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1.
Biomed Res Int ; 2022: 6889285, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759514

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To develop and implement a "semi-presential" technology platform to support urgent and priority dental care for the elderly in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic among the Chilean population. Methods: A dental mobile clinic was implemented along with the development of a technological platform designed to support emergency and priority dental procedures, including teleconsultation with specialists. Under strict biosafety protocols, dental care was provided in five Chilean regions between February and May 2021. Sociodemographic, medical, and dental data were recorded. Results: A total of 135 patients over sixty years old, with a mean age of 72 years, were treated, 48 males and 87 females were attended between February and May 2021 in five different regions of Chile. 53.3% required immediate or urgent treatment, and 24.4% were derived to specialists from whom 60.6% needed immediate or urgent treatment. 74.3% of teleconsultations were derived to an oral pathology specialist. Conclusion: It was shown that a "semi-presential" technology platform implemented in a mobile dental clinic can help elderly people who are impeded to look for traditional dental assistance during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dental Health Services/organization & administration , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Mobile Health Units/standards , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Chile , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
2.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(2): 94-95, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686365

ABSTRACT

The pandemic is shining a new light on mobile clinics and their operators, prompting discussion about how to optimize their use. Gary Humphrey reports.


Subject(s)
Mobile Health Units , Pandemics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 763723, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637675

ABSTRACT

The healthcare systems in China and globally have faced serious challenges during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. The shortage of beds in traditional hospitals has exacerbated the threat of COVID-19. To increase the number of available beds, China implemented a special public health measure of opening mobile cabin hospitals. Mobile cabin hospitals, also called Fangcang shelter hospitals, refer to large-scale public venues such as indoor stadiums and exhibition centers converted to temporary hospitals. This study is a mini review of the practice of mobile cabin hospitals in China. The first part is regarding emergency preparedness, including site selection, conversion, layout, and zoning before opening the hospital, and the second is on hospital management, including organization management, management of nosocomial infections, information technology support, and material supply. This review provides some practical recommendations for countries that need mobile cabin hospitals to relieve the pressure of the pandemic on the healthcare systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Defense , China/epidemiology , Humans , Mobile Health Units , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Vaccine ; 40(5): 734-741, 2022 01 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586267

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People living in clustered communities with health comorbidities are highly vulnerable to COVID-19 infection. Rapid vaccination of vulnerable populations is critical to reducing fatalities and mitigating strain on healthcare systems. We present a case study on COVID-19 vaccine distribution via mobile vans to residents/staff of 47,907 long-term care facilities (LTCFs) across the United States that relied on algorithms to optimize vaccine distribution. METHODS: We developed a modeling framework for vaccine distribution to high-risk populations in a supply-constrained environment. Our framework decomposed this challenge as two separate problems: an assignment problem where we optimally mapped each LTCF to select CVS stores responsible for distributing vaccines; and a scheduling problem where we developed an algorithm to assign available resources efficiently. RESULTS: We assigned 1,214 retail stores as depots for vaccine distribution to LTCFs throughout the United States. Forty-one percent of matched depot-LTCF pairs were within 5 miles of a depot, 74% were within 20 miles, and only 8% mapped to depots farther than 50 miles away. Our two-step approach ensured that the first LTCF vaccination dose was distributed within 9 days after the program start date in 76% of states, and greater than 90% of doses were administered in the minimum amount of time. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that algorithmic approaches are instrumental in maximizing vaccine distribution efficiency. Our learning and framework may be of use to other organizations, including communities where mobile clinics can be established to efficiently distribute vaccines and other healthcare resources in a variety of scenarios.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , Long-Term Care , Mobile Health Units , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
5.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 13(1): e1-e9, 2021 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580227

