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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239858

ABSTRACT

The present study investigated how altered daily life behavior and its self-evaluation associated with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic relate to psychological health in Japanese working adults, and how such relationships may be moderated by dispositional mindfulness. A total of 1000 participants completed an online survey comprising questions on how they used time and self-evaluated life behavior before and during the pandemic, as well as scales on mindfulness and psychological health. The results revealed that after the pandemic, participants spent significantly more time at home and using a PC/smartphone. They were also more likely to perceive frequent exposure to COVID-19-related media reports and less likely to find their work going well. Many of these variables were significantly correlated with lower psychological health. Moreover, hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed the moderating effects of mindfulness, such that the perceived frequency of exposure to pandemic-related media reports and poorer views that work was going well were less likely to predict lower psychological health when mindfulness was high. These findings suggest that altered daily life behavior and its self-evaluation after the pandemic are associated with deteriorated psychological health, but that mindfulness can serve as a protective factor against psychological distress among Japanese workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Mindfulness , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , East Asian People , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics , Personality
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 348, 2023 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327166

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing undergraduates' academic self-efficacy is a significant factor in determining their learning motivation, cognition, and emotions. It has a significant impact on improving academic performance and achieving learning goals. METHODS: To explore the mechanism of psychological distress affecting the academic self-efficacy of nursing undergraduates, the generalized anxiety disorder scale-7, patient health questionnaire-9, academic self-efficacy scale, perceived social support scale and mindful attention awareness scale were conducted. RESULTS: Model fitness indexes of the structural equation model is good (CMIN/DF = 1.404, RMSEA = 0.042, GFI = 0.977, IFI = 0.977, TLI = 0.954, CFI = 0.975, NFI = 0.923). Structural equation model analysis showed that social support and mindfulness were the mediating variables of psychological distress on academic self-efficacy. Mediating variables accounted for 44% of the total effect value (- 0.3) with a value of - 0.132. Three paths were verified: psychological distress indirectly affected academic self-efficacy through social support (- 0.064); psychological distress indirectly affected academic self-efficacy through mindfulness (- 0.053); psychological distress indirectly affected academic self-efficacy through social support and mindfulness (- 0.015). CONCLUSIONS: Social support and mindfulness play significant mediating roles in the effect of psychological distress on academic self-efficacy, and the chain mediating role of social support and mindfulness is also significant. Educators may mitigate the impact of psychological distress on academic self-efficacy by enhancing students' social support and mindfulness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Psychological Distress , Humans , Self Efficacy , Students/psychology , Social Support
3.
Trials ; 22(1): 892, 2021 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319884

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Like many helping professionals in emotional labor occupations, clergy experience high rates of mental and physical comorbidities. Regular stress management practices may reduce stress-related symptoms and morbidity, but more research is needed into what practices can be reliably included in busy lifestyles and practiced at a high enough level to meaningfully reduce stress symptoms. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The overall design is a preference-based randomized waitlist control trial. United Methodist clergy in North Carolina will be eligible to participate. The intervention and waitlist control groups will be recruited by email. The interventions offered are specifically targeted to clergy preference and include mindfulness-based stress reduction, Daily Examen, and stress inoculation training. Surveys will be conducted at 0, 12, and 24 weeks with heart rate data collected at 0 and 12 weeks. The primary outcomes for this study are self-reported symptoms of stress and heart rate at week 12 for each intervention compared to waitlist control; the secondary outcome is symptoms of anxiety comparing each intervention vs waitlist control. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was obtained from the Duke University Campus IRB (2019-0238). The results will be made available to researchers, funders, and members of the clergy community. STRENGTHS AND LIMITATIONS OF THIS STUDY: While evidence-based stress reduction practices such as mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) exist, a wider variety of practices should be tested to appeal to different individuals. Clergy in particular may prefer, and consequently enact, spiritual practices like the Daily Examen, and individuals such as clergy who spend most of their time thinking and feeling may prefer experiential-based practices like stress inoculation training. If efficacious, the Daily Examen and stress inoculation training practices have high feasibility in that they require few minutes per day. This study is limited by the inclusion of Christian clergy of only one denomination. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04625777 . November 12, 2020.


