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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e058686, 2022 04 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822073

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Existing studies have shown that mobile-based mindfulness meditation (MMM) can have a certain impact on nurses' mental health problems, but its specific effect and the effect on specific mental health problems such as stress, anxiety, depression, mindfulness, well-being and resilience are not clear. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study protocol follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols guidelines. Electronic search through PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, Embase and three Chinese databases namely CNKI, Wan Fang and Chinese Biology Medicine disc. The inclusion criteria follow the PICO principle, which is defined translate the question into a searchable and answerable question . P (patient/population): clinical characteristics of patients; I (intervention or exposure): treatment measures or exposure factors of concern; C (comparison): control measure.; O (outcome): outcome indicator of concern. Registered nurses, preregistered nurses, midwives and nursing students will all be included, studies using MMM as intervention to improve mental health of nurses, compared with waitlist controls or traditional methods groups, outcomes assessment of stress, anxiety, depression, mindfulness, well-being and resilience will meet the inclusion criteria. Studies designed randomised controlled trails (RCTs) of quasiexperimental and written in English or Chinese will be eligible. Search time was from inception of each database to July 2022. Two reviewers screen and assess studies for inclusion and extract data independently; any dispute will be settled through discussion. If the discussion still fails, the third author will make a decision. For RCT, risk of bias will be assessed using Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomised trials (RoB 2), and for non-RCT studies, risk of bias in non-randomised studies of interventions (ROBINS-I) tool will be performed. Meta-analysis will be performed using RevMan software if sufficient number of comparable studies are retrieved. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This is a study protocol of meta-analysis; no primary data will be collected, and no ethics assessment is required. The study results will be presented in a peer-reviewed scientific publication. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021277932.


Subject(s)
Meditation , Mindfulness , Humans , Mental Health , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Mindfulness/methods , Systematic Reviews as Topic
2.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 6483, 2022 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799563

ABSTRACT

Mindfulness interventions were shown to be effective in improving well-being and reducing perceived stress in several conditions. These effects were also found in online mindfulness-based training, especially in employees in organizational environments. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of an online mindfulness intervention on healthy employees, especially after the first Italian Covid-19 lockdown. Participants in the intervention group underwent an 8-week mindfulness online training program based on the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) protocol compared to a control (no-intervention) group. All participants filled in weekly surveys for the whole intervention duration via online questionnaires to measure their habits, mindfulness (FFMQ-15), emotion regulation (ERQ), positive and negative affect (PANAS), depression, anxiety and stress (DASS-21), resilience (RSA) and insomnia (ISI). 69 participants in the intervention group and 63 in the no-treatment control group were considered in the longitudinal analyses. We found significant differences between the intervention and control groups over time in the measures of mindfulness (in particular the nonreactivity subscale), positive affect, depression, and insomnia. Moreover, we found that the frequency of practice and ease perceived in practicing were positively correlated to several indices of well-being (mindfulness, positive affect, cognitive reappraisal) and negatively correlated to several indices of stress (negative affect, depression, anxiety, stress, insomnia, expressive suppression). These results show the importance and effectiveness of online mindfulness training programs to cope with stress among employees, especially after the Covid-19 lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internet-Based Intervention , Mindfulness , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/psychology , Humans , Mindfulness/methods , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Stress, Psychological/therapy
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 742715, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775902

ABSTRACT

Study Basis: This evidence map presents a summary of studies that addressed the effects of meditation on various clinical and health conditions. Meditation is a contemplative practice that has been used for the promotion of health, and the treatment of different conditions. Method: The study is based on the search of four electronic databases for the period 1994-November 2019 and includes systematic reviews, meta-analyses, meta-syntheses, and integrative reviews. 3iE evidence gap map was the methodology of choice, and AMSTAR 2 was used for the analyses. Tableau was used to graphically display the confidence level, number of reviews, health outcomes, and intervention effects. Results: This map encompasses 191 studies, with Mindfulness being the key word that retrieved the highest number of results. Several meditation techniques were evaluated in different contexts, and the confidence levels of 22 studies were high, 84 were moderate, and 82 were low. Two 2 meta-syntheses and 1 integrative review were also included. Most of the studies reported positive effects and a beneficial potential of the practice of meditation. Health outcomes were divided into five groups out of which mental health and vitality, and well-being and quality of life stood out with the largest number of studies. Conclusions: Meditation has been applied in different areas. This Evidence Map intends to be an easy visual tool to access valuable evidence-based information on this complementary therapy for patients, health professionals, and managers.