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus pandemic has put extreme pressure on health care services in South Africa. AIM: To describe the design, patients and outcomes of a field hospital during the first wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. SETTING: The Cape Town International Convention Centre was the first location in Cape Town to be commissioned as a field hospital that would serve as an intermediate care bed facility. METHODS: This was a retrospective descriptive study of patients admitted to this facility between 8th June 2020 and 14th August 2020 using deidentified data extracted from patient records. RESULTS: There were 1502 patients admitted, 56.4% female, with a mean age of 58.6 years (standard deviation [s.d.]: 14.2). The majority of patients (82.9%) had at least one comorbidity, whilst 15.4% had three or more. Nearly 80.0% (79.8%) of patients required oxygen and 63.5% received steroids, and only 5.7% of patients were required to be transferred for escalation of care. The mean length of stay was 6 days (s.d.: 4.8) with an overall mortality of 5.7%. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the role of a field hospital in providing surge capacity. Its use halved the predicted duration of stay at acute care hospitals, allowing them the capacity to manage more unstable and critical patients. Adaptability and responsivity as well as adequate referral platforms proved to be crucial. Daily communication with the whole health care service platform was a critical success factor. This study provides information to assist future health planning and strategy development in the current pandemic and future disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Health Units , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa/epidemiology , United States
6.
J Glob Health ; 11: 05023, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573936

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, two new temporary hospitals were constructed in record time in Wuhan, China, to help combat the fast-spreading virus in February 2020. Using the experience of one of the hospitals as a case study, we discuss the health and economic implications of this response strategy and its potential application in other countries. METHODS: This retrospective observational study analyzed health resource utilization and clinical outcomes data for 2011 inpatients diagnosed with COVID-19 and admitted to Leishenshan Hospital during its 67 days of operation from February 8th to April 14th, 2020. We used a top-down costing approach to estimate the total cost of treating patients at the Leishenshan Hospital, including capital cost for hospital construction, health personnel costs, and direct health care costs. We used a multivariate generalized linear model to examine risk factors associated with in-hospital deaths. RESULTS: During the 67 days of hospital operation, 19 medical teams comprising of 933 doctors and 2312 nurses were gradually transferred to Leishenshan Hospital from across China. Of the 2011 admissions, 4.5% used intensive care and 2.0% used ventilators. Overall median length of stay was 19 days, and 21 days for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). The case fatality rate (CFR) was 2.3% overall, 41.8% in the ICU, and 0.4% in general ward (GW). CFRs were 55% and 50% among patients using non-invasive and invasive ventilators, respectively. The mean total cost and direct health care cost were CNY806 997 (US$114 793) and CNY16 087 (US$2288), respectively. Patients admitted to the ICU had much higher direct health care costs, on average, compared to those in the GW (CNY150 415 vs CNY9720, or US$21 396 vs US$1383). The mean direct health care cost per patient with severe or critical diseases was more than five times higher than those with mild or moderate diseases (CNY45 191 vs CNY8838, or US$6428 vs US$1257). Older age, having comorbidities, and critical disease were associated with higher risks of death from COVID-19. Lower health worker to patient ratio (<2.6) was not associated with in-hospital death. CONCLUSION: An adequate health workforce were mobilized and deployed to a new temporary hospital. The Leishenshan Hospital increased access to care during the surge in COVID-19 infections, facilitated timely treatment, and transferred COVID-19 patients between GWs and ICUs within the hospital, all of which are potential contributors to lowering the CFR. Patients in the ICU experienced a much higher CFR and a greater burden of health care cost than those in GW. Our results have important implications for other countries interested in constructing temporary emergency hospitals, such as the need for adequate infrastructure capacities and financial support, centralized strategies to mobilize health workforce and to provide respiratory protective devices, and improvement in access to health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Mobile Health Units , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
BMC Med Imaging ; 21(1): 192, 2021 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571744

