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2.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(11): 1027-1030, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483697

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Rehabilitation experts play an important role in preventing hospital-acquired debility, increasing patients' abilities to safely perform activities of daily living, and facilitating discharge to the home setting for patients with COVID-19. Surges in COVID-19 hospitalization rates combined with increases in length of hospital stay and decreases in postacute care placements have necessitated the opening of COVID-19 field hospitals around the country. Most field hospitals lack the resources to offer a full suite of rehabilitation services, but there are opportunities for small teams of rehabilitation experts to increase their reach by using innovative strategies. This article describes the implementation of a small team of rehabilitation experts in a COVID-19 field hospital and strategies used by this team to maximize patient activity and mobility, facilitate timely discharge, and maximize the number of patients discharged to the home setting. Strategies include training nonclinical staff to assist with activity and mobility promotion and using a rehabilitation triage system to determine needs of individual patients and facilitate efficient resource utilization. The authors reflect on successful aspects of these strategies, as well as barriers to rehabilitation implementation, and make recommendations for other field hospitals seeking to implement rehabilitation during the COVID-19 pandemic or future health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Activities of Daily Living , Baltimore , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Recovery of Function , SARS-CoV-2 , Subacute Care
3.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 42(spe): e20200378, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410819

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand the role of nurses in field hospitals aimed at patients with Covid-19. METHODS: Qualitative research based on Alfred Schütz's social phenomenology. Twenty nurses working in São Paulo were interviewed between May and June 2020. The testimonies were organized and analyzed based on the theoretical-methodological and thematic framework. RESULTS: The following categories emerged: "Nurses' challenges in field hospital care", "Visibility of nursing in the Covid-19 pandemic scenario" and "Covid-19 post-pandemic professional valorization". FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: The reflection on the results that emerged in this study may contribute to support improvements in training, working conditions and valuing nurses, considering the importance of this professional category in the scope of health services. New investigations may increase knowledge in the area, providing subsidies for professional role in this and other health situations that require nursing intensity and excellence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Nurse's Role/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Nursing/standards , Adult , Brazil , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Theory , Pandemics , Professional Practice , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25117, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262268

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To describe and advise on management protocols and infection-protection experience of the radiology department in makeshift hospitals in Wuhan during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak.Based on the literature review and the experience in the frontline, we retrospectively reviewed the configuration of the radiology department, human resource, personal protection, examination procedures for patients confirmed with COVID-19 in Wuhan fangcang shelter hospital.From February 11, 2020 to March 10, 2020, 2730 and 510 CT examinations were performed in the Hanjiang shelter hospital and Hanyang Sports School shelter hospital, respectively, including initial examinations and re-examinations. The maximum number of daily CT examinations reached 289. The CT scanned a patient approximately once every 13 mins.Fangcang shelter radiology department could be powerful components of both global and national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , China/epidemiology , Clinical Protocols , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Administration, Hospital , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
7.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(2): 102-108, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165558

ABSTRACT

As hospitals across the world realized their surge capacity would not be enough to care for patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) infection, an urgent need to open field hospitals prevailed. In this article the authors describe the implementation process of opening a Boston field hospital including the development of a culture unique to this crisis and the local community needs. Through first-person accounts, readers will learn (1) about Boston Hope, (2) how leaders managed and collaborated, (3) how the close proximity of the care environment impacted decision-making and management style, and (4) the characteristics of leaders under pressure as observed by the team.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Capacity Building/organization & administration , Hospital Design and Construction/methods , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Boston , Female , Humans , Leadership , Male , Mobile Health Units/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Uncertainty
9.
J Med Syst ; 45(4): 42, 2021 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1092039

