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1.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1318: 549-573, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222734

ABSTRACT

The history of vaccine development spans centuries. At first, whole pathogens were used as vaccine agents, either inactivated or attenuated, to reduce virulence in humans. Safety and tolerability were increased by including only specific proteins as antigens and using cell culture methods, while novel vaccine strategies, like nucleic acid- or vector-based vaccines, hold high promise for the future. Vaccines have generally not been employed as the primary tools in outbreak response, but this might change since advances in medical technology in the last decades have made the concept of developing vaccines against novel pathogens a realistic strategy. Wandering the uncharted territory of a novel pathogen, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), we can learn from other human Betacoronaviridae that emerged in the last decades, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV. We can identify the most likely target structures of immunity, establish animal models that emulate human disease and immunity as closely as possible, and learn about complex mechanisms of immune interaction such as cross-reactivity or antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). However, significant knowledge gaps remain. What are the correlates of protection? How do we best induce immunity in vulnerable populations like the elderly? Will the immunity induced by vaccination (or by natural infection) wane over time? To date, at least 149 vaccine candidates against SARS-CoV-2 are under development. At the time of writing, at least 17 candidates have already progressed past preclinical studies (in vitro models and in vivo animal experiments) into clinical development. This chapter will provide an overview of this rapidly developing field.


Subject(s)
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Vaccines , Viral Vaccines , Aged , Animals , Humans
2.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1318: 293-313, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222720

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has posed a crucial hazard to global health. The new species share similarities with the two previously emerged entities: severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) that have caused outbreaks in 2002 and 2012, respectively. Interestingly, all of these coronaviruses can cause potentially fatal respiratory syndromes, though behave differently in patients with cancer compared to patients without cancer. Accordingly, the present chapter aims to, through a systematic investigation, estimate the prevalence of cancer among COVID-19, SARS, and MERS confirmed cases. Our analysis based on data from 78 studies with SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 confirmed cases showed that the prevalence of cancer (4.94%) stands at fourth place after hypertension (20.8%), diabetes (11.39%), and cardiovascular diseases (7.46%). According to the findings of the present study, comorbidities are significantly more common in patients with MERS compared to patients with COVID-19 and SARS, and this was the cancer case as well. Further studies need to address whether or not patients with coronaviruses and cancer are different from patients with coronaviruses without cancer in terms of clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, outcomes, and men to women ratio.


Subject(s)
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Neoplasms , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Female , Humans , Male , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology
3.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1318: 1-22, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222704

ABSTRACT

By driving the ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), coronaviruses have become a significant change in twenty-first-century medicine, healthcare systems, education, and the global economy. This chapter rapidly reviews the origin, immunopathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical manifestations, and potential therapeutics of COVID-19. It would also explore the effects of the introduction of a single virus, the so-called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), on the public health preparedness planning.


Subject(s)
Medicine , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Humans , Pandemics
4.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(4): e1009500, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197396

ABSTRACT

The high transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 is related to abundant replication in the upper airways, which is not observed for the other highly pathogenic coronaviruses SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. We here reveal features of the coronavirus spike (S) protein, which optimize the virus towards the human respiratory tract. First, the S proteins exhibit an intrinsic temperature preference, corresponding with the temperature of the upper or lower airways. Pseudoviruses bearing the SARS-CoV-2 spike (SARS-2-S) were more infectious when produced at 33°C instead of 37°C, a property shared with the S protein of HCoV-229E, a common cold coronavirus. In contrast, the S proteins of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV favored 37°C, in accordance with virus preference for the lower airways. Next, SARS-2-S-driven entry was efficiently activated by not only TMPRSS2, but also the TMPRSS13 protease, thus broadening the cell tropism of SARS-CoV-2. Both proteases proved relevant in the context of authentic virus replication. TMPRSS13 appeared an effective spike activator for the virulent coronaviruses but not the low pathogenic HCoV-229E virus. Activation of SARS-2-S by these surface proteases requires processing of the S1/S2 cleavage loop, in which both the furin recognition motif and extended loop length proved critical. Conversely, entry of loop deletion mutants is significantly increased in cathepsin-rich cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the D614G mutation increases SARS-CoV-2 stability, particularly at 37°C, and, enhances its use of the cathepsin L pathway. This indicates a link between S protein stability and usage of this alternative route for virus entry. Since these spike properties may promote virus spread, they potentially explain why the spike-G614 variant has replaced the early D614 variant to become globally predominant. Collectively, our findings reveal adaptive mechanisms whereby the coronavirus spike protein is adjusted to match the temperature and protease conditions of the airways, to enhance virus transmission and pathology.


