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1.
Lancet ; 398(10301): 685-697, 2021 08 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815297

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Associations between high and low temperatures and increases in mortality and morbidity have been previously reported, yet no comprehensive assessment of disease burden has been done. Therefore, we aimed to estimate the global and regional burden due to non-optimal temperature exposure. METHODS: In part 1 of this study, we linked deaths to daily temperature estimates from the ERA5 reanalysis dataset. We modelled the cause-specific relative risks for 176 individual causes of death along daily temperature and 23 mean temperature zones using a two-dimensional spline within a Bayesian meta-regression framework. We then calculated the cause-specific and total temperature-attributable burden for the countries for which daily mortality data were available. In part 2, we applied cause-specific relative risks from part 1 to all locations globally. We combined exposure-response curves with daily gridded temperature and calculated the cause-specific burden based on the underlying burden of disease from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study, for the years 1990-2019. Uncertainty from all components of the modelling chain, including risks, temperature exposure, and theoretical minimum risk exposure levels, defined as the temperature of minimum mortality across all included causes, was propagated using posterior simulation of 1000 draws. FINDINGS: We included 64·9 million individual International Classification of Diseases-coded deaths from nine different countries, occurring between Jan 1, 1980, and Dec 31, 2016. 17 causes of death met the inclusion criteria. Ischaemic heart disease, stroke, cardiomyopathy and myocarditis, hypertensive heart disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, lower respiratory infection, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease showed J-shaped relationships with daily temperature, whereas the risk of external causes (eg, homicide, suicide, drowning, and related to disasters, mechanical, transport, and other unintentional injuries) increased monotonically with temperature. The theoretical minimum risk exposure levels varied by location and year as a function of the underlying cause of death composition. Estimates for non-optimal temperature ranged from 7·98 deaths (95% uncertainty interval 7·10-8·85) per 100 000 and a population attributable fraction (PAF) of 1·2% (1·1-1·4) in Brazil to 35·1 deaths (29·9-40·3) per 100 000 and a PAF of 4·7% (4·3-5·1) in China. In 2019, the average cold-attributable mortality exceeded heat-attributable mortality in all countries for which data were available. Cold effects were most pronounced in China with PAFs of 4·3% (3·9-4·7) and attributable rates of 32·0 deaths (27·2-36·8) per 100 000 and in New Zealand with 3·4% (2·9-3·9) and 26·4 deaths (22·1-30·2). Heat effects were most pronounced in China with PAFs of 0·4% (0·3-0·6) and attributable rates of 3·25 deaths (2·39-4·24) per 100 000 and in Brazil with 0·4% (0·3-0·5) and 2·71 deaths (2·15-3·37). When applying our framework to all countries globally, we estimated that 1·69 million (1·52-1·83) deaths were attributable to non-optimal temperature globally in 2019. The highest heat-attributable burdens were observed in south and southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and North Africa and the Middle East, and the highest cold-attributable burdens in eastern and central Europe, and central Asia. INTERPRETATION: Acute heat and cold exposure can increase or decrease the risk of mortality for a diverse set of causes of death. Although in most regions cold effects dominate, locations with high prevailing temperatures can exhibit substantial heat effects far exceeding cold-attributable burden. Particularly, a high burden of external causes of death contributed to strong heat impacts, but cardiorespiratory diseases and metabolic diseases could also be substantial contributors. Changes in both exposures and the composition of causes of death drove changes in risk over time. Steady increases in exposure to the risk of high temperature are of increasing concern for health. FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


Subject(s)
Cause of Death/trends , Cold Temperature/adverse effects , Global Burden of Disease/statistics & numerical data , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Hot Temperature/adverse effects , Mortality/trends , Bayes Theorem , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736939

