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1.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 601: 129-136, 2022 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699331

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has been spreading worldwide for more than two years and has led to immense challenges to human health. Despite the great efforts that have been made, our understanding of SARS-CoV-2 is still limited. The viral helicase, NSP13 is an important enzyme involved in SARS-CoV-2 replication and transcription. Here we highlight the important role of the stalk domain in the enzymatic activity of NSP13. Without the stalk domain, NSP13 loses its dsRNA unwinding ability due to the lack of ATPase activity. The stalk domain of NSP13 also provides a rigid connection between the ZBD and helicase domain. We found that the tight connection between the stalk and helicase is necessary for NSP13-mediated dsRNA unwinding. When a short flexible linker was inserted between the stalk and helicase domains, the helicase activity of NSP13 was impaired, although its ATPase activity remained intact. Further study demonstrated that linker insertion between the stalk and helicase domains attenuated the RNA binding ability and affected the thermal stability of NSP13. In summary, our results suggest the crucial role of the stalk domain in NSP13 enzymatic activity and provide mechanistic insight into dsRNA unwinding by SARS-CoV-2 NSP13.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Methyltransferases/metabolism , RNA Helicases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Adenosine Triphosphatases/genetics , Adenosine Triphosphatases/metabolism , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Enzyme Stability , Humans , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/genetics , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Protein Conformation , RNA/chemistry , RNA/genetics , RNA/metabolism , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA Helicases/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Temperature , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
2.
Nature ; 602(7896): 343-348, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671588

ABSTRACT

Carbapenems are antibiotics of last resort in the clinic. Owing to their potency and broad-spectrum activity, they are an important part of the antibiotic arsenal. The vital role of carbapenems is exemplified by the approval acquired by Merck from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of an imipenem combination therapy to treat the increased levels of hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia that have occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic1. The C6 hydroxyethyl side chain distinguishes the clinically used carbapenems from the other classes of ß-lactam antibiotics and is responsible for their low susceptibility to inactivation by occluding water from the ß-lactamase active site2. The construction of the C6 hydroxyethyl side chain is mediated by cobalamin- or B12-dependent radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes3. These radical SAM methylases (RSMTs) assemble the alkyl backbone by sequential methylation reactions, and thereby underlie the therapeutic usefulness of clinically used carbapenems. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of TokK, a B12-dependent RSMT that catalyses three-sequential methylations during the biosynthesis of asparenomycin A. These structures, which contain the two metallocofactors of the enzyme and were determined in the presence and absence of a carbapenam substrate, provide a visualization of a B12-dependent RSMT that uses the radical mechanism that is shared by most of these enzymes. The structures provide insight into the stereochemistry of initial C6 methylation and suggest that substrate positioning governs the rate of each methylation event.


Subject(s)
Carbapenems/biosynthesis , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/metabolism , S-Adenosylmethionine/metabolism , Streptomyces/enzymology , Thienamycins/biosynthesis , Vitamin B 12/metabolism , Binding Sites , Biocatalysis , Coenzymes/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Kinetics , Methylation , Models, Molecular , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Streptomyces/metabolism , beta-Lactamase Inhibitors/metabolism , beta-Lactamases/chemistry , beta-Lactamases/metabolism
3.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(2): 635-650, 2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621653

ABSTRACT

Coronaviral methyltransferases (MTases), nsp10/16 and nsp14, catalyze the last two steps of viral RNA-cap creation that takes place in cytoplasm. This cap is essential for the stability of viral RNA and, most importantly, for the evasion of innate immune system. Non-capped RNA is recognized by innate immunity which leads to its degradation and the activation of antiviral immunity. As a result, both coronaviral MTases are in the center of scientific scrutiny. Recently, X-ray and cryo-EM structures of both enzymes were solved even in complex with other parts of the viral replication complex. High-throughput screening as well as structure-guided inhibitor design have led to the discovery of their potent inhibitors. Here, we critically summarize the tremendous advancement of the coronaviral MTase field since the beginning of COVID pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/enzymology , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Amino Acids/chemistry , Binding Sites , Coronavirus/genetics , Drug Discovery , Humans , Methylation , Models, Molecular , Molecular Conformation , Molecular Structure , Protein Binding , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580696

