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1.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 68(5): 632-635, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855103

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is an economic, social, and health challenge. During the coronavirus disease 2019 lockdown, a telematics platform for respiratory physiotherapy and mindfulness was created, aiming to reduce dyspnea and anxiety and to increase quality of life in post-coronavirus disease 2019 patient. METHODS: A quasi-experimental study was performed on post-coronavirus disease 2019 patients, with breathing exercises and mindfulness with remote supervision by a respiratory physiotherapist. Dyspnea on exertion (Mahler Scale), quality of life (EuroQol-5D score), and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire) were measured before and after the rehabilitation program. RESULTS: A total of 20 subjects completed the program, with a significant decrease in the measures of dyspnea on exertion (p<0.001), state anxiety (p=0.004), and trait anxiety (p=0.001) and a significant increase in quality of life (p=0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Coronavirus disease 2019 should be treated using a multidisciplinary approach that includes respiratory rehabilitation. At present, there are few studies on respiratory rehabilitation and mindfulness in post-coronavirus disease 2019 patients. The results of this study showed that the implementation of breathing exercises and mindfulness with remote supervision was effective in decreasing dyspnea and anxiety and in increasing quality of life in post-coronavirus disease 2019 patients during confinement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Anxiety/therapy , Breathing Exercises/methods , Communicable Disease Control , Dyspnea/therapy , Humans , Quality of Life
2.
Creat Nurs ; 28(2): 109-114, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833854

ABSTRACT

Nursing education to prepare students for practice traditionally includes teaching knowledge and developing clinical judgment in the physical classroom, laboratory, and clinical setting. The Covid-19 pandemic presented challenges previously unseen in academia. An abrupt shift to online learning was associated with higher levels of stress and anxiety. In response, the faculty at a mid-sized, rural, four-year private university in the Midwest incorporated mindfulness and resilience practices into courses to promote coping mechanisms for use throughout nursing school and in future practice, and surveyed students to determine the degree to which they used the mindfulness and resilience strategies provided. This article describes the implementation of the strategies, survey results, and lessons learned to inform use in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e058686, 2022 04 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822073

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Existing studies have shown that mobile-based mindfulness meditation (MMM) can have a certain impact on nurses' mental health problems, but its specific effect and the effect on specific mental health problems such as stress, anxiety, depression, mindfulness, well-being and resilience are not clear. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study protocol follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols guidelines. Electronic search through PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, Embase and three Chinese databases namely CNKI, Wan Fang and Chinese Biology Medicine disc. The inclusion criteria follow the PICO principle, which is defined translate the question into a searchable and answerable question . P (patient/population): clinical characteristics of patients; I (intervention or exposure): treatment measures or exposure factors of concern; C (comparison): control measure.; O (outcome): outcome indicator of concern. Registered nurses, preregistered nurses, midwives and nursing students will all be included, studies using MMM as intervention to improve mental health of nurses, compared with waitlist controls or traditional methods groups, outcomes assessment of stress, anxiety, depression, mindfulness, well-being and resilience will meet the inclusion criteria. Studies designed randomised controlled trails (RCTs) of quasiexperimental and written in English or Chinese will be eligible. Search time was from inception of each database to July 2022. Two reviewers screen and assess studies for inclusion and extract data independently; any dispute will be settled through discussion. If the discussion still fails, the third author will make a decision. For RCT, risk of bias will be assessed using Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomised trials (RoB 2), and for non-RCT studies, risk of bias in non-randomised studies of interventions (ROBINS-I) tool will be performed. Meta-analysis will be performed using RevMan software if sufficient number of comparable studies are retrieved. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This is a study protocol of meta-analysis; no primary data will be collected, and no ethics assessment is required. The study results will be presented in a peer-reviewed scientific publication. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021277932.