ABSTRACT

Mitochondria are complex intracellular organelles traditionally identified as the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells due to their central role in bioenergetic metabolism. In recent decades, the growing interest in mitochondria research has revealed that these multifunctional organelles are more than just the cell powerhouses, playing many other key roles as signaling platforms that regulate cell metabolism, proliferation, death and immunological response. As key regulators, mitochondria, when dysfunctional, are involved in the pathogenesis of a wide range of metabolic, neurodegenerative, immune and neoplastic disorders. Far more recently, mitochondria attracted renewed attention from the scientific community for their ability of intercellular translocation that can involve whole mitochondria, mitochondrial genome or other mitochondrial components. The intercellular transport of mitochondria, defined as horizontal mitochondrial transfer, can occur in mammalian cells both in vitro and in vivo, and in physiological and pathological conditions. Mitochondrial transfer can provide an exogenous mitochondrial source, replenishing dysfunctional mitochondria, thereby improving mitochondrial faults or, as in in the case of tumor cells, changing their functional skills and response to chemotherapy. In this review, we will provide an overview of the state of the art of the up-to-date knowledge on intercellular trafficking of mitochondria by discussing its biological relevance, mode and mechanisms underlying the process and its involvement in different pathophysiological contexts, highlighting its therapeutic potential for diseases with mitochondrial dysfunction primarily involved in their pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
Metabolic Diseases/physiopathology , Mitochondria/physiology , Mitochondrial Dynamics , Neoplasms/physiopathology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/physiopathology , Animals , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/therapy , Neoplasms/therapy
3.
Orphanet J Rare Dis ; 17(1): 109, 2022 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, MetabERN has been monitoring the SARS-CoV-2 infection rates within its metabolic community. To gather data on the total number of cases and the severity of symptoms among IMD patients one year into the pandemic, an online survey was distributed among all MetabERN healthcare providers (HCP). Epidemiological analysis was performed by integrating the survey's data with the MetabERN database. RESULTS: Survey's respondents reported a total of 452 cases of COVID-19 among their IMD patients (213 paediatric and 239 adults). Considering the total number of patients followed by the respondents (n = 26,347), the registered prevalence of COVID-19 in the IMD population was of 1716 × 100,000. Italy emerged as the most affected country (25.4% of cases), followed by the United Kingdom (14.2% of cases). Most of the paediatric cases of COVID-19 displayed no or mild symptoms during the disease: 34% of HCP reported having asymptomatic patients in 75-100% of cases, while 37.5% reported mild symptoms in about a quarter of their patients. Similarly to paediatric cases, most adult IMD patients with COVID-19 were asymptomatic or had mild symptoms: about one third of respondents reported 75-100% asymptomatic patients and about 65% of HCP had between 0 and 50% of patients with mild symptoms. The majority of the respondents reported no deaths due to COVID-19 in adult and paediatric patients with IMDs. CONCLUSIONS: Most of MetabERN's IMD patients who got COVID-19 during the first year of the pandemic had mild symptoms and a positive outcome of the disease. However, fatal events were recorded in paediatric patients; this, together with the lack of information on the long-term effects of COVID-19 in IMDs, call for caution in the metabolic population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Metabolic Diseases , Adult , Child , Health Personnel , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Intern Med ; 291(3): 388-389, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704537
5.
J Immunol Res ; 2022: 1433323, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1697599

ABSTRACT

We performed a database mining on 102 transcriptomic datasets for the expressions of 29 m6A-RNA methylation (epitranscriptomic) regulators (m6A-RMRs) in 41 diseases and cancers and made significant findings: (1) a few m6A-RMRs were upregulated; and most m6A-RMRs were downregulated in sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock, and trauma; (2) half of 29 m6A-RMRs were downregulated in atherosclerosis; (3) inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis modulated m6A-RMRs more than lupus and psoriasis; (4) some organ failures shared eight upregulated m6A-RMRs; end-stage renal failure (ESRF) downregulated 85% of m6A-RMRs; (5) Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infections modulated m6A-RMRs the most among viral infections; (6) proinflammatory oxPAPC modulated m6A-RMRs more than DAMP stimulation including LPS and oxLDL; (7) upregulated m6A-RMRs were more than downregulated m6A-RMRs in cancer types; five types of cancers upregulated ≥10 m6A-RMRs; (8) proinflammatory M1 macrophages upregulated seven m6A-RMRs; (9) 86% of m6A-RMRs were differentially expressed in the six clusters of CD4+Foxp3+ immunosuppressive Treg, and 8 out of 12 Treg signatures regulated m6A-RMRs; (10) immune checkpoint receptors TIM3, TIGIT, PD-L2, and CTLA4 modulated m6A-RMRs, and inhibition of CD40 upregulated m6A-RMRs; (11) cytokines and interferons modulated m6A-RMRs; (12) NF-κB and JAK/STAT pathways upregulated more than downregulated m6A-RMRs whereas TP53, PTEN, and APC did the opposite; (13) methionine-homocysteine-methyl cycle enzyme Mthfd1 downregulated more than upregulated m6A-RMRs; (14) m6A writer RBM15 and one m6A eraser FTO, H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1, and DNA methyltransferase, DNMT1, regulated m6A-RMRs; and (15) 40 out of 165 ROS regulators were modulated by m6A eraser FTO and two m6A writers METTL3 and WTAP. Our findings shed new light on the functions of upregulated m6A-RMRs in 41 diseases and cancers, nine cellular and molecular mechanisms, novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory disorders, metabolic cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, organ failures, and cancers.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic , Neoplasms/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/metabolism , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Datasets as Topic , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Metabolic Diseases/genetics , Methylation
6.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 21(1): 24, 2022 02 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686015