Subject(s)
Clergy , Mindfulness , Anxiety , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Waiting Lists
4.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0283208, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320314

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been suggested to cause psychological problems such as anxiety, depression, panic, and insomnia. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to assess the efficacy of psychological interventions (including CBT, DBT, and mindfulness based interventions) in reducing distressing feelings in college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on psychological interventions for reducing negative emotions among college students during the COVID-19 epidemic were searched in databases Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, PsychInfo, CNKI, WanFang, and VIP. We utilized Cochrane risk of bias assessment technique to assess the quality of included RCTs. The data were analyzed using RevMan 5.4. Eight RCTs were finally included involving 1,496 participants. According to the meta-analysis results, psychotherapies could significantly alleviate anxiety, depression, and stress symptoms among university students, [MD = -0.98, 95%CI (-1.53, -0.43), p<0.001] [SMD = -0.47, 95%CI (-0.77, -0.16), p = 0.003] [MD = -1.53, 95%CI (-2.23, -0.83), p <0.001]. The difference in attenuation of somatization symptoms between the two groups was not statistically significant [SMD = -0.42, 95%CI (-1.41, 0.56), p = 0.40]. Psychotherapy might effectively alleviate anxiety, depression, and stress in university students caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. It could be considered the preferred strategy for reducing negative emotions and improving the quality of life of university students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Humans , Psychosocial Intervention , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Depression/diagnosis , Universities , COVID-19/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety/diagnosis , Emotions , Students
5.
Int J Community Based Nurs Midwifery ; 11(2): 110-121, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303471

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) is a widespread disease all over the world that has caused many psychological complications such as health anxiety (HA) and low quality of life (QOL). Mindfulness-based approaches could improve these complications. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of Internet-delivered mindfulness stress reduction combined with acceptance and commitment therapy (IMSR-ACT) on QOL and HA of caregivers of patients infected by COVID-19. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 72 people from Golpayegan city, Iran, who had a patient with COVID-19 in their family were selected from March to June 2020. A caregiver with a score above 27 on the Health Anxiety inventory (HAI-18) was selected using simple random sampling. Participants were assigned in the intervention or control group by permuted block random allocation. The intervention group was trained by MSR and ACT techniques for 9 weeks accomplished via WhatsApp. All participants completed the QOLQuestionnaire-12 (SF-12) items and HAI-18 before and after completing IMSR-ACT sessions. The data were analyzed through SPSS-23 software, using Chi square, independent and paired t-test, and analysis of covariance, and P-value<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The results showed that the intervention group compared to the control group had a significant decrease in all subscales of HAI after the intervention including worry about consequences (5.78±2.66 vs. 7.37±1.34, P=0.004) and awareness of bodily sensation or changes (8.90±2.77 vs. 11.75±2.30, P=0.001), worry about health (10.94±2.38 vs. 13.09±1.92, P=0.001), and total score of HAI (25.62±4.93 vs. 32.25±3.93, P=0.001). Also, the intervention group compared to the control group had better QOL after the intervention in general health perceptions (3.03±0.96 vs. 2.43±0.95, P=0.01), mental health (7.12±2.25 vs. 6.34±1.85 and P=0.01) and mental component summary) 16.78±3.75 vs. 15.43±3.05, P=0.01), physical component summary (16.06±2.66 vs. 15.19±2.25, P=0.01), and total score of SF-12 (32.84±5.39 vs. 30.62±4.34, P=0.004). Conclusion: Internet-delivered MSR combined with ACT could improve the HA and QOL of caregivers with patients infected by COVID-19. Thus, it can used in other similar situations for now and future. Also, it seems to be a useful approach for caregivers of the other illnesses. Trial Registration Number: IRCT20180909040974N.


