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1.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 7, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606287

ABSTRACT

Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in antibody genes. Protein expression and activity are tightly controlled by various mechanisms. However, it remains unknown whether a signal from the extracellular environment directly affects the AID activity in the nucleus where it works. Here, we demonstrated that a deubiquitinase USP10, which specifically stabilizes nuclear AID protein, can translocate into the nucleus after AKT-mediated phosphorylation at its T674 within the NLS domain. Interestingly, the signals from BCR and TLR1/2 synergistically promoted this phosphorylation. The deficiency of USP10 in B cells significantly decreased AID protein levels, subsequently reducing neutralizing antibody production after immunization with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nanoparticle vaccines. Collectively, we demonstrated that USP10 functions as an integrator for both BCR and TLR signals and directly regulates nuclear AID activity. Its manipulation could be used for the development of vaccines and adjuvants.


Subject(s)
AIDS Vaccines/immunology , B-Cell Activating Factor/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cytidine Deaminase/immunology , HIV-1/immunology , Nanoparticles , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/immunology , Ubiquitination/immunology , AIDS Vaccines/genetics , Animals , B-Cell Activating Factor/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Cytidine Deaminase/genetics , HEK293 Cells , HIV-1/genetics , Humans , Mice , Mice, Knockout , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Signal Transduction/genetics , Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/genetics
2.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24432, 2021 12 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585772

ABSTRACT

Despite the initial success of some drugs and vaccines targeting COVID-19, understanding the mechanism underlying SARS-CoV-2 disease pathogenesis remains crucial for the development of further approaches to treatment. Some patients with severe Covid-19 experience a cytokine storm and display evidence of inflammasome activation leading to increased levels of IL-1ß and IL-18; however, other reports have suggested reduced inflammatory responses to Sars-Cov-2. In this study we have examined the effects of the Sars-Cov-2 envelope (E) protein, a virulence factor in coronaviruses, on inflammasome activation and pulmonary inflammation. In cultured macrophages the E protein suppressed inflammasome priming and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Similarly, in mice transfected with E protein and treated with poly(I:C) to simulate the effects of viral RNA, the E protein, in an NLRP3-dependent fashion, reduced expression of pro-IL-1ß, levels of IL-1ß and IL-18 in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid, and macrophage infiltration in the lung. To simulate the effects of more advanced infection, macrophages were treated with both LPS and poly(I:C). In this setting the E protein increased NLRP3 inflammasome activation in both murine and human macrophages. Thus, the Sars-Cov-2 E protein may initially suppress the host NLRP3 inflammasome response to viral RNA while potentially increasing NLRP3 inflammasome responses in the later stages of infection. Targeting the Sars-Cov-2 E protein especially in the early stages of infection may represent a novel approach to Covid-19 therapy.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Humans , Inflammasomes/drug effects , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/deficiency , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , Poly I-C/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
3.
Gastroenterology ; 160(3): 925-928.e4, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575253
4.
Cell Rep ; 37(12): 110126, 2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556413

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have shown that the high mortality caused by viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and influenza virus primarily results from complications of a cytokine storm. Therefore, it is critical to identify the key factors participating in the cytokine storm. Here we demonstrate that interferon-induced protein 35 (IFP35) plays an important role in the cytokine storm induced by SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus infection. We find that the levels of serum IFP35 in individuals with SARS-CoV-2 correlates with severity of the syndrome. Using mouse model and cell assays, we show that IFP35 is released by lung epithelial cells and macrophages after SARS-CoV-2 or influenza virus infection. In addition, we show that administration of neutralizing antibodies against IFP35 considerably reduces lung injury and, thus, the mortality rate of mice exposed to viral infection. Our findings suggest that IFP35 serves as a biomarker and as a therapeutic target in virus-induced syndromes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/blood , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Influenza, Human/pathology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/metabolism , Macrophages/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17263, 2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550348

