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1.
Viruses ; 14(6)2022 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903496

ABSTRACT

Enterovirus infections can cause hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFDM), aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, and acute flaccid myelitis, leading to death of infants and young children. However, no specific antiviral drug is currently available for the treatment of this type of infection. The Unites States and United Kingdom health authorities recently approved a new antiviral drug, molnupiravir, for the treatment of COVID-19. In this study, we reported that molnupiravir (EIDD-2801) and its active form, EIDD-1931, have broad-spectrum anti-enterovirus potential. Our data showed that EIDD-1931 could significantly reduce the production of EV-A71 progeny virus and the expression of EV-A71 viral protein at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The results of the time-of-addition assay suggest that EIDD-1931 acts at the post-entry step, which is in accordance with its antiviral mechanism. The intraperitoneal administration of EIDD-1931 and EIDD-2801 protected 1-day-old ICR suckling mice from lethal EV-A71 challenge by reducing the viral load in various tissues of the infected mice. The pharmacokinetics analysis indicated that the plasma drug concentration overwhelmed the EC50 for enteroviruses, suggesting the clinical potential of molnupiravir against enteroviruses. Thus, molnupiravir along with its active form, EIDD-1931, may be a promising drug candidate against enterovirus infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Enterovirus A, Human , Enterovirus Infections , Enterovirus , Animals , Antigens, Viral/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Child, Preschool , Cytidine/analogs & derivatives , Enterovirus/metabolism , Enterovirus Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Hydroxylamines , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR
2.
Molecules ; 27(11)2022 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1892924

ABSTRACT

Excessive corticosterone (CORT), resulting from a dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, is associated with cognitive impairment and behavioral changes, including depression. In Korean oriental medicine, Pedicularis resupinata is used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, the antidepressant properties of P. resupinata have not been well characterized. Here, the antidepressant-like effects of P. resupinata extract (PRE) were evaluated in terms of CORT-induced depression using in vivo models. HPLC confirmed that acteoside, a phenylethanoid glycoside, was the main compound from PRE. Male ICR mice (8 weeks old) were injected with CORT (40 mg/kg, i.p.) and orally administered PRE daily (30, 100, and 300 mg/kg) for 21 consecutive days. Depressive-like behaviors were evaluated using the open-field test, sucrose preference test, passive avoidance test, tail suspension test, and forced swim test. Treatment with a high dose of PRE significantly alleviated CORT-induced, depressive-like behaviors in mice. Additionally, repeated CORT injection markedly reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, whereas total glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and GR phosphorylation at serine 211 were significantly increased in the mice hippocampus but improved by PRE treatment. Thus, our findings suggest that PRE has potential antidepressant-like effects in CORT-induced, depressive-like behavior in mice.


Subject(s)
Corticosterone , Pedicularis , Animals , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Behavior, Animal , Corticosterone/adverse effects , Depression/chemically induced , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/psychology , Disease Models, Animal , Hippocampus , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Pituitary-Adrenal System , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Receptors, Glucocorticoid
3.
Inflamm Res ; 71(5-6): 627-639, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797665

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: The existing biological models of diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) in mice have many shortcomings. To offset these shortcomings, we have proposed a simple, nonsurgical, and reproducible method of unilateral total damage of the left lung in ICR mice. This model is based on the intrabronchial administration of a mixture of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the cell wall of S. enterica and α-galactosylceramide (inducing substances) to the left lung. METHODS: Using computer tomography of the lungs with endobronchial administration of contrast material, we have been able to perform an operative intravital verification of the targeted delivery of the inducer. The model presented is characterized by more serious and homogeneous damage of the affected lung compared to the existing models of focal pneumonia; at the same time, our model is characterized by longer animal survival since the right lung remains intact. RESULTS: The model is also characterized by diffuse alveolar damage of the left lung, animal survival of 100%, abrupt increases in plasma levels of TNFa, INFg, and IL-6, and significant myocardial overload in the right heart. It can be used to assess the efficacy of innovative drugs for the treatment of DAD and ARDS as the clinical manifestations that are developed in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. Morphological patterns of lungs in the noninfectious ("sterile") model of DAD induced by LPS simultaneously with α-galactosylceramide (presented here) and in the infectious model of DAD induced by SARS-CoV-2 have been compared. CONCLUSION: The DAD model we have proposed can be widely used for studying the efficacy of candidate molecules for the treatment of infectious respiratory diseases, such as viral pneumonias of different etiology, including SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia, Viral , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Lipopolysaccharides , Lung , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Virol ; 96(4): e0157821, 2022 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759290

