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1.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 993, 2023 05 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic increases the risk of psychological problems, especially for the infected population. Sleep disturbance and feelings of defeat and entrapment are well-documented risk factors of anxiety symptoms. Exploring the psychological mechanism of the development of anxiety symptoms is essential for effective prevention. This study aimed to examine the mediating effects of entrapment and defeat in the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms among asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers in Shanghai, China. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from March to April, 2022. Participants were 1,283 asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers enrolled from the Ruijin Jiahe Fangcang Shelter Hospital, Shanghai (59.6% male; mean age = 39.6 years). Questionnaire measures of sleep disturbance, entrapment, defeat, anxiety symptoms, and background characteristics were obtained. A mediation model was constructed to test the mediating effects of entrapment and defeat in the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms. RESULTS: The prevalence rates of sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms were 34.3% and 18.8%. Sleep disturbance was positively associated with anxiety symptoms (OR [95%CI] = 5.013 [3.721-6.753]). The relationship between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms (total effect: Std. Estimate = 0.509) was partially mediated by entrapment (indirect effect: Std. Estimate = 0.129) and defeat (indirect effect: Std. Estimate = 0.126). The mediating effect of entrapment and defeat accounted for 50.3% of the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSION: Sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms were prevalent among asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers. Entrapment and defeat mediate the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms. More attention is needed to monitoring sleep conditions and feelings of defeat and entrapment to reduce the risk of anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Humans , Male , Adult , Female , Depression/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Special , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units , Anxiety/epidemiology , Sleep , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238612

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, Fangcang shelter hospitals have been built and operated in several cities, and have played a huge role in epidemic prevention and control. How to use medical resources effectively in order to maximize epidemic prevention and control is a big challenge that the government should address. In this paper, a two-stage infectious disease model was developed to analyze the role of Fangcang shelter hospitals in epidemic prevention and control, and examine the impact of medical resources allocation on epidemic prevention and control. Our model suggested that the Fangcang shelter hospital could effectively control the rapid spread of the epidemic, and for a very large city with a population of about 10 million and a relative shortage of medical resources, the model predicted that the final number of confirmed cases could be only 3.4% of the total population in the best case scenario. The paper further discusses the optimal solutions regarding medical resource allocation when medical resources are either limited or abundant. The results show that the optimal allocation ratio of resources between designated hospitals and Fangcang shelter hospitals varies with the amount of additional resources. When resources are relatively sufficient, the upper limit of the proportion of makeshift hospitals is about 91%, while the lower limit decreases with the increase in resources. Meanwhile, there is a negative correlation between the intensity of medical work and the proportion of distribution. Our work deepens our understanding of the role of Fangcang shelter hospitals in the pandemic and provides a reference for feasible strategies by which to contain the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics/prevention & control , Hospitals, Special , Mobile Health Units , China/epidemiology
3.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1129322, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276101

ABSTRACT

Introduction: With the COVID-19 pandemic in China, a large number of mild or ordinary confirmed cases have been sent to Fangcang shelter hospitals for treatment. We aimed to investigate the mental health condition of Fangcang patients 2 years after the pandemic when patients knew more about COVID-19 and the virus was less virulent. We focused on the effect of dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep on depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Methods: A total of 1,014 patients from two large Fangcang shelter hospitals in Shanghai between 22 April and 8 May 2022 completed a set of questionnaires comprising: the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire, and the Insomnia Severity Index scale. Results: Results show that the positive screening rates for anxiety, depression, and insomnia among tested patients were 55.3, 27.0, and 47.8%, respectively. Patients were more likely to report higher anxiety, depression, and insomnia, and to endorse affective and sleep disorders if they were: female, aged 18-40 years, with undergraduate course or above, white-collar employees, or those who thought the pandemic would have severe economic effects. About 51.4% of the participants had dysfunctional beliefs about sleep to varying degrees. Compared with patients who had accurate beliefs about sleep, the ratios of insomnia, anxiety, and depression were significantly higher among patients with dysfunctional beliefs about sleep. Discussion: Attention should be paid to the mental health problems of patients in Fangcang shelter hospitals. The results indicate that dysfunctional beliefs about sleep significantly increased anxiety, depression, and insomnia of Fangcang patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Female , Mental Health , Sleep Quality , Pandemics , Hospitals, Special , Depression/psychology , Mobile Health Units , China , Sleep
4.
BMJ Open ; 13(3): e067227, 2023 03 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261999

