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1.
J Spec Oper Med ; 23(2): 70-72, 2023 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237091

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is the virus responsible for the disease that is known as COVID-19. While there have been numerous studies detailing the survival rates of SARS-CoV-2 on various materials, there are currently no published data regarding whether this virus is stable on standard military uniforms. Consequently, there are no standard operating procedures for washing uniforms once exposed to the virus. This study aimed to determine whether SARS-CoV-2 could be removed from Army combat uniform material by washing with a commercially available detergent and tap water. Washing the fabric with detergent followed by a rinse step with tap water effectively removes detectable viral particles. Importantly, it was found that washing with hot water alone was not effective. Therefore, it is recommended that military personnel wash their uniforms with detergent and water as soon as possible after exposure to SARS-CoV-2; hot water should not be used as a substitute for detergent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Detergents/therapeutic use , Water
2.
Sci Total Environ ; 892: 164509, 2023 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327761

ABSTRACT

As the World slowly emerged from the then-ongoing pandemic, War broke out in Europe with the invasion of Ukraine by Russia. The enduring military conflict in Ukraine has had sweeping consequences at the human, social, economic, and environmental levels, not only for the nations involved but across Europe and globally. Damaged infrastructures, severe disruption of economic activity, and forced migration have led to negative impacts on sustainability. The COVID-19 pandemic has added another layer of complexity to this already challenging situation, as the virus has further disrupted economic activity and strained healthcare systems. Herein, we examine how the intersection of war and COVID-19 affect the United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. How these intersecting challenges have impacted efforts to build a more sustainable future, and how these impacts have a global reach are also assessed. The broader implications of this case for understanding the linkages between conflict, pandemics, and sustainability more generally are also considered, relating these with the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Agenda for 2030.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Humans , Ukraine/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Europe
4.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 76Suppl 1(Suppl 1): e20220498, 2023.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312097

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of the educational program based on self-regulation of learning in the level of knowledge about COVID-19 in the soldiers. METHODS: Pre-experimental study with a pre-test and post-test design with a single group, carried out in 2020. 179 soldiers from Puno, Peru participated. Two expository-participatory sessions and a demonstrative workshop were developed. A valid (Aiken's V = 0.69) and reliable (McDonald's Omega = 0.81) questionnaire was used. The Friedman's test was used to compare the results pre and post-test. RESULTS: The level of knowledge about COVID-19 and in two of its dimensions changed from poor (pre-test) to regular (post-test). However, in the preventive measures dimension, it changed from poor (pre-test) to excellent (post-test). CONCLUSION: The proposed educational intervention was effective in increasing knowledge about COVID-19 in the soldiers, mainly in terms of preventive measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Self-Control , Humans , Peru , Learning
5.
Health Secur ; 20(4): 339-347, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2309296

ABSTRACT

The definitive care component of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) may not be able to effectively manage tens of thousands of casualties resulting from a catastrophic disaster incident or overseas conflict. To address this potential national security threat, Congress authorized the US Secretary of Defense to conduct the NDMS Pilot Program to improve the interoperability, special capabilities, and patient capacity of the NDMS. The pilot's first phase was the Military-Civilian NDMS Interoperability Study, designed to identify broad themes to direct further NDMS research. Researchers conducted a series of facilitated discussions with 49 key NDMS federal and civilian (private sector) stakeholders to identify and assess weaknesses and opportunities for improving the NDMS. After qualitative analysis, 6 critical themes emerged: (1) coordination, collaboration, and communication between federal and private sector NDMS partners; (2) funding and incentives for improved surge capacity and preparedness for NDMS partners; (3) staffing capacity and competencies for government and private NDMS partners; (4) surge capacity, especially at private sector healthcare facilities; (5) training, education, and exercises and knowledge sharing between federal and private sector NDMS partners; and (6) metrics, benchmarks, and modeling for NDMS partners to track their NDMS-related capabilities and performance. These findings provide a roadmap for federal-level changes and additional operations research to strengthen the NDMS definitive care system, particularly in the areas of policy and legislation, operational coordination, and funding.


