Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 17 de 17
Filter
1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(1): e2146168, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620079

ABSTRACT

Importance: The association of COVID-19 not requiring hospitalization with functional mobility in community-dwelling adults above and beyond the impact of the pandemic control measures implemented in 2020 remains to be elucidated. Objective: To evaluate the association between a COVID-19 diagnosis and change in mobility and physical function of adults in Canada aged 50 years or older during the initial pandemic lockdown. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study used data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) COVID-19 study. This study was launched on April 15, 2020, and the exit questionnaires were completed between September and December 2020. Prepandemic data from the first CLSA follow-up (2015-2018) were also used. Respondents included middle-aged and older community-dwelling participants residing in Canadian provinces. Data were analyzed from February to May 2021. Exposures: The assessment for self-reported COVID-19 status was adapted from the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention case definition available at the time of data collection; cases were classified as confirmed or probable, suspected, or non-COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: Changes in mobility since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic were assessed using global rating of change in mobility scales at the COVID-19 exit questionnaire. Participant-reported new onset of difficulty in 3 physical function tasks was also examined. Results: Among 51 338 participants at baseline, 21 491 participants (41.9%) were 65 years or older and 26 155 participants (51.0%) were women and 25 183 (49.1%) were men. Of 2748 individuals with confirmed or probable or suspected COVID-19, 113 (94.2%) were not hospitalized. Individuals with confirmed or probable COVID-19 had higher odds of worsening mobility in terms of ability to engage in household activity (odds ratio [OR], 1.89; 95% CI, 1.11-3.22), physical activity (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.32-2.76), and standing up after sitting in a chair (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.06-5.11) compared with adults without COVID-19 during the same pandemic time period. Similar results were found for suspected COVID-19 status (eg, household activity: OR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.82-2.41). Conclusions and Relevance: This cohort study among older adults in Canada found that receiving a COVID-19 diagnosis was significantly associated with worse mobility and functioning outcomes even in the absence of hospitalization. These findings suggest that interventions may be needed for individuals with mild to moderate COVID-19 who do not require hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Exercise , Geriatric Assessment , Independent Living , Mobility Limitation , Pandemics , Physical Functional Performance , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 Testing , Canada , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Movement , Odds Ratio , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
2.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 141(2021-14)2021 10 12.
Article in Norwegian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528950

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rapid detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in hospitals is essential for early isolation and treatment. However, false positive test results can have adverse consequences for patient safety. CASE PRESENTATION: A man in his eighties was admitted to hospital with fatigue and new-onset gait and balance difficulties, without fever or symptoms of focal infection, but with elevated C-reactive protein. On admission, he tested positive on screening for SARS-CoV-2 using a fully automated rapid reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test. He was placed together with two patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection in cohort isolation. Due to very low exposure risk and nonspecific symptoms, the primary and multiple subsequent test swabs were analysed using RT-PCR analyses guided by laboratory personnel, and all gave negative results. The patient had several risk factors for developing severe COVID-19 illness, but fortunately he remained COVID-19 negative on repeated tests. INTERPRETATION: The case presentation highlights the danger of false-positive SARS-CoV-2 test results, and the importance of interpreting a diagnostic test in the context of pretest probability and test accuracy. It also underlines the risk of using cohort isolation instead of individual isolation.


Subject(s)
Mobility Limitation , Walking , Humans , Male
3.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr ; 98: 104522, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525683

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Meaningful activities can be done in or around home, but opportunities for participation and active aging decrease when moving in smaller areas. Active aging refers to having an active approach to life in line with one's goals, ability and opportunities. In adults over 75 years with different baseline neighborhood mobility levels, we studied active aging scores two years prior to and amid COVID-19, when governments restricted mobility of residents to slow the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: AGNES cohort data were collected in 2017-2018 and spring 2020. Individuals were queried about their will, ability, and opportunity, and extent of doing 17 activities, and subsequently, item, composite and sub-scores of active aging were computed. Neighborhood mobility was assessed as frequency of moving in or beyond own neighborhood (limited, regular, daily=reference). Associations were studied using Generalized Linear Models (cross-sectionally, n = 1007) and General Estimating Equations (prospectively, n = 774). RESULTS: Participants with limited baseline neighborhood mobility had lower active aging scores than those with daily mobility, but the decline over time was similar. Some item scores on opportunity to act and extent of doing, e.g. for making one's day more interesting and advancing matters of faith or worldview, were better retained amid COVID-19 by those with limited mobility, attenuating group differences. CONCLUSIONS: Active aging scores were somewhat compromised in individuals with limited neighborhood mobility, but opportunities for and engagement in several activities seemed to be better retained amid COVID-19 than for those with daily mobility. Thus, active aging may be possible despite mobility restriction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aging , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mobility Limitation , Residence Characteristics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(10): e2128568, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1465510