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 has strained healthcare systems, requiring the redesign of their structure, human resource management and clinical approach. Countries have adopted implementation strategies and maximise field hospital functionality to address the issue of overflow of patients with COVID-19. This scoping review was based on the main research question, 'What are the implementation strategies, challenges and opportunities in managing the field hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic?', and aimed to consolidate all recent evidence on COVID-19 field hospital implementation approaches, challenges and potentialities. DESIGN: Scoping review, following the Arksey and O'Malley's framework, and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews guidelines. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus were searched from 1 January 2020 through 31 December 2021. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Original articles, reviews, case studies and reports written in English were included. Works without full article and articles that did not answer the research questions were excluded. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Data were extracted using a standardised data extraction form in Microsoft Excel. The findings of all included articles were synthesised narratively. RESULTS: Eighty-five records were reviewed and 25 studies were included. For the field hospital implementation strategies, 'surge capacity', namely space, human resource, supply and system, was discussed in addition to the preparation and workflow of other services such as pharmacy, rehabilitation, food and nutrition. The management of COVID-19 field hospitals is challenging with respect to staff and resource shortages, inability to anticipate patient load and poor communication. The opportunities and recommendations for improvement of management were also highlighted. CONCLUSIONS: The compilation of lessons learnt may help improve the future management of field hospitals, administratively and clinically.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Mobile Health Units , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care
5.
BMJ Open ; 13(4): e066930, 2023 04 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261406

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to assess the volunteer motivation and stress load of patient volunteers in the Fangcang shelter hospitals (FSHs), examine their associations, and explore the potential influence factors of volunteer motivation. DESIGN: Cross-sectional online survey conducted from 21 April to 20 May 2022. SETTING: Questionnaires were collected from patient volunteers selected by random cluster sampling in the FSHs in Shanghai, China. PARTICIPANTS: 197 participants who met the inclusion criteria as patients who were asymptomatic or presenting with mild symptoms in the FSHs and who volunteered to assist with routine work under quarantined settings. OUTCOME MEASURES: We investigated sociodemographic information, stress load and volunteer motivation through an online survey using the Volunteer Function Inventory and the Stress Overload Scale. Comparisons between groups were conducted by applying t-tests or analysis of variance. The correlation between volunteer motivation and stress was analysed by Pearson correlation. Influencing factors of volunteer motivation were determined by multivariable linear regression models. A value of p<0.05 was used to declare statistical significance. RESULTS: The mean score of volunteer motivation of patient volunteers was 73.24 (SD 12.00), while that of stress load was 46.08 (SD 21.28). The mean scores of the personal vulnerability (PV) and event load (EL), two dimensions of stress load, were 26.99 (SD 12.46) and 19.09 (SD 9.63), respectively. The majority of the participants (136, 69.04%) were grouped in the low (PV)-low (EL) stress category. Participants' volunteer motivation was negatively correlated with stress load (r=-0.238, p<0.001), as well as PV (r=-0.188, p<0.01) and EL (r=-0.283, p<0.001). Multivariable linear regression analysis identified that the potential influencing factors of volunteer motivation were occupation (B=1.100, 95% CI 0.037 to 2.164, p=0.043), health condition (B=-3.302, 95% CI -5.287 to -1.317, p<0.001) and EL (B=-0.434, 95% CI -0.756 to -0.111, p=0.009). Participants who worked in the public sector, had better health conditions and had lower EL were more likely to have higher volunteer motivation. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggested that reducing stress load might be a possible pathway to encourage and maintain volunteerism in the FSH context. Implications and suggestions for future research on patient volunteer recruitment and management could be drawn from our findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Motivation , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Special , Pandemics , Mobile Health Units , China/epidemiology , Volunteers
6.
Int J Infect Dis ; 130: 60-70, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265428

