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2.
Arch. latinoam. nutr ; 71(4): 281-289, dic. 2021. tab
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1668087

ABSTRACT

Conocer la asociación específica de las enfermedades metabólicas en la mortalidad por COVID-19, ocurrida en México durante el año crítico de la pandemia de marzo 2020 a marzo 2021. Método. Se utilizó la base nacional de COVID-19 de la Dirección General de Epidemiología. Se analizaron los casos positivos que presentaron las enfermedades metabólicas: cardiovasculares, hipertensión, diabetes y obesidad. Se realizó un análisis descriptivo para conocer la distribución de los casos fallecidos y no fallecidos. Se empleó la prueba de ji cuadrada para la diferencia de las proporciones. Se utilizaron análisis de regresión logística para conocer la asociación entre las enfermedades metabólicas y la mortalidad por COVID-19 en personas positivas al virus SARS-CoV-2. Los datos fueron ajustados por edad y sexo. Resultados. Se observó la asociación de las enfermedades metabólicas en la mortalidad. La diabetes tuvo mayor porcentaje de letalidad 18,4%. Cuando se conjuntaron las enfermedades cardiovasculares y diabetes el porcentaje de letalidad subió a 31,5%; la conjunción de las enfermedades cardiovasculares, con hipertensión y diabetes fue la de mayor porcentaje de letalidad 38,7%. La obesidad fue la que tuvo menor incidencia. Conclusiones. Las enfermedades metabólicas en México son un problema de salud pública que afectó la mortalidad por covid-19. Es prioritario atender con políticas públicas preventivas y efectivas en favor de un modelo de consumo alimentario sano, acorde con las necesidades nutrimentales de la población(AU)


To know the specific association of metabolic disease on COVID-19 mortality, occurred during the critical year of the pandemic, from march 2020 to march 2021. Method: The Covid-19 national base of the General Directorate of Epidemiology was used. Positive cases of metabolic diseases were analyzed: cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and obesity. A descriptive analysis was carried out to find out the distribution of deceased and non-deceased cases. The chi-square test was used for the difference in proportions. Logistic regression analysis was used to understand the association between metabolic diseases and COVID 19 mortality in people who tested positive for the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The data were adjusted for age and gender. Results: The association of metabolic diseases on mortality was observed. Diabetes had a higher percentage of lethality 18,4%. When cardiovascular disease and diabetes were combined, the fatality rate rose to 31,5%; the combination of cardiovascular diseases, with hypertension and diabetes was the highest percentage of lethality 38,7%. Obesity had the least incidence. Conclusions: Metabolic diseases in México are a public health problem that affected COVID-19 mortality. It is a priority to deal with preventive and effective public policies in favor of a healthy food consumption model, in line with the nutritional needs of the population(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus , Eating , COVID-19/mortality , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Metabolic Diseases/mortality , Obesity/physiopathology , Dietary Fats, Unsaturated , Epidemiology , Industrialized Foods , Pandemics , Hypertension
4.
Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao ; 41(4): 628-632, 2021 Apr 20.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219329

ABSTRACT

The high comorbidity between cardiovascular and metabolic diseases (CVMD) and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the consequent high mortality and the potential risk of cardiovascular damage have brought great challenges to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of the condition. The latest studies found that advanced age, immune function defects, inflammatory factor storms and oxidative stress damage all potentially contribute to the high comorbidity of the two. Direct virus invasion, myocardial oxygen supply and demand imbalance and vascular endothelial and coagulation dysfunction may be important mechanisms for cardiovascular injury in COVID-19 patients. In addition, the expression level of ACE2 (the cell membrane receptor of SARS-CoV-2) in various organs and the peripheral blood not only mediates the direct invasion and damage of the organs, but also participates in regulation of the balance of systematic inflammation and oxidative stress, thus affecting the susceptibility and outcomes of the patients. Herein we review the recent research progress in the comorbidity between COVID-19 and CVMD and explore the mechanisms of cardiovascular damage caused by SARS-CoV-2, thus to provide a theoretical basis for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19 with underlying CVMD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Metabolic Diseases , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(8)2021 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196033

ABSTRACT

Amyloidoses are a group of diseases associated with the formation of pathological protein fibrils with cross-ß structures. Approximately 5-10% of the cases of these diseases are determined by amyloidogenic mutations, as well as by transmission of infectious amyloids (prions) between organisms. The most common group of so-called sporadic amyloidoses is associated with abnormal aggregation of wild-type proteins. Some sporadic amyloidoses are known to be induced only against the background of certain pathologies, but in some cases the cause of amyloidosis is unclear. It is assumed that these diseases often occur by accident. Here we present facts and hypotheses about the association of sporadic amyloidoses with vascular pathologies, trauma, oxidative stress, cancer, metabolic diseases, chronic infections and COVID-19. Generalization of current data shows that all sporadic amyloidoses can be regarded as a secondary event occurring against the background of diseases provoking a cellular stress response. Various factors causing the stress response provoke protein overproduction, a local increase in the concentration or modifications, which contributes to amyloidogenesis. Progress in the treatment of vascular, metabolic and infectious diseases, as well as cancers, should lead to a significant reduction in the risk of sporadic amyloidoses.