ABSTRACT

Importance: Short-term and long-term persistent postacute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC) have not been systematically evaluated. The incidence and evolution of PASC are dependent on time from infection, organ systems and tissue affected, vaccination status, variant of the virus, and geographic region. Objective: To estimate organ system-specific frequency and evolution of PASC. Evidence Review: PubMed (MEDLINE), Scopus, the World Health Organization Global Literature on Coronavirus Disease, and CoronaCentral databases were searched from December 2019 through March 2021. A total of 2100 studies were identified from databases and through cited references. Studies providing data on PASC in children and adults were included. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines for abstracting data were followed and performed independently by 2 reviewers. Quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for cohort studies. The main outcome was frequency of PASC diagnosed by (1) laboratory investigation, (2) radiologic pathology, and (3) clinical signs and symptoms. PASC were classified by organ system, ie, neurologic; cardiovascular; respiratory; digestive; dermatologic; and ear, nose, and throat as well as mental health, constitutional symptoms, and functional mobility. Findings: From a total of 2100 studies identified, 57 studies with 250 351 survivors of COVID-19 met inclusion criteria. The mean (SD) age of survivors was 54.4 (8.9) years, 140 196 (56%) were male, and 197 777 (79%) were hospitalized during acute COVID-19. High-income countries contributed 45 studies (79%). The median (IQR) proportion of COVID-19 survivors experiencing at least 1 PASC was 54.0% (45.0%-69.0%; 13 studies) at 1 month (short-term), 55.0% (34.8%-65.5%; 38 studies) at 2 to 5 months (intermediate-term), and 54.0% (31.0%-67.0%; 9 studies) at 6 or more months (long-term). Most prevalent pulmonary sequelae, neurologic disorders, mental health disorders, functional mobility impairments, and general and constitutional symptoms were chest imaging abnormality (median [IQR], 62.2% [45.8%-76.5%]), difficulty concentrating (median [IQR], 23.8% [20.4%-25.9%]), generalized anxiety disorder (median [IQR], 29.6% [14.0%-44.0%]), general functional impairments (median [IQR], 44.0% [23.4%-62.6%]), and fatigue or muscle weakness (median [IQR], 37.5% [25.4%-54.5%]), respectively. Other frequently reported symptoms included cardiac, dermatologic, digestive, and ear, nose, and throat disorders. Conclusions and Relevance: In this systematic review, more than half of COVID-19 survivors experienced PASC 6 months after recovery. The most common PASC involved functional mobility impairments, pulmonary abnormalities, and mental health disorders. These long-term PASC effects occur on a scale that could overwhelm existing health care capacity, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Survivors , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Lung Diseases/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mobility Limitation , Muscle Weakness/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases
5.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 332, 2021 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379784