Subject(s)
Disaster Planning , Disasters , Military Personnel , Carbolines , Communication , Disaster Planning/methods , Humans
6.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 691, 2023 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305112

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, increased workload and stress could have increased mental health problems (anxiety and depression) in military personnel. However, the number of studies in military members is scarce, especially in regard to mental health. The objective of this study was determine the prevalence and factors associated with depression and anxiety in Peruvian military personnel. METHODS: We undertook an analytical cross-sectional study. The survey was distributed face to face between November 02 and 09, 2021, during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic among the military personnel. We used some instruments to measure depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder, GAD-7), insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index, ISI), food insecurity (Household Food Insecurity Access Scale, HFIAS), physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaires, IPAQ-S), resilience (abbreviated CD-RISC), and fear of COVID-19 scale. The exclusion criteria included those who did not completely fill out the evaluation instruments. RESULTS: We analyzed the data of 615 military personnel that participated in the survey. Of them, 93.7% were male and the median age was 22 years old. There was a prevalence of 29.9% and 22.0% in regard to depression and anxiety symptoms, respectively. In addition, it was found that being married (PR: 0.63; 95% IC: 0.42-0.94), having a relative with mental health problems (PR: 2.16), having experienced food insecurity (PR: 1.48), insomnia (PR: 2.71), fear of COVID-19 (PR: 1.48), and a high level of resilience (PR: 0.65) were factors associated with depression. In regard to anxiety, the factors associated were working for more than 18 months since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic (PR: 0.52), a high level of resilience (PR: 0.50; 95% IC: 0.33-0.77), insomnia (PR: 3.32), fear of COVID-19 (PR: 2.43). CONCLUSION: We found a prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety of 29.9% and 22.0%, respectively. In regard to the factors that attenuate depression, we can mention being married and having resilience; and among the aggravating factors, having a relative with mental health problems, food insecurity, insomnia, and fear of COVID-19. Finally, anxiety increased through working time, insomnia, and fear of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Adult , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Peru/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology
8.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e354, 2023 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278891

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, mass vaccination centers became an essential element of the public health response. This drive-through mass vaccination operation was conducted in a rural, medically underserved area of the United States, employing a civilian-military partnership. Operations were conducted without traditional electronic medical record systems or Internet at the point of vaccination. Nevertheless, the mass vaccination center (MVC) achieved throughput of 500 vaccinations per hour (7200 vaccinations in 2 days), which is comparable with the performance of other models in more ideal conditions. Here, the study describes the minimum necessary resources and operational practicalities in detail required to implement a successful mass vaccination event. This has significant implications for the generalizability of our model to other rural, underserved, and international settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Mass Vaccination , Medically Underserved Area , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2277056

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Poland is witnessing a migration crisis caused by the ongoing military conflict in Ukraine. In addition to housing and necessities, 1.8 million Ukrainians that had taken refuge in Poland must have access to medical care. We aim to propose a strategy for implementing the changes in the Polish health care system in response to the Ukrainian refugee crisis. METHODS: A literature review on organizational changes in the functioning of health care systems during the migration crises worldwide in recent years and brainstorming in order to develop a strategy for implementing changes in the Polish health care system in response to the Ukrainian refugee crisis. RESULTS: The proposed strategy for implementing the changes in the Polish health care system is based on building health care resilience and adaptation to different crises. The operational objectives of organization-related activities are: (1) preparation of medical facilities to provide help for refugees, (2) development and implementation of the communication system, (3) implementation of available digital solutions, (4) organization of the diagnostic and medical services, (5) and implementation of changes in the management of medical facilities. CONCLUSIONS: Urgent reorganization is required to respond to an unavoidable increase in the demand for health care services.


Subject(s)
Military Personnel , Refugees , Humans , Poland , Ukraine , Delivery of Health Care
10.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(7): 2153536, 2022 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276110