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Asymptomatic infections and mild diseases were more common during the Omicron outbreak in Shanghai, China in 2022. This study aimed to assess the characteristics and viral RNA decay between patients with asymptomatic and mild infections. METHODS: A total of 55,111 patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 who were quarantined in the National Exhibition & Convention Center (Shanghai) Fangcang shelter hospital within 3 days after diagnosis from April 9 to May 23, 2022 were enrolled. The kinetics of cycle threshold (Ct) values of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were assessed. The influencing factors for disease progression and the risk factors for the viral RNA shedding time (VST) were investigated. RESULTS: On admission, 79.6% (43,852/55,111) of the cases were diagnosed with asymptomatic infections, and 20.4% were mild diseases. However, 78.0% of initially asymptomatic subjects developed mild diseases at the follow-up. The final proportion of asymptomatic infections was 17.5%. The median time of symptom onset, the duration of symptoms, and the VST were 2 days, 5 days, and 7 days, respectively. Female, age 19-40 years, underlying comorbidities with hypertension and diabetes, and vaccination were associated with higher risks of progressing to mildly symptomatic infections. In addition, mildly symptomatic infections were found to be associated with prolonged VST compared with asymptomatic infections. However, the kinetics of viral RNA decay and dynamics of Ct values were similar among asymptomatic subjects, patients with asymptomatic-to-mild infection, and patients with mild infection. CONCLUSION: A large proportion of initially diagnosed asymptomatic Omicron infections is in the presymptomatic stage. The Omicron infection has a much shorter incubation period and VST than previous variants. The infectivity of asymptomatic infections and mildly symptomatic infections with Omicron is similar.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Female , Young Adult , Adult , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Hospitals, Special , China/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units
7.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 168, 2023 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265007

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sexual and gender minorities (SGM) in the Southern United States face challenges in accessing sexual and gender affirming health care. Alternative care models, like inclusive mobile clinics, help mitigate barriers to care for SGM. There is limited data in the literature on the experience of medical referral processes for SGM individuals accessing services from mobile health clinics. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to describe the medical referral experiences of SGM clients and their providers at a mobile health clinic in the Southern United States. METHODS: We recruited English-speaking individuals who provided care or received care from the mobile health clinic in South Carolina between June 2019 and August 2020. Participants completed a brief demographic survey and a virtual in-depth, semi-structured individual interview. Data analysis was conducted using an iterative process to generate codes, categories, and themes. Data collection and analysis were terminated once thematic saturation was achieved. RESULTS: The findings from this study indicated that the mobile health clinic had an inconsistent referral process that was largely dependent on providers' knowledge. Furthermore, clients and providers expressed individual barriers to the referral process, such as financial barriers, and opportunities to improve the referral process, such as an opt-in follow-up from the mobile clinic and increased mobile clinic resources. CONCLUSION: The findings in this study underscore the importance of having mobile clinics create a structured referral process that all medical providers are familiar with, and the value of hiring patient navigators that can support and refer clients to care that goes beyond the mobile health clinic setting.


Subject(s)
Mobile Health Units , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Humans , South Carolina , Public Health , Gender Identity , Referral and Consultation
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1073387, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242670

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the clinical characteristics and risk factors of viral shedding time in mildly symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron variant (BA.2 and BA2.2) infection in Shanghai, and the effect of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment, so as to provide a reference basis for epidemic prevention, control and clinical treatment. Methods: A total of 6,134 asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic Omicron-infected patients admitted to Tianhua Road fangcang shelter hospital in Jinshan, Shanghai, between April 2022 and May 2022 were included. Demographic characteristics and clinical histories were collected and compared in subgroups according to the different durations of viral shedding. Spearman's correlation analysis was performed to explore the association between virus shedding time and clinical variables. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the risk factors for viral shedding time. Result: Most patients with asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic Omicron infection were male, and more than half of patients had a viral shedding time of 8-15 days. The patients were divided into three groups according to the time of viral shedding: short-duration (≤ 7 days), intermediate-duration (8-15 days) and long-duration group (≥16 days). The proportion of patients aged ≤ 29 years was the highest in the short-duration group (30.2%), whereas the proportion of patients aged 50-64 yeas was the highest in the long-duration group (37.9%). The proportion of patients with the chronic non-communicable diseases among the short-, intermediate- and long-duration groups was 6.2, 9.4, and 14.9%, respectively. Among them, hypertension was the most found (4.9, 7.8, and 11.7%, respectively). By multivariate analyses, we identified that viral shedding time of Omicron variants was independently negatively correlated with male patients, TCM treatment, and manual laborers, while it was independently positively associated with age and hypertension. Additionally, TCM treatment could significantly shorten the length of viral shedding time, especially for men, age ≥30 years, comorbid chronic non-communicable diseases, unemployed people and manual worker. Conclusions: Our results suggested that age and hypertension were independent risk factors for the duration of viral shedding in asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic omicron infected patients. TCM can effectively shorten viral shedding time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Noncommunicable Diseases , Humans , Male , Female , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Shedding , Hospitals, Special , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units , China/epidemiology
9.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1048358, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230560