ABSTRACT

The ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic poses a severe global threat to public health, as do influenza viruses and other coronaviruses. Here, we present chimpanzee adenovirus 68 (AdC68)-based vaccines designed to universally target coronaviruses and influenza. Our design is centered on an immunogen generated by fusing the SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD) to the conserved stalk of H7N9 hemagglutinin (HA). Remarkably, the constructed vaccine effectively induced both SARS-CoV-2-targeting antibodies and anti-influenza antibodies in mice, consequently affording protection from lethal SARS-CoV-2 and H7N9 challenges as well as effective H3N2 control. We propose our AdC68-vectored coronavirus-influenza vaccine as a universal approach toward curbing respiratory virus-causing pandemics. IMPORTANCE The COVID-19 pandemic exemplifies the severe public health threats of respiratory virus infection and influenza A viruses. The currently envisioned strategy for the prevention of respiratory virus-causing diseases requires the comprehensive administration of vaccines tailored for individual viruses. Here, we present an alternative strategy by designing chimpanzee adenovirus 68-based vaccines which target both the SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding-domain and the conserved stalk of influenza hemagglutinin. When tested in mice, this strategy attained potent neutralizing antibodies against wild-type SARS-CoV-2 and its emerging variants, enabling an effective protection against lethal SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Notably, it also provided complete protection from lethal H7N9 challenge and efficient control of H3N2-induced morbidity. Our study opens a new avenue to universally curb respiratory virus infection by vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/immunology , Influenza Vaccines , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , /immunology , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred ICR , Mice, Transgenic , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/epidemiology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667197

ABSTRACT

An Escherichia coli (E. coli) production of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 (isolate Wuhan-Hu-1) spike protein would significantly accelerate the search for anti-COVID-19 therapeutics because of its versatility and low cost. However, RBD contains four disulfide bonds and its expression in E. coli is limited by the formation of aberrant disulfide bonds resulting in inclusion bodies. Here, we show that a solubility-enhancing peptide (SEP) tag containing nine arginine residues (RBD-C9R) attached at the C-terminus can overcome this problem. The SEP-tag increased the expression in the soluble fraction and the final yield by five times (2 mg/L). The folding properties of the E. coli expressed RBD-C9R were demonstrated with biophysical characterization using RP-HPLC, circular dichroism, thermal denaturation, fluorescence, and light scattering. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis confirmed the binding activity of RBD-C9R with ACE2, the host cell's receptor. In addition, RBD-C9R elicited a Th-2 immune response with a high IgG titer in Jcl: ICR mice. The RBD-C9R antisera interacted with both itself and the mammalian-cell expressed spike protein (S1), as demonstrated by ELISA, indicating that the E. coli expressed RBD-C9R harbors native-like epitopes. Overall, these results emphasize the potential of our SEP-tag for the E. coli production of active multi-disulfide-bonded RBD.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Escherichia coli/growth & development , Peptides/administration & dosage , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Cloning, Molecular , Disulfides/metabolism , Escherichia coli/genetics , Female , Humans , Immune Sera/metabolism , Immunization , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Peptides/genetics , Peptides/immunology , Protein Domains , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Th2 Cells/metabolism
6.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 19(2): 210-221, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608557