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The consequences of strict COVID-19 mobility restrictions on motor/non-motor features in Parkinson's disease (PD) have not been systematically studied but worse mobility and quality of life have been reported. To elucidate this question, 12 mild to moderate PD patients were assessed in March 2020 before and after two months of isolation as part of a clinical study that had to be interrupted due to the pandemic and the implementation of COVID19 mobility restrictions. METHODS: Twelve patients were systematically evaluated before and after the lockdown period as part of a larger cohort that previously underwent thermal water rehabilitation. Clinical outcomes were the Body Mass index, the Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test, the MDS-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, the 6 Minute Walking Test and the New Freezing of Gait Questionnaire. Global cognition was evaluated with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale. The impact of COVID-19 restrictions on quality of life and functional independence was evaluated with The Parkinson's disease Quality of life (PDQ-39), the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living questionnaires (IADL) and the Parkinson's disease cognitive functional rating scales (PD-CFRS). RESULTS: After two months of isolation the Mini-BESTest score worsened (p=0.005), and four patients reported one or more falls during the lockdown. BMI increased (p=0.031) while the remaining clinical variables including quality of life did not change. CONCLUSION: We observed moderate worsening at Mini-BESTest, greater risk of falls and increased body weight as consequence of prolonged immobility. We believe negative effects were partially softened since patients were in contact with our multidisciplinary team during the lockdown and had previously received training to respond to the needs of this emergency isolation. These findings highligh the importnace of patient-centered interventions in PD management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gait Disorders, Neurologic , Mobility Limitation , Parkinson Disease , Accidental Falls , Activities of Daily Living , Communicable Disease Control , Gait Disorders, Neurologic/etiology , Humans , Male , Parkinson Disease/complications , Quality of Life , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 33(10): 2909-2916, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366432

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Outdoor mobility enables participation in essential out-of-home activities in old age. AIM: To compare changes in different aspects of outdoor mobility during COVID-19 restrictions versus two years before according to self-reported walking. METHODS: Community-dwelling participants of AGNES study (2017-2018, initial age 75-85) responded to AGNES-COVID-19 postal survey in spring 2020 (N = 809). Life-space mobility, autonomy in participation outdoors, and self-reported physical activity were assessed at both time points and differences according to self-reported walking modifications and difficulty vs. intact walking at baseline were analyzed. RESULTS: Life-space mobility and autonomy in participation outdoors had declined (mean changes -11.4, SD 21.3; and 6.7, SD 5.3, respectively), whereas physical activity had increased (5.5 min/day, SD 25.1) at follow-up. Participants perceiving walking difficulty reported the poorest baseline outdoor mobility, a steeper decline in life-space mobility (p = 0.001), a smaller increase in physical activity (p < 0.001), and a smaller decline in autonomy in participation outdoors (p = 0.017) than those with intact walking. Those with walking modifications also reported lower baseline life-space mobility and physical activity, a steeper decline in life-space mobility and a smaller increase in physical activity those with intact walking (p < 0.001 for both). DISCUSSION: Participants reporting walking modifications remained the intermediate group in outdoor mobility over time, whereas those with walking difficulty showed the steepest decline in outdoor mobility and hence potential risk for accelerated further functional decline. CONCLUSION: Interventions should target older people perceiving walking difficulty, as they may be at the risk for becoming homebound when environmental facilitators for outdoor mobility are removed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Walking , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Humans , Independent Living , Mobility Limitation , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Rev Recent Clin Trials ; 16(3): 316-321, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344220

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the differences in life-space mobility and quality of life (QoL) of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) between the pre- and postnationwide state of emergency initiated by the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Japan and to show the factors associated with the decrease in life-space mobility and QoL in these patients. METHODS: We undertook a longitudinal study of 20 out of 51 consecutive CVD patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who met the study criteria. We used the Life-Space Assessment (LSA) tool to evaluate Life-space mobility and assessed QoL with the five-level EuroQoL five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D-5L) in Japanese. RESULTS: The LSA scores and EQ-5D-5L QoL score decreased significantly from the pre- to postnationwide state of emergency in Japan (p < 0.01). ΔLSA was significantly positively associated with body mass index and significantly negatively associated with knee extensor muscle strength and pre-LSA score (p < 0.05). There were no significant relationships between ΔLSA and ΔEQ- 5D-5L QoL scores and between ΔEQ-5D-5L QoL scores and patient characteristics. CONCLUSION: The policies promoted to address the state of emergency in Japan might affect life-space mobility and QoL of CAD patients. Moreover, CAD patients in Japan who were not obese and maintained their physical function and activity tended to refrain from activity during the period between the pre- and post-nationwide state of emergency. Clarification of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the relationship between living space motility and QoL in CAD patients will require further study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Body Mass Index , Health Policy , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Mobility Limitation , Muscle Strength , Pandemics , Quality of Life
8.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 382, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269883