Subject(s)
Meditation , Mindfulness , Humans , Mental Health , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Mindfulness/methods , Systematic Reviews as Topic
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820255

ABSTRACT

During the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic in Taiwan, 6.5% of Generation Y required medical treatment for emotional and stress-related mental disorders. This study explores the moderating effect of mindfulness training on psychological needs and emotions to propose effective measures to promote the mental health of Generation Y. This study was carried out by questionnaire, using the data of respondents born in 1980-1999, collected in three different periods for quantitative analysis with compassionate mindfulness as the main variable. The results show that the compassionate mindfulness effect on emotion regulation varies greatly among different educational levels. However, it still plays a positive role in the psychological needs of Generation Y. Most members of Generation Y who receive compassionate mindfulness training have fewer basic needs and more interpersonal trust. They pay more attention to individual-oriented self-realization. Compassionate mindfulness has a greater positive moderating effect on the mental health of women aged 30-39 and those who are highly educated. Compassionate mindfulness has a more positive moderating effect on the psychological needs of members of Generation Y who were born more recently. During the COVID-19 pandemic, providing compassionate mindfulness has a significant positive effect on the prevention of mental disorders of Generation Y in Taiwan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Taiwan/epidemiology
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1818126

ABSTRACT

This paper investigates the relationship between mindfulness and well-being within the context of compliance with prophylactic measures in the time of COVID-19. We conducted a large-scale survey among a representative sample of the French population. We measured mindfulness, using the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, and the extent to which respondents were impacted by COVID-19 in terms of their mood and quality of sleep, as well as how they complied with prophylactic measures. Our results suggest that more mindful individuals were less negatively impacted by COVID-19 with regard to their sleep and mood. Concerning the prophylactic measures, we obtained mixed results: more mindful participants were more likely to respect lockdowns, physical distancing and to cough in their sleeves, but did not wash their hands, wear masks or avoid touching their face more often than less mindful individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Masks , Pandemics/prevention & control
7.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(1): 148-156, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1811930

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Past studies provide crucial evidence that pregnancy and childbirth increase the risk of emotional vulnerability and instability. Current research intends to explore the role of early maladaptive schemas and mindfulness as determinants of postpartum depression for expecting mothers during COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: The data was collected from 170 expecting mothers who conceived and gave birth during the COVID-19 pandemic. Edinburgh postnatal depression scale, the young schema questionnaire-SF 75 items, and the Kentucky inventory for mindfulness scale were administered. RESULTS: Results discovered that mindfulness partially mediated the relationship between three kinds of early maladaptive schemas and postpartum depression. CONCLUSION: Mindfulness-based control techniques can be considered to buffer the impact of the early maladaptive schemas on postpartum depression, for mothers who give birth during any challenging time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression, Postpartum , Mindfulness , Adaptation, Psychological , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy
8.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 6483, 2022 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799563

ABSTRACT

Mindfulness interventions were shown to be effective in improving well-being and reducing perceived stress in several conditions. These effects were also found in online mindfulness-based training, especially in employees in organizational environments. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of an online mindfulness intervention on healthy employees, especially after the first Italian Covid-19 lockdown. Participants in the intervention group underwent an 8-week mindfulness online training program based on the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) protocol compared to a control (no-intervention) group. All participants filled in weekly surveys for the whole intervention duration via online questionnaires to measure their habits, mindfulness (FFMQ-15), emotion regulation (ERQ), positive and negative affect (PANAS), depression, anxiety and stress (DASS-21), resilience (RSA) and insomnia (ISI). 69 participants in the intervention group and 63 in the no-treatment control group were considered in the longitudinal analyses. We found significant differences between the intervention and control groups over time in the measures of mindfulness (in particular the nonreactivity subscale), positive affect, depression, and insomnia. Moreover, we found that the frequency of practice and ease perceived in practicing were positively correlated to several indices of well-being (mindfulness, positive affect, cognitive reappraisal) and negatively correlated to several indices of stress (negative affect, depression, anxiety, stress, insomnia, expressive suppression). These results show the importance and effectiveness of online mindfulness training programs to cope with stress among employees, especially after the Covid-19 lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internet-Based Intervention , Mindfulness , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/psychology , Humans , Mindfulness/methods , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Stress, Psychological/therapy
9.
Am J Health Promot ; 34(8): 929-941, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794234