Subject(s)
/metabolism , Respiratory System/metabolism , Respiratory System/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , /transmission , Coronavirus 229E, Human/metabolism , Furin/metabolism , Humans , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Peptide Hydrolases/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Temperature , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication/physiology
5.
J Med Virol ; 93(5): 2722-2734, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196526

ABSTRACT

The 21st century has witnessed three outbreaks of coronavirus (CoVs) infections caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by SARS-CoV-2, spreads rapidly and since the discovery of the first COVID-19 infection in December 2019, has caused 1.2 million deaths worldwide and 226,777 deaths in the United States alone. The high amino acid similarity between SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins supports testing therapeutic molecules that were designed to treat SARS infections during the 2003 epidemic. In this review, we provide information on possible COVID-19 treatment strategies that act via inhibition of the two essential proteins of the virus, 3C-like protease (3CLpro ) or papain-like protease (PLpro ).


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , /drug effects , /epidemiology , /drug effects , /chemistry , /genetics , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , /metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
6.
BMC Res Notes ; 14(1): 150, 2021 Apr 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195930

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this study we compare the amino acid and codon sequence of SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV using different statistics programs to understand their characteristics. Specifically, we are interested in how differences in the amino acid and codon sequence can lead to different incubation periods and outbreak periods. Our initial question was to compare SARS-CoV-2 to different viruses in the coronavirus family using BLAST program of NCBI and machine learning algorithms. RESULTS: The result of experiments using BLAST, Apriori and Decision Tree has shown that SARS-CoV-2 had high similarity with SARS-CoV while having comparably low similarity with MERS-CoV. We decided to compare the codons of SARS-CoV-2 and MERS-CoV to see the difference. Though the viruses are very alike according to BLAST and Apriori experiments, SVM proved that they can be effectively classified using non-linear kernels. Decision Tree experiment proved several remarkable properties of SARS-CoV-2 amino acid sequence that cannot be found in MERS-CoV amino acid sequence. The consequential purpose of this paper is to minimize the damage on humanity from SARS-CoV-2. Hence, further studies can be focused on the comparison of SARS-CoV-2 virus with other viruses that also can be transmitted during latent periods.


Subject(s)
Data Mining , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , SARS Virus , Algorithms , Amino Acid Sequence , Base Sequence , Humans , Machine Learning , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , SARS Virus/genetics , /genetics
7.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e96, 2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1182771

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is pandemic. Prevention and control strategies require an improved understanding of SARS-CoV-2 dynamics. We did a rapid review of the literature on SARS-CoV-2 viral dynamics with a focus on infective dose. We sought comparisons of SARS-CoV-2 with other respiratory viruses including SARS-CoV-1 and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. We examined laboratory animal and human studies. The literature on infective dose, transmission and routes of exposure was limited specially in humans, and varying endpoints were used for measurement of infection. Despite variability in animal studies, there was some evidence that increased dose at exposure correlated with higher viral load clinically, and severe symptoms. Higher viral load measures did not reflect coronavirus disease 2019 severity. Aerosol transmission seemed to raise the risk of more severe respiratory complications in animals. An accurate quantitative estimate of the infective dose of SARS-CoV-2 in humans is not currently feasible and needs further research. Our review suggests that it is small, perhaps about 100 particles. Further work is also required on the relationship between routes of transmission, infective dose, co-infection and outcomes.


Subject(s)
/transmission , Viral Load , Adenoviridae/pathogenicity , Animals , /prevention & control , Chlorocebus aethiops , Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cricetinae , Enterovirus/pathogenicity , Ferrets , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Orthomyxoviridae/pathogenicity , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/pathogenicity , Rhinovirus/pathogenicity , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/transmission , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/transmission , Virus Diseases/virology
8.
J Prev Med Public Health ; 54(2): 86-95, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181670

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study investigated associations between perceptions of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in workers at hospitals designated to treat COVID-19, as well as the difference in the magnitude of these associations by occupational type and previous Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) experience. METHODS: The participants were workers at hospitals designated to treat COVID-19 who completed a questionnaire about their perceptions related to COVID-19, work experience during the previous MERS-CoV outbreak, and symptoms of PTSD ascertained by the PTSD Checklist for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Participants' characteristics were compared using the chi-square test. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate the associations between perceptions and the prevalence of PTSD, stratified by occupational type and previous MERS-CoV experience. RESULTS: Non-medical personnel showed stronger associations with PTSD than medical personnel according to general fear (odds ratio [OR], 6.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92 to 23.20), shortages of supplies (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.56), and issue-specific fear (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.59). Those with prior MERS-CoV quarantine experience were more prone to PTSD than those without such experience in terms of general fear (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.22 to 2.37), shortages of supplies (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.40), and issue-specific fear (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.38). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, non-medical personnel tended to have higher odds of being categorized as having PTSD. Workers with prior MERS-CoV experience were more susceptible than those without such experience. These findings suggest the need for timely interventions to manage human resources for a sustainable quarantine system.