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This randomized controlled study compared standard supervised physiotherapy (SPT) with a self-developed, home-based, enhanced knee flexion exercise program involving a low stool (KFEH) in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: Patients were recruited from July 2014 to December 2015 and randomly assigned to one of two groups: KFEH (n = 60) and SPT (n = 59). Outcomes (joint function) were evaluated according to the Knee Society Score (KSS), visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score, and range of motion (ROM) assessment at selected time points (preoperatively; 1 week; 1, 3, and 6 months; and 1 year after surgery). RESULTS: Pain and functional improvement were observed in both groups. Non-inferiority of KFEH was evident 12 months postoperatively; however, patients in the KFEH group exhibited better ROM at 1 month (P < 0.01). Absolute WOMAC and KSS scores were slightly better in the KFEH group, although the difference was not statistically significant. There was no difference in VAS scores and complication rates between the two groups. Additionally, the home program would save patient time and decrease the economic burden associated with in-hospital SPT. CONCLUSION: Considering rehabilitation and economic efficiency as well as the COVID pandemic, a home-based enhanced knee flexion exercise program for TKA rehabilitation is recommended.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Exercise Therapy/methods , Osteoarthritis, Knee/rehabilitation , Physical Therapy Modalities , Self Care/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobility Limitation , Osteoarthritis, Knee/physiopathology , Osteoarthritis, Knee/surgery , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Range of Motion, Articular , Safety , Treatment Outcome
9.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(9): 821-830, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258826

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on access to rehabilitation therapies and the impact of changes in therapy access on the physical and mental well-being of children with motor impairment and their caregivers. DESIGN: Caregivers of children younger than 18 yrs with childhood-onset motor impairment (primarily cerebral palsy) completed an anonymous survey through the online platform REDCap between May 5 and July 13, 2020. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 102 participants. Before the pandemic, 92 of 102 children (90%) were receiving one or more therapies; at the time surveyed, 55 children (54%) were receiving any therapies (P < 0.001). More than 40% of the sample reported increased child stress, decreased physical activity, and/or decline in mobility/movement. Participants who reported a decrease in number of therapies at the time surveyed more frequently reported lower satisfaction with treatment delivery (P < 0.001), a decline in child's mobility (P = 0.001), and increased caregiver stress (P = 0.004). Five qualitative themes were identified from open-ended question responses related to therapies and well-being. CONCLUSIONS: Access to pediatric rehabilitation therapies was disrupted during COVID-19. Disrupted access may be related to impact on physical and mental health. With the expansion of telehealth, caregiver and child feedback should be incorporated to optimize benefit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cerebral Palsy/rehabilitation , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Movement Disorders/rehabilitation , Quarantine/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Caregiver Burden/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Cerebral Palsy/psychology , Child , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Mobility Limitation , Movement Disorders/psychology , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 11(3): 1057-1065, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are at higher risk of vaccine-preventable respiratory infections. However, advanced, homebound individuals may have less access to vaccinations. In light of COVID-19, understanding barriers to vaccination in PD may inform strategies to increase vaccine uptake. OBJECTIVE: To identify influenza and pneumococcal vaccination rates, including barriers and facilitators to vaccination, among homebound and ambulatory individuals with PD and related disorders. METHODS: Cross-sectional US-based study among individuals with PD, aged > 65 years, stratified as homebound or ambulatory. Participants completed semi-structured interviews on vaccination rates and barriers, and healthcare utilization. RESULTS: Among 143 participants, 9.8% had missed all influenza vaccinations in the past 5 years, and 32.2% lacked any pneumococcal vaccination, with no between-group differences. Homebound participants (n = 41) reported difficulty traveling to clinic (p < 0.01) as a vaccination barrier, and despite similar outpatient visit frequencies, had more frequent emergency department visits (31.7% vs. 9.8%, p < 0.01) and hospitalizations (14.6% vs. 2.9%, p = 0.03). Vaccine hesitancy was reported in 35% of participants, vaccine refusal in 19%, and 13.3% reported unvaccinated household members, with no between-group differences. Nearly 13% thought providers recommended against vaccines for PD patients, and 31.5% were unsure of vaccine recommendations in PD. CONCLUSION: Among a sample of homebound and ambulatory people with PD, many lack age-appropriate immunizations despite ample healthcare utilization. Many participants were unsure whether healthcare providers recommend vaccinations for people with PD. In light of COVID-19, neurologist reinforcement that vaccinations are indicated, safe, and recommended may be beneficial.