Subject(s)
Meditation , Mindfulness , Humans , Meditation/methods , Mindfulness/methods , Quality of Life , Systematic Reviews as Topic
4.
J Integr Complement Med ; 28(6): 497-506, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1769105

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) live online during the COVID-19 shutdown. Design: Mixed-methods study using a sequential explanatory design. Settings/location: Cohorts 1-4 took place in-person and Cohorts 5-6 took place over Zoom following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Subjects: Participants were paying members of the general public enrolled in one of six live MBSR courses. Interventions: All MBSR courses followed the standard 8-week MBSR curriculum, led by experienced instructors. Outcome measures: Feasibility measured via class attendance, acceptability measured via the adapted Treatment Satisfaction Survey, and MBSR course effects measured by a focus group with Cohort 5, and the following assessments completed by all cohorts: Perceived Stress Scale-10, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the 36-item Short Form Survey. Results: 73 adults participated in six live MBSR courses (48 in the four in-person courses; 25 in the two online courses). Most of the participants identified as white, non-Hispanic, middle-aged females, with annual household income >$100,000. Course completion, defined as at least 6/8 classes attended, did not differ between in-person and online cohorts (84.1% versus 67.6%, respectively, p = 0.327). Participants in Cohort 5 who completed the course (n = 10) rated it as very important and useful for stress coping, and reported high likelihood of continuing their mindfulness practice (all ratings: between 8 and 10 on a 1-10 Likert scale), with open-ended responses corroborating their numerical ratings. Focus group (n = 6) responses indicated that online MBSR was positively received, reduced perceived loss of control, and improved quality of life and morale during the pandemic. Conclusions: Delivering MBSR live online can be feasible and acceptable for the general public, and is potentially beneficial, including during the social upheaval of the COVID-19 pandemic. Online delivery could help expand access to MBSR and address health inequities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Stress, Psychological/therapy
5.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 64(1): 49-57, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1734763

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Given the adverse impact of COVID-19 on the wellbeing of palliative care providers, there is a growing need to better understand protective variables, such as self-care, mindfulness and self-compassion, as they relate to resilience. OBJECTIVE: To investigate mindful self-care, self-compassion, and resilience as reported by palliative care providers during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Descriptive, cross-sectional survey. An electronic questionnaire captured data from validated instruments measuring each study variable, as well as participant demographics and perceived impacts of COVID-19 on professional quality of life. RESULTS: Positive, statistically significant correlations were found between mindful self-care, self-compassion, and resilience. These variables were also associated with greater satisfaction with professional life and perceived lessened impairment in physical and/or mental health due to a decrease in self-care activities stemming from altered routines during COVID-19. Those with higher resilience had worked in palliative care longer and also reported higher levels of self-compassion and mindful self-care, explaining 50% of variance. Self-compassion, satisfaction with professional life, and changes in self-care routine due to professional activities in the pandemic explained 44.3% of variance in mindful self-care. Self-compassion, female gender, and working as a frontline responder to the COVID-19 pandemic accounted for 35% variance in resilience levels. CONCLUSIONS: Results from this study extend the currently limited knowledge of self-care, mindfulness and self-compassion, as protective variables related to resilience in palliative care providers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further longitudinal studies into causal effects on health and wellbeing over time are needed.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Empathy , Female , Humans , Mindfulness/methods , Palliative Care/psychology , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Self Care/methods
6.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e055369, 2022 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699898