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This systematic review focused on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with physicians and nurses that tested interventions designed to improve their mental health, well-being, physical health, and lifestyle behaviors. DATA SOURCE: A systematic search of electronic databases from 2008 to May 2018 included PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, and the Cochrane Library. STUDY INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria included an RCT design, samples of physicians and/or nurses, and publication year 2008 or later with outcomes targeting mental health, well-being/resiliency, healthy lifestyle behaviors, and/or physical health. Exclusion criteria included studies with a focus on burnout without measures of mood, resiliency, mindfulness, or stress; primary focus on an area other than health promotion; and non-English papers. DATA EXTRACTION: Quantitative and qualitative data were extracted from each study by 2 independent researchers using a standardized template created in Covidence. DATA SYNTHESIS: Although meta-analytic pooling across all studies was desired, a wide array of outcome measures made quantitative pooling unsuitable. Therefore, effect sizes were calculated and a mini meta-analysis was completed. RESULTS: Twenty-nine studies (N = 2708 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Results indicated that mindfulness and cognitive-behavioral therapy-based interventions are effective in reducing stress, anxiety, and depression. Brief interventions that incorporate deep breathing and gratitude may be beneficial. Visual triggers, pedometers, and health coaching with texting increased physical activity. CONCLUSION: Healthcare systems must promote the health and well-being of physicians and nurses with evidence-based interventions to improve population health and enhance the quality and safety of the care that is delivered.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Nurses , Physicians , Humans , Life Style , Mental Health
10.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 36(3): 156-165, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795010

ABSTRACT

Infectious diseases cause psychological problems for health care workers and especially nurses. Nurses who provided coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) patients with care experience negative feelings such as stress, work-related strain, discomfort, and helplessness related to their high-intensity work. The aims of this study are to investigate the effect of the mindfulness-based breathing and music therapy practice on stress, work-related strain, and psychological well-being levels of nurses who provided COVID-19 patients with care. This randomized controlled trial was conducted in a COVID-19 department at a university hospital in Turkey. Nurses who care for patients infected with COVID-19 were randomly divided into an intervention group (n = 52) and a no-treatment control group (n = 52). The intervention group received mindfulness-based breathing and music therapy. In data collection, the Personal Information Form, State Anxiety Inventory, Work-Related Strain Scale, and Psychological Well-Being Scale were used. The data from the study showed that mindfulness-based breathing and music therapy decreased stress and work-related strain (P < .05) and increased psychological well-being (P < .05). The control group showed no statistically significant changes on these measures (P > .05). The mindfulness-based breathing and music therapy practice reduced nurses' stress and work-related strain and increased psychological well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Music Therapy , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Anxiety/therapy , Humans , Occupational Stress/therapy , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Stress, Psychological/therapy
11.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(7)2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785896

ABSTRACT

Neuroticism has recently received increased attention in the psychology field due to the finding of high implications of neuroticism on an individual's life and broader public health. This study aims to investigate the effect of a brief 6-week breathing-based mindfulness intervention (BMI) on undergraduate neurotic students' emotion regulation. We acquired data of their psychological states, physiological changes, and electroencephalogram (EEG), before and after BMI, in resting states and tasks. Through behavioral analysis, we found the students' anxiety and stress levels significantly reduced after BMI, with p-values of 0.013 and 0.027, respectively. Furthermore, a significant difference between students in emotion regulation strategy, that is, suppression, was also shown. The EEG analysis demonstrated significant differences between students before and after MI in resting states and tasks. Fp1 and O2 channels were identified as the most significant channels in evaluating the effect of BMI. The potential of these channels for classifying (single-channel-based) before and after BMI conditions during eyes-opened and eyes-closed baseline trials were displayed by a good performance in terms of accuracy (~77%), sensitivity (76-80%), specificity (73-77%), and area-under-the-curve (AUC) (0.66-0.8) obtained by k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms. Mindfulness can thus improve the self-regulation of the emotional state of neurotic students based on the psychometric and electrophysiological analyses conducted in this study.


Subject(s)
Emotional Regulation , Mindfulness , Brain , Emotions/physiology , Humans , Students/psychology
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785640