ABSTRACT

Dexamethasone (Dex) is a highly insoluble front-line drug used in cancer therapy. Data from clinical trials indicates that the pharmacokinetics of Dex vary considerably between patients and prolonging drug exposure rather than increasing absolute dose may improve efficacy. Non-toxic, fully biodegradable Dex loaded nanovectors (NV) were formulated, via simple direct hydration within 10 min, as a vehicle to extend exposure and distribution in vivo. Dex-NV were just as effective as the free drug against primary human leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, high levels of DMSO solvent were not required in the NV formulations. Broad distribution of NV was seen rapidly following inoculation into mice. NV accumulated in major organs, including bone marrow and brain, known sanctuary sites for ALL. The study describes a non-toxic, more easily scalable system for improving Dex solubility for use in cancer and can be applied to other medical conditions associated with inflammation.


Subject(s)
Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Nanostructures/chemistry , Polymers/chemistry , Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy , Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays/methods , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/pharmacokinetics , Child , Dexamethasone/chemistry , Dexamethasone/pharmacokinetics , Drug Liberation , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Mice, Inbred NOD , Mice, Knockout , Mice, SCID , Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/metabolism , Treatment Outcome , Tumor Cells, Cultured , Young Adult
6.
Immunity ; 54(11): 2632-2649.e6, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549842

ABSTRACT

The incidence and severity of sepsis is higher among individuals of African versus European ancestry. We found that genetic risk variants (RVs) in the trypanolytic factor apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1), present only in individuals of African ancestry, were associated with increased sepsis incidence and severity. Serum APOL1 levels correlated with sepsis and COVID-19 severity, and single-cell sequencing in human kidneys revealed high expression of APOL1 in endothelial cells. Analysis of mice with endothelial-specific expression of RV APOL1 and in vitro studies demonstrated that RV APOL1 interfered with mitophagy, leading to cytosolic release of mitochondrial DNA and activation of the inflammasome (NLRP3) and the cytosolic nucleotide sensing pathways (STING). Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of NLRP3 and STING protected mice from RV APOL1-induced permeability defects and proinflammatory endothelial changes in sepsis. Our studies identify the inflammasome and STING pathways as potential targets to reduce APOL1-associated health disparities in sepsis and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Apolipoprotein L1/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Sepsis/genetics , Animals , Apolipoprotein L1/blood , COVID-19/pathology , DNA, Mitochondrial/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/pathology , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Mitophagy/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Risk Factors , Sepsis/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , /statistics & numerical data
7.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258856, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542176

ABSTRACT

Hypoxia is a common pathway to the progression of end-stage kidney disease. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) encodes an RNA helicase that recognizes viruses including SARS-CoV2, which is responsible for the production of interferon (IFN)-α/ß to prevent the spread of viral infection. Recently, RIG-I activation was found under hypoxic conditions, and klotho deficiency was shown to intensify the activation of RIG-I in mouse brains. However, the roles of these functions in renal inflammation remain elusive. Here, for in vitro study, the expression of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß was examined in normal rat kidney (NRK)-52E cells incubated under hypoxic conditions (1% O2). Next, siRNA targeting RIG-I or scramble siRNA was transfected into NRK52E cells to examine the expression of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß under hypoxic conditions. We also investigated the expression levels of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß in 33 human kidney biopsy samples diagnosed with IgA nephropathy. For in vivo study, we induced renal hypoxia by clamping the renal artery for 10 min in wild-type mice (WT mice) and Klotho-knockout mice (Kl-/- mice). Incubation under hypoxic conditions increased the expression of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß in NRK52E cells. Their upregulation was inhibited in NRK52E cells transfected with siRNA targeting RIG-I. In patients with IgA nephropathy, immunohistochemical staining of renal biopsy samples revealed that the expression of RIG-I was correlated with that of IFN-α/ß (r = 0.57, P<0.001, and r = 0.81, P<0.001, respectively). The expression levels of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß were upregulated in kidneys of hypoxic WT mice and further upregulation was observed in hypoxic Kl-/- mice. These findings suggest that hypoxia induces the expression of IFN-α/ß through the upregulation of RIG-I, and that klotho deficiency intensifies this hypoxia-induced expression in kidneys.