ABSTRACT

In confronting the sudden epidemic of COVID-19, China and other countries have been under great deal of pressure to block virus transmission and reduce death cases. Fangcang shelter hospital, which is converted from large-scale public venue, is proposed and proven to be an effective way for administering medical care and social isolation. This paper presents the practice in information technology support for a Fangcang shelter hospital in Wuhan, China. The experiences include the deployment strategy of IT infrastructure, the redesign of function modules in the hospital information system (HIS), equipment maintenance and medical staff training. The deployment strategy and HIS modules have ensured smoothness and efficiency of clinical work. The team established a quick response mechanism and adhered to the principle of nosocomial infection control. Deployment of network and modification of HIS was finished in the 48 hours before patient admittance. A repair hotline and remote support for equipment and software were available whenever medical workers met with any questions. No engineer ever entered the contaminated areas and no one was infected by the coronavirus during the hospital operation. Up to now, Fangcang shelter hospital is adopted by many regions around the world facing the collapse of their medical systems. This valuable experience in informatization construction and service in Wuhan may help participators involving in Fangcang shelter hospital get better information technology support, and find more practical interventions to fight the epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Emergency Shelter/organization & administration , Hospitals, Special/organization & administration , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Emergencies , Facility Design and Construction , Hospitals, Isolation , Humans , Information Technology , Risk Factors
10.
Prehosp Disaster Med ; 36(3): 338-343, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087390

ABSTRACT

Alternate care sites (ACS) are locations that can be converted to provide either in-patient and/or out-patient health care services when existing facilities are compromised by a hazard impact or the volume of patients exceeds available capacity and/or capabilities. In March through May of 2020, Michigan Medicine (MM), the affiliated health system of the University of Michigan, planned a 500 bed ACS at an off-site location. Termed the Michigan Medicine Field Hospital (MMFH), this ACS was intended to be a step-down care facility for low-acuity COVID-19 positive MM patients who could be transitioned from the hospital setting and safely cared for prior to discharge home, while also allowing increased bed capacity in the remaining MM hospitals for additional critical patient care. The planning was organized into six units: personnel and labor, security, clinical operations, logistics and supply, planning and training, and communications. The purpose of this report is to describe the development and planning of an ACS within the MM academic medical center (AMC) to discuss anticipated barriers to success and to suggest guidance for health systems in future planning.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Planning/organization & administration , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Role , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Michigan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(3): e24077, 2021 Jan 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066468

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This study aimed to systematically analyze the effect of Wuhan mobile cabin hospitals (WMCHs) on the novel coronavirus-caused pneumonia (COVID-19) prevention and control in China. Between February 5, 2020 and March 10, 2020, a total of 16 mobile cabin hospitals were constructed in 3 batches to offer over 13,000 beds and admitted more than 12,000 patients in Wuhan City. The strategy of implementing WMCHs in 3 batches played a key role in fighting against COVID-19 in China. (1) The first batch of WMCHs increased hospital admission capacity of COVID-19 patients in Wuhan, which showed initial effect on COVID-19 epidemic control. (2) The operation of the second batch of WMCHs greatly contributed to the rapid growth in discharged patients. (3) After launching the third batch of WMCHs, the COVID-19 epidemic situation in Wuhan improved considerably. The last batch of WMCHs made a substantial contribution to defeating the COVID-19 epidemic in Wuhan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Health Policy , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , China/epidemiology , Hospital Bed Capacity , Hospitalization , Humans
13.
J Nepal Health Res Counc ; 18(4): 785-788, 2021 Jan 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1055436

ABSTRACT

Mobile Swab Collection Vehicle is a concept that has been innovated by a team of medical and non-medical personals based upon the dire need to perform throat or nasopharyngeal swab collections to do reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction  'RT-PCR' quickly, safely, and comfortably during this Corona Virus Diseases 2019, 'COVID-19' pandemic in a resource-poor country like Nepal. Inputs from the health care workers, beneficiaries, and engineers have been taken to construct this vehicle-mounted booth for swab collection. This vehicle is the 'first of its kind' in Nepal. Keywords: COVID-19; Nepal; swab collection vehicle.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Specimen Handling/methods , Humans , Nepal , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Soins ; 65(849): 22-27, 2020 Oct.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997629