ABSTRACT

The inhibition of key enzymes that may contain the viral replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have assumed central importance in drug discovery projects. Nonstructural proteins (nsps) are essential for RNA capping and coronavirus replication since it protects the virus from host innate immune restriction. In particular, nonstructural protein 16 (nsp16) in complex with nsp10 is a Cap-0 binding enzyme. The heterodimer formed by nsp16-nsp10 methylates the 5'-end of virally encoded mRNAs to mimic cellular mRNAs and thus it is one of the enzymes that is a potential target for antiviral therapy. In this study, we have evaluated the mechanism of the 2'-O methylation of the viral mRNA cap using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. It was found that the calculated free energy barriers obtained at M062X/6-31+G(d,p) is in agreement with experimental observations. Overall, we provide a detailed molecular analysis of the catalytic mechanism involving the 2'-O methylation of the viral mRNA cap and, as expected, the results demonstrate that the TS stabilization is critical for the catalysis.


Subject(s)
Methyltransferases/metabolism , RNA Caps/chemistry , RNA Caps/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism , Biocatalysis , Biomechanical Phenomena , Methylation , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Quantum Theory , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry
5.
J Virol ; 95(15): e0046321, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486505

ABSTRACT

The OC43 coronavirus is a human pathogen that usually causes only the common cold. One of its key enzymes, similar to other coronaviruses, is the 2'-O-RNA methyltransferase (MTase), which is essential for viral RNA stability and expression. Here, we report the crystal structure of the 2'-O-RNA MTase in a complex with the pan-methyltransferase inhibitor sinefungin solved at 2.2-Å resolution. The structure reveals an overall fold consistent with the fold observed in other coronaviral MTases. The major differences are in the conformation of the C terminus of the nsp16 subunit and an additional helix in the N terminus of the nsp10 subunits. The structural analysis also revealed very high conservation of the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) binding pocket, suggesting that the SAM pocket is a suitable spot for the design of antivirals effective against all human coronaviruses. IMPORTANCE Some coronaviruses are dangerous pathogens, while some cause only common colds. The reasons are not understood, although the spike proteins probably play an important role. However, to understand the coronaviral biology in sufficient detail, we need to compare the key enzymes from different coronaviruses. We solved the crystal structure of 2'-O-RNA methyltransferase of the OC43 coronavirus, a virus that usually causes mild colds. The structure revealed some differences in the overall fold but also revealed that the SAM binding site is conserved, suggesting that development of antivirals against multiple coronaviruses is feasible.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Methyltransferases/genetics , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Viral Proteins/genetics
6.
Sci Signal ; 14(689)2021 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406596

ABSTRACT

Capping of viral messenger RNAs is essential for efficient translation, for virus replication, and for preventing detection by the host cell innate response system. The SARS-CoV-2 genome encodes the 2'-O-methyltransferase nsp16, which, when bound to the coactivator nsp10, uses S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as a donor to transfer a methyl group to the first ribonucleotide of the mRNA in the final step of viral mRNA capping. Here, we provide biochemical and structural evidence that this reaction requires divalent cations, preferably Mn2+, and a coronavirus-specific four-residue insert. We determined the x-ray structures of the SARS-CoV-2 2'-O-methyltransferase (the nsp16-nsp10 heterodimer) in complex with its reaction substrates, products, and divalent metal cations. These structural snapshots revealed that metal ions and the insert stabilize interactions between the capped RNA and nsp16, resulting in the precise alignment of the ribonucleotides in the active site. Comparison of available structures of 2'-O-methyltransferases with capped RNAs from different organisms revealed that the four-residue insert unique to coronavirus nsp16 alters the backbone conformation of the capped RNA in the binding groove, thereby promoting catalysis. This insert is highly conserved across coronaviruses, and its absence in mammalian methyltransferases makes this region a promising site for structure-guided drug design of selective coronavirus inhibitors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , RNA Caps/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Catalytic Domain , Crystallography, X-Ray , Humans , Manganese/metabolism , Methylation , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Nucleic Acid Conformation , RNA Caps/chemistry , RNA Caps/genetics , RNA Stability , RNA, Messenger/chemistry , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , S-Adenosylmethionine/chemistry , S-Adenosylmethionine/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Signal Transduction , Substrate Specificity , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
7.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(9): 5382-5392, 2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387965