Subject(s)
Facilities and Services Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Parkinson Disease , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Influenza Vaccines , Male , Mobility Limitation , Pneumococcal Vaccines , United States
11.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0250180, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197383

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak is evolving rapidly worldwide. Data on the mobility level of patients with COVID-19 in the intensive care unit (ICU) are needed. OBJECTIVE: To describe the mobility level of patients with COVID-19 admitted to the ICU and to address factors associated with mobility level at the time of ICU discharge. METHODS: Single center, retrospective cohort study. Consecutive patients admitted to the ICU with confirmed COVID-19 infection were analyzed. The mobility status was assessed by the Perme Score at admission and discharge from ICU with higher scores indicating higher mobility level. The Perme Mobility Index (PMI) was calculated [PMI = ΔPerme Score (ICU discharge-ICU admission)/ICU length of stay]. Based on the PMI, patients were divided into two groups: "Improved" (PMI > 0) and "Not improved" (PMI ≤ 0). RESULTS: A total of 136 patients were included in this analysis. The hospital mortality rate was 16.2%. The Perme Score improved significantly when comparing ICU discharge with ICU admission [20.0 (7-28) points versus 7.0 (0-16) points; P < 0.001]. A total of 88 patients (64.7%) improved their mobility level during ICU stay, and the median PMI of these patients was 1.5 (0.6-3.4). Patients in the improved group had a lower duration of mechanical ventilation [10 (5-14) days versus 15 (8-24) days; P = 0.021], lower hospital length of stay [25 (12-37) days versus 30 (11-48) days; P < 0.001], and lower ICU and hospital mortality rate. Independent predictors for mobility level were lower age, lower Charlson Comorbidity Index, and not having received renal replacement therapy. CONCLUSION: Patients' mobility level was low at ICU admission; however, most patients improved their mobility level during ICU stay. Risk factors associated with the mobility level were age, comorbidities, and use of renal replacement therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Mobility Limitation , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Critical Care , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome
12.
Rev Recent Clin Trials ; 16(3): 316-321, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138650

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the differences in life-space mobility and quality of life (QoL) of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) between the pre- and postnationwide state of emergency initiated by the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Japan and to show the factors associated with the decrease in life-space mobility and QoL in these patients. METHODS: We undertook a longitudinal study of 20 out of 51 consecutive CVD patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who met the study criteria. We used the Life-Space Assessment (LSA) tool to evaluate Life-space mobility and assessed QoL with the five-level EuroQoL five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D-5L) in Japanese. RESULTS: The LSA scores and EQ-5D-5L QoL score decreased significantly from the pre- to postnationwide state of emergency in Japan (p < 0.01). ΔLSA was significantly positively associated with body mass index and significantly negatively associated with knee extensor muscle strength and pre-LSA score (p < 0.05). There were no significant relationships between ΔLSA and ΔEQ- 5D-5L QoL scores and between ΔEQ-5D-5L QoL scores and patient characteristics. CONCLUSION: The policies promoted to address the state of emergency in Japan might affect life-space mobility and QoL of CAD patients. Moreover, CAD patients in Japan who were not obese and maintained their physical function and activity tended to refrain from activity during the period between the pre- and post-nationwide state of emergency. Clarification of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the relationship between living space motility and QoL in CAD patients will require further study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Body Mass Index , Health Policy , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Mobility Limitation , Muscle Strength , Pandemics , Quality of Life
13.
Invest Educ Enferm ; 39(1)2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123988