Subject(s)
Amyloidosis/etiology , Stress, Physiological , Brain Injuries/complications , Communicable Diseases/complications , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Neoplasms/complications , Oxidative Stress , Vascular Diseases/complications
6.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 652765, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177968

ABSTRACT

Previous studies link obesity and components of metabolic health, such as hypertension or inflammation, to increased hospitalizations and mortality of patients with COVID-19. Here, in two overlapping samples of over 1,000 individuals from the UK Biobank we investigate whether metabolic health as measured by waist circumference, dyslipidemia, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and systemic inflammation is related to increased COVID-19 infection and mortality rate. Using logistic regression and controlling for confounding variables such as socioeconomic status, age, sex or ethnicity, we find that individuals with worse metabolic health (measured on average eleven years prior to 2020) have an increased risk for COVID-19-related death (adjusted odds ratio: 1.75). We also find that specific factors contributing to increased mortality are increased serum glucose levels, systolic blood pressure and waist circumference.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Health Status , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Metabolic Diseases/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Glucose , Blood Pressure , Databases, Factual , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Dyslipidemias/complications , Dyslipidemias/mortality , Female , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Waist Circumference
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(6)2021 Mar 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148303

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is without any doubt the worst pandemic we have faced since the H1N1 virus outbreak. Even if vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 infection is becoming increasingly available, a more feasible approach for COVID-19 prevention and therapy is still needed. Evidence of a pathological link between metabolic diseases and severe forms of COVID-19 has stimulated critical reflection and new considerations. In particular, an abnormal immune response observed in certain patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection suggested possible common predisposing risk factors with autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). Correct supplementation with dietary factors may be key to preventing and counteracting both the underlying metabolic impairment and the complications of COVID-19. A set of agents may inhibit the cytokine storm and hypercoagulability that characterize severe COVID-19 infection: vitamin D3, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polyphenols like pterostilbene, polydatin and honokiol, which can activate anti-inflammatory and antioxidant sirtuins pathways, quercetin, vitamin C, zinc, melatonin, lactoferrin and glutathione. These agents could be highly beneficial for subjects who have altered immune responses. In this review, we discuss the antiviral and metabolic effects of these dietary factors and propose their combination for potential applications in the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. Rigorous studies will be fundamental for validating preventive and therapeutic protocols that could be of assistance to mitigate disease progression following SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/diet therapy , COVID-19/diet therapy , Diet , Metabolic Diseases/diet therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/complications , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diet therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Disease Progression , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Thrombophilia/diet therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology
10.
AIDS ; 34(12): 1771-1774, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105050

ABSTRACT

: We performed an observational prospective monocentric study in patients living with HIV (PLWH) diagnosed with COVID-19. Fifty-four PLWH developed COVID-19 with 14 severe (25.9%) and five critical cases (9.3%), respectively. By multivariate analysis, age, male sex, ethnic origin from sub-Saharan Africa and metabolic disorder were associated with severe or critical forms of COVID-19. Prior CD4 T cell counts did not differ between groups. No protective effect of a particular antiretroviral class was observed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Africa South of the Sahara/ethnology , Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/ethnology , Female , France/epidemiology , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
11.
JNCI Cancer Spectr ; 5(2): pkaa102, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101856

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cancer patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been reported to have double the case fatality rate of the general population. METHODS: A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central was done for studies on cancer patients with COVID-19. Pooled proportions were calculated for categorical variables. Odds ratio (OR) and forest plots (random-effects model) were constructed for both primary and secondary outcomes. RESULTS: This systematic review of 38 studies and meta-analysis of 181 323 patients from 26 studies included 23 736 cancer patients. Our meta-analysis shows that cancer patients with COVID-19 have a higher likelihood of death (n = 165 980, OR = 2.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.47 to 4.42), which was largely driven by mortality among patients in China. Cancer patients were more likely to be intubated. Among cancer subtypes, the mortality was highest in hematological malignancies (n = 878, OR = 2.39, 95% CI = 1.17 to 4.87) followed by lung cancer (n = 646, OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.00 to 3.37). There was no association between receipt of a particular type of oncologic therapy and mortality. Our study showed that cancer patients affected by COVID-19 are a decade older than the normal population and have a higher proportion of comorbidities. There was insufficient data to assess the association of COVID-19-directed therapy and survival outcomes in cancer patients. CONCLUSION: Cancer patients with COVID-19 disease are at increased risk of mortality and morbidity. A more nuanced understanding of the interaction between cancer-directed therapies and COVID-19-directed therapies is needed. This will require uniform prospective recording of data, possibly in multi-institutional registry databases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Databases, Factual/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/complications , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Liver Diseases/complications , Lung Diseases/complications , Male , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/mortality , Pandemics , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
13.
Microbes Infect ; 23(2-3): 104780, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039496