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study is to compare the lung image quality between shelter hospital CT (CT Ark) and ordinary CT scans (Brilliance 64) scans. METHODS: The patients who received scans with CT Ark or Brilliance 64 CT were enrolled. Their lung images were divided into two groups according to the scanner. The objective evaluation methods of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were used. The subjective evaluation methods including the evaluation of the fine structure under the lung window and the evaluation of the general structure under the mediastinum window were compared. Kappa method was used to assess the reliability of the subjective evaluation. The subjective evaluation results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. SNR and CNR were tested using independent sample t tests. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in somatotype of enrolled subjects. The Kappa value between the two observers was between 0.68 and 0.81, indicating good consistency. For subjective evaluation results, the rank sum test P value of fine structure evaluation and general structure evaluation by the two observers was ≥ 0.05. For objective evaluation results, SNR and CNR between the two CT scanners were significantly different (P<0.05). Notably, the absolute values ​​of SNR and CNR of the CT Ark were larger than Brilliance 64 CT scanner. CONCLUSION: CT Ark is fully capable of scanning the lungs of the COVID-19 patients during the epidemic in the shelter hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Mobile Health Units/standards , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/instrumentation , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/standards , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Observer Variation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal-To-Noise Ratio
8.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(3): e0100821, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546470

ABSTRACT

Rapid antigen tests are simple to perform and provide results within 15 min. We describe our implementation and assess performance of the BinaxNOW COVID-19 Antigen Test (Abbott Laboratories) in 6,099 adults at a self-referred walk-up testing site. Participants were grouped by self-reported COVID-19 exposure and symptom status. Most (89%) were asymptomatic, of whom 17% reported potential exposure. Overall test sensitivity compared with reference laboratory reverse-transcription [RT] PCR testing was 81% (95% confidence interval [CI] 75%, 86%). It was higher in symptomatic (87%; 95% CI 80%, 91%) than asymptomatic (71%; 95% CI 61%, 80%) individuals. Sensitivity was 82% (95% CI 66%, 91%) for asymptomatic individuals with potential exposure and 64% (95% CI 51%, 76%) for those with no exposure. Specificity was greater than 99% for all groups. BinaxNOW has high accuracy among symptomatic individuals and is below the FDA threshold for emergency use authorization in asymptomatic individuals. Nonetheless, rapid antigen testing quickly identifies positive among those with symptoms and/or close contact exposure and could expedite isolation and treatment. IMPORTANCE The BinaxNOW rapid antigen COVID-19 test had a sensitivity of 87% in symptomatic and 71% asymptomatic individuals when performed by health care workers in a high-throughput setting. The performance may expedite isolation decisions or referrals for time-sensitive monoclonal antibody treatment in communities where timely COVID PCR tests are unavailable.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/analysis , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Asymptomatic Diseases , Female , Humans , Male , Mobile Health Units , Point-of-Care Testing , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sensitivity and Specificity
9.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0256908, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542171

ABSTRACT

This article describes our experience developing a novel mobile health unit (MHU) program in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area. Our main objectives were to improve healthcare accessibility, quality and equity in our community during the novel coronavirus pandemic. While initially focused on SARS-CoV-2 testing, our program quickly evolved to include preventive health services. The MHU program began as a location-based SARS-CoV-2 testing strategy coordinated with local and state public health agencies. Community needs motivated further program expansion to include additional preventive healthcare and social services. MHU deployment was targeted to disease "hotspots" based on publicly available SARS-CoV-2 testing data and community-level information about social vulnerability. This formative evaluation explores whether our MHU deployment strategy enabled us to reach patients from communities with heightened social vulnerability as intended. From 3/20/20-3/24/21, the Detroit MHU program reached a total of 32,523 people. The proportion of patients who resided in communities with top quartile Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Social Vulnerability Index rankings increased from 25% during location-based "drive-through" SARS-CoV-2 testing (3/20/20-4/13/20) to 27% after pivoting to a mobile platform (4/13/20-to-8/31/20; p = 0.01). The adoption of a data-driven deployment strategy resulted in further improvement; 41% of the patients who sought MHU services from 9/1/20-to-3/24/21 lived in vulnerable communities (Cochrane Armitage test for trend, p<0.001). Since 10/1/21, 1,837 people received social service referrals and, as of 3/15/21, 4,603 were administered at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. Our MHU program demonstrates the capacity to provide needed healthcare and social services to difficult-to-reach populations from areas with heightened social vulnerability. This model can be expanded to meet emerging pandemic needs, but it is also uniquely capable of improving health equity by addressing longstanding gaps in primary care and social services in vulnerable communities.