Subject(s)
Glucuronidase/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Interferon-alpha/metabolism , Kidney/metabolism , RNA Helicases/metabolism , Up-Regulation , Animals , Glucuronidase/genetics , Hypoxia/genetics , Mice , Mice, Knockout , RNA, Small Interfering , Rats
8.
Nat Neurosci ; 24(11): 1522-1533, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500484

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can damage cerebral small vessels and cause neurological symptoms. Here we describe structural changes in cerebral small vessels of patients with COVID-19 and elucidate potential mechanisms underlying the vascular pathology. In brains of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected individuals and animal models, we found an increased number of empty basement membrane tubes, so-called string vessels representing remnants of lost capillaries. We obtained evidence that brain endothelial cells are infected and that the main protease of SARS-CoV-2 (Mpro) cleaves NEMO, the essential modulator of nuclear factor-κB. By ablating NEMO, Mpro induces the death of human brain endothelial cells and the occurrence of string vessels in mice. Deletion of receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIPK) 3, a mediator of regulated cell death, blocks the vessel rarefaction and disruption of the blood-brain barrier due to NEMO ablation. Importantly, a pharmacological inhibitor of RIPK signaling prevented the Mpro-induced microvascular pathology. Our data suggest RIPK as a potential therapeutic target to treat the neuropathology of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Microvessels/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain/pathology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/genetics , Cricetinae , Female , Humans , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics , Male , Mesocricetus , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mice, Transgenic , Microvessels/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells
9.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 99-114, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496673

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) is characterized by the alternative-pathway (AP) hyperactivation induced by nephritic factors or complement gene mutations. Mice deficient in complement factor H (CFH) are a classic C3G model, with kidney disease that requires several months to progress to renal failure. Novel C3G models can further contribute to understanding the mechanism behind this disease and developing therapeutic approaches. METHODS: A novel, rapidly progressing, severe, murine model of C3G was developed by replacing the mouse C3 gene with the human C3 homolog using VelociGene technology. Functional, histologic, molecular, and pharmacologic assays characterize the presentation of renal disease and enable useful pharmacologic interventions in the humanized C3 (C3hu/hu) mice. RESULTS: The C3hu/hu mice exhibit increased morbidity early in life and die by about 5-6 months of age. The C3hu/hu mice display elevated biomarkers of kidney dysfunction, glomerulosclerosis, C3/C5b-9 deposition, and reduced circulating C3 compared with wild-type mice. Administration of a C5-blocking mAb improved survival rate and offered functional and histopathologic benefits. Blockade of AP activation by anti-C3b or CFB mAbs also extended survival and preserved kidney function. CONCLUSIONS: The C3hu/hu mice are a useful model for C3G because they share many pathologic features consistent with the human disease. The C3G phenotype in C3hu/hu mice may originate from a dysregulated interaction of human C3 protein with multiple mouse complement proteins, leading to unregulated C3 activation via AP. The accelerated disease course in C3hu/hu mice may further enable preclinical studies to assess and validate new therapeutics for C3G.