ABSTRACT

Exploring the cross-talk between the immune system and advanced biomaterials to treat SARS-CoV-2 infection is a promising strategy. Here, we show that ACE2-overexpressing A549 cell-derived microparticles (AO-MPs) are a potential therapeutic agent against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Intranasally administered AO-MPs dexterously navigate the anatomical and biological features of the lungs to enter the alveoli and are taken up by alveolar macrophages (AMs). Then, AO-MPs increase the endosomal pH but decrease the lysosomal pH in AMs, thus escorting bound SARS-CoV-2 from phago-endosomes to lysosomes for degradation. This pH regulation is attributable to oxidized cholesterol, which is enriched in AO-MPs and translocated to endosomal membranes, thus interfering with proton pumps and impairing endosomal acidification. In addition to promoting viral degradation, AO-MPs also inhibit the proinflammatory phenotype of AMs, leading to increased treatment efficacy in a SARS-CoV-2-infected mouse model without side effects. These findings highlight the potential use of AO-MPs to treat SARS-CoV-2-infected patients and showcase the feasibility of MP therapies for combatting emerging respiratory viruses in the future.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy/methods , Cell-Derived Microparticles/metabolism , Cholesterol/metabolism , Endosomes/chemistry , Macrophages, Alveolar/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , A549 Cells , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Lysosomes/chemistry , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Mice, Transgenic , Oxidation-Reduction , RAW 264.7 Cells , Treatment Outcome , Vero Cells
7.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 287: 114965, 2022 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587284

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Coronavirus and influenza virus infection seriously threaten human health. Cangma Huadu Granules (CMHD) is an in-hospital preparation composed of eight traditional Chinese medicines (TCM), which has been clinically used against COVID-19 in China and may be a promising candidate for the treatment of influenza. However, the role of its treatment urgently needs to be studied. AIM OF THE STUDY: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of CMHD on pneumonia induced by coronavirus (HCoV-229E) and influenza A virus (H1N1/FM1) in mice and explore its mechanism of anti-infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice were infected with HCoV-229E or H1N1/FM1 virus through the nasal cavity. CMHD (12.1, 6.05 and 3.03 g/kg/d) or the positive control drugs were administered intragastrically. The lung index and histopathological changes were used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of CMHD. The expression of TNF-α, IL-1ß, IL-6 and IL-4 in Serum and the proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood were detected to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and immune regulation effects of CMHD, respectively. Furthermore, the levels of p-NF-κBp65/ NF-κB p65, which was the key targets of the NF-κB pathway was analyzed. RESULTS: In HCoV-229E-induced pneumonia, the lung index was markedly reduced, and lung pathology was improved in mice that treated with CMHD (12.1, 6.05 g/kg/d). Meanwhile, the expression of TNF-α, IL-6 were obviously inhibited, but the expression of IL-4 was significantly increased in CMHD groups. Compared with the model group, CMHD could also markedly upregulate the level of CD4+ and CD8+. Furthermore, CMHD has a markedly effect on inhibit the expression of p-NF-κB p65/NF-κB p65 in the lung. In H1N1-induced pneumonia, the lung index of mice in the CMHD (12.1 g/kg/d) treatment group was lower than that in the model group, and less inflammatory infiltration could be seen in the lung pathological. Moreover, CMHD could also obviously decrease the expression of TNF-α, IL-1ß, IL-6, but significantly increase the expression of IL-4. Except for that, CMHD could also markedly downregulate the level of CD4+ and upregulate the level of CD8+ compared with the model group. In addition, CMHD has a markedly effect on inhibit the expression of p-NF-κB p65/NF-κB p65 in the lung. CONCLUSION: CMHD can significantly combats viral infections caused by HCoV-229E and H1N1, and the mechanism may be related to its multiple functions of anti-inflammatory, immunity regulating and inhibiting NF-κB signal transduction pathway.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/drug effects , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus 229E, Human/drug effects , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Female , Immunity/drug effects , Male , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred ICR , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/pathology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Transcription Factor RelA/metabolism
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470894