Subject(s)
Mobile Health Units , Pandemics , Public Health , Adult , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Geography , Health Services , Humans , Male , Michigan , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Work
11.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(11): 1027-1030, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483697

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Rehabilitation experts play an important role in preventing hospital-acquired debility, increasing patients' abilities to safely perform activities of daily living, and facilitating discharge to the home setting for patients with COVID-19. Surges in COVID-19 hospitalization rates combined with increases in length of hospital stay and decreases in postacute care placements have necessitated the opening of COVID-19 field hospitals around the country. Most field hospitals lack the resources to offer a full suite of rehabilitation services, but there are opportunities for small teams of rehabilitation experts to increase their reach by using innovative strategies. This article describes the implementation of a small team of rehabilitation experts in a COVID-19 field hospital and strategies used by this team to maximize patient activity and mobility, facilitate timely discharge, and maximize the number of patients discharged to the home setting. Strategies include training nonclinical staff to assist with activity and mobility promotion and using a rehabilitation triage system to determine needs of individual patients and facilitate efficient resource utilization. The authors reflect on successful aspects of these strategies, as well as barriers to rehabilitation implementation, and make recommendations for other field hospitals seeking to implement rehabilitation during the COVID-19 pandemic or future health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Activities of Daily Living , Baltimore , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Recovery of Function , SARS-CoV-2 , Subacute Care
12.
S Afr Med J ; 111(10): 961-967, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478409

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared an international pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020. Throughout the pandemic, the association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and more severe COVID-19 has been well described internationally, with limited data, however, on South Africa (SA). The role of field hospitals in the management of patients with COVID-19 in SA has not yet been described. OBJECTIVES: To describe the mortality and morbidity of people living with DM (PLWD) and comorbid COVID-19, as well as to shed light on the role of intermediate facilities in managing DM and COVID-19 during the pandemic. METHODS: This is a single-centre cross-sectional descriptive study that included all patients with confirmed COVID-19 and pre-existing or newly diagnosed DM (of any type) admitted to the Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC) Intermediate Care Bed Facility from June 2020 to August 2020. This study presents the profile of patients admitted to the CTICC, and reports on the clinical outcome of PLWD diagnosed with COVID-19, and additionally determines some associations between risk factors and death or escalation of care in this setting. RESULTS: There were 1 447 admissions at the CTICC, with a total of 674 (46.6%) patients who had confirmed DM, of whom 125 (19%) were newly diagnosed diabetics and 550 (81%) had pre-existing DM. Included in this group were 57 referrals from the telemedicine platform - a platform that identified high-risk diabetic patients with COVID-19 in the community, and linked them directly to hospital inpatient care. Of the 674 PLWD admitted, 593 were discharged alive, 45 were escalated to tertiary hospital requiring advanced care and 36 died. PLWD who died were older, had more comorbidities (specifically chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive cardiac failure and chronic kidney disease) and were more likely to be on insulin. CONCLUSIONS: In a resource-limited environment, interdisciplinary and interfacility collaboration ensured that complicated patients with DM and COVID-19 were successfully managed in a field hospital setting. Telemedicine offered a unique opportunity to identify high-risk patients in the community and link them to in-hospital monitoring and care. Future studies should explore ways to optimise this collaboration, as well as to explore possibilities for early identification and management of high-risk patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Mobile Health Units , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , South Africa/epidemiology , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
13.
S Afr Med J ; 111(10): 957-960, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478408