ABSTRACT

This study intended to explore which leisure preferences contribute to mindfulness, psychological capital, and life satisfaction and assess whether mindfulness, psychological capital, and life satisfaction are associated with different leisure preferences. This study applied the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ-12), the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), and the instrument to evaluate the prevalence of leisure preferences. A sample consisted of 586 participants, 104 males and 478 females. The mean age of participants was 42.06, SD = 13.29. The results show that respondents who did not spend free time watching television scored higher on life satisfaction, mindfulness, and psychological capital. Participants who preferred attending events scored higher on life satisfaction and psychological capital. Participants who preferred spending time with family as a leisure preference scored significantly higher on life satisfaction, mindfulness, and psychological capital, including PsyCap overall, PsyCap work, PsyCap relationship, and PsyCap health. The findings also reveal that time spent with family is significantly associated with life satisfaction. Besides, males' life satisfaction was significantly associated with time spent in nature, while females' satisfaction was associated with spending time with family and participating in events. Males' mindfulness was significantly associated with book reading, and females' mindfulness was associated with not watching television. Males' psychological capital was significantly associated with spending time with family and book reading, and females' psychological capital was associated with not watching television but spending time with family, participating in events, and spending time in nature. The findings also showed that mindfulness mediated the link between watching television and life satisfaction, and psychological capital mediated links between spending time with family, participating in events, and life satisfaction. The findings demonstrate that life satisfaction is also significantly associated with spending time with family as a leisure preference. This study also revealed a significant negative association between age and spending time with friends or family, evidencing the possible loneliness of elderly respondents. Due to limitations of this study, including sample size and characteristics, cultural context, and research design, the research findings would preferably be regarded thoughtfully.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Leisure Activities , Male , Personal Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Percept Mot Skills ; 129(3): 670-695, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784973

ABSTRACT

Promoting athlete wellbeing has become a priority in elite sport, and the COVID-19 pandemic has accentuated the need for a comprehensive understanding of risk and protective factors. Existing sport research has not yet considered whether specific cognitive factors such as dispositional mindfulness and executive function may protect athletes against psychological distress. In a sample of high-performance Australian football athletes (n = 27), we administered measures of dispositional mindfulness (MAAS), executive function (AOSPAN; eStroop), and psychological distress (APSQ) at pre-season, coinciding with the initial (2020) COVID-19-related sport shutdown in Australia. Measures of executive function and psychological distress were re-administered at the end of the COVID-19 affected competitive season in 2020. Athletes reported significantly elevated psychological distress relative to previous estimates of distress among high-performance athletes established in prior studies. Executive functions, including working memory and inhibitory control were not significantly associated with psychological distress or dispositional mindfulness at either timepoint. However, baseline mindfulness was associated with reduced distress at both pre-season (r = -0.48, p = .03) and end of season (r = -0.56, p = .004), suggesting that dispositional mindfulness may have afforded protective buffering against symptoms of distress. Correlation data alone does not establish a directional connection from mindfulness to reduced distress, and future research is required to elucidate this association and/or establish the mechanism/s by which dispositional mindfulness may protect against psychological distress in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Psychological Distress , Athletes/psychology , Australia/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
14.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e058976, 2022 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784836

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: With mental ill health listed as a top cause of global disease burden, there is an urgent need to prioritise mental health promotion programmes. Mindfulness-based programmes (MBPs) are being widely implemented to reduce stress in non-clinical settings. In a recent aggregate-level meta-analysis we found that, compared with no intervention, these MBPs reduce average psychological distress. However, heterogeneity between studies impedes generalisation of effects across every setting. Study-level effect modifiers were insufficient to reduce heterogeneity; studying individual-level effect modifiers is warranted. This requires individual participant data (IPD) and larger samples than those found in existing individual trials. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We propose an IPD meta-analysis. Our primary aim is to see if, and how, baseline psychological distress, gender, age, education and dispositional mindfulness moderate the effect of MBPs on distress. We will search 13 databases for good-quality randomised controlled trials comparing in-person, expert-defined MBPs in non-clinical settings with passive controls. Two researchers will independently select, extract and appraise trials using the revised Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Anonymised IPD of eligible trials will be sought from authors, who will be invited to collaborate.The primary outcome will be psychological distress measured using psychometrically validated questionnaires at 1-6 months after programme completion. Pairwise random-effects two-stage IPD meta-analyses will be conducted. Moderator analyses will follow a 'deft' approach. We will estimate subgroup-specific intervention effects. Secondary outcomes and sensitivity analyses are prespecified. Multiple imputation strategies will be applied to missing data. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The findings will refine our knowledge on the effectiveness of MBPs and help improve the targeting of MBPs in non-clinical settings. They will be shared in accessible formats with a range of stakeholders. Public and professional stakeholders are being involved in the planning, conduct and dissemination of this project. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020200117.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Adult , Data Analysis , Health Promotion , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
15.
Front Public Health ; 9: 742715, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775902