ABSTRACT

Infection caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) in many cases is accompanied by the release of a large amount of proinflammatory cytokines in an event known as "cytokine storm", which is associated with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases and high mortality. The excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines is linked, inter alia, to the enhanced activity of receptors capable of recognizing the conservative regions of pathogens and cell debris, namely TLRs, TREM-1 and TNFR1. Here we report that peptides derived from innate immunity protein Tag7 inhibit activation of TREM-1 and TNFR1 receptors during acute inflammation. Peptides from the N-terminal fragment of Tag7 bind only to TREM-1, while peptides from the C-terminal fragment interact solely with TNFR1. Selected peptides are capable of inhibiting the production of proinflammatory cytokines both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors and in vivo in the mouse model of acute lung injury (ALI) by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Treatment with peptides significantly decreases the infiltration of mononuclear cells to lungs in animals with DAD. Our findings suggest that Tag7-derived peptides might be beneficial in terms of the therapy or prevention of acute lung injury, e.g., for treating COVID-19 patients with severe pulmonary lesions.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Cytokines/chemistry , Peptides/metabolism , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/metabolism , Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Animals , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Peptides/chemistry , Peptides/pharmacology , Protein Binding , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/antagonists & inhibitors , Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1/antagonists & inhibitors
9.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 144: 112291, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oxytocin (OXT), a neuropeptide involved in mammal reproductive and prosocial behaviors, has been reported to interact with various stressor-provoked neurobiological changes, including neuroendocrine, neurotransmitter, and inflammatory processes. In view of disturbances in psychosocial relationships due to social isolation and physical distancing measures amid the COVID-19 pandemic, being one of the triggering factors for the recent rise in depression and anxiety, OXT is a potential candidate for a new antidepressant. METHODS: In this present study, we have aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of Rosmarinus officinalis extract (RE), extracted from distillation residue of rosemary essential oil, on central OXT level in the context of other stress biomarkers and neurotransmitter levels in mice models. Tail suspension test (TST) and elevated plus maze test (EPMT) following LPS injection were employed to assess depressive- and anxiety-like behavior in mice, respectively. FINDINGS: Pretreatment with RE for seven days significantly improved behavior in TST and EPMT. Whole-genome microarray analysis reveals that RE significantly reversed TST stress-induced alterations in gene expressions related to oxytocinergic and neurotransmitter pathways and inflammatory processes. In both models, RE significantly increased central Oxt and Oxtr expressions, as well as OXT protein levels. RE also significantly attenuated stress-induced changes in serum corticosterone, brain and serum BDNF levels, and brain neurotransmitters levels in both models. INTERPRETATION: Altogether, our study is the first to report antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activities of RE through modulating oxytocinergic system in mice brain and thus highlights the prospects of RE in the treatment of depressive disorders of psychosocial nature.


Subject(s)
Anti-Anxiety Agents/therapeutic use , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Oxytocin/metabolism , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Receptors, Oxytocin/metabolism , Rosmarinus , Animals , Anti-Anxiety Agents/isolation & purification , Anti-Anxiety Agents/pharmacology , Antidepressive Agents/isolation & purification , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/metabolism , Brain/drug effects , Brain/metabolism , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Oxytocin/agonists , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Receptors, Oxytocin/agonists
10.
Bioorg Med Chem ; 46: 116364, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406212

ABSTRACT

The nucleoside metabolite of remdesivir, GS-441524 displays potent anti-SARS-CoV-2 efficacy, and is being evaluated in clinical as an oral antiviral therapeutic for COVID-19. However, this nucleoside has a poor oral bioavailability in non-human primates, which may affect its therapeutic efficacy. Herein, we reported a variety of GS-441524 analogs with modifications on the base or the sugar moiety, as well as some prodrug forms, including five isobutyryl esters, two l-valine esters, and one carbamate. Among the new nucleosides, only the 7-fluoro analog 3c had moderate anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity, and its phosphoramidate prodrug 7 exhibited reduced activity in Vero E6 cells. As for the prodrugs, the 3'-isobutyryl ester 5a, the 5'-isobutyryl ester 5c, and the tri-isobutyryl ester 5g hydrobromide showed excellent oral bioavailabilities (F = 71.6%, 86.6% and 98.7%, respectively) in mice, which provided good insight into the pharmacokinetic optimization of GS-441524.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenosine/pharmacokinetics , Adenosine/pharmacology , Adenosine/toxicity , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/toxicity , Chlorocebus aethiops , Male , Mice, Inbred ICR , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Prodrugs/chemical synthesis , Prodrugs/pharmacokinetics , Prodrugs/pharmacology , Prodrugs/toxicity , Vero Cells
11.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1555-1573, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324547