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa (SA) created numerous supply challenges. Demand for diagnostic testing overwhelmed the capacity to deliver. We describe the utility and outcomes of a mobile laboratory staffed by non-laboratory healthcare workers and established to perform polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for the rapid diagnosis of COVID-19 at a large hospital in SA. OBJECTIVES: To describe the performance of the mobile PCR COVID-19 laboratory. The secondary objective was to determine the prevalence of COVID-19 infections in the non-COVID intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: This was a retrospective descriptive study of data from the newly established mobile COVID-19 PCR laboratory database and the non-COVID ICU database during the first peak of the COVID-19 pandemic (20 May - 8 August 2020) at a tertiary hospital in SA. RESULTS: The mobile laboratory received 1 113 emergency COVID-19 PCR test requests for patients with non-COVID clinical presentations. The median (interquartile range) turnaround time was 152 (123 - 184) minutes (n=36). Primary outcome (20 May - 19 June, n=315): The sensitivity and specificity were 95% and 97%, respectively, and the positive and negative predictive values 82.4% and 99.2%, respectively. Secondary outcomes (9 June - 8 August): The prevalence of COVID-19 infections among patients admitted to the multidisciplinary adult and paediatric non-COVID ICU was 2.4% (n=4/168). The mean (standard deviation) COVID-19 positive rate for the mobile laboratory during this period was 18.1% (6%). The prevalence of COVID-19 infections among medical staff in the non-COVID ICU was 3.1% (n=1/32). CONCLUSIONS: The establishment of a mobile PCR laboratory staffed by non-laboratory healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic provided a rapid, accurate and clinically effective solution for emergency hospital admissions with non-COVID-19 presentations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Mobile Health Units , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Laboratories , Male , Middle Aged , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , South Africa , Tertiary Care Centers , Time Factors , Young Adult
14.
Orv Hetil ; 162(40): 1591-1600, 2021 10 03.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448615

ABSTRACT

Összefoglaló. Bevezetés: A COVID-19-pandémia okozta nagyfokú betegszám-növekedés ellátásának érdekében az egészségügyi rendszerek gyakran a kórházak teljes átszervezésére kényszerültek. A szakállomány gyors és hatékony felzárkóztatása kulcsfontosságú ilyen körülmények között. A telepített kórházi egységek személyzetének felkészítésére a virtuális valóságban levezetheto csoportos gyakorlatozás ígéretes módszernek mutatkozik. Célkituzés: Célunk egy telepített kórház személyzetének felkészítésére alkalmazott virtuális szimulációs gyakorlatsorozat tapasztalatainak bemutatása, valamint a létrehozott és kipróbált virtuális gyakorlatcsomagok adaptálási lehetoségeinek elméleti bemutatása a COVID-19-kórházak személyzetének gyors felzárkóztatását szolgáló gyakorlatsorozat lehetséges kivitelezése érdekében. Módszer: Három, prototípusként eloállított virtuális gyakorlat került alkalmazásba két próbatanfolyam keretén belül. A virtuális színterek kialakítására az XVR szimulációs szoftvert használtuk. A gyakorlatok alkalmazhatóságának és hasznosságának kiértékelésére anonim kérdoíves felméréseket készítettünk. Az adatok feldolgozásában kereszttábla-elemzést és khi-négyzet-próbát alkalmaztunk. Eredmények: A két próbaképzésen nyolc ország képviseletében összesen 76 gyakornok vett részt. A résztvevok 63,9%-a szerint a módszer alkalmas ilyen jellegu gyakorlatok levezetésére, de további fejlesztéseket igényel. Véleményük, hogy technikai használata "elég könnyen" elsajátítható (59,7%), és interaktív (90,32%), valósághu (45,0%) szimulációs közeget biztosít. Megbeszélés: Eredményeink alapján a virtuális valóság egy alkalmazható módszer a telepített kórházak szakállományának valós bevetésekre való felkészítésére. A létrehozott virtuális gyakorlatcsomagok tartalma és szerkezete könnyen adaptálható egy COVID-19 ideiglenes egészségügyi egység sajátos munkakörülményeihez való gyors személyzeti felzárkóztatást szolgáló muhelygyakorlatok megszervezéséhez. Következtetés: A virtuális valóság ígéretes oktatási eszköz, amely kiegészítheti a nagy költségekkel és bonyolult szervezéssel járó terepgyakorlatokat, megközelítve azok oktatási hatásfokát. A virtuális térben megélt tapasztalatok valós szakmai élményekké alakulnak, és hozzájárulnak egy biztonságos és hatékony munkaközeg gyors kialakításához. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(40): 1591-1600. INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 pandemic imposed sudden increase in hospital admissions, thus medical systems needed to reorganize entire hospitals quite often. Quick and efficient training is of outmost importance. Virtual reality team training is a promising tool for newly organized hospital units' staff. OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to present the usefulness and applicability of virtual simulation exercises for training of field hospital personnel and to evaluate the adaptability of these created and tested exercise packs for urgent staff training of COVID-19 hospitals. METHOD: Three prototypes of virtual reality exercises were assessed through two test courses. XVR simulation software was used to create virtual environments. Evaluation of exercise applicability and utility was performed by anonymous questionnaires. Statistical data-processing was performed using contingency table and chi-square tests. RESULTS: 76 trainees from eight countries participated in the two pilot courses. 63.9% of the participants stated that the method is suitable for conducting such exercises, but needs further development. Its technical use is "easy enough" to learn (59.7%) and provides an interactive (90.32%) and realistic (45.0%) working environment. DISCUSSION: Virtual reality is applicable to train field hospital staffs for real missions. The created virtual exercise packages are easily adaptable, both in content and structure, to workshops dedicated for quick training of specific COVID-19 temporary medical facility's personnel. CONCLUSION: Virtual reality is a promising educational tool that can complement the expensive and laborious field exercises, with comparable training efficiency. These virtual reality experiences may become real professional memories and create swiftly a secure and efficient professional milieu. Orv Hetil. 2021; 160(40): 1591-1600.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virtual Reality , Hospitals , Humans , Hungary , Mobile Health Units , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 71-76, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436197