Subject(s)
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy , COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Humans , Quality of Life , COVID-19/therapy , Caregivers/psychology , Anxiety/therapy , Internet
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299583

ABSTRACT

College students faced unique challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. Implementing a physical activity intervention can help support the physical and mental health of college students. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an aerobic-strength training exercise intervention (WeActive) and a mindful exercise intervention (WeMindful) in improving resilience and mindfulness among college students. Seventy-two students from a major public university in the Midwest participated in a two-arm experimental study over the course of ten weeks. One week before and after the 8-week interventions, participants completed the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-15), Connor Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC-10), and demographic and background questionnaire via Qualtrics. Both groups also participated in bi-weekly Peer Coaching sessions, which utilized reflective journaling and goal-setting exercises. ANCOVA showed a significant main effect of time for total mindfulness score (F = 5.177, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.070), mindfulness Acting with Awareness (F = 7.321, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.096), and mindfulness Non-Judging of Inner Experience (F = 5.467, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.073). No significant main effect of group and interaction effects of time with group were observed for the total mindfulness and the five facets of mindfulness as well as resilience. In addition, no significant main effect of time for resilience was found. We conclude that aerobic-strength exercises and mindful yoga exercises, together with reflective journaling, may be effective in increasing mindfulness in the college population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Humans , Pilot Projects , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Internet
7.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1102473, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2274305

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Disasters can be traumatic with a profound and lasting impact on individuals. During the COVID-19 pandemic, our team developed the Mindful Living Group (MLG) activities manual based on Eastern body-mind wisdom and Western trauma healing theory to provide psychological assistance for trauma healing. Methods: In this study, we introduce a framework developed for the 10-session MLG activities manual, which consists of three core modules. Thirty-one participants living all over the country who had experienced traumatic stress resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic received the MLG intervention. This single-arm intervention study offered psychological assistance during the pandemic. The MLG intervention included 10 weekly 2-h sessions held online. Participants completed the initial interview, pre-test, post-test, and 1-month follow-up interviews. The effectiveness of the MLG activities manual was evaluated using psychological measures, including Self-Rating Depression Scale, Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, Post-traumatic Growth Inventory, General Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Perceived Social Support Scale. Results: Compared with the pretest level, the post-test levels of depression (F = 42.78, p < 0.001, η 2 = 0.59) and anxiety (F = 23.40, p < 0.001, η 2 = 0.44) were significantly lower; and mindfulness (F = 12.98, p =0.001, η 2 =0.30), posttraumatic growth (F = 27.06, p < 0.001, η 2 = 0.48), general self-efficacy (F = 13.20, p = 0.001, η 2 = 0.31), and perceived social support (F = 16.27, p < 0.001, η 2 = 0.35) were significantly higher (ANOVA). Further correlation analysis revealed a significant negative relationship of mindfulness with both depression (r = -0.43, p = 0.015) and anxiety (r = -0.35, p = 0.053), and significant positive relationships of mindfulness with posttraumatic growth (r = 0.40, p = 0.025), general self-efficacy (r = 0.52, p = 0.003), and perceived social support (r = 0.40, p = 0.024). Discussion: These preliminary findings showed the effectiveness of MLG activities for trauma healing. The mechanisms underlying mindfulness promoting trauma healing are discussed based on both Eastern body-mind wisdom and Western theories of trauma healing. Clinical trial registration: Identifier, ChiCTR2000034164.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Humans , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics , Anxiety , Self Efficacy
8.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0281994, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255814