ABSTRACT

The Omicron wave of the COVID-19 pandemic significantly affected Shanghai, China, from March to June 2022. Numbers of Fangcang Shelter Hospitals (FSHs) were conversed from stadiums and exhibition centers to tackle the pandemic. This study aimed to identify the stress load profiles of nurses working in FSHs and explore the characteristics and factors influencing stress load profiles. Totally, 609 out of 700 FSH nurses (with an effective response rate of 87%) participated in an online survey investigating their socio-demographic information, work-related stressors, and stress load. Results of the latent profile analysis identified four classes of stress load, which were labeled as the low (Class 1), mild (Class 2), moderate (Class 3), and high (Class 4) stress load class. Maternity status and self-perceived health condition were significantly different between the four stress load classes by comparisons using the Chi-square test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. The contributors to the stress load profiles were determined by the multinomial logistic regression analysis, including age, education, maternity status, self-perceived health condition, working time in FSHs, and the four dimensions of work-related stressors. Participants who were less healthy (OR = 0.045, 95% CI:0.012,0.171), worked longer time in FSHs (OR = 40.483, 95% CI: 12.103,135.410), faced with more workload (OR = 3.664, 95% CI: 1.047,12.815), and worse working environment (OR = 12.274, 95% CI: 3.029,49.729) were more likely to be classified to the high stress load class. The task arrangement and working environment for FSH nurses should be optimized, and psychological training should be conducted routinely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , East Asian People , Hospitals , Nurses , Stress, Psychological , Female , Humans , China/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , East Asian People/psychology , Follicle Stimulating Hormone , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Special/statistics & numerical data , Mobile Health Units/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload/psychology , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Working Conditions/psychology , Working Conditions/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology
10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1038296, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2224930

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic had a major impact on people's mental health. As the SAS-Cov-2 evolves to become less virulent, the number of asymptomatic patients increases. It remains unclear if the mild symptoms are associated with mild perceived stress and mental illness, and the interventions to improve the mental health of the patients are rarely reported. Methods: This cross-sectional study investigated the level of depression, anxiety and perceived stress of 1,305 COVID-19 patients who received treatment in the Fangcang shelter hospitals in Shanghai, China. Network analysis was used to explore the relationship among depression, anxiety and perceived stress. Results: The prevalence of depression, anxiety and perceived stress in the patients with Omicron infection were 9.03, 4.60, and 17.03%, respectively, lower than the prevalence reported during the initial outbreak of COVID-19. "Restlessness (A5)," "Uncontrollable worry (A2)," "Trouble relaxing (A4)" and "Fatigue (D4)" had the highest expected influence values. "Irritability (A6)" and "Uncontrollable (S1)" were bridge symptoms in the network. Comparative analysis of the network identified differences in the network structures between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Conclusion: This study investigated the prevalence of depression, anxiety and perceived stress and the correlation among them in Omicron-infected patients in Fangcang shelter hospital, in Shanghai, China. The core symptoms identified in the study provide insight into targeted clinical prevention and intervention of mental health in non-severe Omicron-infected patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Special , Pandemics , China/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units
11.
Front Public Health ; 10: 993831, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2215425