ABSTRACT

Across the globe, the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic is causing distress with governments doing everything in their power to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) to prevent morbidity and mortality. Actions are being implemented to keep health care systems from being overstretched and to curb the outbreak. Any policy responses aimed at slowing down the spread of the virus and mitigating its immediate effects on health care systems require a firm basis of information about the absolute number of currently infected people, growth rates, and locations/hotspots of infections. The only way to obtain this base of information is by conducting numerous tests in a targeted way. Currently, in Ghana, there is a centralized testing approach, that takes 4-5 days for samples to be shipped and tested at central reference laboratories with results communicated to the district, regional and national stakeholders. This delay in diagnosis increases the risk of ongoing transmission in communities and vulnerable institutions. We have validated, evaluated and deployed an innovative diagnostic tool on a mobile laboratory platform to accelerate the COVID-19 testing. A preliminary result of 74 samples from COVID-19 suspected cases has a positivity rate of 12% with a turn-around time of fewer than 3 hours from sample taking to reporting of results, significantly reducing the waiting time from days to hours, enabling expedient response by the health system for contact tracing to reduce transmission and additionally improving case management. FUNDING: Test kits were provided by AngloGold Ashanti Obuasi Mine (AngloGold Ashanti Health Foundation). The American Leprosy Mission donated the PCR machine, and the mobile laboratory van was funded by the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (EKN). AAS, YAA was supported by (PANDORA-ID-NET RIA2016E-1609) and ROP supported by EDCTP Senior Fellowship (TMA2016SF), both funded by the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP2) programme which is supported under Horizon 2020, the European Union.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Mobile Health Units , Population Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Contact Tracing , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Early Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Time Factors , Young Adult
16.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 42(spe): e20200378, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410819