Subject(s)
/complications , Health Personnel , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Perception , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Occupations , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
9.
Mol Ther ; 29(3): 1174-1185, 2021 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-985497

ABSTRACT

Self-amplifying RNA (saRNA) is a cutting-edge platform for both nucleic acid vaccines and therapeutics. saRNA is self-adjuvanting, as it activates types I and III interferon (IFN), which enhances the immunogenicity of RNA vaccines but can also lead to inhibition of translation. In this study, we screened a library of saRNA constructs with cis-encoded innate inhibiting proteins (IIPs) and determined the effect on protein expression and immunogenicity. We observed that the PIV-5 V and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) ORF4a proteins enhance protein expression 100- to 500-fold in vitro in IFN-competent HeLa and MRC5 cells. We found that the MERS-CoV ORF4a protein partially abates dose nonlinearity in vivo, and that ruxolitinib, a potent Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) inhibitor, but not the IIPs, enhances protein expression of saRNA in vivo. Both the PIV-5 V and MERS-CoV ORF4a proteins were found to enhance the percentage of resident cells in human skin explants expressing saRNA and completely rescued dose nonlinearity of saRNA. Finally, we observed that the MERS-CoV ORF4a increased the rabies virus (RABV)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and neutralization half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) by ∼10-fold in rabbits, but not in mice or rats. These experiments provide a proof of concept that IIPs can be directly encoded into saRNA vectors and effectively abate the nonlinear dose dependency and enhance immunogenicity.


Subject(s)
Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/pharmacology , Viral Envelope Proteins/administration & dosage , Animals , Cell Line , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/drug effects , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/immunology , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/pathogenicity , Fibroblasts , Gene Expression Regulation , HeLa Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/biosynthesis , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/immunology , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology , Parainfluenza Virus 5/drug effects , Parainfluenza Virus 5/immunology , Parainfluenza Virus 5/pathogenicity , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Rabbits , Rabies virus/drug effects , Rabies virus/immunology , Rabies virus/pathogenicity , Rats , STAT Transcription Factors/antagonists & inhibitors , STAT Transcription Factors/genetics , STAT Transcription Factors/immunology , Signal Transduction , Vaccines, Synthetic/biosynthesis , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology
10.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 727-732, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169498

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) with droplets and contact as the main means of transmission. Since the first case appeared in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, the outbreak has gradually spread nationwide. Up to now, according to official data released by the Chinese health commission, the number of newly diagnosed patients has been declining, and the epidemic is gradually being controlled. Although most patients have mild symptoms and good prognosis after infection, some patients developed severe and die from multiple organ complications. The pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection in humans remains unclear. Immune function is a strong defense against invasive pathogens and there is currently no specific antiviral drug against the virus. This article reviews the immunological changes of coronaviruses like SARS, MERS and other viral pneumonia similar to SARS-CoV-2. Combined with the published literature, the potential pathogenesis of COVID-19 is inferred, and the treatment recommendations for giving high-doses intravenous immunoglobulin and low-molecular-weight heparin anticoagulant therapy to severe type patients are proposed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human/immunology , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS Virus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
11.
Clin Chem ; 67(4): 672-683, 2021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165392