ABSTRACT

To increase Soldiers' access to HPV vaccination, we evaluated the feasibility and sustainability of a nurse-led intervention to integrate HPV vaccination into medical processing procedures for Soldiers. We partnered with nursing staff to introduce HPV vaccine into existing vaccination services at a nurse-led clinic that serves Soldiers at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. In addition to stocking the vaccine, the intervention included training nursing staff (n = 11) strategies for recommending HPV vaccination for Soldiers ages 18-26. We conducted surveys of nursing staff to assess their perspectives on feasibility. Nursing staff tracked HPV vaccine uptake among Soldiers for 4 weeks post-training to assess adoption and again for 2 weeks at 4-month follow-up to assess sustainability. We assessed delivery cost as the cost of personnel time, vaccine doses, and other materials during the initial 4-week intervention period. Nursing staff agreed that recommending HPV vaccination fit in with medical processing procedures (mean = 4.6 of 5.0). Of the 516 Soldiers offered HPV vaccine in the 4 weeks following the training, 198 (38%) accepted and received the vaccine. Soldier ages 18-20 more often accepted HPV vaccination than older Soldier ages 21-26 (46% versus 32%, p < .01). Vaccine uptake was similar at follow-up, with 98 of 230 eligible Soldiers (43%) receiving HPV vaccine. The total delivery cost was $12,737, with an average cost per vaccine dose delivered of $64. Our findings suggest that training nursing staff to recommend and administer HPV vaccinations to Soldiers is feasible and warrants wider-scale testing as a strategy to protect soldiers from HPV-attributable cancers.


HPV vaccination is not required for US military service, and Soldiers' uptake is low. We trained nursing staff at a large military clinic to recommend HPV vaccine to Soldiers using a nursing education intervention to integrate HPV vaccination into routine care for active duty Soldiers. Our findings suggest that training nursing staff to recommend and administer HPV vaccines to Soldiers is feasible and low cost, and may warrant wider-scale testing as a strategy for increasing military readiness and protecting Soldiers from HPV-attributable cancers. Until guideline and policy changes are implemented and HPV vaccine is required for military service, use of education strategies is one path to increasing HPV vaccine coverage among Soldiers to ensure protection from HPV-related diseases.


Subject(s)
Military Personnel , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Feasibility Studies , Nurse's Role , Vaccination/methods
11.
BMC Med Ethics ; 24(1): 21, 2023 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2252824

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The field of personal health monitoring (PHM) develops rapidly in different contexts, including the armed forces. Understanding the ethical dimension of this type of monitoring is key to a morally responsible development, implementation and usage of PHM within the armed forces. Research on the ethics of PHM has primarily been carried out in civilian settings, while the ethical dimension of PHM in the armed forces remains understudied. Yet, PHM of military personnel by design takes place in a different setting than PHM of civilians, because of their tasks and the context in which they operate. This case study therefore focusses on obtaining insights into the experiences and related values of different stakeholders regarding an existing form of PHM, the Covid-19 Radar app, in the Netherlands Armed Forces. METHODS: We carried out an exploratory qualitative study, using semi-structured interviews with twelve stakeholders in the Netherlands Armed Forces. We focussed on participation in the use of PHM, reflections on the practical use and use of data, moral dilemmas and the need for ethics support, all in regard to PHM. The data was analysed using an inductive thematic approach. RESULTS: Three interlinking categories reflecting ethical dimensions of PHM emerged: (1) values, (2) moral dilemmas, and (3) external norms. The main values identified were: security (in relation to data), trust and hierarchy. Multiple related values were found. Some, but no broadly shared, moral dilemmas were identified and no strong need for ethics support was expressed. CONCLUSION: This study shed light on key values, provide insights in the experienced and presumed moral dilemmas and bring to mind ethics support considerations when looking at PHM in the armed forces. Some values bring a certain vulnerability to military users when personal and organisational interests are not aligned. Furthermore, some identified values may hinder a careful consideration of PHM because they potentially conceal parts of ethical dimensions of PHM. Ethics support can assist in uncovering and addressing these concealed parts. The findings highlight a moral responsibility for the armed forces to devote attention to the ethical dimensions of PHM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Humans , Netherlands , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Morals
12.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 80(6): 577-584, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2259247