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pre-existing cardiometabolic comorbidities place SARS-CoV-2 positive patients at a greater risk for poorer clinical course and mortality than those without it. We aimed to analyze real-world registry data focused primarily on participants with cardiometabolic diseases (CMD), which were remotely obtained via a digital platform. METHODS: Participants were divided into two groups: CMD or no cardiometabolic disease (non-CMD). They were evaluated based on their medical history, current medications/supplements, COVID-19 status, demographics, and baseline characteristics. The frequency of medications/supplements for CMD were compared using relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. The WHO (Five) Well-Being Index (WHO-5) were collected monthly for 6 months to assess psychological well-being which included cheerfulness, calmness, vigor, rest, and engagement with daily activities of interest. RESULTS: The 791 enrollees represented 49 U.S. states. The CMD group had significantly higher (p < 0.0001) BMI (mean + 3.04 kg/m2) and age (mean + 9.15 years) compared to non-CMD group. In the CMD group, participants who tested positive for COVID-19 had lower (p < 0.0001) well-being scores than those without COVID-19. For the 274 participants on CMD medications/supplements, there was no statistical difference in risk of COVID-19 contracture based on medication/supplement type; however, all six participants who were not being treated for CMD were COVID-19 positive (RR ~ 104). For 89 participants who were on treatment for diabetes or insulin resistance, there was a 90% reduced risk of COVID-19 incidence (p = 0.0187). CONCLUSION: The well-being score of the CMD group was dependent on whether they tested positive for COVID-19. Type of CMD treatment did not impact COVID-19 status, but absence of treatment significantly increased COVID-19 incidence. With respect to SARS-CoV-2, our analysis supports continued use of the statins, ACE-I, ARBs, and diabetes medications in CMD patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04348942.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cardiometabolic Risk Factors , Comorbidity , Female , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Heart Diseases/therapy , Humans , Incidence , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Metabolic Diseases/diagnosis , Metabolic Diseases/therapy , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Registries , Risk Assessment , Time Factors , United States/epidemiology
8.
Cell Metab ; 34(3): 424-440.e7, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676683

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) represents a systemic disease that may cause severe metabolic complications in multiple tissues including liver, kidney, and cardiovascular system. However, the underlying mechanisms and optimal treatment remain elusive. Our study shows that impairment of ACE2 pathway is a key factor linking virus infection to its secondary metabolic sequelae. By using structure-based high-throughput virtual screening and connectivity map database, followed with experimental validations, we identify imatinib, methazolamide, and harpagoside as direct enzymatic activators of ACE2. Imatinib and methazolamide remarkably improve metabolic perturbations in vivo in an ACE2-dependent manner under the insulin-resistant state and SARS-CoV-2-infected state. Moreover, viral entry is directly inhibited by these three compounds due to allosteric inhibition of ACE2 binding to spike protein on SARS-CoV-2. Taken together, our study shows that enzymatic activation of ACE2 via imatinib, methazolamide, or harpagoside may be a conceptually new strategy to treat metabolic sequelae of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , Metabolic Diseases/drug therapy , Methazolamide/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Down-Regulation/drug effects , HEK293 Cells , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , Male , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Metabolic Diseases/virology , Methazolamide/pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Obese , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization/drug effects
10.
Arch. latinoam. nutr ; 71(4): 281-289, dic. 2021. tab
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1668087