Subject(s)
Complement C3/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Glomerulonephritis, Membranoproliferative/genetics , Kidney Diseases/genetics , Animals , Complement C3/metabolism , Complement Pathway, Alternative/genetics , Exons , Gene Expression Regulation , Glomerulonephritis, Membranoproliferative/metabolism , Humans , Kidney Diseases/metabolism , Liver/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Microscopy, Fluorescence , Phenotype , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Renal Insufficiency/genetics , Renal Insufficiency/metabolism
10.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 41-51, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496668

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mutations in PKD1 and PKD2, which encode the transmembrane proteins polycystin-1 and polycystin-2, respectively, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Polycystins are expressed in the primary cilium, and disrupting cilia structure significantly slows ADPKD progression following inactivation of polycystins. The cellular mechanisms of polycystin- and cilia-dependent cyst progression in ADPKD remain incompletely understood. METHODS: Unbiased transcriptional profiling in an adult-onset Pkd2 mouse model before cysts formed revealed significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in Pkd2 single-knockout kidneys, which were used to identify candidate pathways dysregulated in kidneys destined to form cysts. In vivo studies validated the role of the candidate pathway in the progression of ADPKD. Wild-type and Pkd2/Ift88 double-knockout mice that are protected from cyst growth served as controls. RESULTS: The RNASeq data identified cell proliferation as the most dysregulated pathway, with 15 of 241 DEGs related to cell cycle functions. Cdk1 appeared as a central component in this analysis. Cdk1 expression was similarly dysregulated in Pkd1 models of ADPKD, and conditional inactivation of Cdk1 with Pkd1 markedly improved the cystic phenotype and kidney function compared with inactivation of Pkd1 alone. The Pkd1/Cdk1 double knockout blocked cyst cell proliferation that otherwise accompanied Pkd1 inactivation alone. CONCLUSIONS: Dysregulation of Cdk1 is an early driver of cyst cell proliferation in ADPKD due to Pkd1 inactivation. Selective targeting of cyst cell proliferation is an effective means of slowing ADPKD progression caused by inactivation of Pkd1.


Subject(s)
CDC2 Protein Kinase/metabolism , Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant/genetics , Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant/metabolism , TRPP Cation Channels/metabolism , Animals , Apoptosis , CDC2 Protein Kinase/genetics , Catalytic Domain , Cell Proliferation , Crosses, Genetic , DNA Replication , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mutation , Phenotype , Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Acetyl-Transferring Kinase/genetics , RNA-Seq , TRPP Cation Channels/genetics , Transcription, Genetic , Whole Exome Sequencing
11.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(2): 357-374, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Injury to kidney podocytes often results in chronic glomerular disease and consecutive nephron malfunction. For most glomerular diseases, targeted therapies are lacking. Thus, it is important to identify novel signaling pathways contributing to glomerular disease. Neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 3 (TrkC) is expressed in podocytes and the protein transmits signals to the podocyte actin cytoskeleton. METHODS: Nephron-specific TrkC knockout (TrkC-KO) and nephron-specific TrkC-overexpressing (TrkC-OE) mice were generated to dissect the role of TrkC in nephron development and maintenance. RESULTS: Both TrkC-KO and TrkC-OE mice exhibited enlarged glomeruli, mesangial proliferation, basement membrane thickening, albuminuria, podocyte loss, and aspects of FSGS during aging. Igf1 receptor (Igf1R)-associated gene expression was dysregulated in TrkC-KO mouse glomeruli. Phosphoproteins associated with insulin, erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase (Erbb), and Toll-like receptor signaling were enriched in lysates of podocytes treated with the TrkC ligand neurotrophin-3 (Nt-3). Activation of TrkC by Nt-3 resulted in phosphorylation of the Igf1R on activating tyrosine residues in podocytes. Igf1R phosphorylation was increased in TrkC-OE mouse kidneys while it was decreased in TrkC-KO kidneys. Furthermore, TrkC expression was elevated in glomerular tissue of patients with diabetic kidney disease compared with control glomerular tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that TrkC is essential for maintaining glomerular integrity. Furthermore, TrkC modulates Igf-related signaling in podocytes.