ABSTRACT

Importance: Concerns have been raised since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic that vulnerable populations, such as military veterans, may be at increased risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs). Objective: To examine longitudinal trends in STBs in US military veterans during the first 3 years of the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study is a population-based longitudinal study including US military veterans that used 3 surveys from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study. Median dates of data collection were November 21, 2019 (prepandemic); November 14, 2020; and August 18, 2022. Main Outcomes and Measures: Lifetime and past-year suicidal ideation, suicide planning, and suicide attempt. Results: In this longitudinal study including 2441 veterans (mean [SD] age, 63.2 years [14.0]; 2182 [92.1%] male), past-year suicidal ideation decreased from 9.3% prepandemic (95% CI, 8.2%-10.6%) to 6.8% a year later (95% CI%, 5.8-7.9%) and then slightly increased to 7.7% (95% CI, 6.7%-8.9%) 2 years later. In total, 9 veterans (0.4%) reported attempting suicide at least once during the follow-up period, while 100 (3.8%) developed new-onset suicidal ideation and 28 (1.2%) developed new-onset suicide planning. After adjusting for sociodemographic and military characteristics, factors strongly associated with new-onset suicidal ideation included higher education (odds ratio [OR], 3.27; 95% CI, 1.95-5.46), lifetime substance use disorder (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.23-3.46), prepandemic loneliness (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.09-1.49), and lower prepandemic purpose in life (OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.86-0.97). Factors associated with new-onset suicide planning included lifetime substance use disorder (OR, 3.03; 95% CI, 1.22-7.55), higher prepandemic psychiatric distress (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.06-2.18), and lower prepandemic purpose in life (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95). Conclusions and Relevance: Contrary to expectations, the prevalence of STBs did not increase for most US veterans during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, veterans with preexisting loneliness, psychiatric distress, and lower purpose in life were at heightened risk of developing new-onset suicidal ideation and suicide planning during the pandemic. Evidence-based prevention and intervention efforts that target these factors may help mitigate suicide risk in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Substance-Related Disorders , Veterans , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Female , Suicidal Ideation , Veterans/psychology , Pandemics , Cohort Studies , Longitudinal Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Military Personnel/psychology , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Risk Factors
13.
J Infect Dis ; 228(2): 149-159, 2023 Jul 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2282978

ABSTRACT

Omicron and its subvariants have steadily gained greater capability of immune escape compared to other variants of concern, resulting in an increased incidence of reinfections even among vaccinated individuals. We evaluated the antibody response to Omicron BA.1, BA.2, and BA.4/5 in US military members vaccinated with the primary 2-dose series of Moderna mRNA-1273 in a cross-sectional study. While nearly all vaccinated participants had sustained spike (S) IgG and neutralizing antibodies (ND50) to the ancestral strain, only 7.7% participants had detectable ND50 to Omicron BA.1 at 8 months postvaccination. The neutralizing antibody response to BA.2 and BA.5 was similarly reduced. The reduced antibody neutralization of Omicron correlated with the decreased antibody binding to the receptor-binding domain. The participants' seropositivity to the nuclear protein positively correlated with ND50. Our data emphasizes the need for continuous vigilance in monitoring for emerging variants and the need to identify potential alternative targets for vaccine design.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Humans , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , Antibody Formation , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral
14.
MSMR ; 30(1): 11-18, 2023 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2282612