ABSTRACT

Aim: COVID-19 patients' security is related to their mental health. However, the classification of this group's sense of security is still unclear. The aim of our research is to clarify the subtypes of security of patients infected with COVID-19, explore the factors affecting profile membership, and examine the relationship between security and psychological capital for the purpose of providing a reference for improving patients' sense of security and mental health. Methods: A total of 650 COVID-19 patients in a mobile cabin hospital were selected for a cross-sectional survey from April to May 2022. They completed online self-report questionnaires that included a demographic questionnaire, security scale, and psychological capital scale. Data analysis included latent profile analysis, variance analysis, the Chi-square test, multiple comparisons, multivariate logistical regression, and hierarchical regression analysis. Results: Three latent profiles were identified-low security (Class 1), moderate security (Class 2), and high security (Class 3)-accounting for 12.00, 49.51, and 38.49% of the total surveyed patients, respectively. In terms of the score of security and its two dimensions, Class 3 was higher than Class 2, and Class 2 was higher than Class 1 (all P < 0.001). Patients with difficulty falling asleep, sleep quality as usual, and lower tenacity were more likely to be grouped into Class 1 rather than Class 3; Patients from families with a per capita monthly household income <3,000 and lower self-efficacy and hope were more likely to be grouped into Classes 1 and 2 than into Class 3. Psychological capital was an important predictor of security, which could independently explain 18.70% of the variation in the patients' security. Conclusions: Security has different classification features among patients with COVID-19 infection in mobile cabin hospitals. The security of over half of the patients surveyed is at the lower or middle level, and psychological capital is an important predictor of the patients' security. Medical staff should actively pay attention to patients with low security and help them to improve their security level and psychological capital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Mobile Health Units , Mental Health , Medical Staff
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e25945, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191011

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms and the associated risk factors among first-line medical staff in Wuhan during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic.From March 5 to 15, 2020, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Hamilton Depression scale were used to investigate the anxiety and depression status of medical staff in Wuhan Cabin Hospital (a Hospital). Two hundred seventy-six questionnaires were received from 96 doctors and 180 nurses, including 79 males and 197 females.During the COVID-19 epidemic, the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression was 27.9% and 18.1%, respectively, among 276 front-line medical staff in Wuhan. The prevalence rate of anxiety and depression among doctors was 19.8% and 11.5%, respectively, and the prevalence rate of anxiety and depression among nurses was 32.2% and 21.7%, respectively. Females recorded higher total scores for anxiety and depression than males, and nurses recorded higher scores for anxiety and depression than doctors.During the COVID-19 epidemic, some first-line medical staff experienced mental health problems such as depression and anxiety. Nurses were more prone to anxiety and depression than doctors. Effective strategies toward to improving the mental health should be provided to first-line medical staff, especially female medical staff and nurses.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Medical Staff/psychology , Mobile Health Units/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Fear , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Male , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sex Factors , Workload/psychology
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25117, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2190989

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To describe and advise on management protocols and infection-protection experience of the radiology department in makeshift hospitals in Wuhan during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak.Based on the literature review and the experience in the frontline, we retrospectively reviewed the configuration of the radiology department, human resource, personal protection, examination procedures for patients confirmed with COVID-19 in Wuhan fangcang shelter hospital.From February 11, 2020 to March 10, 2020, 2730 and 510 CT examinations were performed in the Hanjiang shelter hospital and Hanyang Sports School shelter hospital, respectively, including initial examinations and re-examinations. The maximum number of daily CT examinations reached 289. The CT scanned a patient approximately once every 13 mins.Fangcang shelter radiology department could be powerful components of both global and national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , China/epidemiology , Clinical Protocols , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Administration, Hospital , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
14.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1032957, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2199504