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is high worldwide, and patients with COPD commonly suffer from mood disorders, such as symptoms of anxiety and depression. However, it is difficult to communicate with patients face to face to solve these psychological problems in the case of the fluctuations in symptoms of COPD and COVID-19 prevalence, which may lead to the fact that patients with COPD are more likely to suffer exacerbations, frequent readmissions and worse survival. Mindfulness-based interventions are a stress-reducing therapy with mindfulness at its core. Remote mindfulness-based interventions combine the advantages of high availability, accessibility, low cost and anonymity and can solve the barriers to access that many patients face when attending face-to-face programmes. Therefore, remote mindfulness-based interventions may be an effective way to improve the mental health of patients with COPD. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will search PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CNKI, PsycNET, MEDLINE, Psychology & Behavioral Sciences Collection and Web of Science to select eligible studies that were published. The eligible studies will be screened, extracted and then the methodological quality will be evaluated independently by two reviewers. Review manager software V.5.3 software and Stata V.14.0 software will be used for meta-analysis. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is not required for a systematic review protocol. Findings of the proposed systematic review will be disseminated through conference presentations and publication in a peer-reviewed journal. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021265286.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , Depression/etiology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Mindfulness/methods , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/complications , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
7.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260208, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575897

ABSTRACT

Medical personnel working in emergency rooms (ER) are at increased risk of mental health problems and suicidality. There is increasing evidence that mindfulness-based interventions can improve burnout and other mental health outcomes in health care providers. In contrast, few longitudinal prospective studies have examined protective functions of dispositional mindfulness in this population. The objective of this study was to examine whether mindfulness prospectively predicts anxiety, depression, and social impairment in a sample of emergency care professionals. The authors administered online surveys to ER personnel prior to work in ER, and at 3 and 6 months follow up. Participants were 190 ER personnel (73% residents, 16% medical students, 11% nurses). Linear mixed effects regression was used to model longitudinal 3-month and 6-month follow up of depression, anxiety, and social impairment. Predictors included time-varying contemporaneous work stressors, perceived social support at work and life events, and baseline dispositional mindfulness, demographics, and workplace characteristics. Mindfulness indexed when starting ER work predicted less depression, anxiety, and social impairment 6 months later. Mindfulness remained a strong predictor of mental health outcomes after controlling for time-varying stressful events in emergency care, negative life events, and social support at work. Mindfulness moderated the adverse impact of poor social support at work on depression. To our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study to show that mindfulness prospectively and robustly predicts anxiety, depression, and social impairment. Results support the role of mindfulness as a potential resilience factor in at-risk health care providers.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/pathology , Depression/pathology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mindfulness/methods , Adult , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Occupational Stress , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
8.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259167, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504045

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mindfulness-Based Interventions (MBIs) are widely used in clinical and non-clinical populations, but little attention has been given to potential adverse effects (AEs). AIMS: This study aimed to gain insight in the prevalence and course of AEs during Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for patients with bipolar disorder (BD). METHOD: The current mixed-methods study was conducted as part of a RCT on (cost-) effectiveness of MBCT in 144 patients with BD (Trial registered on 25th of April 2018, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03507647). During MBCT, occurrence of AEs was monitored prospectively, systematically, and actively (n = 72). Patients who reported AEs were invited for semi-structured interviews after completing MBCT (n = 29). Interviews were analysed with directed content analysis, using an existing framework by Lindahl et al. RESULTS: AEs were reported by 29 patients, in seven of whom the experiences could not be attributed to MBCT during the interview. AEs were reported most frequently up to week 3 and declined afterwards. Baseline anxiety appeared to be a risk factor for developing AEs. Seven existing domains of AEs were observed: cognitive, perceptual, affective, somatic, conative, sense of self, and social. Influencing factors were subdivided into predisposing, precipitating, perpetuating, and mitigating factors. With hindsight, more than half of patients considered the reported AEs as therapeutic rather than harmful. CONCLUSIONS: Although the occurrence of AEs in MBCT for patients with BD is not rare, even in this population with severe mental illness they were not serious or had lasting bad effects. In fact, most of them were seen by the patients as being part of a therapeutic process, although some patients only experienced AEs as negative.