Subject(s)
Kidney Diseases/metabolism , Nephrons/metabolism , Receptor, IGF Type 1/metabolism , Receptor, trkC/metabolism , Animals , Case-Control Studies , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Kidney Diseases/etiology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Podocytes/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology
12.
Immunology ; 164(3): 541-554, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488214

ABSTRACT

IL-33 and ATP are alarmins, which are released upon damage of cellular barriers or are actively secreted upon cell stress. Due to high-density expression of the IL-33 receptor T1/ST2 (IL-33R), and the ATP receptor P2X7, mast cells (MCs) are one of the first highly sensitive sentinels recognizing released IL-33 or ATP in damaged peripheral tissues. Whereas IL-33 induces the MyD88-dependent activation of the TAK1-IKK2-NF-κB signalling, ATP induces the Ca2+ -dependent activation of NFAT. Thereby, each signal alone only induces a moderate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lipid mediators (LMs). However, MCs, which simultaneously sense (co-sensing) IL-33 and ATP, display an enhanced and prolonged activation of the TAK1-IKK2-NF-κB signalling pathway. This resulted in a massive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and GM-CSF as well as of arachidonic acid-derived cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated pro-inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxanes (TXs), hallmarks of strong MC activation. Collectively, these data show that co-sensing of ATP and IL-33 results in hyperactivation of MCs, which resembles to MC activation induced by IgE-mediated crosslinking of the FcεRI. Therefore, the IL-33/IL-33R and/or the ATP/P2X7 signalling axis are attractive targets for therapeutical intervention of diseases associated with the loss of integrity of cellular barriers such as allergic and infectious respiratory reactions.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Hypersensitivity/immunology , Interleukin-33/metabolism , Mast Cells/immunology , Animals , Anti-Allergic Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Allergic Agents/therapeutic use , Cell Degranulation/drug effects , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Eicosanoids/metabolism , Humans , Hypersensitivity/drug therapy , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/metabolism , Interleukin-33/antagonists & inhibitors , Lipidomics , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Knockout , NFATC Transcription Factors/genetics , Primary Cell Culture , Receptors, Purinergic P2X7/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology
13.
J Virol ; 95(15): e0053021, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486507

ABSTRACT

Elicitation of lung tissue-resident memory CD8 T cells (TRMs) is a goal of T cell-based vaccines against respiratory viral pathogens, such as influenza A virus (IAV). C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-dependent monocyte trafficking plays an essential role in the establishment of CD8 TRMs in lungs of IAV-infected mice. Here, we used a combination adjuvant-based subunit vaccine strategy that evokes multifaceted (TC1/TC17/TH1/TH17) IAV nucleoprotein-specific lung TRMs to determine whether CCR2 and monocyte infiltration are essential for vaccine-induced TRM development and protective immunity to IAV in lungs. Following intranasal vaccination, neutrophils, monocytes, conventional dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived dendritic cells internalized and processed vaccine antigen in lungs. We found that basic leucine zipper ATF-like transcription factor 3 (BATF3)-dependent DCs were essential for eliciting T cell responses, but CCR2 deficiency enhanced the differentiation of CD127hi, KLRG-1lo, OX40+ve CD62L+ve, and mucosally imprinted CD69+ve CD103+ve effector and memory CD8 T cells in lungs and airways of vaccinated mice. Mechanistically, increased development of lung TRMs induced by CCR2 deficiency was linked to dampened expression of T-bet but not altered TCF-1 levels or T cell receptor signaling in CD8 T cells. T1/T17 functional programming, parenchymal localization of CD8/CD4 effector and memory T cells, recall T cell responses, and protective immunity to a lethal IAV infection were unaffected in CCR2-deficient mice. Taken together, we identified a negative regulatory role for CCR2 and monocyte trafficking in mucosal imprinting and differentiation of vaccine-induced TRMs. Mechanistic insights from this study may aid the development of T-cell-based vaccines against respiratory viral pathogens, including IAV and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). IMPORTANCE While antibody-based immunity to influenza A virus (IAV) is type and subtype specific, lung- and airway-resident memory T cells that recognize conserved epitopes in the internal viral proteins are known to provide heterosubtypic immunity. Hence, broadly protective IAV vaccines need to elicit robust T cell memory in the respiratory tract. We have developed a combination adjuvant-based IAV nucleoprotein vaccine that elicits strong CD4 and CD8 T cell memory in lungs and protects against H1N1 and H5N1 strains of IAV. In this study, we examined the mechanisms that control vaccine-induced protective memory T cells in the respiratory tract. We found that trafficking of monocytes into lungs might limit the development of antiviral lung-resident memory T cells following intranasal vaccination. These findings suggest that strategies that limit monocyte infiltration can potentiate vaccine-induced frontline T-cell immunity to respiratory viruses, such as IAV and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Immunity, Mucosal , Immunologic Memory , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Receptors, CCR2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , Animals , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/pharmacology , Lung/immunology , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Receptors, CCR2/genetics
14.
Nat Neurosci ; 24(11): 1522-1533, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483143