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infectious disease outbreaks such as the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic call for rapid response and complete screening of the suspected community population to identify potential carriers of pathogens. Central laboratories rely on time-consuming sample collection methods that are rarely available in resource-limited settings. METHODS: We present a highly automated and fully integrated mobile laboratory for fast deployment in response to infectious disease outbreaks. The mobile laboratory was equipped with a 6-axis robot arm for automated oropharyngeal swab specimen collection; virus in the collected specimen was inactivated rapidly using an infrared heating module. Nucleic acid extraction and nested isothermal amplification were performed by a "sample in, answer out" laboratory-on-a-chip system, and the result was automatically reported by the onboard information platform. Each module was evaluated using pseudovirus or clinical samples. RESULTS: The mobile laboratory was stand-alone and self-sustaining and capable of on-site specimen collection, inactivation, analysis, and reporting. The automated sampling robot arm achieved sampling efficiency comparable to manual collection. The collected samples were inactivated in as short as 12 min with efficiency comparable to a water bath without damage to nucleic acid integrity. The limit of detection of the integrated microfluidic nucleic acid analyzer reached 150 copies/mL within 45 min. Clinical evaluation of the onboard microfluidic nucleic acid analyzer demonstrated good consistency with reverse transcription quantitative PCR with a κ coefficient of 0.979. CONCLUSIONS: The mobile laboratory provides a promising solution for fast deployment of medical diagnostic resources at critical junctions of infectious disease outbreaks and facilitates local containment of SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) transmission.


Subject(s)
/methods , Laboratories , Mobile Health Units , Pathology, Molecular/methods , RNA, Viral/analysis , Adult , Automobiles , /instrumentation , Female , Humans , Lab-On-A-Chip Devices , Male , Microfluidic Analytical Techniques/instrumentation , Microfluidic Analytical Techniques/methods , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/chemistry , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/instrumentation , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/methods , Pandemics , Pathology, Molecular/instrumentation , Robotics , /chemistry
12.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(16)2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165017

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses are adept at evading host antiviral pathways induced by viral double-stranded RNA, including interferon (IFN) signaling, oligoadenylate synthetase-ribonuclease L (OAS-RNase L), and protein kinase R (PKR). While dysregulated or inadequate IFN responses have been associated with severe coronavirus infection, the extent to which the recently emerged SARS-CoV-2 activates or antagonizes these pathways is relatively unknown. We found that SARS-CoV-2 infects patient-derived nasal epithelial cells, present at the initial site of infection; induced pluripotent stem cell-derived alveolar type 2 cells (iAT2), the major cell type infected in the lung; and cardiomyocytes (iCM), consistent with cardiovascular consequences of COVID-19 disease. Robust activation of IFN or OAS-RNase L is not observed in these cell types, whereas PKR activation is evident in iAT2 and iCM. In SARS-CoV-2-infected Calu-3 and A549ACE2 lung-derived cell lines, IFN induction remains relatively weak; however, activation of OAS-RNase L and PKR is observed. This is in contrast to Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, which effectively inhibits IFN signaling and OAS-RNase L and PKR pathways, but is similar to mutant MERS-CoV lacking innate immune antagonists. Remarkably, OAS-RNase L and PKR are activated in MAVS knockout A549ACE2 cells, demonstrating that SARS-CoV-2 can induce these host antiviral pathways despite minimal IFN production. Moreover, increased replication and cytopathic effect in RNASEL knockout A549ACE2 cells implicates OAS-RNase L in restricting SARS-CoV-2. Finally, while SARS-CoV-2 fails to antagonize these host defense pathways, which contrasts with other coronaviruses, the IFN signaling response is generally weak. These host-virus interactions may contribute to the unique pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Immunity, Innate , Lung/pathology , Myocytes, Cardiac/immunology , Myocytes, Cardiac/virology , RNA, Double-Stranded/metabolism , /immunology , A549 Cells , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Nose/virology , Virus Replication , eIF-2 Kinase
13.
Cell Rep ; 35(1): 108940, 2021 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157178

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has currently precipitated the COVID-19 global health crisis. We developed a medium-throughput drug-screening system and identified a small-molecule library of 34 of 430 protein kinase inhibitors that were capable of inhibiting the SARS-CoV-2 cytopathic effect in human epithelial cells. These drug inhibitors are in various stages of clinical trials. We detected key proteins involved in cellular signaling pathways mTOR-PI3K-AKT, ABL-BCR/MAPK, and DNA-damage response that are critical for SARS-CoV-2 infection. A drug-protein interaction-based secondary screen confirmed compounds, such as the ATR kinase inhibitor berzosertib and torin2 with anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity. Berzosertib exhibited potent antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2 in multiple cell types and blocked replication at the post-entry step. Berzosertib inhibited replication of SARS-CoV-1 and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) as well. Our study highlights key promising kinase inhibitors to constrain coronavirus replication as a host-directed therapy in the treatment of COVID-19 and beyond as well as provides an important mechanism of host-pathogen interactions.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , DNA Damage , Isoxazoles/pharmacology , Pyrazines/pharmacology , Virus Replication/drug effects , A549 Cells , Animals , /pathology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells
14.
Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 37(1): 69-76, 2021 Feb.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156216