ABSTRACT

Study Basis: This evidence map presents a summary of studies that addressed the effects of meditation on various clinical and health conditions. Meditation is a contemplative practice that has been used for the promotion of health, and the treatment of different conditions. Method: The study is based on the search of four electronic databases for the period 1994-November 2019 and includes systematic reviews, meta-analyses, meta-syntheses, and integrative reviews. 3iE evidence gap map was the methodology of choice, and AMSTAR 2 was used for the analyses. Tableau was used to graphically display the confidence level, number of reviews, health outcomes, and intervention effects. Results: This map encompasses 191 studies, with Mindfulness being the key word that retrieved the highest number of results. Several meditation techniques were evaluated in different contexts, and the confidence levels of 22 studies were high, 84 were moderate, and 82 were low. Two 2 meta-syntheses and 1 integrative review were also included. Most of the studies reported positive effects and a beneficial potential of the practice of meditation. Health outcomes were divided into five groups out of which mental health and vitality, and well-being and quality of life stood out with the largest number of studies. Conclusions: Meditation has been applied in different areas. This Evidence Map intends to be an easy visual tool to access valuable evidence-based information on this complementary therapy for patients, health professionals, and managers.


Subject(s)
Meditation , Mindfulness , Humans , Meditation/methods , Mindfulness/methods , Quality of Life , Systematic Reviews as Topic
16.
J Integr Complement Med ; 28(6): 497-506, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1769105

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) live online during the COVID-19 shutdown. Design: Mixed-methods study using a sequential explanatory design. Settings/location: Cohorts 1-4 took place in-person and Cohorts 5-6 took place over Zoom following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Subjects: Participants were paying members of the general public enrolled in one of six live MBSR courses. Interventions: All MBSR courses followed the standard 8-week MBSR curriculum, led by experienced instructors. Outcome measures: Feasibility measured via class attendance, acceptability measured via the adapted Treatment Satisfaction Survey, and MBSR course effects measured by a focus group with Cohort 5, and the following assessments completed by all cohorts: Perceived Stress Scale-10, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the 36-item Short Form Survey. Results: 73 adults participated in six live MBSR courses (48 in the four in-person courses; 25 in the two online courses). Most of the participants identified as white, non-Hispanic, middle-aged females, with annual household income >$100,000. Course completion, defined as at least 6/8 classes attended, did not differ between in-person and online cohorts (84.1% versus 67.6%, respectively, p = 0.327). Participants in Cohort 5 who completed the course (n = 10) rated it as very important and useful for stress coping, and reported high likelihood of continuing their mindfulness practice (all ratings: between 8 and 10 on a 1-10 Likert scale), with open-ended responses corroborating their numerical ratings. Focus group (n = 6) responses indicated that online MBSR was positively received, reduced perceived loss of control, and improved quality of life and morale during the pandemic. Conclusions: Delivering MBSR live online can be feasible and acceptable for the general public, and is potentially beneficial, including during the social upheaval of the COVID-19 pandemic. Online delivery could help expand access to MBSR and address health inequities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Stress, Psychological/therapy
17.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264921, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753191

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify preferred burnout interventions within a resident physician population, utilizing the Nominal Group Technique. The results will be used to design a discrete choice experiment study to inform the development of resident burnout prevention programs. METHODS: Three resident focus groups met (10-14 participants/group) to prioritize a list of 23 factors for burnout prevention programs. The Nominal Group Technique consisted of three steps: an individual, confidential ranking of the 23 factors by importance from 1 to 23, a group discussion of each attribute, including a group review of the rankings, and an opportunity to alter the original ranking across participants. RESULTS: The total number of residents (36) were a representative sample of specialty, year of residency, and sex. There was strong agreement about the most highly rated attributes which grouped naturally into themes of autonomy, meaning, competency and relatedness. There was also disagreement on several of the attributes that is likely due to the differences in residency specialty and subsequently rotation requirements. CONCLUSION: This study identified the need to address multiple organizational factors that may lead to physician burnout. There is a clear need for complex interventions that target systemic and program level factors rather than focus on individual interventions. These results may help residency program directors understand the specific attributes of a burnout prevention program valued by residents. Aligning burnout interventions with resident preferences could improve the efficacy of burnout prevention programs by improving adoption of, and satisfaction with, these programs. Physician burnout is a work-related syndrome characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment [1]. Burnout is present in epidemic proportions and was estimated to occur in over 50 percent of practicing physicians and in up to 89 percent of resident physicians pre-COVID 19. The burnout epidemic is growing; a recent national survey of US physicians reported an 8.9 percent increase in burnout between 2011 and 2014 [2]. Rates of physician burnout have also increased [3] during the COVID-19 pandemic with a new classification of "pandemic burnout" experienced by over 52 percent of healthcare workers as early as June of 2020 [4]. Physician burnout can lead to depression, suicidal ideation, and relationship problems that may progress to substance abuse, increased interpersonal conflicts, broken relationships, low quality of life, major depression, and suicide [5-7]. The estimated rate of physician suicide is 300-400 annually [8-10].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Physicians/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mindfulness , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Sleep Hygiene , Social Support
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736924