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory-related disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). More than 200 countries worldwide are affected by this disease. The Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 is the major epidemic variant worldwide and is characterized by higher infectivity. However, the immunity and risk factors for prolonged viral elimination in patients with non-severe SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant infections are unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the relationship between immunity and duration of viral elimination in non-severe SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant-infected patients in Shanghai. Methods: In total, 108 non-severe SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant-infected patients from Shanghai New International Expo Center Fangcang Shelter Hospital were recruited in this study. They were further allocated to the early elimination (EE) and prolonged elimination (PE) groups according to SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid positivity duration. Results: Compared to patients with EE, those with PE had increased serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, and IL-8; higher neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR); lower lymphocyte, eosinophil, and red blood cell counts; and lower concentrations of hemoglobin and albumin (ALB). In lymphocyte subpopulation analysis, lower numbers of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and NK cells and a higher CD4/CD8 ratio were observed in patients with PE. In addition, correlation analysis results revealed that cycle threshold values of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant ORF1ab and N were negatively correlated with IL-6 and IL-8 levels and positively correlated with eosinophil count in patients with COVID-19. Finally, multivariate regression analysis showed that ALB, CD4/CD8 ratio, NLR, and eosinophil count were predictors of the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant elimination. Conclusion: In this study, we identified that the ALB, CD4/CD8 ratio, NLR, and eosinophil count were risk factors for prolonged viral elimination in non-severe SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant-infected patients. These factors might be efficient indicators in the diagnosis, evaluation, and prognosis monitoring of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virus Shedding , Humans , China/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Hospitals, Special , Interleukin-6 , Interleukin-8 , Mobile Health Units , SARS-CoV-2
15.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2203, 2022 11 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139241

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the psychological experience of Juvenile patient's parents in Fangcang shelter hospital during the Omicron wave of COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted by using a phenomenological research method. Sixteen parents of juvenile patients with COVID-19 were recruited from National Exhibition and Convention Center (Shanghai, China) Fangcang shelter hospital (FSH) using purposive sampling. Data were collected by face-to-face in-depth interviews over 27 days, from April 9 to May 6, 2022. The interview data were analyzed using Colaizzi seven-step analysis method. RESULTS: The psychological experiences of the parents of juvenile patients in the Fangcang shelter hospital were summarized into three themes: "perception regarding the FSH", "worried about the unmet needs of juvenile patients ", and "the psychological burden after discharge". These themes were classified into 9 sub-themes, including the acceptance of FSH, adaptability to FSH, concerns about cross-infection in the FSH, special needs of infants and young children, psychological needs of preschool children, the learning demands of school-age children, concern about re-positive, fear of sequelae, worry about social acceptance. CONCLUSION: Juvenile patients and their parents in the Fangcang shelter hospitals have both positive and negative experiences. It is suggested that facilities for minors should be planned in advance. Humanistic care for adolescent patients and health education for the public are also critical.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Infant , Child, Preschool , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Special , Pandemics , China/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units , Hospitals , Parents , Follicle Stimulating Hormone
16.
Artif Intell Med ; 135: 102456, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119903

ABSTRACT

This study mainly aims to develop two effective and practical multi-criteria group decision-making approaches by taking advantage of the ground-breaking theory of PROMETHEE family of outranking methods. The presented variants of Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE) method are acknowledged to address the complex decision-making problems carrying the ambiguous information, expressible in terms of yes, no, abstinence and refusal, owing to the preeminent condition and wider structure of spherical fuzzy sets. Both of the proposed approaches seek help from the Shannon's entropy formula to evaluate the object weights of the decision criteria. The proposed techniques operate by taking into account the deviation between each pair of potential alternatives in accordance to different types of preference functions to determine the preference indices. The proposed technique of spherical fuzzy PROMETHEE I method carefully compares the positive and negative outranking flows of the alternative to get partial rankings. In contrast, the spherical fuzzy PROMETHEE II method has the edge to eliminate the incomparable pair by employing the net outranking flow to derive the final ranking. The application of proposed approaches is explained via a case study in the field of medical concerning the selection of appropriate site to establish Fangcang shelter hospital in Wuhan to treat COVID-19 patients. The convincing comparisons of the proposed methodologies with q-rung orthopair fuzzy PROMETHEE and spherical fuzzy TOPSIS methods are also included to verify the aptitude of the proposed methodology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fuzzy Logic , Humans , Hospitals, Special , Mobile Health Units , Decision Making
17.
Br Dent J ; 233(6): 503-505, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042317