ABSTRACT

The mental health crisis in graduate education combined with low treatment rates among engineering graduate students underscores the need for engineering graduate programs to provide effective methods to promote well-being. There is an extensive body of neuroscience research showing that contemplative practices, such as mindfulness, produce measurable effects on brain function and overall well-being. We hypothesized that a mindfulness-based training program designed for engineering graduate students would improve emotional well-being and, secondarily, enhance research capacity. An initial pilot study was conducted at a single institution (Phase 1), followed by a larger study conducted at both the original and a second institution (Phase 2) to gather additional data and show the program's transferability. The program comprised eight weekly mindfulness training sessions. Individuals in the study were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or wait-list control group. We administered pre- and post-test surveys with quantitative measures designed to assess emotional and physical well-being, as well as creativity, research satisfaction, and desire to contribute to the betterment of society. Participants also completed a summative survey to evaluate the impact of the program on their well-being and research. Analysis revealed statistically significant findings: improved emotional health, decreased neuroticism, increased positive affect, decreased negative affect, and increased mindfulness in the intervention groups compared to the control groups. Intervention groups in Phase 2 also reported statistically significant improvement in satisfaction with their research. Our findings suggest that mindfulness training has the potential to play a vital professional and personal development role in graduate engineering education.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Humans , Emotions , Mental Health , Mindfulness/methods , Pilot Projects , Students/psychology
9.
Trials ; 24(1): 220, 2023 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262486

ABSTRACT

There are increasing rates of internalising difficulties, particularly anxiety and depression, being reported in children and young people in England. School-based universal prevention programmes are thought to be one way of helping tackle such difficulties. This paper describes an update to a four-arm cluster randomised controlled trial ( http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN16386254 ), investigating the effectiveness of three different interventions when compared to usual provision, in English primary and secondary pupils. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the trial was put on hold and subsequently prolonged. Data collection will now run until 2024. The key changes to the trial outlined here include clarification of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, an amended timeline reflecting changes to the recruitment period of the trial due to the COVID-19 pandemic and clarification of the data that will be included in the statistical analysis, since the second wave of the trial was disrupted due to COVID-19.Trial registration ISRCTN Registry ISRCTN16386254. Registered on 30 August 2018.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Schools , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
10.
J Psychiatr Res ; 161: 27-33, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286098

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated anxiety and related symptoms among the general population. In order to cope with the mental health burden, we developed an online brief modified mindfulness-based stress reduction (mMBSR) therapy. We performed a parallel-group randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of the mMBSR for adult anxiety with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) as an active control. Participants were randomized to mMBSR, CBT or waitlist group. Those in the intervention arms performed each therapy for 6 sections in 3 weeks. Measurements were conducted at baseline, post-treatment and 6 months post-treatment by Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Patient Health Questionnaire-15, reverse scored Cohen Perceived Stress scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale. 150 participants with anxiety symptoms were randomized to mMBSR, CBT or waitlist group. Post intervention assessments showed that mMBSR improved the scores of all the six mental problem dimensions (anxiety, depression, somatization, stress, insomnia, and the experience of pleasure) significantly compared to the waitlist group. During 6-month post treatment assessment, the scores of all six mental problem dimensions in the mMBSR group still showed improvement compared to baseline and showed no significant difference with the CBT group. Our results provide positive evidence for the efficacy and feasibility of an online brief modified MBSR program to alleviate anxiety and related symptoms of individuals from the general population, and the therapeutic benefits of mMBSR persisted for up to six months. This low resource-consuming intervention could facilitate the challenges of supplying psychological health therapy to large scale of population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Adult , Humans , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Depression/therapy , Depression/psychology , East Asian People , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Treatment Outcome , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Waiting Lists
11.
J Music Ther ; 60(2): 131-148, 2023 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242239

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this secondary analysis was to explore physiological, psychological, and situational influencing factors that may affect the impact of a mindfulness-music therapy intervention on anxiety severity in young adults receiving cancer treatment. Young adults receiving cancer treatment for ≥ eight weeks were recruited from adult and pediatric oncology outpatient centers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Participants were asked to attend up to four, in-person (offered virtually via Zoom video conference after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic) 45-min mindfulness-based music therapy sessions over twelve weeks with a board-certified music therapist. Participants completed questionnaires about anxiety, stress, and other cancer treatment-related outcomes before and after participating in the intervention. Changes in anxiety (i.e., PROMIS Anxiety 4a) over time were compared among baseline physiological (e.g., age or sex), psychological (e.g., stress), and situational influencing (i.e., intervention delivery format) factors using Wilcoxon-rank sum tests. Thirty-one of the 37 enrolled participants completed the baseline and post-intervention measures and were eligible for inclusion in the secondary analysis. Results revealed that higher baseline physical functioning (median change = -6.65), anxiety (median change=-5.65), fatigue (median change = -5.6), sleep disturbance (median change = -5.6),female sex (median change = -5.15), or virtual intervention delivery(median change = -4.65) were potential physiological, psychological, or situational influencing factors associated with anxiety improvement following mindfulness-based music therapy. Additional investigation into physiological, psychological, or situational influencing factors associated with anxiety response will help to tailor the design of future mindfulness-music therapy interventions to decrease psychological distress and address the unique psychosocial concerns among young adults receiving cancer treatment. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03709225.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Music Therapy , Neoplasms , Child , Humans , Young Adult , Music Therapy/methods , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Stress, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasms/psychology , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety/psychology
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(4)2023 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240957