ABSTRACT

To curb the pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), multiple platforms have been employed toward a safe and highly effective vaccine. Here, we develop a novel cell-based vaccine candidate, namely K562-S, by utilizing human cell K562 as a cellular carrier to display Spike (S) protein of SARS-CoV-2 on the membrane. Analogous to the traditional inactivated vaccine, K562-S cells can be propagated to a large scale by culturing and completely lose their viability after exposure to X-ray irradiation or formalin. We in turn demonstrated high immunogenicity of formalin-inactivated K562-S vaccine in both mouse and non-human primates and its protective efficacy in mice. In mice, immunization with inactivated K562-S vaccines can elicit potent neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses persisting longer than 5 months. We consequently showed in a hACE2 mouse model of SARS-CoV-2 infection that a two-shot vaccination with adjuvanted K562-S rendered greater than 3 log reduction in viral lung load and concomitant ameliorated lung pathology. Of importance, the administration of the same regimen in non-human primates was able to induce a neutralizing antibody titer averaging three-fold higher relative to human convalescent serum. These results together support the promise of K562-based, S-protein-expressing vaccines as a novel vaccination approach against SARS-CoV-2. Importantly, with a powerful capacity to carry external genes for cell-based vectors, this platform could rapidly generate two- and multiple-valent vaccines by incorporating SARS-CoV-2 mutants, SARS-CoV, or MERS-CoV.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , Animals, Genetically Modified , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , K562 Cells , Macaca mulatta , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Inbred ICR , Primates , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/administration & dosage , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology
12.
J Nutr Biochem ; 98: 108821, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309296

ABSTRACT

Membrane glycoprotein is the most abundant protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but its role in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has not been fully characterized. Mice intranasally inoculated with membrane glycoprotein substantially increased the interleukin (IL)-6, a hallmark of the cytokine storm, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), compared to mice inoculated with green fluorescent protein (GFP). The high level of IL-6 induced by membrane glycoprotein was significantly diminished in phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4B) knockout mice, demonstrating the essential role of PDE4B in IL-6 signaling. Mycelium fermentation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus) EH8 strain yielded butyric acid, which can down-regulate the PDE4B expression and IL-6 secretion in macrophages. Feeding mice with mycelia increased the relative abundance of commensal L. rhamnosus. Two-week supplementation of mice with L. rhamnosus plus mycelia considerably decreased membrane glycoprotein-induced PDE4B expression and IL-6 secretion. The probiotic activity of L. rhamnosus plus mycelia against membrane glycoprotein was abolished in mice treated with GLPG-0974, an antagonist of free fatty acid receptor 2 (Ffar2). Activation of Ffar2 in the gut-lung axis for down-regulation of the PDE4B-IL-6 signalling may provide targets for development of modalities including probiotics for treatment of the cytokine storm in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus M Proteins/pharmacology , Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lactobacillus rhamnosus/physiology , Probiotics/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Butyric Acid , Cell Line , Cloning, Molecular , Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4/genetics , Female , Fermentation , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/metabolism
13.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 141: 111835, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1271574

ABSTRACT

Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) produced by mast cells is involved in allergic inflammation pathogenesis. Chloroquine (CQ) is known to be an anti-malarial drug; however, additional protective functions of CQ have been discovered. This study aims to clarify an anti-inflammatory effect of CQ through modulating TSLP levels using an in vitro model of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) + A23187-activated human mast cell line (HMC-1) and an in vivo model of PMA-irritated ear edema. CQ treatment reduced the production and mRNA expression levels of TSLP in activated HMC-1 cells. CQ down-regulated caspase-1 (CASP1), MAPKs, and NF-κB levels enhanced by stimulation with PMA + A23187. Moreover, ear thickness in ear edema was suppressed following CQ treatment. CQ decreased CASP1 and NF-κB levels in the ear tissue. TSLP levels in the ear tissue and serum were reduced following CQ treatment. Collectively, the above findings elucidate that CQ inhibits the pro-inflammatory mechanisms of TSLP via the down-regulation of distinct intracellular signaling cascade in mast cells. Therefore, CQ may have protective roles against TSLP-mediated inflammatory disorders.