Subject(s)
Bipolar Disorder/therapy , Mindfulness/methods , Psychotherapy/methods , Adult , Aged , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome
9.
J Couns Psychol ; 69(2): 157-171, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310779

ABSTRACT

This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effect of a mindfulness-based mobile health (mHealth) intervention, tailored to the pandemic context, among young adult students (N = 114) with elevated anxiety and/or depressive symptoms during quarantine in China, compared to a time- and attention-matched social support-based mHealth control. At baseline, postintervention (1 month), and 2-month follow-up, participants completed self-reports of primary outcomes (anxiety and depression), secondary outcomes (mindfulness and social support), and emotional suppression as a culturally relevant mechanism of change. Feasibility and acceptability were also evaluated. Using intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis, linear mixed effects models showed that compared to social support mHealth, mindfulness mHealth had a superior effect on anxiety (p = .024, between-group d = 0.72). Both conditions improved on depression (baseline-to-FU ds > 1.10, between-group difference not significant, d = 0.36 favoring mindfulness). There was an interaction of Emotional suppression reduction × Condition in the improvement of anxiety and depression. Further, mindfulness mHealth was demonstrated to be more feasible and acceptable in program engagement, evaluation, skills improvement, and perceived benefit. Retention was high in both conditions (>80%). The difference in self-reported adverse effect was nonsignificant (3.9% in mindfulness and 8.7% in social support). Results of this pilot trial suggest that both mindfulness and social support, delivered via mHealth, show promise in reducing distress among young adults in quarantine, with mindfulness being particularly effective in addressing anxiety. Successful implementation and dissemination of this mHealth intervention approach have the potential for addressing the psychological consequences of the pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Telemedicine , Depression/psychology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine , Students/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Universities , Young Adult
10.
Int Tinnitus J ; 25(1): 29-33, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256967

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Covid-19 pandemic has caused a profound impact on the lives of people and has given rise to many mental health issues like anxiety and stress which eventually has given rise to bothersome tinnitus. In case of people having pre-existing tinnitus, the pandemic has raised the problem of tinnitus and the co-morbid issues related to tinnitus and severely affected the overall quality of life. Hence, we need to find a mean for home-based management of tinnitus and its associated problems. OBJECTIVE: To understand the mechanism of mental health and to compare between the mindfulness-based tinnitus reduction and tinnitus retraining therapy on android-based application. DESIGN: Comparative and Experimental design. METHOD: The study was conducted on 60 participants and was divided into two groups. Detailed audiological assessment, tinnitus assessment and Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and Tinnitus Cognitions Questionnaire (TCQ) were administered. Group-I was provided with tinnitus retraining therapy and group-II was provided with mindfulness based tinnitus stress reduction. After the post therapy evaluation the data were compiled for statistical analysis in SPSS software 20.0. Results: It was found that there were significant difference between the pre and post therapy scores of TRT and MBTSR in both THI and TCQ (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Home-based management of tinnitus during the COVID-19 pandemic using both TRT and MBTSR were highly successful and had similar results MBTSR was found to be more useful as it had better outcome in reducing the tinnitus related annoyance and shown better improvement in QOL examination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mindfulness , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Tinnitus/therapy , Adult , Audiometry, Pure-Tone , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mindfulness/methods , Mobile Applications , Smartphone , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tinnitus/complications , Tinnitus/diagnosis , Tinnitus/psychology , Young Adult
11.
J Perinat Neonatal Nurs ; 35(2): 105-109, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201358

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has further illuminated the already existing need for methods of building resilience in perinatal caregivers. Using a scoping review approach, literature was examined to identify evidence-based models of resilience building in a cohort of perinatal clinicians. Research published between January 2015 and 2020 was evaluated using PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases. Of the initial 3399 records reviewed, 2 qualitative studies met the inclusion criteria. Given the deleterious effects of Covid-19 on perinatal care providers, and in light of the paucity of available studies, personnel, time, and funding should be allocated for research to address these issues.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses, Neonatal/psychology , Occupational Stress , Perinatal Care/methods , Resilience, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Crew Resource Management, Healthcare/methods , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Midwifery , Mindfulness/methods , Obstetric Nursing/methods , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/rehabilitation , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Hosp Pract (1995) ; 49(3): 194-202, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121091