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To understand changes in daily life emerging from the COVID-19 Pandemic in people with visual impairment from four cities of Colombia. METHODS: Exploratory-type, descriptive qualitative study. The study conducted 26 semi-structured interviews via telephone. The analysis process used the methodological design from the approach proposed by Taylor and Bogdan: following the discovery process, coding and relativizing of data. RESULTS: Three categories emerge: 1) Transformations in daily dynamics, 2) Barriers to mobility, and 3) Use of technology. CONCLUSIONS: People with visual impairment report barriers to mobility to take public transportation, which can affect maintenance of their autonomy and independence. Using technological tools is identified as facilitators for the continuity of educational and work activities; however, some did not have computer literacy or the basic inputs for connectivity. Difficulties were identified to continue work activities and maintain income.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobility Limitation , Personal Autonomy , Vision Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Colombia , Computer Literacy , Female , Humans , Internet , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
14.
Physiotherapy ; 111: 4-22, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096196

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To establish the evidence for rehabilitation interventions tested in populations of patients admitted to ICU and critical care with severe respiratory illness, and consider whether the evidence is generalizable to patients with COVID-19. METHODS: The authors undertook a rapid systematic review. Medline (via OvidSP), CINAHL Complete (via EBSCOhost), Cochrane Library, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and CENTRAL (via Wiley), Epistemonikos (via Epistemonikos.org), PEDro (via pedro.org.au) and OTseeker (via otseeker.com) searched to 7 May 2020. The authors included systematic reviews, RCTs and qualitative studies involving adults with respiratory illness requiring intensive care who received rehabilitation to enhance or restore resulting physical impairments or function. Data were extracted by one author and checked by a second. TIDier was used to guide intervention descriptions. Study quality was assessed using Critical Skills Appraisal Programme (CASP) tools. RESULTS: Six thousand nine hundred and three titles and abstracts were screened; 24 systematic reviews, 11 RCTs and eight qualitative studies were included. Progressive exercise programmes, early mobilisation and multicomponent interventions delivered in ICU can improve functional independence. Nutritional supplementation in addition to rehabilitation in post-ICU hospital settings may improve performance of activities of daily living. The evidence for rehabilitation after discharge from hospital following an ICU admission is inconclusive. Those receiving rehabilitation valued it, engendering hope and confidence. CONCLUSIONS: Exercise, early mobilisation and multicomponent programmes may improve recovery following ICU admission for severe respiratory illness that could be generalizable to those with COVID-19. Rehabilitation interventions can bring hope and confidence to individuals but there is a need for an individualised approach and the use of behaviour change strategies. Further research is needed in post-ICU settings and with those who have COVID-19. Registration: Open Science Framework https://osf.io/prc2y.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19/diet therapy , Early Ambulation , Electric Stimulation Therapy/methods , Exercise Therapy/methods , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Mobility Limitation , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Exp Gerontol ; 142: 111123, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943107

ABSTRACT

Aging is the primary risk factor for functional decline; thus, understanding and preventing disability among older adults has emerged as an important public health challenge of the 21st century. The science of gerontology - or geroscience - has the practical purpose of "adding life to the years." The overall goal of geroscience is to increase healthspan, which refers to extending the portion of the lifespan in which the individual experiences enjoyment, satisfaction, and wellness. An important facet of this goal is preserving mobility, defined as the ability to move independently. Despite this clear purpose, this has proven to be a challenging endeavor as mobility and function in later life are influenced by a complex interaction of factors across multiple domains. Moreover, findings over the past decade have highlighted the complexity of walking and how targeting multiple systems, including the brain and sensory organs, as well as the environment in which a person lives, can have a dramatic effect on an older person's mobility and function. For these reasons, behavioral interventions that incorporate complex walking tasks and other activities of daily living appear to be especially helpful for improving mobility function. Other pharmaceutical interventions, such as oxytocin, and complementary and alternative interventions, such as massage therapy, may enhance physical function both through direct effects on biological mechanisms related to mobility, as well as indirectly through modulation of cognitive and socioemotional processes. Thus, the purpose of the present review is to describe evolving interventional approaches to enhance mobility and maintain healthspan in the growing population of older adults in the United States and countries throughout the world. Such interventions are likely to be greatly assisted by technological advances and the widespread adoption of virtual communications during and after the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Geriatrics , Physical Functional Performance , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aging/physiology , Circadian Rhythm/physiology , Cognition , Complementary Therapies , Humans , Middle Aged , Mobility Limitation , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...