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 infection has posed unprecedented threat to global public health. The virus-encoded non-structural protein 14 (nsp14) is a bi-functional enzyme consisting of an exoribonuclease (ExoN) domain and a methyltransferase (MTase) domain and plays a pivotal role in viral replication. Here, we report the structure of SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-ExoN domain bound to its co-factor nsp10 and show that, compared to the SARS-CoV nsp10/nsp14-full-length complex, SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-ExoN retains an integral exoribonuclease fold and preserves an active configuration in the catalytic center. Analysis of the nsp10/nsp14-ExoN interface reveals a footprint in nsp10 extensively overlapping with that observed in the nsp10/nsp16 structure. A marked difference in the co-factor when engaging nsp14 and nsp16 lies in helix-α1', which is further experimentally ascertained to be involved in nsp14-binding but not in nsp16-engagement. Finally, we also show that nsp10/nsp14-ExoN is enzymatically active despite the absence of nsp14-MTase domain. These data demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 nsp10/nsp14-ExoN functions as an exoribonuclease with both structural and functional integrity.


Subject(s)
Biocatalysis , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Guanine , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/deficiency , Methyltransferases/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Domains/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/genetics
8.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 5874, 2020 11 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387320

ABSTRACT

Non-structural proteins (nsp) constitute the SARS-CoV-2 replication and transcription complex (RTC) to play a pivotal role in the virus life cycle. Here we determine the atomic structure of a SARS-CoV-2 mini RTC, assembled by viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, nsp12) with a template-primer RNA, nsp7 and nsp8, and two helicase molecules (nsp13-1 and nsp13-2), by cryo-electron microscopy. Two groups of mini RTCs with different conformations of nsp13-1 are identified. In both of them, nsp13-1 stabilizes overall architecture of the mini RTC by contacting with nsp13-2, which anchors the 5'-extension of RNA template, as well as interacting with nsp7-nsp8-nsp12-RNA. Orientation shifts of nsp13-1 results in its variable interactions with other components in two forms of mini RTC. The mutations on nsp13-1:nsp12 and nsp13-1:nsp13-2 interfaces prohibit the enhancement of helicase activity achieved by mini RTCs. These results provide an insight into how helicase couples with polymerase to facilitate its function in virus replication and transcription.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Virus Replication , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Binding Sites , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Humans , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA Helicases/genetics , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Structure-Activity Relationship , Transcription, Genetic , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
9.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4848, 2021 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354102

ABSTRACT

There is currently a lack of effective drugs to treat people infected with SARS-CoV-2, the cause of the global COVID-19 pandemic. The SARS-CoV-2 Non-structural protein 13 (NSP13) has been identified as a target for anti-virals due to its high sequence conservation and essential role in viral replication. Structural analysis reveals two "druggable" pockets on NSP13 that are among the most conserved sites in the entire SARS-CoV-2 proteome. Here we present crystal structures of SARS-CoV-2 NSP13 solved in the APO form and in the presence of both phosphate and a non-hydrolysable ATP analog. Comparisons of these structures reveal details of conformational changes that provide insights into the helicase mechanism and possible modes of inhibition. To identify starting points for drug development we have performed a crystallographic fragment screen against NSP13. The screen reveals 65 fragment hits across 52 datasets opening the way to structure guided development of novel antiviral agents.