ABSTRACT

Objective: Unprecedented work pressures and social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic may worsen loneliness and sleep problems in health-care professionals. Heartfulness meditation has been shown to improve burnout and sleep. In the current study, the effects of remote Heartfulness meditation in improving loneliness and sleep quality were measured. Methods: Physicians and advance practice providers were randomly assigned to receive either daily Heartfulness Meditation program or no intervention (control group) in a prospective four-week randomized control study design. UCLA loneliness and PSQI scores were collected at baseline and after the program duration of 4 weeks. The study was retrospectively registered with trial Number, ISRCTN85787008 (8 January 2021). Results: Of the 155 subjects enrolled in the study, 50% were lonely and 97% had sleep problems. Attrition rate was 36%. Among those who completed the study, the mean UCLA loneliness scores decreased from 42.1 to 39.4 in the Heartfulness group (N = 40, p = 0.009) and 42.2 to 41.15 in the control group (N = 57, p = 0.254). The mean PSQI scores decreased from 10.75 to 9.14 in the Heartfulness group (N = 41, p = 0.001) and 9.41 to 8.87 in the control group (N = 58, p = 0.122). Younger participants aged 30 and under had higher loneliness and sleep problems. Conclusions: The current study is one of the first attempts to assess loneliness and sleep problems among physicians and advance practice providers during COVID-19 pandemic in the US. A significant burden of loneliness and sleep problems was identified. An improvement of sleep and loneliness was noted with the practice of Heartfulness meditation. This remote intervention might be a useful tool to be explored in larger studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Meditation/methods , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Adult , Anxiety/prevention & control , Humans , Male , Meditation/psychology , Middle Aged , Mindfulness/methods , Occupational Stress/psychology , Prospective Studies
13.
Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry ; 107: 110260, 2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117495

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Preliminary evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on children's mental health. Given these problems can have significant impacts throughout the lifespan, preventing the negative repercussions of COVID-19 on children's mental health is essential. Philosophy for children (P4C) and mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) show promise in this regard. OBJECTIVE: The goal of the present study was to compare the impact of online MBI and P4C interventions on mental health, within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. We used a randomized cluster trial to assess and compare the impact of both interventions on elementary school students' (N = 37) anxiety and inattention symptoms as well as on their basic psychological need satisfaction (BPN). RESULTS: ANCOVAs revealed a significant effect of the P4C intervention on mental health difficulties, controlling for baseline levels. Participants in the P4C group showed lower scores on the measured symptoms at post-test than participants in the MBI group. Significant effects of the MBI on levels of BPN were also found. Participants in the MBI intervention reported greater BPN satisfaction at post-test than participants in the P4C intervention. CONCLUSION: Results from this study suggest that, in the current context of the COVID-19 pandemic, a P4C intervention centered around COVID-19 related themes may be helpful to reduce mental health difficulties, that a MBI may be useful to satisfy BPN, and that both interventions were easy to offer online to elementary school students. Future work including a larger sample size and follow-up measures is warranted. PUBLIC SIGNIFICANCE: Practice: Philosophy for children (P4C) and mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) can be used to foster mental health in elementary school students, in the current COVID-19 context. Policy: As we do not anticipate that facilitators will be allowed in schools during the 2020-2021 school year and that children will, most likely, be attending school in the current COVID-19 context, policymakers who want to implement psychological support measures in elementary schools should consider an online modality, which has shown in this study to work well, be feasible, and yield positive results on youth mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/education , Mindfulness/methods , Schools , Students/psychology , Thinking , Child , Child, Preschool , Cluster Analysis , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health/trends , Mindfulness/trends , Schools/trends , Thinking/physiology
14.
Mo Med ; 118(1): 7-12, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068452

ABSTRACT

Medical students, residents, and practicing physicians experience high burnout, depression, and suicide rates, and the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated stress for many.1-6 While laudable, current well-being efforts appear insufficient to meet the challenges that so many are facing. This essay explores approaches that individuals and organizations can take to promote mental health and well-being from medical school to practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/standards , Physicians/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/therapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Limbic System/physiopathology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Mindfulness/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Schools, Medical/standards , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Suicide/prevention & control , Suicide/psychology , Suicide/statistics & numerical data
15.
Enferm Clin (Engl Ed) ; 31: S35-S39, 2021 Feb.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065068