ABSTRACT

Conocer la asociación específica de las enfermedades metabólicas en la mortalidad por COVID-19, ocurrida en México durante el año crítico de la pandemia de marzo 2020 a marzo 2021. Método. Se utilizó la base nacional de COVID-19 de la Dirección General de Epidemiología. Se analizaron los casos positivos que presentaron las enfermedades metabólicas: cardiovasculares, hipertensión, diabetes y obesidad. Se realizó un análisis descriptivo para conocer la distribución de los casos fallecidos y no fallecidos. Se empleó la prueba de ji cuadrada para la diferencia de las proporciones. Se utilizaron análisis de regresión logística para conocer la asociación entre las enfermedades metabólicas y la mortalidad por COVID-19 en personas positivas al virus SARS-CoV-2. Los datos fueron ajustados por edad y sexo. Resultados. Se observó la asociación de las enfermedades metabólicas en la mortalidad. La diabetes tuvo mayor porcentaje de letalidad 18,4%. Cuando se conjuntaron las enfermedades cardiovasculares y diabetes el porcentaje de letalidad subió a 31,5%; la conjunción de las enfermedades cardiovasculares, con hipertensión y diabetes fue la de mayor porcentaje de letalidad 38,7%. La obesidad fue la que tuvo menor incidencia. Conclusiones. Las enfermedades metabólicas en México son un problema de salud pública que afectó la mortalidad por covid-19. Es prioritario atender con políticas públicas preventivas y efectivas en favor de un modelo de consumo alimentario sano, acorde con las necesidades nutrimentales de la población(AU)


To know the specific association of metabolic disease on COVID-19 mortality, occurred during the critical year of the pandemic, from march 2020 to march 2021. Method: The Covid-19 national base of the General Directorate of Epidemiology was used. Positive cases of metabolic diseases were analyzed: cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and obesity. A descriptive analysis was carried out to find out the distribution of deceased and non-deceased cases. The chi-square test was used for the difference in proportions. Logistic regression analysis was used to understand the association between metabolic diseases and COVID 19 mortality in people who tested positive for the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The data were adjusted for age and gender. Results: The association of metabolic diseases on mortality was observed. Diabetes had a higher percentage of lethality 18,4%. When cardiovascular disease and diabetes were combined, the fatality rate rose to 31,5%; the combination of cardiovascular diseases, with hypertension and diabetes was the highest percentage of lethality 38,7%. Obesity had the least incidence. Conclusions: Metabolic diseases in México are a public health problem that affected COVID-19 mortality. It is a priority to deal with preventive and effective public policies in favor of a healthy food consumption model, in line with the nutritional needs of the population(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus , Eating , COVID-19/mortality , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Metabolic Diseases/mortality , Obesity/physiopathology , Dietary Fats, Unsaturated , Epidemiology , Industrialized Foods , Pandemics , Hypertension
11.
Elife ; 112022 01 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626761

ABSTRACT

Insulin resistance (IR) contributes to the pathophysiology of diabetes, dementia, viral infection, and cardiovascular disease. Drug repurposing (DR) may identify treatments for IR; however, barriers include uncertainty whether in vitro transcriptomic assays yield quantitative pharmacological data, or how to optimise assay design to best reflect in vivo human disease. We developed a clinical-based human tissue IR signature by combining lifestyle-mediated treatment responses (>500 human adipose and muscle biopsies) with biomarkers of disease status (fasting IR from >1200 biopsies). The assay identified a chemically diverse set of >130 positively acting compounds, highly enriched in true positives, that targeted 73 proteins regulating IR pathways. Our multi-gene RNA assay score reflected the quantitative pharmacological properties of a set of epidermal growth factor receptor-related tyrosine kinase inhibitors, providing insight into drug target specificity; an observation supported by deep learning-based genome-wide predicted pharmacology. Several drugs identified are suitable for evaluation in patients, particularly those with either acute or severe chronic IR.