Subject(s)
Methyltransferases/chemistry , RNA Helicases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Adenosine Triphosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Apoenzymes/chemistry , Apoenzymes/metabolism , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Drug Design , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Phosphates/chemistry , Phosphates/metabolism , Protein Conformation , RNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Structure-Activity Relationship , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
10.
J Virol ; 95(15): e0046321, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236419

ABSTRACT

The OC43 coronavirus is a human pathogen that usually causes only the common cold. One of its key enzymes, similar to other coronaviruses, is the 2'-O-RNA methyltransferase (MTase), which is essential for viral RNA stability and expression. Here, we report the crystal structure of the 2'-O-RNA MTase in a complex with the pan-methyltransferase inhibitor sinefungin solved at 2.2-Å resolution. The structure reveals an overall fold consistent with the fold observed in other coronaviral MTases. The major differences are in the conformation of the C terminus of the nsp16 subunit and an additional helix in the N terminus of the nsp10 subunits. The structural analysis also revealed very high conservation of the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) binding pocket, suggesting that the SAM pocket is a suitable spot for the design of antivirals effective against all human coronaviruses. IMPORTANCE Some coronaviruses are dangerous pathogens, while some cause only common colds. The reasons are not understood, although the spike proteins probably play an important role. However, to understand the coronaviral biology in sufficient detail, we need to compare the key enzymes from different coronaviruses. We solved the crystal structure of 2'-O-RNA methyltransferase of the OC43 coronavirus, a virus that usually causes mild colds. The structure revealed some differences in the overall fold but also revealed that the SAM binding site is conserved, suggesting that development of antivirals against multiple coronaviruses is feasible.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Methyltransferases/genetics , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Viral Proteins/genetics
11.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(21)2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223143

ABSTRACT

The genome of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) coronavirus has a capping modification at the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) to prevent its degradation by host nucleases. These modifications are performed by the Nsp10/14 and Nsp10/16 heterodimers using S-adenosylmethionine as the methyl donor. Nsp10/16 heterodimer is responsible for the methylation at the ribose 2'-O position of the first nucleotide. To investigate the conformational changes of the complex during 2'-O methyltransferase activity, we used a fixed-target serial synchrotron crystallography method at room temperature. We determined crystal structures of Nsp10/16 with substrates and products that revealed the states before and after methylation, occurring within the crystals during the experiments. Here we report the crystal structure of Nsp10/16 in complex with Cap-1 analog (m7GpppAm2'-O). Inhibition of Nsp16 activity may reduce viral proliferation, making this protein an attractive drug target.


Subject(s)
RNA Caps/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Crystallography , Methylation , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Multiprotein Complexes/chemistry , Multiprotein Complexes/metabolism , RNA Cap Analogs/chemistry , RNA Cap Analogs/metabolism , RNA Caps/chemistry , RNA, Messenger/chemistry , RNA, Viral/chemistry , S-Adenosylhomocysteine/chemistry , S-Adenosylhomocysteine/metabolism , S-Adenosylmethionine/chemistry , S-Adenosylmethionine/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Synchrotrons , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism
12.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(9): 5382-5392, 2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217861

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 infection has posed unprecedented threat to global public health. The virus-encoded non-structural protein 14 (nsp14) is a bi-functional enzyme consisting of an exoribonuclease (ExoN) domain and a methyltransferase (MTase) domain and plays a pivotal role in viral replication. Here, we report the structure of SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-ExoN domain bound to its co-factor nsp10 and show that, compared to the SARS-CoV nsp10/nsp14-full-length complex, SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-ExoN retains an integral exoribonuclease fold and preserves an active configuration in the catalytic center. Analysis of the nsp10/nsp14-ExoN interface reveals a footprint in nsp10 extensively overlapping with that observed in the nsp10/nsp16 structure. A marked difference in the co-factor when engaging nsp14 and nsp16 lies in helix-α1', which is further experimentally ascertained to be involved in nsp14-binding but not in nsp16-engagement. Finally, we also show that nsp10/nsp14-ExoN is enzymatically active despite the absence of nsp14-MTase domain. These data demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 nsp10/nsp14-ExoN functions as an exoribonuclease with both structural and functional integrity.