ABSTRACT

The militaryintensive care field hospital is a new tool set up by the military medical service as part of Operation Resilience to provide medical support in the regions of France most affected by the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic. Deployed in Mulhouse and Mayotte, this hospital facility is a functional intensive care unit set up to support an existing hospital structure. The caregivers and logistics specialists are all from the military medical service, active personnel or reservists, predominantly nurses. The implementation of this intensive care field hospital in a constrained environment requires an efficient provision of care in accordance with medical guidelines, while protecting the healthcare staff and, notably, the frontline nursing staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Military Medicine , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Critical Care , France , Humans , Military Personnel
19.
Bull World Health Organ ; 98(12): 830-841D, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-964002

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To design models of the spread of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan and the effect of Fangcang shelter hospitals (rapidly-built temporary hospitals) on the control of the epidemic. METHODS: We used data on daily reported confirmed cases of COVID-19, recovered cases and deaths from the official website of the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission to build compartmental models for three phases of the COVID-19 epidemic. We incorporated the hospital-bed capacity of both designated and Fangcang shelter hospitals. We used the models to assess the success of the strategy adopted in Wuhan to control the COVID-19 epidemic. FINDINGS: Based on the 13 348 Fangcang shelter hospitals beds used in practice, our models show that if the Fangcang shelter hospitals had been opened on 6 February (a day after their actual opening), the total number of COVID-19 cases would have reached 7 413 798 (instead of 50 844) with 1 396 017 deaths (instead of 5003), and the epidemic would have lasted for 179 days (instead of 71). CONCLUSION: While the designated hospitals saved lives of patients with severe COVID-19, it was the increased hospital-bed capacity of the large number of Fangcang shelter hospitals that helped slow and eventually stop the COVID-19 epidemic in Wuhan. Given the current global pandemic of COVID-19, our study suggests that increasing hospital-bed capacity, especially through temporary hospitals such as Fangcang shelter hospitals, to isolate groups of people with mild symptoms within an affected region could help curb and eventually stop COVID-19 outbreaks in communities where effective household isolation is not possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , China/epidemiology , Humans , Markov Chains , Models, Statistical , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Int J Equity Health ; 19(1): 201, 2020 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mobile clinics have been used to deliver primary health care to populations that otherwise experience difficulty in accessing services. Indigenous populations in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States experience greater health inequities than non-Indigenous populations. There is increasing support for Indigenous-governed and culturally accessible primary health care services which meet the needs of Indigenous populations. There is some support for primary health care mobile clinics implemented specifically for Indigenous populations to improve health service accessibility. The purpose of this review is to scope the literature for evidence of mobile primary health care clinics implemented specifically for Indigenous populations in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. METHODS: This review was undertaken using the Joanna Brigg Institute (JBI) scoping review methodology. Review objectives, inclusion criteria and methods were specified in advance and documented in a published protocol. The search included five academic databases and an extensive search of the grey literature. RESULTS: The search resulted in 1350 unique citations, with 91 of these citations retrieved from the grey literature and targeted organisational websites. Title, abstract and full-text screening was conducted independently by two reviewers, with 123 citations undergoing full text review. Of these, 39 citations discussing 25 mobile clinics, met the inclusion criteria. An additional 14 citations were snowballed from a review of the reference lists of included citations. Of these 25 mobile clinics, the majority were implemented in Australia (n = 14), followed by United States (n = 6) and Canada (n = 5). No primary health mobile clinics specifically for Indigenous people in New Zealand were retrieved. There was a pattern of declining locations serviced by mobile clinics with an increasing population. Furthermore, only 13 mobile clinics had some form of evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: This review identifies geographical gaps in the implementation of primary health care mobile clinics for Indigenous populations in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. There is a paucity of evaluations supporting the use of mobile clinics for Indigenous populations and a need for organisations implementing mobile clinics specifically for Indigenous populations to share their experiences. Engaging with the perspectives of Indigenous people accessing mobile clinic services is imperative to future evaluations. REGISTRATION: The protocol for this review has been peer-reviewed and published in JBI Evidence Synthesis (doi: 10.11124/JBISRIR-D-19-00057).


Subject(s)
Health Services, Indigenous/organization & administration , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Australia , Canada , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , New Zealand , United States
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