ABSTRACT

The health crisis caused by the COVID-19 virus pandemic has once again highlighted the role of health professionals as a key element for their containment, who suffer from high tension marked by healthcare pressure and the lack of means of protection. Given this tension, it is relevant to analyze the emotional impact on health professionals of the coronavirus pandemic and the coping resources to reduce or mitigate this impact. Stress, sleep disorders and depressive symptoms stand out. Some strategies are recommended that have been used by professionals who have previously been under pressure from COVID-19 and have been helpful to them. Finally, some recommendations whose efficacy is known for managing emotional impact are pointed out.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Breathing Exercises/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Exercise , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Mindfulness/methods , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Psychotherapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/prevention & control , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Symptom Assessment/methods
16.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244717, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021674

ABSTRACT

The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to test whether a commercially available, mindfulness meditation mobile app, (i.e., Calm app), was effective in reducing fatigue (primary outcome), pre-sleep arousal, and daytime sleepiness (secondary outcomes) in adults with sleep disturbance (Insomnia Severity Index Score >10) as compared to a wait-list control group. Associations between the use of the Calm app (i.e., adherence to the intervention) and changes in sleep quality was also explored in the intervention group only. Adults with sleep disturbance were recruited (N = 640). Eligible and consenting participants (N = 263) were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 124) or a wait-list control (n = 139) group. Intervention participants were asked to meditate using the Calm app ≥10 minutes/day for eight weeks. Fatigue, daytime sleepiness, and pre-sleep arousal were assessed at baseline, mid- (4-weeks) and post-intervention (8-weeks) in both groups, whereas sleep quality was evaluated only in the intervention group. Findings from intent-to-treat analyses suggest the use of the Calm app for eight weeks significantly decreased daytime fatigue (p = .018) as well as daytime sleepiness (p = .003) and cognitive (p = .005) and somatic (p < .001) pre-sleep arousal as compared to the wait-list control group. Within the intervention group, use of the Calm app was associated with improvements in sleep quality (p < .001). This randomized controlled trial demonstrates that the Calm app can be used to treat fatigue, daytime sleepiness, and pre-sleep arousal in adults with sleep disturbance. Given that the Calm app is affordable and widely accessible, these data have implications for community level dissemination of a mobile app to improve sleep-related symptoms associated with sleep disturbance. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04045275.


Subject(s)
Meditation/psychology , Mindfulness/methods , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Adult , Arousal/physiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
17.
J Subst Abuse Treat ; 122: 108213, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965034

ABSTRACT

Effective communication is critical for therapeutic work with individuals, for the interdisciplinary team, and for leadership in a substance use disorder (SUD) treatment program. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, over a two-year period Thomas Jefferson University's Maternal Addiction Treatment, Education and Research (MATER) program, an SUD treatment program serving pregnant and parenting women living in an urban environment, implemented Mindfulness Dialogue for Life (MDfL) to deepen communication, encourage courageous conversations, bring more compassion to staff and patients, and improve trust among leadership. MDfL focuses on three stages-connecting, exploring, and discovering-and it uses mindfulness practices to enhance communication. Here we describe our efforts to implement MDfL on a virtual platform and how the COVID-19 pandemic affected staff's work experience, as identified during their MDfL sessions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics , Substance-Related Disorders/rehabilitation , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Communication , Empathy , Female , Humans , Leadership , Pregnancy , Urban Population , Women
18.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(20): 10874-10878, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-914963