Subject(s)
Biocatalysis , Exoribonucleases/chemistry , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/chemistry , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism , Binding Sites , Crystallography, X-Ray , Exoribonucleases/genetics , Guanine , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/deficiency , Methyltransferases/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Protein Domains/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/genetics
13.
Mol Omics ; 17(3): 357-364, 2021 06 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135703

ABSTRACT

In the era of big data and artificial intelligence, a lot of new discoveries have influenced the fields of antiviral drug design and pharmacophore identification. Viruses have always been a threat to society in terms of public health and economic stability. Viruses not only affect humans but also livestock and agriculture with a direct impact on food safety, economy and environmental imprint. Most recently, with the pandemic of COVID-19, it was made clear that a single virus can have a devastating impact on global well-being and economy. In this direction, there is an emerging need for the identification of promising pharmacological targets in viruses. Herein, an effort has been made to discuss the current knowledge, state-of-the-art applications and future implications for the main pharmacological targets of single-stranded RNA viruses.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Discovery/methods , Positive-Strand RNA Viruses/genetics , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Drug Design , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Peptide Hydrolases/chemistry , Positive-Strand RNA Viruses/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Proteins/metabolism
14.
Molecules ; 26(5)2021 Mar 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136523

ABSTRACT

With the emergence and global spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, the scientific community worldwide has focused on search for new therapeutic strategies against this disease. One such critical approach is targeting proteins such as helicases that regulate most of the SARS-CoV-2 RNA metabolism. The purpose of the current study was to predict a library of phytochemicals derived from diverse plant families with high binding affinity to SARS-CoV-2 helicase (Nsp13) enzyme. High throughput virtual screening of the Medicinal Plant Database for Drug Design (MPD3) database was performed on SARS-CoV-2 helicase using AutoDock Vina. Nilotinib, with a docking value of -9.6 kcal/mol, was chosen as a reference molecule. A compound (PubChem CID: 110143421, ZINC database ID: ZINC257223845, eMolecules: 43290531) was screened as the best binder (binding energy of -10.2 kcal/mol on average) to the enzyme by using repeated docking runs in the screening process. On inspection, the compound was disclosed to show different binding sites of the triangular pockets collectively formed by Rec1A, Rec2A, and 1B domains and a stalk domain at the base. The molecule is often bound to the ATP binding site (referred to as binding site 2) of the helicase enzyme. The compound was further discovered to fulfill drug-likeness and lead-likeness criteria, have good physicochemical and pharmacokinetics properties, and to be non-toxic. Molecular dynamic simulation analysis of the control/lead compound complexes demonstrated the formation of stable complexes with good intermolecular binding affinity. Lastly, affirmation of the docking simulation studies was accomplished by estimating the binding free energy by MMPB/GBSA technique. Taken together, these findings present further in silco investigation of plant-derived lead compounds to effectively address COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , Methyltransferases/metabolism , RNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA Helicases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/toxicity , Binding Sites , Biological Availability , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Chemical , Drug Design , Humans , Hydrogen Bonding , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Phytochemicals/chemistry , Phytochemicals/metabolism , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Domains/drug effects , Pyrimidines/chemistry , Pyrimidines/metabolism , Pyrimidines/pharmacokinetics , Pyrimidines/toxicity , RNA Helicases/chemistry , Structure-Activity Relationship , Thermodynamics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry
15.
PLoS One ; 16(2): e0246181, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088753