Developing a new drug that is both safe and effective is a complex and expensive endeavor. An alternative approach is to 'repurpose' existing, safe compounds ­ that is, to establish if they could treat conditions others than the ones they were initially designed for. To achieve this, methods that can predict the activity of thousands of established drugs are necessary. These approaches are particularly important for conditions for which it is hard to find promising treatment. This includes, for instance, heart failure, dementia and other diseases that are linked to the activity of the hormone insulin becoming modified throughout the body, a defect called insulin resistance. Unfortunately, it is difficult to model the complex actions of insulin using cells in the lab, because they involve intricate networks of proteins, tissues and metabolites. Timmons et al. set out to develop a way to better assess whether a drug could be repurposed to treat insulin resistance. The aim was to build a biological signature of the disease in multiple human tissues, as this would help to make the findings more relevant to the clinic. This involved examining which genes were switched on or off in thousands of tissue samples from patients with different degrees of insulin resistance. Importantly, some of the patients had their condition reversed through lifestyle changes, while others did not respond well to treatment. These 'non-responders' provided crucial new clues to screen for active drugs. Carefully piecing the data together revealed the molecules and pathways most related to the severity of insulin resistance. Cross-referencing these results with the way existing drugs act on gene activity, highlighted 138 compounds that directly bind 73 proteins responsible for regulating insulin resistance pathways. Some of the drugs identified are suitable for short-term clinical studies, and it may even be possible to rank similar compounds based on their chemical activity. Beyond giving a glimpse into the complex molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in humans, Timmons et al. provide a fresh approach to how drugs could be repurposed, which could be adapted to other conditions.


Subject(s)
Drug Repositioning , Metabolic Diseases/drug therapy , Adipose Tissue/metabolism , Biomarkers/metabolism , Humans , Insulin Resistance , Metabolic Diseases/genetics , Muscles/metabolism , Transcriptome
12.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 9(11): 786-798, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586178

ABSTRACT

Up to 50% of the people who have died from COVID-19 had metabolic and vascular disorders. Notably, there are many direct links between COVID-19 and the metabolic and endocrine systems. Thus, not only are patients with metabolic dysfunction (eg, obesity, hypertension, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and diabetes) at an increased risk of developing severe COVID-19 but also infection with SARS-CoV-2 might lead to new-onset diabetes or aggravation of pre-existing metabolic disorders. In this Review, we provide an update on the mechanisms of how metabolic and endocrine disorders might predispose patients to develop severe COVID-19. Additionally, we update the practical recommendations and management of patients with COVID-19 and post-pandemic. Furthermore, we summarise new treatment options for patients with both COVID-19 and diabetes, and highlight current challenges in clinical management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Management , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/metabolism , Hypertension/therapy , Metabolic Diseases/therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/epidemiology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/metabolism , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/therapy , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/metabolism , Obesity/therapy
14.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248995, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575502

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic forced healthcare services organization to adjust to mutating healthcare needs. Not exhaustive data are available on the consequences of this on non-COVID-19 patients. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the pandemic on non-COVID-19 patients living in a one-million inhabitants' area in Northern Italy (Bologna Metropolitan Area-BMA), analyzing time trends of Emergency Department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and mortality. We conducted a retrospective observational study using data extracted from BMA healthcare informative systems. Weekly trends of ED visits, hospitalizations, in- and out-of-hospital, all-cause and cause-specific mortality between December 1st, 2019 to May 31st, 2020, were compared with those of the same period of the previous year. Non-COVID-19 ED visits and hospitalizations showed a stable trend until the first Italian case of COVID-19 has been recorded, on February 19th, 2020, when they dropped simultaneously. The reduction of ED visits was observed in all age groups and across all severity and diagnosis groups. In the lockdown period a significant increase was found in overall out-of-hospital mortality (43.2%) and cause-specific out-of-hospital mortality related to neoplasms (76.7%), endocrine, nutritional and metabolic (79.5%) as well as cardiovascular (32.7%) diseases. The pandemic caused a sudden drop of ED visits and hospitalizations of non-COVID-19 patients during the lockdown period, and a concurrent increase in out-of-hospital mortality mainly driven by deaths for neoplasms, cardiovascular and endocrine diseases. As recurrencies of the COVID-19 pandemic are underway, the scenario described in this study might be useful to understand both the population reaction and the healthcare system response at the early phases of the pandemic in terms of reduced demand of care and systems capability in intercepting it.


Subject(s)
Cause of Death , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Metabolic Diseases/mortality , Metabolic Diseases/pathology , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/pathology , Pandemics , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
16.
Mol Metab ; 55: 101409, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540868

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic disease appears connected to obesity. However, evidence suggests that chronic metabolic diseases are more specifically related to adipose dysfunction rather than to body weight itself. SCOPE OF REVIEW: Further study of the first generation "insulin sensitizer" pioglitazone and molecules based on its structure suggests that is possible to decouple body weight from the metabolic dysfunction that drives adverse outcomes. The growing understanding of the mechanism of action of these agents together with advances in the pathophysiology of chronic metabolic disease offers a new approach to treat chronic conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, and their common organ and vascular sequelae. MAJOR CONCLUSIONS: We hypothesize that treating adipocyte dysfunction with new insulin sensitizers might significantly impact the interface of infectious disease and chronic metabolic disease.