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can damage cerebral small vessels and cause neurological symptoms. Here we describe structural changes in cerebral small vessels of patients with COVID-19 and elucidate potential mechanisms underlying the vascular pathology. In brains of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected individuals and animal models, we found an increased number of empty basement membrane tubes, so-called string vessels representing remnants of lost capillaries. We obtained evidence that brain endothelial cells are infected and that the main protease of SARS-CoV-2 (Mpro) cleaves NEMO, the essential modulator of nuclear factor-κB. By ablating NEMO, Mpro induces the death of human brain endothelial cells and the occurrence of string vessels in mice. Deletion of receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIPK) 3, a mediator of regulated cell death, blocks the vessel rarefaction and disruption of the blood-brain barrier due to NEMO ablation. Importantly, a pharmacological inhibitor of RIPK signaling prevented the Mpro-induced microvascular pathology. Our data suggest RIPK as a potential therapeutic target to treat the neuropathology of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Microvessels/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain/pathology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/genetics , Cricetinae , Female , Humans , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics , Male , Mesocricetus , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mice, Transgenic , Microvessels/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells
16.
Antiviral Res ; 195: 105185, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458855

ABSTRACT

Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are emerging as safe and effective therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2. However, variant strains of SARS-CoV-2 have evolved, with early studies showing that some mAbs may not sustain their efficacy in the face of escape mutants. Also, from the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, concern has been raised about the potential for Fcγ receptor-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection. In this study, plaque reduction neutralization assays demonstrated that mAb 1741-LALA neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 strains B.1.351, D614 and D614G. MAbs S1D2-hIgG1 and S1D2-LALA mutant (STI-1499-LALA) did not neutralize B.1.351, but did neutralize SARS-CoV-2 strains D614 and D614G. LALA mutations did not result in substantial differences in neutralizing abilities between clones S1D2-hIgG1 vs STI-1499-LALA. S1D2-hIgG1, STI-1499-LALA, and convalescent plasma showed minimal ability to induce ADE in human blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Further, no differences in pharmacokinetic clearance of S1D2-hIgG1 vs STI-1499-LALA were observed in mice expressing human FcRn. These findings confirm that SARS-CoV-2 has already escaped some mAbs, and identify a mAb candidate that may neutralize multiple SARS-CoV-2 variants. They also suggest that risk of ADE in macrophages may be low with SARS-CoV-2 D614, and LALA Fc change impacts neither viral neutralization nor Ab clearance.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibody-Dependent Enhancement , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Macrophages/immunology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Neutralization Tests , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vero Cells
17.
Dis Model Mech ; 14(11)2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430507