ABSTRACT

The 2019 emergence of, SARS-CoV-2 has tragically taken an immense toll on human life and far reaching impacts on society. There is a need to identify effective antivirals with diverse mechanisms of action in order to accelerate preclinical development. This study focused on five of the most established drug target proteins for direct acting small molecule antivirals: Nsp5 Main Protease, Nsp12 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, Nsp13 Helicase, Nsp16 2'-O methyltransferase and the S2 subunit of the Spike protein. A workflow of solvent mapping and free energy calculations was used to identify and characterize favorable small-molecule binding sites for an aromatic pharmacophore (benzene). After identifying the most favorable sites, calculated ligand efficiencies were compared utilizing computational fragment screening. The most favorable sites overall were located on Nsp12 and Nsp16, whereas the most favorable sites for Nsp13 and S2 Spike had comparatively lower ligand efficiencies relative to Nsp12 and Nsp16. Utilizing fragment screening on numerous possible sites on Nsp13 helicase, we identified a favorable allosteric site on the N-terminal zinc binding domain (ZBD) that may be amenable to virtual or biophysical fragment screening efforts. Recent structural studies of the Nsp12:Nsp13 replication-transcription complex experimentally corroborates ligand binding at this site, which is revealed to be a functional Nsp8:Nsp13 protein-protein interaction site in the complex. Detailed structural analysis of Nsp13 ZBD conformations show the role of induced-fit flexibility in this ligand binding site and identify which conformational states are associated with efficient ligand binding. We hope that this map of over 200 possible small-molecule binding sites for these drug targets may be of use for ongoing discovery, design, and drug repurposing efforts. This information may be used to prioritize screening efforts or aid in the process of deciphering how a screening hit may bind to a specific target protein.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Methyltransferases/metabolism , RNA Helicases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Allosteric Site , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Humans , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Models, Molecular , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Protein Binding , RNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Virus Replication/drug effects
16.
Expert Opin Ther Pat ; 31(4): 339-350, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087605

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronaviruses encode a helicase that is essential for viral replication and represents an excellent antiviral target. However, only a few coronavirus helicase inhibitors have been patented. These patents include drug-like compound SSYA10-001, aryl diketo acids (ADK), and dihydroxychromones. Additionally, adamantane-derived bananins, natural flavonoids, one acrylamide derivative [(E)-3-(furan-2-yl)-N-(4-sulfamoylphenyl)acrylamide], a purine derivative (7-ethyl-8-mercapto-3-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1 H-purine-2,6-dione), and a few bismuth complexes. The IC50 of patented inhibitors ranges between 0.82 µM and 8.95 µM, depending upon the assays used. Considering the urgency of clinical interventions against Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19), it is important to consider developing antiviral portfolios consisting of small molecules.Areas covered: This review examines coronavirus helicases as antiviral targets, and the potential of previously patented and experimental compounds to inhibit the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) helicase.Expert opinion: Small molecule coronavirus helicase inhibitors represent attractive pharmacological modalities for the treatment of coronaviruses such as SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. Rightfully so, the current emphasis is focused upon the development of vaccines. However, vaccines may not work for everyone and broad-based adoption of vaccinations is an increasingly challenging societal endeavor. Therefore, it is important to develop additional pharmacological antivirals against the highly conserved coronavirus helicases to broadly protect against this and subsequent coronavirus epidemics.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Development , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Humans , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/physiology , Patents as Topic , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA Helicases/physiology , Triazoles/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/physiology
17.
Structure ; 29(2): 186-195.e6, 2021 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-939287

ABSTRACT

Recent advances in single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) have enabled the structural determination of numerous protein assemblies at high resolution, yielding unprecedented insights into their function. However, despite its extraordinary capabilities, cryo-EM remains time-consuming and resource-intensive. It is therefore beneficial to have a means for rapidly assessing and optimizing the quality of samples prior to lengthy cryo-EM analyses. To do this, we have developed a native mass spectrometry (nMS) platform that provides rapid feedback on sample quality and highly streamlined biochemical screening. Because nMS enables accurate mass analysis of protein complexes, it is well suited to routine evaluation of the composition, integrity, and homogeneity of samples prior to their plunge-freezing on EM grids. We demonstrate the utility of our nMS-based platform for facilitating cryo-EM studies using structural characterizations of exemplar bacterial transcription complexes as well as the replication-transcription assembly from the SARS-CoV-2 virus that is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Cryoelectron Microscopy/methods , Mass Spectrometry/methods , Single Molecule Imaging/methods , Escherichia coli , Escherichia coli Proteins/chemistry , Escherichia coli Proteins/metabolism , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/metabolism , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA Helicases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Transcription Factors/chemistry , Transcription Factors/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
18.
Gene ; 768: 145313, 2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933101

