTJ) up to April 2022. Relevant randomized controlled trials meeting the eligibility criteria will be included. And the study selection and data extraction will be independently screened for eligibility by two authors. The quality of evidence will be evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Pairwise meta-analysis and network meta-analysis (NMA) will be conducted using Rev Man, Stata, and R software. Statistical analyses including homogeneity tests, sensitivity analysis, transitivity tests, consistency tests, and publication bias will be completed. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No formal research ethics approval is required. The results will be disseminated to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. PROTOCOL REGISTRATION NUMBER: INPLASY2021120040.


Subject(s)
Research Design , China , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Network Meta-Analysis
20.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273691, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021935

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is spreading rapidly worldwide, and the population is generally susceptible to SARS-CoV-2, especially those with cancer. Hence, our study aims to design a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of the clinical characteristics and prognoses of lung cancer patients with COVID-19. METHODS: The protocol is prepared following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The literature will be searched in Embase, Pubmed, the Cochrane Library, LitCovid, and CNKI for potentially eligible articles. The quality of the articles will be used in the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS) and Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Statistical analysis will be performed through RevMan 5 software. This review protocol has been registered in PROSPERO (CRD42022306866). DISCUSSION: To clarify whether COVID-19 affects the clinical symptoms and prognoses of lung cancer patients. Further study is needed to establish the best evidence-based for the management of lung cancer patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The definitive conclusion will be important to physicians effectively manage lung cancer patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
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