ABSTRACT

This review portrays the metabolic consequences of Covid-19 infection at different stages of the clinical syndrome. It also describes how events can change when patients with metabolic problems are infected and the effects that diet and nutrition might play to influence the outcome of infection. We also discuss the types of maneuvers that could be used to reshape metabolic events and question if this approach could be a practical therapy used alone or in combination with other approaches to reduce the burden of Covid-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Diet , Disease Susceptibility/complications , Disease Susceptibility/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility/pathology , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Metabolic Diseases/immunology , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Nutritional Status , Obesity/complications , Obesity/immunology , Obesity/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
14.
Orphanet J Rare Dis ; 15(1): 341, 2020 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-958041

ABSTRACT

The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused disruption in all aspects of daily life, including the management and treatment of rare inherited metabolic disorders (IMDs). To perform a preliminary assessment of the incidence of COVID-19 in IMD patients and the impact of the coronavirus emergency on the rare metabolic community between March and April 2020, the European Reference Network for Hereditary Metabolic Diseases (MetabERN) has performed two surveys: one directed to patients' organizations (PO) and one directed to healthcare providers (HCPs). The COVID-19 incidence in the population of rare metabolic patients was lower than that of the general European population (72.9 × 100,000 vs. 117 × 100,000). However, patients experienced extensive disruption of care, with the majority of appointments and treatments cancelled, reduced, or postponed. Almost all HCPs (90%) were able to substitute face-to-face visits with telemedicine, about half of patients facing treatment changes switched from hospital to home therapy, and a quarter reported difficulties in getting their medicines. During the first weeks of emergency, when patients and families lacked relevant information, most HCPs contacted their patients to provide them with support and information. Since IMD patients require constant follow-up and treatment adjustments to control their disease and avoid degradation of their condition, the results of our surveys are relevant for national health systems in order to ensure appropriate care for IMD patients. They highlight strong links in an interconnected community of HCPs and PO, who are able to work quickly and effectively together to support and protect fragile persons during crisis. However, additional studies are needed to better appreciate the actual impact of COVID-19 on IMD patients' health and the mid- and long-term effects of the pandemic on their wellbeing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Rare Diseases/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Data Collection , Europe/epidemiology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Health Personnel , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/classification , Telemedicine
17.
BMC Med ; 18(1): 220, 2020 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-645540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In women of reproductive age, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) constitutes the most frequent endocrine disorder. Women with PCOS are considered to typically belong to an age and sex group which is at lower risk for severe COVID-19. MAIN BODY: Emerging data link the risk of severe COVID-19 with certain factors such as hyper-inflammation, ethnicity predisposition, low vitamin D levels, and hyperandrogenism, all of which have known direct associations with PCOS. Moreover, in this common female patient population, there is markedly high prevalence of multiple cardio-metabolic conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and hypertension, which may significantly increase the risk for adverse COVID-19-related outcomes. This strong overlap of risk factors for both worse PCOS cardio-metabolic manifestations and severe COVID-19 should be highlighted for the clinical practice, particularly since women with PCOS often receive fragmented care from multiple healthcare services. Comprehensively informing women with PCOS regarding the potential risks from COVID-19 and how this may affect their management is also essential. CONCLUSION: Despite the immense challenges posed by the COVID-19 outbreak to the healthcare systems in affected countries, attention should be directed to maintain a high standard of care for complex patients such as many women with PCOS and provide relevant practical recommendations for optimal management in the setting of this fast moving pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/complications , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hyperandrogenism/complications , Hyperandrogenism/epidemiology , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/epidemiology , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/epidemiology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Diabetes Obes Metab ; 22(10): 1942-1945, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-102319

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19) has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization and sent all countries scrambling to review emergency healthcare provisions. There is global evidence of each nation struggling to effectively manage the number of people being diagnosed with the virus. These are testing times which have not been experienced in recent generations and there are a number of insecurities regarding the management of people with COVID-19 and cardiometabolic diseases. This review highlights the current concerns related to COVID-19 and provides advice in terms of the therapeutic uncertainty and potential adverse harms associated with therapy when managing people, particularly those with cardiometabolic diseases, who have contracted or are at increased risk of contracting COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Metabolic Diseases/therapy , Uncertainty , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Clinical Trials as Topic/standards , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Male , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
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