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand the role of nurses in field hospitals aimed at patients with Covid-19. METHODS: Qualitative research based on Alfred Schütz's social phenomenology. Twenty nurses working in São Paulo were interviewed between May and June 2020. The testimonies were organized and analyzed based on the theoretical-methodological and thematic framework. RESULTS: The following categories emerged: "Nurses' challenges in field hospital care", "Visibility of nursing in the Covid-19 pandemic scenario" and "Covid-19 post-pandemic professional valorization". FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: The reflection on the results that emerged in this study may contribute to support improvements in training, working conditions and valuing nurses, considering the importance of this professional category in the scope of health services. New investigations may increase knowledge in the area, providing subsidies for professional role in this and other health situations that require nursing intensity and excellence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Nurse's Role/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Nursing/standards , Adult , Brazil , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Theory , Pandemics , Professional Practice , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int ; 29(2): 1985-1997, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345177

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 poses many challenges for hospitals around the world. Each country attempts to solve the problems in its hospitals using different methods. In Turkey, two pandemic hospitals were built in Istanbul, the most crowded province. In addition, some hospitals were designated as pandemic hospitals. This study focuses on the methods used for site selection for a pandemic hospital in Atakum, a district of Samsun City, Turkey. As a solution to the problem, initially, spatial analysis was performed using GIS to produce maps based on seven criteria obtained from the insight of an expert team. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) augmented by interval-valued Pythagorean fuzzy numbers (PFNs) was then used to determine weights for the criteria. Distance to transportation network was the most important criterion influencing the selection process and the least significant one was the distance to fire stations. Based on the criteria weights, and five rules specified by the expert team, 13 suitable locations for a pandemic hospital were determined using GIS. The technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) method was used to determine the final ranking of 13 alternative locations (A1-A13). A10 was identified as the most appropriate site and A11 as the least appropriate site for a pandemic hospital. Finally, sensitivity analysis was performed to investigate how changes in weight values of the criteria affect the ranking of the alternatives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Health Units , Refuse Disposal , Geographic Information Systems , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey
20.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(9): 1206-1211, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330981

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has affected over 145 million infected people and 3 million deaths worldwide. There has been limited data to recommend either for or against use of antiviral regimens in mild COVID-19 patients. This study aimed to compare clinical outcomes between mild COVID-19 patients receiving antiviral drugs and those without. METHOD: Thai patients diagnosed with COVID-19 at field hospital affiliated to Thammasat University Hospital, Thailand were evaluated between January 1, 2020 and April 13, 2021. Patients' data, clinical presentation, past medical history, laboratory results, and treatment outcomes were extensively reviewed. RESULTS: Five hundred patients with positive tests were included in the study. The mean age was 35.9 years; 46% males. There were 225 (45%), 207 (41.4%), 44 (8.8%), 18 (3.6%), 6 (1.2%) patients with asymptomatic, mild, moderate, severe, and critical COVID-19, respectively. Of 207 mild COVID-19 patients, 9 (4.3%) received lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir, 17 (8.2%) received favipiravir, while 175 (84.5%) had only supportive care. Mild COVID-19 patients receiving antiviral treatment had longer median length of hospital stay [13 days (IQR 11-14) vs. 10 days (IQR 8-12), p < 0.001] than patients having only supportive treatment. Antiviral drug use was significantly associated with longer hospital stay (>10 days) in mild COVID-19 patients (OR 5.52; 95%CI 2.12-14.40, p < 0.001). Adverse drug reactions such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and hepatitis were also demonstrated in our COVID-19 patients with antiviral treatments. Majority of patients (97.6%) recovered without any complications and were discharged home. Two deaths were caused by acute respiratory distress syndrome from severe COVID-19 pneumonia. CONCLUSION: Antiviral treatment could not provide superior clinical outcomes to supportive care in mild COVID-19 patients. Mild COVID-19 patients receiving antiviral medication had longer length of hospital stay than those without. Standard supportive care and regular monitoring of disease progression might be keys for successful management of mild COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , COVID-19 , Adult , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Male , Mobile Health Units , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
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