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to survey medical staff's acceptance of online Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) during the Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia (NCP), and to know some information of physical and emotional response of those medical staff who worked at the forefront of COVID-19, through the playback amount of the online MBSR training. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Considering the working environment of medical staff in forefront of NCP, we designed and recorded MBSR audio album including 13 sessions, covering 24 hours of a day, then sent the album to medical staff who had been working in Wuhan, Hubei province, China. We collected the playback amount in each session on February 10th and February 24th, which were one week and three weeks after the album was finished. RESULTS: On February 10th and February 24th, there were separately 5778 and 10640 times of broadcasting. The highest broadcasting frequency session was at 5:00 am, followed by 7:00 am. The least broadcasting frequency sessions were 17:00 pm and 19:00 pm. The broadcasting amount in the 6 periods of the night (from 21:00 pm to 7:00 am) was significantly higher than those in the daytime (from 9:00 am to 19:00 pm), with a statistical difference. The tendency of the amount of playback was consistent, which was not affected by the specific content of the mindfulness exercises. CONCLUSIONS: Online MBSR exercises were well accepted by medical staff in the COVID-19. It may help them relax and reduce the risk of stress reactions. During the NCP, medical staff may have different degrees of sleep and emotional problems, which need to be paid more attention to.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Medical Staff/psychology , Mindfulness/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological/therapy , COVID-19 , China , Female , Humans , Internet-Based Intervention , Male , Pandemics , Social Media , Treatment Outcome
19.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 35(2): 189-194, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-856448

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout rates among nurses have detrimental impact on job satisfaction, teamwork, and patient care. This costs millions of dollars in the healthcare system and challenges nurse leaders to address in order to keep up with the healthcare demands. Furthermore, burnout is especially relevant in our current healthcare climate, as frontline nurses have increased workload and multiple psychosocial stressors during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic (Sultana, Sharma, Hossain, Bhattacharya, & Purohit, 2019). Literature also suggests that mindful self-care practices need to be reinforced in order to impact burnout long term (Chamorro-Premuzic & Lusk, 2017). Project7 Mindfulness Pledge© is an accessible and voluntary mindfulness tool that nurses can utilize in their individual practice to reduce burnout and does not require significant time commitment. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of intentional self-care practices on nurse burnout and workplace environment by measuring job satisfaction and teamwork among nurses. METHODS: Comparisons between inpatient units on data from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) with the Practice Environment Scale (PES), specifically on job enjoyment and teamwork, were done utilizing ANOVA. RESULTS: Results show that nurses in an inpatient unit that implemented Project7 has significantly higher job satisfaction as compared to units that did not implement Project7. CONCLUSIONS: This suggests that this tool provides an effective and accessible mindfulness framework managers and directors can utilize to improve job satisfaction, teamwork, and thereby reduce burnout to create healthier work environments.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Mindfulness/methods , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Self Care/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Job Satisfaction , Male , Retrospective Studies , Workplace
20.
BMJ Open ; 10(8): e039646, 2020 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721207

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic poses immense challenges for national and international healthcare systems. Especially in times of social isolation and governmental restrictions, mental health should not be neglected. Innovative approaches are required to support psychologically burdened people. The e-mental health intervention 'CoPE It' has been developed to offer manualised and evidence-based psychotherapeutic support adapted to COVID-19-related issues in order to overcome psychological distress. In our study, we aim to assess the efficacy of the e-mental health intervention 'CoPE It' in terms of reducing distress (primary outcome), depression and anxiety symptoms as well as improving self-efficacy, quality of life and mindfulness (secondary outcomes). Furthermore, we want to evaluate the programme's usability, feasibility and participants' satisfaction with 'CoPE It' (tertiary outcome). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The e-mental health intervention 'CoPE It' consists of four 30 min modules, conducted every other day, involving psychotherapeutic techniques of mindfulness-based stress reduction and cognitive-behavioural therapy. The widely applied and previously established content has been adapted to the context of the COVID-19 pandemic by experts in psychosomatic medicine and stress prevention. In our longitudinal study, adult participants-with adequate German language and computer skills, and who have provided informed consent-will be recruited via emergency support hotlines in Germany. Flyers will be distributed, and online channels will be used. Participants will complete a baseline assessment (T0), a postintervention assessment (T1) and assessments 1 and 3 months later (T2 and T3, respectively). We will perform repeated measures analysis of covariance, mixed linear models, standard analyses of variance and regression, and correlation coefficients. In case of binary outcome variables, either mixed logistic regression or χ² tests will be used. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The Ethics Committees of the University of Duisburg-Essen (20-9243-BO) and University of Tübingen (469/2020BO) approved the study. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: DRKS00021301.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Distance Counseling/methods , Mindfulness/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Efficacy , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
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