ABSTRACT

The whole world is still suffering substantially from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. Several protein-based molecules that are associated with the Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which are essential for its functionality, survival, and pathogenesis have been identified and are considered as potential therapeutic targets. These protein-based molecules are either structural/non-structural components of SARS-CoV-2 or host factors, which play a crucial role in this infection. Developing drug molecules against these essential functional molecules to hinder their regular functioning and associated physiological pathways could be promising for successful clinical management of this novel coronavirus infection. The review aims to highlight the functional molecules that play crucial roles in SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. We have emphasized how these potential druggable targets could be beneficial in tackling the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Humans , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Molecular Targeted Therapy , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Structural Proteins/metabolism , Virulence , Virus Replication/drug effects
19.
Sci Signal ; 13(651)2020 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808027

ABSTRACT

There are currently no antiviral therapies specific for SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the global pandemic disease COVID-19. To facilitate structure-based drug design, we conducted an x-ray crystallographic study of the SARS-CoV-2 nsp16-nsp10 2'-O-methyltransferase complex, which methylates Cap-0 viral mRNAs to improve viral protein translation and to avoid host immune detection. We determined the structures for nsp16-nsp10 heterodimers bound to the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the reaction product S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), or the SAH analog sinefungin (SFG). We also solved structures for nsp16-nsp10 in complex with the methylated Cap-0 analog m7GpppA and either SAM or SAH. Comparative analyses between these structures and published structures for nsp16 from other betacoronaviruses revealed flexible loops in open and closed conformations at the m7GpppA-binding pocket. Bound sulfates in several of the structures suggested the location of the ribonucleic acid backbone phosphates in the ribonucleotide-binding groove. Additional nucleotide-binding sites were found on the face of the protein opposite the active site. These various sites and the conserved dimer interface could be exploited for the development of antiviral inhibitors.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine/metabolism , Adenosine/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Binding Sites , COVID-19 , Catalytic Domain , Crystallography, X-Ray , Dimerization , Genes, Viral/genetics , Humans , Methylation , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , Models, Molecular , Open Reading Frames/genetics , Pandemics , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , RNA Cap Analogs/metabolism , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional , RNA, Viral/metabolism , S-Adenosylhomocysteine/metabolism , S-Adenosylmethionine/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Structure-Activity Relationship , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
20.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 163: 1687-1696, 2020 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-793718

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has caused COVID-19 outbreak with nearly 2 M infected people and over 100K death worldwide, until middle of April 2020. There is no confirmed drug for the treatment of COVID-19 yet. As the disease spread fast and threaten human life, repositioning of FDA approved drugs may provide fast options for treatment. In this aspect, structure-based drug design could be applied as a powerful approach in distinguishing the viral drug target regions from the host. Evaluation of variations in SARS-CoV-2 genome may ease finding specific drug targets in the viral genome. In this study, 3458 SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences isolated from all around the world were analyzed. Incidence of C17747T and A17858G mutations were observed to be much higher than others and they were on Nsp13, a vital enzyme of SARS-CoV-2. Effect of these mutations was evaluated on protein-drug interactions using in silico methods. The most potent drugs were found to interact with the key and neighbor residues of the active site responsible from ATP hydrolysis. As result, cangrelor, fludarabine, folic acid and polydatin were determined to be the most potent drugs which have potency to inhibit both the wild type and mutant SARS-CoV-2 helicase. Clinical data supporting these findings would be important towards overcoming COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , RNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Amino Acid Sequence , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Binding Sites , COVID-19 , Computer Simulation , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Approval , Drug Repositioning , Folic Acid/pharmacology , Genome, Viral , Glucosides/pharmacology , Humans , Methyltransferases/chemistry , Methyltransferases/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , Molecular Docking Simulation , Mutation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA Helicases/genetics , RNA Helicases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Stilbenes/pharmacology , Vidarabine/analogs & derivatives , Vidarabine/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
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