ABSTRACT

This quantitative, before-after study was developed to evaluate the usefulness of an online mindfulness practices program to help nursing professionals deal with stress in the challenging context of the COVID-19 pandemic through the assessment of perceived stress, anxiety and depression, levels of mindfulness, and participants' satisfaction with the program. Eligible participants were assessed at baseline to receive the online mindfulness training program for eight weeks and were appraised again at the end of the program. Standardized measures of perceived stress, depression, anxiety, and one-dimensional and multidimensional mindfulness were performed. Participant satisfaction was also studied. Adherence to treatment was 70.12%. The perceived stress, depression, and anxiety scores were significantly lower after the intervention. The mindfulness measure increased significantly, as well as the sense of well-being and satisfaction with life, study, and/or work. The participants showed high satisfaction with the program and would recommend it to other professionals. Our results indicate that mindfulness-based interventions represent an effective strategy for nurses in the face of the need for self-care with mental health and mechanisms that guarantee the sustainability of their capacities to continue exercising health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Nurses , Humans , Mental Health , Mindfulness/methods , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Brazil , Pandemics , Anxiety/therapy , Depression/psychology
13.
Int J Yoga Therap ; 32(2022)2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2229748

ABSTRACT

Despite increased interest in mindfulness practices such as yoga as an adjunct for depression, anxiety, and other chronic health concerns, little research exists on the potential benefits of yoga in therapeutic settings. As a complementary therapy, yoga provides a value-added benefit to traditional clinical practices for (1) clinicians as a form of self-care in treating compassion fatigue caused by, for example, fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic, and (2) the patients they serve. The primary goal of the present study was to understand clinician perspectives of yoga as an intervention in the therapeutic setting for clinicians and clients. We conducted a qualitative study and surveyed therapists from a yoga teacher training program designed specifically for clinical therapists. Eight therapists completed a qualitative questionnaire designed to understand the effects of yoga on clinicians and patients in the therapeutic setting. Although the effects of COVID-19 had not been anticipated, survey results corroborate high rates of compassion fatigue for therapists and a decline in mental health for patients throughout the study. Yoga, specifically body awareness and breathwork, however, provided a baseline for navigating mental health for both patients and therapists amid the pandemic. Additionally, body awareness and breathwork were found to help therapists avoid burnout and compassion fatigue and facilitate a more positive therapy experience for patients and therapists. Yoga has the potential to be a positive adjunct in therapeutic settings and would benefit from further research into various applications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Meditation , Mindfulness , Yoga , Humans , Yoga/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19/therapy
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(2)2023 Jan 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2237375

ABSTRACT

The present study was conducted twice over one year during the COVID-19 pandemic with Chinese adolescents (n = 1582) to investigate the relationships among family socioeconomic status (SES), adolescent mental health problems, trait mindfulness, and perceived stress using self-reported measures. We administered the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), the Perceived Stress Scale (PPS), the Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), the Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and Conduct Problem Tendency Inventory (CPTDI) to a sample of Chinese adolescents. The results prove that (1) there were significant correlations among socioeconomic status, trait mindfulness, perceived stress, and adolescent mental health problems, and the (2) serial mediation analysis indicated that trait mindfulness and perceived stress performed as mediators on the path from SES to anxiety, depression, and externalizing problems. Our findings provide a contribution by showing the connection between socioeconomic position and adolescent mental health problems and by offering a reference for the treatment of psychological issues affecting adolescents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/psychology
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(2)2023 01 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2236682