ABSTRACT

This study evaluated trends in the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and diabetes among active component service members between 2018 and 2021, before and after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study also investigated the incidence of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) diagnoses during the same period. Between 2018 and 2021, the prevalence of obesity among active component service members who completed a Periodic Health Assessment (PHA) increased from 16.1% to 18.8%. The incidence of prediabetes increased from 588.2 to 763.8 cases per 100,000 person-years (p-yrs), and the incidence of T2DM increased from 55.5 to 69.6 per 100,000 p-yrs. The largest relative increases in obesity prevalence were in the youngest (<30 years) age categories. Navy members and Hispanic service members experienced the largest absolute and relative increases in rates of new diabetes diagnoses. These findings indicate that during the COVID-19 pandemic active component service members experienced increased prevalence of obesity, prediabetes, and diabetes. Evaluation of lifestyle factors associated with these chronic diseases among service members may be useful to enhance deployment readiness and operational effectiveness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Military Personnel , Prediabetic State , Humans , Overweight/epidemiology , Prediabetic State/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Incidence , Pandemics , Prevalence , COVID-19/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology
15.
Mil Med ; 188(Suppl 1): 15-23, 2023 03 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2270262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The U.S. Military Health System (MHS) pioneered the use of telehealth in deployed environments in the early 1990s. However, its use in non-deployed environments historically lagged behind that of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and comparable large civilian health systems, due to administrative, policy, and other obstacles that slowed or blocked its expansion in the MHS. A report was prepared in December 2016, which summarized past and then-present telehealth initiatives in the MHS; described the obstacles, opportunities, and policy environment; and provided three possible courses of action for expansion of telehealth in deployed and non-deployed settings. METHODS: Gray literature, peer-reviewed literature, presentations, and direct input were aggregated under the guidance of subject matter experts. RESULTS: Past and then-current efforts demonstrated significant telehealth capability in use and in development for the MHS, mainly in deployed or operational settings. Policy from 2011 to 2017 demonstrated an environment favorable for MHS expansion, while the review of comparable civilian and veterans' healthcare systems showed significant benefits including increased access and lower cost from use of telehealth in non-deployed settings. The 2017 National Defense Authorization Act charged the Secretary of Defense with promoting telehealth usage for the Department of Defense, including provisions for removing obstacles and reporting progress within 3 years. The MHS has the ability to reduce burdensome interstate licensing and privileging requirements, but still requires an increased level of cybersecurity, compared to civilian systems. DISCUSSION: The benefits of telehealth fit with the MHS Quadruple Aim of improving cost, quality, access, and readiness. Readiness is particularly served by the use of "physician extenders," which allows nurses, physician assistants, medics, and corpsmen to provide hands-on care under remote oversight and to practice at the top of their licenses. Based on this review, three courses of action were recommended: to focus largely on developing telehealth in deployed environments; to maintain focus in deployed environments and increase telehealth development in non-deployed environments to keep pace with the VHA and private sector; or to use lessons learned from military and civilian telehealth initiatives to leapfrog the private sector. CONCLUSION: This review serves as a snapshot in time of the steps leading to telehealth expansion before 2017, which helped to set the stage for later use of telehealth in behavioral health initiatives and as a response to coronavirus disease 2019. The lessons learned are ongoing and further research is expected to inform additional development of telehealth capability for the MHS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Health Services , Military Personnel , Telemedicine , United States , Humans , Hand
16.
Int Marit Health ; 73(4): 178-180, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2263842

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Follow-up of patients who had coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) proves that clinical symptoms persist for months after recovery. A complex of such persistent manifestations is defined as the post-COVID-19 syndrome. One of the criteria for post-COVID-19 syndrome may be typical changes in white blood cell count and white blood cell (WBC) differential. The aim of the work is to study the frequency of haematological changes in sailors who had the acute coronavirus infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The retrospective study covered 30 candidate sailors aged 21 to 60 years with a history of COVID-19 and persistent changes in the WBC count and WBC differential and who did not have haematological abnormalities during the previous medical examinations. RESULTS: Analysis of WBC and WBC count at the long-term period after COVID-19 confirmed persistent changes in the form of neutrophilia, lymphopenia, changes in the neutrophils and lymphocytes ratio. The revealed changes in the WBC count were typical and fit into several patterns: A. Absolute leukocytosis, absolute and relative neutrophilia, relative lymphopenia; B. Relative and absolute lymphopenia, relative neutrophilia; C. Relative and absolute lymphocytosis, relative neutropenia; D. Relative lymphopenia, without other changes in WBC differential. CONCLUSIONS: The most typical laboratory change in WBC count in patients with the past COVID-19 is relative or absolute leukopenia. Persistent changes in WBC count are not always outside of the reference range for absolute values and should be assessed by a complex of typical changes. The presence of typical changes in WBC count in a patient with the past COVID-19 requires a profound examination for the post-COVID-19 syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphopenia , Military Personnel , Humans , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Retrospective Studies , Leukocytosis/diagnosis
17.
Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis ; 90-91: 101905, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266717

ABSTRACT

Domestic cats are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and can transmit the virus to other felines. A high number of COVID-19 human cases within the military personnel and a high density of stray cats living close to soldiers raised the need to perform active animal surveillance. We validated a novel quantitative serological microarray for use in cats, that enables simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM responses; in addition, molecular genetic SARS-CoV-2 detection was performed. Three out of 131 cats analyzed, showed IgG antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 RBD and S2P (2.3 %). None of cats were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by RT-PCR. SARS-CoV-2 infection rate in soldiers ranged from 4.7 % to 16 % (average rate=8.9 %). Further investigations on a larger cohort are necessary, in the light of the emerging new viral variants in other animal species and in humans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Military Personnel , Cats , Humans , Animals , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/veterinary , RNA, Viral/genetics , Israel/epidemiology , Military Facilities , Immunoglobulin G , Antibodies, Viral , Cat Diseases/epidemiology
18.
Mil Med ; 187(9-10): e1043-e1046, 2022 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258147