Subject(s)
Chronic Disease/drug therapy , Metabolic Syndrome/drug therapy , Metabolic Syndrome/metabolism , Thiazolidinediones/pharmacology , Adipose Tissue/metabolism , COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation , Insulin/metabolism , Insulin Resistance , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Mitochondria , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease , Pioglitazone/metabolism
17.
Curr Top Med Chem ; 22(2): 109-131, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528766

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Allium sativum L., or garlic, is one of the most studied plants worldwide within the field of traditional medicine. Current interests lie in the potential use of garlic as a preventive measure and adjuvant treatment for viral infections, e.g., SARS-CoV-2. Even though it cannot be presented as a single treatment, its beneficial effects are beyond doubt. The World Health Organization has deemed it an essential part of any balanced diet with immunomodulatory properties. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to review the literature on the effects of garlic compounds and preparations on immunomodulation and viral infection management, with emphasis on SARS-CoV- -2. METHODS: Exhaustive literature search has been carried out on electronic databases. CONCLUSION: Garlic is a fundamental part of a well-balanced diet which helps maintain general good health. The reported information regarding garlic's ability to beneficially modulate inflammation and the immune system is encouraging. Nonetheless, more efforts must be made to understand the actual medicinal properties and mechanisms of action of the compounds found in this plant to inhibit or diminish viral infections, particularly SARS-CoV-2. Based on our findings, we propose a series of innovative strategies to achieve such a challenge in the near future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Garlic , Metabolic Diseases , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Immunomodulation , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Intern Med ; 291(3): 388-389, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518079
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 732913, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504188

ABSTRACT

Obesity prevails worldwide to an increasing effect. For example, up to 42% of American adults are considered obese. Obese individuals are prone to a variety of complications of metabolic disorders including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Recent meta-analyses of clinical studies in patient cohorts in the ongoing coronavirus-disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic indicate that the presence of obesity and relevant disorders is linked to a more severe prognosis of COVID-19. Given the significance of obesity in COVID-19 progression, we provide a review of host metabolic and immune responses in the immunometabolic dysregulation exaggerated by obesity and the viral infection that develops into a severe course of COVID-19. Moreover, sequela studies of individuals 6 months after having COVID-19 show a higher risk of metabolic comorbidities including obesity, diabetes, and kidney disease. These collectively implicate an inter-systemic dimension to understanding the association between obesity and COVID-19 and suggest an interdisciplinary intervention for relief of obesity-COVID-19 complications beyond the phase of acute infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Obesity/immunology , Obesity/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , Disease Progression , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity , Metabolic Diseases/immunology , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Obesity/complications , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
20.
J Clin Invest ; 131(19)2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488299

ABSTRACT

Circadian disruption is pervasive and can occur at multiple organizational levels, contributing to poor health outcomes at individual and population levels. Evidence points to a bidirectional relationship, in that circadian disruption increases disease severity and many diseases can disrupt circadian rhythms. Importantly, circadian disruption can increase the risk for the expression and development of neurologic, psychiatric, cardiometabolic, and immune disorders. Thus, harnessing the rich findings from preclinical and translational research in circadian biology to enhance health via circadian-based approaches represents a unique opportunity for personalized/precision medicine and overall societal well-being. In this Review, we discuss the implications of circadian disruption for human health using a bench-to-bedside approach. Evidence from preclinical and translational science is applied to a clinical and population-based approach. Given the broad implications of circadian regulation for human health, this Review focuses its discussion on selected examples in neurologic, psychiatric, metabolic, cardiovascular, allergic, and immunologic disorders that highlight the interrelatedness between circadian disruption and human disease and the potential of circadian-based interventions, such as bright light therapy and exogenous melatonin, as well as chronotherapy to improve and/or modify disease outcomes.


Subject(s)
Circadian Rhythm/physiology , Biomarkers , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Humans , Mental Disorders/physiopathology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Metabolic Diseases/physiopathology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/physiopathology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/physiopathology , Public Health
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