ABSTRACT

The mental health crisis across college campuses is accelerating, with anxiety listed as the top mental health issue for undergraduate college students. Although evidence suggests the COVID-19 pandemic escalated the mental health crisis on college campuses, pre-COVID-19 anxiety among college students was on the rise. Research supports Mindfulness Based Interventions (MBIs) to reduce anxiety among college students. Additionally, exposure to natural environments, which are accessible to students on college campuses, is effective in reducing anxiety. While brief nature-based mindfulness interventions appear effective in reducing anxiety among college students, these interventions are often offered in isolation without social interaction among group members and lack intentional integration of mindfulness and nature-related theories. The purpose of this work is to describe a framework for integrating the use of Mindfulness and Attention Restoration Theory (ART) in an innovative psychoeducational group intervention, Nature-Based Mindfulness Training © (NBMT), for college students with anxiety. In conclusion, we argue for the need to intentionally integrate mindfulness and nature into nature-based mindfulness interventions as an effective and sustainable means to reduce anxiety. Limitations and areas for future research are described.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Humans , Pandemics , Students/psychology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology
16.
J Integr Complement Med ; 28(11): 851-861, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230847

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Complementary and integrative health (CIH) modalities promote overall health and well-being and can be beneficial for individuals with a range of conditions. Traditionally, CIH has been delivered in person. COVID-19 created a need to identify sustainable remote delivery options to assure access to CIH while practicing public health recommendations. This scoping review maps the opportunities and challenges to remotely delivered CIH. Materials and methods: A scoping review was conducted between June 2020 and October 2020 using the following search engines: PubMed, Academic Search Premier, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Reviews, and the Cochrane Clinical Trial Collections. Search results investigating remote CIH delivery were restricted to articles written in English, published after 1990. Results: Of the 10,884 articles identified, after review for content and methods, 330 articles were included. Most articles were randomized controlled trials (n = 170), applied mindfulness (n = 203), and targeted mental and behavioral health conditions (n = 182). Interventions were primarily delivered through mobile applications (n = 151) and web-based platforms (n = 86). Most commonly reported barriers were adherence (n = 24), resource requirements (e.g., time and space) (n = 23), and technology-related issues (n = 21). Although most studies did not report facilitators (n = 217), most commonly reported facilitators were social and technologic supports, accessibility, usability, perceptions, and rewards. Participant outcomes measured were broad and included movement (n = 88), stress (n = 68), and pain (n = 54). Intervention characteristic outcomes most often measured were satisfaction and usability (n = 5). Conclusions: This scoping literature review identified many articles addressing remote delivery of CIH, but few reporting on the implementation of remotely delivered CIH. Findings suggest remotely delivered CIH, specifically mindfulness and meditation-based modalities, is a viable treatment option for a diverse range of health conditions. Feasibility studies and larger sample sizes are recommended to strengthen the scientific evidence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(3)2023 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2225196

ABSTRACT

Sleep of inadequate quantity and quality is increasing in the present 24 h society, with a negative impact on physical and mental health. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) generate a state of calm behavior that can reduce hyperactivity and improve sleep. We hypothesized that our specific MBI, administered online, may improve sleep quality and foster emotion regulation and mindfulness. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Sleep Condition Indicator (SCI), Arousal Predisposition Scale (APS), Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST), Sleep Hygiene Index (SHI) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) were used to measure sleep quality and stability. Emotion regulation and mindfulness were measured via the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ) and Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ). Our MBI included 12 biweekly integral meditation (IM) classes, recorded IM training for individual practice, and dietary advice to promote sleep regulation. Fifty-six voluntary poor sleepers with a PSQI score of >5 were randomly allocated to treated (n = 28) and control (n = 28) groups. Linear mixed models were used to estimate the effectiveness of the intervention. Statistically significant results were observed in the FFMQ sub-domain non-reactivity to inner experience (ß = 0.29 [0.06; -0.52], p = 0.01), PSQI (ß = -1.93 [-3.43; -0.43], p = 0.01), SCI (ß = 3.39 [0.66; 6.13], p = 0.02) and ISI (ß = -3.50 [-5.86; -1.14], p = 0.004). These results confirm our hypothesis regarding the beneficial effects of our intervention on sleep quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy , Mindfulness/methods , Sleep Quality , Pandemics , Sleep/physiology
18.
J Affect Disord ; 327: 137-144, 2023 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2220910