ABSTRACT

Introduction As a means of targeting vulnerable populations to offer care outside the traditional clinical setting, mobile clinics exist that permit clinical teams to travel into the community to provide dental care.Aims To highlight some of the inequalities faced by vulnerable populations, to discuss the benefits of a mobile dental unit (MDU) and how it may address some of these inequalities, and to reflect on some of the achievements of the Bradford MDU.Vulnerable populations Vulnerable communities may include the homeless population, those affected by substance misuse, those suffering with mental health problems, asylum seekers, or an amalgamation. Such groups are likely to have lower expectations of healthcare and may not seek help until oral disease is advanced, with a large proportion likely to have already lost their teeth.Bradford MDU The MDU owned by Bradford Community Dental Service is unique in both its longevity of service and populations it serves, and has been providing an outreach dental service to the vulnerable populations of Bradford for the last 16 years. Whilst the COVID-19 pandemic suspended services during the thick of lockdown, the Bradford MDU is slowly re-opening its services, so the care received by these vulnerable populations is no longer compromised.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Health Units , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Vulnerable Populations
18.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e065799, 2022 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029506

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to examine COVID-19 patients' experiences in a Fangcang shelter hospital in China, to provide insights into the effectiveness of this centralised isolation strategy as a novel solution to patient management during emerging infectious disease outbreaks. DESIGN: This study adopted a qualitative descriptive design. Data were collected by individual semistructured interviews and analysed using thematic analysis. SETTING: This study was undertaken in 1 of the 16 Fangcang shelter hospitals in Wuhan, China between 28 February 2020 and 7 March 2020. Fangcang shelter hospitals were temporary healthcare facilities intended for large-scale centralised isolation, treatment and disease monitoring of mild-to-moderate COVID-19 cases. These hospitals were an essential component of China's response to the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 27 COVID-19 patients were recruited by purposive sampling. Eligible participants were (1) COVID-19 patients; (2) above 18 years of age and (3) able to communicate effectively. Exclusion criteria were (1) being clinically or emotionally unstable and (2) experiencing communication difficulties. RESULTS: Three themes and nine subthemes were identified. First, COVID-19 patients experienced a range of psychological reactions during hospitalisation, including fear, uncertainty, helplessness and concerns. Second, there were positive and negative experiences associated with communal living. While COVID-19 patients' evaluation of essential services in the hospital was overall positive, privacy and hygiene issues were highlighted as stressors during their hospital stay. Third, positive peer support and a trusting patient-healthcare professional relationship served as a birthplace for resilience, trust and gratitude in COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that, while sacrificing privacy, centralised isolation has the potential to mitigate negative psychological impacts of social isolation in COVID-19 patients by promoting meaningful peer connections, companionship and support within the shared living space. To our knowledge, this is the first study bringing patients' perspectives into healthcare service appraisal in emergency shelter hospitals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals , Hospitals, Special , Humans , Mobile Health Units , Pandemics
19.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(9): 527-527A, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022474
20.
Prev Med ; 163: 107226, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004627

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has disproportionately impacted underserved populations, including racial/ethnic minorities. Prior studies have demonstrated that mobile health units are effective at expanding preventive services for hard-to-reach populations, but this has not been studied in the context of COVID-19 vaccination. Our objective was to determine if voluntary participants who access mobile COVID-19 vaccination units are more likely to be racial/ethnic minorities and adolescents compared with the general vaccinated population. We conducted a cross-sectional study of individuals who presented to three different mobile COVID-19 vaccination units in the Greater Boston area from May 20, 2021, to August 18, 2021. We acquired data regarding the general vaccinated population in the state and of target communities from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. We used chi-square testing to compare the demographic characteristics of mobile vaccination unit participants and the general state and community populations that received COVID-19 vaccines during the same time period. We found that during this three-month period, mobile vaccination units held 130 sessions and administered 2622 COVID-19 vaccine doses to 1982 unique participants. The median (IQR) age of participants was 31 (16-46) years, 1016 (51%) were female, 1575 (80%) were non-White, and 1126 (57%) were Hispanic. Participants in the mobile vaccination units were more likely to be younger (p < 0.001), non-White race (p < 0.001), and Hispanic ethnicity (p < 0.001) compared with the general vaccinated population of the state and target communities. This study suggests that mobile vaccination units have the potential to improve access to COVID-19 vaccination for diverse populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Health Units , Vaccination , Vulnerable Populations
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