Subject(s)
Caspase 1/drug effects , Caspase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Mast Cells/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Stromal Cells/metabolism , Thymus Gland/metabolism , Animals , Calcimycin/pharmacology , Cell Line , Ear Diseases/drug therapy , Edema/drug therapy , Humans , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , NF-kappa B/drug effects , RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Stromal Cells/drug effects , Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate/pharmacology , Thymus Gland/drug effects
14.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 268, 2021 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216450

ABSTRACT

Maternal stress has debilitating implications for both mother and child, including increased risk for anxiety. The current COVID-19 pandemic escalates these phenomena, thus, urging the need to further explore and validate feasible therapeutic options. Unlike the protracted nature of clinical studies, animal models could offer swift evidence. Prominent candidates for treatment are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to the mother, that putatively accommodate maternal functioning, and, thereby, also protect the child. However, SSRIs might have deleterious effects. It is important to assess whether SSRIs and other pharmacotherapies can moderate the transference of anxiety by soothing maternal anxiety and to examine the extent of offspring's exposure to the drugs via lactation. To our knowledge, the possibility that antenatal stress exacerbates lactation-driven exposure to SSRIs has not been tested yet. Thirty ICR-outbred female mice were exposed to stress during gestation and subsequently administered with either the SSRI, escitalopram, or the novel herbal candidate, shan-zha, during lactation. Upon weaning, both dams' and pups' anxiety-like behavior and serum escitalopram levels were assessed. The major findings of the current study show that both agents moderated the antenatal stress-induced transgenerational transference of anxiety by ameliorating dams' anxiety. Interestingly though, pups' exposure to escitalopram via lactation was exacerbated by antenatal stress. The latter finding provides a significant insight into the mechanism of lactation-driven exposure to xenobiotics and calls for a further consideration vis-à-vis the administration of other drugs during breastfeeding.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/physiopathology , Lactation/metabolism , Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects/prevention & control , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Animals , COVID-19 , Citalopram/administration & dosage , Citalopram/pharmacology , Citalopram/therapeutic use , Crataegus , Disease Models, Animal , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Female , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/pharmacology , Xenobiotics/metabolism
15.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 275: 114063, 2021 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164034

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Fufang-Yinhua-Jiedu Granules (FFYH) optimized from a Yin-Qiao-San, as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), was used to treat influenza and upper respiratory tract infection and was recommended for the prevention and treatment of SARS in 2003 and current COVID-19 in Anhui Province in 2020. AIM OF STUDY: In the clinical studies, FFYH was very effective for the treatment of influenza, but the mechanism of action against influenza A virus remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the antiviral effect of FFYH against influenza A virus in vitro and vivo. Moreover, the potential mechanism of FFYH against influenza A virus in vivo was investigated for the first time. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CPE inhibition assay and HA assay were used to evaluate the in vitro antiviral effects of FFYH against influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N9 and H9N2. Mice were used to evaluate the antiviral effect of FFYH in vivo with ribavirin and lianhuaqingwen as positive controls. RT-PCR was used to quantify the mRNA transcription of TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, IP10, and IL-1ß mRNA. ELISA was used to examine the expression of inflammatory factors such as TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, IP10, and IL-1ß in sera. The blood parameters were analyzed with auto hematology analyzer. Moreover, the potential mechanism of FFYH against influenza A virus in vivo was also investigated. RESULTS: FFYH showed a broad-spectrum of antiviral activity against H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 influenza A viruses. Furthermore, FFYH dose-dependently increased the survival rate, significantly prolonged the median survival time of mice, and markedly reduced lung injury caused by influenza A virus. Also, FFYH significantly improve the sick signs, food taken, weight loss, blood parameters, lung index, and lung pathological changes. Moreover, FFYH could markedly inhibit the inflammatory cytokine expression of TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, IP10, IL-10, and IL-1ß mRNA or protein via inhibition of the TLR7/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway in vivo. CONCLUSION: FFYH not only showed a broad-spectrum of anti-influenza virus activity in vitro, but also exhibited a significant protective effect against lethal influenza virus infection in vivo. Furthermore, our results indicated that the in vivo antiviral effect of FFYH against influenza virus may be attributed to suppressing the expression of inflammatory cytokines via regulating the TLR7/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings provide evidence for the clinical treatment of influenza A virus infection with FFYH.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Influenza A virus/drug effects , Lung/drug effects , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88/metabolism , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/drug therapy , Toll-Like Receptor 7/metabolism , A549 Cells , Animals , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Dogs , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Influenza A virus/pathogenicity , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Mice, Inbred ICR , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/metabolism , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Signal Transduction , Virus Replication/drug effects
16.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248007, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145483