ABSTRACT

To prevent the spread of the COVID-19 epidemic on campus, universities in outbreak areas in China can implement closed-loop management. OBJECTS: This study aimed to explore the relationship between mindfulness and mental health of college students under closed-loop management. MEASURES: 11,939 college students from a university in Changsha, China participated in the online survey during the closed-loop management period. The Chinese version of Perceived Stress Scale, the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire-Cognitive Reappraisal, the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, the 7-item General Anxiety Disorder questionnaire, and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire were administered to the college students. RESULTS: We found that mindfulness was negative association with mental health during the closed-loop management period. Perceived stress mediated the relationship between mindfulness and mental health. Cognitive reappraisal moderated the relationship between mindfulness and perceived stress. Specifically, when the level of mindfulness is the same, individuals with more cognitive reappraisal tend to experience a less perceived stress. CONCLUSION: The results of this study are of great significance to improve the mental health of college students during closed-loop management period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Humans , Mental Health , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological , Students/psychology , Universities
19.
Psychosom Med ; 83(6): 497-502, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191186

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: We are at a difficult time in history with societal increases in stress, loneliness, and psychopathology, along with high rates of obesity, sedentary lifestyles, and chronic pain. Mindfulness interventions offer promise to address these societal issues. However, in order to make best use of the opportunities revealed by our current challenges, we must: (1) tackle these issues head-on with inclusive, innovative, and creative experimental designs and interventions, and (2) collectively adhere to rigorous, high quality methods so as to provide an evidence-based integration of mindfulness interventions into mainstream medicine and public health.We find there are several areas for which important advances are happening, including sampling socially diverse populations, examining mechanisms of action, pain management, and health behaviors. Furthermore, rigorous methods, including measurement, causal inference from control groups, delivery and scalability of mindfulness interventions, and effect modifiers to determine who mindfulness programs work best for are also gaining traction. This special issue on Mindfulness: Biobehavioral Mechanisms and Health Outcomes attends to many of these issues, several of which are highlighted in this editorial perspective.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Meditation , Mindfulness , Humans , Pain Management , Pandemics
20.
Trials ; 23(1): 1020, 2022 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196412

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Insomnia and poor sleep quality are highly prevalent conditions related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) complications among clinical nurses. Although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a first-line treatment, CBT-I suffers from several major drawbacks. This study investigates whether the application of the internet-delivered mindfulness-based stress reduction (iMBSR) intervention will produce effects that are non-inferior to the internet-delivered CBT-I (iCBT-I) intervention in reducing the severity of insomnia in clinical nurses with insomnia at the end of the study. METHODS: This study protocol presents an internet-delivered, parallel-groups, assessor-blinded, two-arm, non-inferiority randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome is sleep quality, assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index. Secondary outcomes include depression, dysfunctional beliefs, five facets of mindfulness, and client satisfaction. CONCLUSION: It is expected that this study may address several gaps in the literature. The non-inferiority study design is a novel approach to evaluating whether a standardized, complementary treatment (i.e., MBSR) is as practical as a gold standard treatment rather than its potential benefits. This approach may lead to expanded evidence-based practice and improve patient access to effective treatments. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Trial registration number: ISRCTN36198096 . Registered on 24th May 2022.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Mindfulness , Nursing Staff , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Treatment Outcome , Internet , Cognition , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
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