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recognizing the under-examined socio-cognitive mindfulness and achievement emotions in nursing, this study aimed to examine the relationships between grit, socio-cognitive mindfulness, and achievement emotions among nursing students, as well as the mediating effects of socio-cognitive mindfulness. METHODS: This study utilized a cross-sectional design. A total of 220 nursing students in Korea completed the questionnaire measuring the levels of grit, socio-cognitive mindfulness, and achievement emotions. To analyze data, structural equation modeling and path analysis were performed. RESULTS: Grit was positively related to socio-cognitive mindfulness and positive achievement emotions but negatively related to negative emotions. Socio-cognitive mindfulness was positively related to positive emotions but negatively related to negative emotions. In addition, the mediating effects of socio-cognitive mindfulness were found in the association between grit and achievement emotions in nursing students. CONCLUSIONS: Grittier students tend to have higher socio-cognitive mindfulness and positive emotions but lower negative emotions in learning environments. Mediating effects highlight the benefits of socio-cognitive mindfulness in the context of nursing education, providing the basis for developing practical mindfulness programs to cultivate nursing students' socio-cognitive mindfulness.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Students, Nursing , Cognition , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736896

ABSTRACT

Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) and practices (MBPs) can promote better health outcomes. Although MBIs and MBPs were developed to be delivered in-person, mobile health (mHealth) tools such as apps have made these more accessible. Mindfulness apps (MAs) are popular among emerging adults (EAs) who have the highest ownership of smartphones and who are also at risk for distress. While adverse effects have been observed with MBIs/MBPs, this has not been examined when mindfulness is practiced using apps. We interviewed EAs (n = 22) to capture their motivations for using these apps and identified health-inhibiting and enhancing experiences. Data were thematically analyzed using the constant comparative method. Motivations for app use included accessibility, convenience, and stress/health management. EAs described health-enhancing outcomes (reduced distress, improved physical symptoms, increased focus) and health-inhibiting outcomes (worsened distress, performance uncertainty, dependency development, worsened physical health). They provided suggestions for improving apps (e.g., feedback option). These findings illustrate benefits and risks that EAs may encounter when practicing mindfulness using apps, which can inform the best practices for app design.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Adult , Humans
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736933

ABSTRACT

Cancer survivorship research faces several recruitment challenges, such as accrual of a representative sample, as well as participant retention. Our study explores patterns in recruited demographics, patient-reported outcomes (PROs), and retention rates for a randomized controlled trial (RCT) utilizing a mobile mindfulness intervention for the well-being of cancer survivors. In total, 123 participants were recruited using traditional and online strategies. Using the chi-square test of independence, recruitment type was compared with demographic and clinical variables, PROs, and retention at Time 2 and Time 3. Online recruitment resulted in almost double the yield compared to traditional recruitment. Online-recruited participants were more often younger, from the continental U.S., Caucasian, diagnosed and treated less recently, at a later stage of diagnosis, diagnosed with blood cancer, without high blood pressure, and with less reported pain. The recruitment method was not significantly associated with retention. Online recruitment may capture a larger, broader survivor sample, but, similar to traditional recruitment, may also lead to selection biases depending on where efforts are focused. Future research should assess the reasons underlying the higher yield and retention rates of online recruitment and should evaluate how to apply a mix of traditional and online recruitment strategies to efficiently accrue samples that are representative of the survivor population.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Mindfulness , Neoplasms , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy , Selection Bias , Survivors , United States
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