ABSTRACT

Abstract: In the past, coronavirus caused two serious human-to-human pandemics in the world, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). In late 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused another major global public health event. Due to the strong infectivity of novel coronavirus, it is difficult to carry out the autopsy of related death cases widely. This paper reviews the previous status of the pathogen detection related to the autopsy of coronavirus infection diseases, and introduces the ongoing detection methods of novel coronavirus in clinical practice, in order to provide reference for the pathogen detection and study related to autopsy of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases , Coronavirus Infections , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Autopsy , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Humans
15.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(4)2021 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154450

ABSTRACT

In the last two decades, three unknown pathogens have caused outbreaks, generating severe global health concerns. In 2003, after nucleic acid genotyping, a new virus was named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). After nine years, another coronavirus emerged in the middle east and was named MERS-CoV (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus). Finally, in December 2019, a new unknown coronavirus was isolated from a cluster of patients and was named SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19, coronavirus disease 2019). This review aims to propose a complete overview of autopsy in the three coronaviruses over the past two decades, showing its pivotal role in the management of unknown diseases. A total of 116 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria: 14 studies were collected concerning SARS-CoV (87 autopsy reports, from Asian and American countries), 2 studies for MERS-CoV (2 autopsy reports, from Middle-East Asian countries), and 100 studies on SARS-CoV-2 (930 autopsy reports). Analyzing the data obtained on COVID-19, based on the country criterion, a large number of post-mortem investigation were performed in European countries (580 reports), followed by American countries (251 reports). It is interesting to note that no data were found from the Oceanic countries, maybe because of the minor involvement of the outbreak. In all cases, autopsy provided much information about each unknown coronavirus. Despite advanced technologies in the diagnostic fields, to date, autopsy remains the gold standard method to understand the biological features and the pathogenesis of unknown infections, especially when awareness of a pathogen is restricted and the impact on the healthcare system is substantial. The knowledge gained through this technique may positively influence therapeutic strategies, ultimately reducing mortality.


Subject(s)
/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Autopsy , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , SARS Virus
16.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(4): 1015-1022, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150678

ABSTRACT

The ongoing global pandemic caused by coronavirus disease has once again demonstrated the role of the family Coronaviridae in causing human disease outbreaks. Because severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 was first detected in December 2019, information on its tropism, host range, and clinical manifestations in animals is limited. Given the limited information, data from other coronaviruses might be useful for informing scientific inquiry, risk assessment, and decision-making. We reviewed endemic and emerging infections of alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses in wildlife, livestock, and companion animals and provide information on the receptor use, known hosts, and clinical signs associated with each host for 15 coronaviruses detected in humans and animals. This information can be used to guide implementation of a One Health approach that involves human health, animal health, environmental, and other relevant partners in developing strategies for preparedness, response, and control to current and future coronavirus disease threats.


Subject(s)
Coronaviridae/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Disease Reservoirs/veterinary , Zoonoses/virology , Alphacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Animals , Animals, Wild , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Host Specificity , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Pandemics , Zoonoses/epidemiology
17.
J Evid Based Integr Med ; 26: 2515690X211003727, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150290

ABSTRACT

Currently, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a big challenge to the healthcare systems in the world. Several researchers in the world have immediately carried out clinical investigations for the discovery of vaccines and drugs. Different studies have shown that antiviral measures including small bioactive compounds targeting multifaceted molecular communications take in COVID-19 infection. The drug development archived in this review emphasizes mainly on drugs that are effective for the Management of MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV, and other RNA viruses. The investigation of therapeutic agents for COVID-19 includes anti-inflammatory agents, antibodies, and nucleic acid-based treatments targeting virus gene expression as well as different sorts of vaccines. Numerous patents revealed techniques of these biologics with the potential for treating and preventing coronavirus infections, which may apply to COVID-19. Phase 3 clinical trials such as Sputnik V, AZD1222, mRNA-1273, BNT162b2, Ad5-nCoV, Anti-COVID antibodies, Kevzara; Actemra, Jakafi; Baricitinib, and some others were undergoing in the race for Covid-19 treatment. However, there's still a lack of a review on vaccines and drugs for COVID-19 management. Therefore, this review summarizes different studies that are ongoing in the race for Covid-19 protection and treatment.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Viral Vaccines , Antibodies, Viral , /prevention & control , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , SARS Virus
18.
PLoS Biol ; 19(3): e3001128, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145480