ABSTRACT

More than 65 million people have been confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 and more than 1 million have died from COVID-19 and this pandemic remains critical worldwide. Effective vaccines are one of the most important strategies to limit the pandemic. Here, we report a construction strategy of DNA vaccine candidates expressing full length wild type SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein, S1 or S2 region and their immunogenicity in mice. All DNA vaccine constructs of pCMVkan-S, -S1 and -S2 induced high levels of specific binding IgG that showed a balance of IgG1/IgG2a response. However, only the sera from mice vaccinated with pCMKkan-S or -S1 DNA vaccines could inhibit viral RBD and ACE2 interaction. The highest neutralizing antibody (NAb) titer was found in pCMVkan-S group, followed by -S1, while -S2 showed the lowest PRNT50 titers. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) were 2,551, 1,005 and 291 for pCMVkan-S, -S1 and -S2, respectively. pCMVkan-S construct vaccine also induced the highest magnitude and breadth of T cells response. Analysis of IFN-γ positive cells after stimulation with SARS-CoV-2 spike peptide pools were 2,991, 1,376 and 1,885 SFC/106 splenocytes for pCMVkan-S, -S1 and -S2, respectively. Our findings highlighted that full-length S antigen is more potent than the truncated spike (S1 or S2) in inducing of neutralizing antibody and robust T cell responses.


Subject(s)
Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Th1 Cells/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Plasmids/genetics , Plasmids/metabolism , Protein Binding , Th1 Cells/cytology , Th1 Cells/metabolism , Vaccines, DNA/genetics
17.
Viruses ; 13(2)2021 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085036

ABSTRACT

Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb) is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) with an antipathogenic activity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that are ubiquitously expressed in cells. Endogenous miRNA may function as an innate response to block pathogen invasion. The miRNA expression profiles of both mice and humans after the ingestion of honeysuckle were obtained. Fifteen overexpressed miRNAs overlapped and were predicted to be capable of targeting three viruses: dengue virus (DENV), enterovirus 71 (EV71) and SARS-CoV-2. Among them, let-7a was examined to be capable of targeting the EV71 RNA genome by reporter assay and Western blotting. Moreover, honeysuckle-induced let-7a suppression of EV71 RNA and protein expression as well as viral replication were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that let-7a targeted EV71 at the predicted sequences using luciferase reporter plasmids as well as two infectious replicons (pMP4-y-5 and pTOPO-4643). The suppression of EV71 replication and viral load was demonstrated in two cell lines by luciferase activity, RT-PCR, real-time PCR, Western blotting and plaque assay. Furthermore, EV71-infected suckling mice fed honeysuckle extract or inoculated with let-7a showed decreased clinical scores and a prolonged survival time accompanied with decreased viral RNA, protein expression and virus titer. The ingestion of honeysuckle attenuates EV71 replication and related pathogenesis partially through the upregulation of let-7a expression both in vitro and in vivo. Our previous report and the current findings imply that both honeysuckle and upregulated let-7a can execute a suppressive function against the replication of DENV and EV71. Taken together, this evidence indicates that honeysuckle can induce the expression of let-7a and that this miRNA as well as 11 other miRNAs have great potential to prevent and suppress EV71 replication.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Enterovirus A, Human/drug effects , Lonicera/chemistry , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Cell Line , Enterovirus A, Human/physiology , Enterovirus Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR
18.
Cell Res ; 30(12): 1078-1087, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-912896