ABSTRACT

Vascular permeability triggered by inflammation or ischemia promotes edema, exacerbates disease progression and impairs tissue recovery. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent inducer of vascular permeability. VEGF plays an integral role in regulating vascular barrier function physiologically and in pathologies, including cancer, stroke, cardiovascular disease, retinal conditions and COVID-19-associated pulmonary edema, sepsis and acute lung injury. Understanding temporal molecular regulation of VEGF-induced vascular permeability will facilitate developing therapeutics to inhibit vascular permeability, while preserving tissue-restorative angiogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that VEGF signals through signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) to promote vascular permeability. We show that genetic STAT3 ablation reduces vascular permeability in STAT3-deficient endothelium of mice and VEGF-inducible zebrafish crossed with CRISPR/Cas9-generated Stat3 knockout zebrafish. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression is transcriptionally regulated by STAT3, and VEGF-dependent STAT3 activation is regulated by JAK2. Pyrimethamine, an FDA-approved antimicrobial agent that inhibits STAT3-dependent transcription, substantially reduces VEGF-induced vascular permeability in zebrafish, mouse and human endothelium. Collectively, our findings suggest that VEGF/VEGFR-2/JAK2/STAT3 signaling regulates vascular barrier integrity, and inhibition of STAT3-dependent activity reduces VEGF-induced vascular permeability. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.


Subject(s)
Capillary Permeability , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , STAT3 Transcription Factor/genetics , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism , Animals , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Humans , Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/metabolism , Janus Kinase 2/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Phosphorylation , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Zebrafish
18.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5376, 2021 09 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402068

ABSTRACT

Natural killer (NK) cells are important early responders against viral infections. Changes in metabolism are crucial to fuel NK cell responses, and altered metabolism is linked to NK cell dysfunction in obesity and cancer. However, very little is known about the metabolic requirements of NK cells during acute retroviral infection and their importance for antiviral immunity. Here, using the Friend retrovirus mouse model, we show that following infection NK cells increase nutrient uptake, including amino acids and iron, and reprogram their metabolic machinery by increasing glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism. Specific deletion of the amino acid transporter Slc7a5 has only discrete effects on NK cells, but iron deficiency profoundly impaires NK cell antiviral functions, leading to increased viral loads. Our study thus shows the requirement of nutrients and metabolism for the antiviral activity of NK cells, and has important implications for viral infections associated with altered iron levels such as HIV and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Retroviridae Infections/immunology , Animals , Bone Marrow , COVID-19 , Cytokines , HIV , HIV Infections , Large Neutral Amino Acid-Transporter 1/genetics , Large Neutral Amino Acid-Transporter 1/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mitochondria , Retroviridae , Retroviridae Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load
20.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(34)2021 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345645

ABSTRACT

Alum, used as an adjuvant in injected vaccines, promotes T helper 2 (Th2) and serum antibody (Ab) responses. However, it fails to induce secretory immunoglobulin (Ig) A (SIgA) in mucosal tissues and is poor in inducing Th1 and cell-mediated immunity. Alum stimulates interleukin 1 (IL-1) and the recruitment of myeloid cells, including neutrophils. We investigated whether neutrophil elastase regulates the adjuvanticity of alum, and whether a strategy targeting neutrophil elastase could improve responses to injected vaccines. Mice coadministered a pharmacological inhibitor of elastase, or lacking elastase, developed high-affinity serum IgG and IgA antibodies after immunization with alum-adsorbed protein vaccines, including the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2). These mice also developed broader antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses, including high Th1 and T follicular helper (Tfh) responses. Interestingly, in the absence of elastase activity, mucosal SIgA responses were induced after systemic immunization with alum as adjuvant. Importantly, lack or suppression of elastase activity enhanced the magnitude of anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike subunit 1 (S1) antibodies, and these antibodies reacted with the same epitopes of spike 1 protein as sera from COVID-19 patients. Therefore, suppression of neutrophil elastase could represent an attractive strategy for improving the efficacy of alum-based injected vaccines for the induction of broad immunity, including mucosal immunity.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Alum Compounds/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Leukocyte Elastase/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunity, Mucosal/drug effects , Immunity, Mucosal/immunology , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Leukocyte Elastase/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Swine , Th1 Cells/immunology
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