ABSTRACT

The scientific community is focused on developing antiviral therapies to mitigate the impacts of the ongoing novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. This will be facilitated by improved understanding of viral dynamics within infected hosts. Here, using a mathematical model in combination with published viral load data, we compare within-host viral dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 with analogous dynamics of MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV. Our quantitative analyses using a mathematical model revealed that the within-host reproduction number at symptom onset of SARS-CoV-2 was statistically significantly larger than that of MERS-CoV and similar to that of SARS-CoV. In addition, the time from symptom onset to the viral load peak for SARS-CoV-2 infection was shorter than those of MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV. These findings suggest the difficulty of controlling SARS-CoV-2 infection by antivirals. We further used the viral dynamics model to predict the efficacy of potential antiviral drugs that have different modes of action. The efficacy was measured by the reduction in the viral load area under the curve (AUC). Our results indicate that therapies that block de novo infection or virus production are likely to be effective if and only if initiated before the viral load peak (which appears 2-3 days after symptom onset), but therapies that promote cytotoxicity of infected cells are likely to have effects with less sensitivity to the timing of treatment initiation. Furthermore, combining a therapy that promotes cytotoxicity and one that blocks de novo infection or virus production synergistically reduces the AUC with early treatment. Our unique modeling approach provides insights into the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 and may be useful for development of antiviral therapies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , /virology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Models, Biological , SARS Virus/physiology , Viral Load/drug effects
19.
J Immunol ; 205(6): 1564-1579, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-694818

ABSTRACT

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a highly pathogenic human coronavirus causing severe disease and mortality. MERS-CoV infection failed to elicit robust IFN response, suggesting that the virus might have evolved strategies to evade host innate immune surveillance. In this study, we identified and characterized type I IFN antagonism of MERS-CoV open reading frame (ORF) 8b accessory protein. ORF8b was abundantly expressed in MERS-CoV-infected Huh-7 cells. When ectopically expressed, ORF8b inhibited IRF3-mediated IFN-ß expression induced by Sendai virus and poly(I:C). ORF8b was found to act at a step upstream of IRF3 to impede the interaction between IRF3 kinase IKKε and chaperone protein HSP70, which is required for the activation of IKKε and IRF3. An infection study using recombinant wild-type and ORF8b-deficient MERS-CoV further confirmed the suppressive role of ORF8b in type I IFN induction and its disruption of the colocalization of HSP70 with IKKε. Ectopic expression of HSP70 relieved suppression of IFN-ß expression by ORF8b in an IKKε-dependent manner. Enhancement of IFN-ß induction in cells infected with ORF8b-deficient virus was erased when HSP70 was depleted. Taken together, HSP70 chaperone is important for IKKε activation, and MERS-CoV ORF8b suppresses type I IFN expression by competing with IKKε for interaction with HSP70.


Subject(s)
Enzyme Activation/immunology , I-kappa B Kinase/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Viral Proteins/immunology , Betacoronavirus , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/immunology , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism , Humans , I-kappa B Kinase/metabolism , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Viral Proteins/metabolism
20.
Front Immunol ; 12: 629193, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140644

ABSTRACT

Hyper-induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, also known as a cytokine storm or cytokine release syndrome (CRS), is one of the key aspects of the currently ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. This process occurs when a large number of innate and adaptive immune cells activate and start producing pro-inflammatory cytokines, establishing an exacerbated feedback loop of inflammation. It is one of the factors contributing to the mortality observed with coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) for a subgroup of patients. CRS is not unique to the SARS-CoV-2 infection; it was prevalent in most of the major human coronavirus and influenza A subtype outbreaks of the past two decades (H5N1, SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and H7N9). With a comprehensive literature search, we collected changing the cytokine levels from patients upon infection with the viral pathogens mentioned above. We analyzed published patient data to highlight the conserved and unique cytokine responses caused by these viruses. Our curation indicates that the cytokine response induced by SARS-CoV-2 is different compared to other CRS-causing respiratory viruses, as SARS-CoV-2 does not always induce specific cytokines like other coronaviruses or influenza do, such as IL-2, IL-10, IL-4, or IL-5. Comparing the collated cytokine responses caused by the analyzed viruses highlights a SARS-CoV-2-specific dysregulation of the type-I interferon (IFN) response and its downstream cytokine signatures. The map of responses gathered in this study could help specialists identify interventions that alleviate CRS in different diseases and evaluate whether they could be used in the COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , SARS Virus/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , /blood , /virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/virology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/blood , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology
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