ABSTRACT

Silent hypoxia has emerged as a unique feature of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this study, we show that mucins are accumulated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of COVID-19 patients and are upregulated in the lungs of severe respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected mice and macaques. We find that induction of either interferon (IFN)-ß or IFN-γ upon SARS-CoV-2 infection results in activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling through an IDO-Kyn-dependent pathway, leading to transcriptional upregulation of the expression of mucins, both the secreted and membrane-bound, in alveolar epithelial cells. Consequently, accumulated alveolar mucus affects the blood-gas barrier, thus inducing hypoxia and diminishing lung capacity, which can be reversed by blocking AhR activity. These findings potentially explain the silent hypoxia formation in COVID-19 patients, and suggest a possible intervention strategy by targeting the AhR pathway.


Subject(s)
Interferons/metabolism , Mucus/metabolism , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Hypoxia , Interferon-beta/pharmacology , Interferon-gamma/pharmacology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Macaca , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Mice, Transgenic , Mucins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction , Up-Regulation/drug effects
19.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(44): 27141-27147, 2020 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-834980

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has highlighted the urgent need to rapidly develop therapeutic strategies for such emerging viruses without effective vaccines or drugs. Here, we report a decoy nanoparticle against COVID-19 through a powerful two-step neutralization approach: virus neutralization in the first step followed by cytokine neutralization in the second step. The nanodecoy, made by fusing cellular membrane nanovesicles derived from human monocytes and genetically engineered cells stably expressing angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2) receptors, possesses an antigenic exterior the same as source cells. By competing with host cells for virus binding, these nanodecoys effectively protect host cells from the infection of pseudoviruses and authentic SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, relying on abundant cytokine receptors on the surface, the nanodecoys efficiently bind and neutralize inflammatory cytokines including interleukin 6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and significantly suppress immune disorder and lung injury in an acute pneumonia mouse model. Our work presents a simple, safe, and robust antiviral nanotechnology for ongoing COVID-19 and future potential epidemics.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cytokines/antagonists & inhibitors , Nanoparticles/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cell Membrane/chemistry , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Monocytes , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Receptors, Cytokine/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , THP-1 Cells
20.
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol ; 404: 115182, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-694488

ABSTRACT

Due to the pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019, the use of disinfectants is rapidly increasing worldwide. Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) is an EPA-registered disinfectant, it was also a component in humidifier disinfectants that had caused idiopathic pulmonary diseases in Korea. In this study, we identified the possible pulmonary toxic response and mechanism using human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells and mice. First, cell viability decreased sharply at a 4 µg/mL of concentration. The volume of intracellular organelles and the ROS level reduced, leading to the formation of apoptotic bodies and an increase of the LDH release. Secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α) and matrix metalloproteinase-1 also significantly increased. More importantly, lamellar body-like structures were formed in both the cells and mice exposed to DDAC, and the expression of both the indicator proteins for lamellar body (ABCA3 and Rab11a) and surfactant proteins (A, B, and D) was clearly enhanced. In addition, chronic fibrotic pulmonary lesions were notably observed in mice instilled twice (weekly) with DDAC (500 µg), ultimately resulting in death. Taken together, we suggest that disruption of pulmonary surfactant homeostasis may contribute to DDAC-induced cell death and subsequent pathophysiology and that the formation of lamellar body-like structures may play a role as the trigger. In addition, we propose that the cause of sudden death of mice exposed to DDAC should be clearly elucidated for the safe application of DDAC.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quaternary Ammonium Compounds/toxicity , Animals , Apoptosis/drug effects , COVID-19 , Cell Line , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Quaternary Ammonium Compounds/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2
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