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The treatment of severe and life-threatening COVID-19 is a rapidly evolving practice. The purpose of our study was to describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients with severe or life-threatening COVID-19 who present to a Military Treatment Facility (MTF) with an emphasis on addressing institutional adaptations to rapidly changing medical evidence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A single-center retrospective study conducted on a prospectively maintained cohort. The MTF is a 52-bed hospital within an urban setting. Patients were included in the cohort if they had laboratory-confirmed severe or life-threatening COVID-19 with positive SARS-CoV-2 reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Severe disease was defined as dyspnea, respiratory frequency ≥30/min, blood oxygen saturation ≤93% on ambient air, partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen ratio <300, or lung infiltrates involving >50% of lung fields within 24-48 hours. Life-threatening COVID-19 was defined as respiratory failure, septic shock, or multiple organ dysfunction. The cohort included patients admitted from June 1 through November 13. Data were collected retrospectively via chart review by a resident physician. RESULTS: In total, our MTF saw 14 cases of severe or life-threatening COVID-19 from June 1 to November 13. Patients had a median age of 70.5 years, with 7% being active duty personnel, 21% dependents, and 71% retired military members. The median time to dexamethasone, remdesivir, and convalescent plasma administration was 4.7, 6.3, and 11.2 hours, respectively. The 28-day in-hospital mortality was 0%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients who present to an MTF with severe or life-threatening COVID-19 are largely retirees, with only a small fraction comprising active duty personnel. The institution of order sets and early consultation can help facilitate prompt patient care for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Oxygen , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 Serotherapy
19.
J Health Commun ; 27(2): 134-139, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2251539

ABSTRACT

Strong emotional responses of health-care professionals to the unusual stress of providing care during the COVID-19 pandemic may be consistent with the experience of moral injury. This term, originally used to explain the feelings of guilt, shame, and righteous anger resulting from trauma experienced by US soldiers who felt betrayed by their leaders in combat, has recently been applied to the experiences of health-care workers who know the right thing to do but lack the autonomy, latitude, or authority to do it. Ancient Greek tragedy, which often explores stories about moral challenges, can provide a fruitful context for communicating about this kind of traumatic experience. Sophocles' Philoctetes is particularly relevant for health care since it describes the psychological pain of a would-be caregiver who is ordered by a superior to deny care to someone suffering with chronic pain, providing a clear example of betrayal through failed leadership and lack of authority to do the right thing. A more detailed reading of Sophocles' Philoctetes demonstrates that it also describes the kind of moral distress that results from being forced to respond to an unsolvable ethical dilemma when there is no clear right thing to do or when doing the right thing requires violating personal moral values.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Military Personnel/psychology , Morals , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
20.
MSMR ; 30(1): 19-25, 2023 Jan 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2273339

ABSTRACT

From 2017 through 2021, a total of 2,454 active component U.S. military service members received incident diagnoses for 1 of the following eating disorders: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), or "other/unspecified eating disorder" (OUED). The incidence rate of any eating disorder was 3.6 cases per 10,000 person-years (p-yrs). The case defining diagnoses OUED, BN, and BED accounted for nearly 89% of total incident cases. The incidence rate of any eating disorder among women was more than 8 times the rate among men. Overall rates were highest among service members under 30 years of age. Crude annual incidence rates of total eating disorders increased in 2021, following the COVID-19 pandemic. Increased prevalence of major life stressors and mental health conditions were reported on Periodic Health Assessment (PHA) forms completed in the 1-year period after an eating disorder diagnosis. These data suggest the need for increased attention to eating disorder prevention. Additionally, treatment programs could be warranted as continued effects of the COVID-19 pandemic are elucidated within the military population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Military Personnel , Male , Female , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology
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