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1.
Perspect Public Health ; 142(3): 142-144, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854725
2.
Ann Ital Chir ; 93: 147-151, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1824293

ABSTRACT

AIM: We analysed our one-year surgical activity in a spoke 'COVID-19 free' centre during the pandemic in South Italy. MATERIAL OF STUDY: From Feb 2020 to Feb 2021 we performed 800 operations (40% in emergency and 60% of major surgery). We applied restrictive measures for the access of patients in our department from 15/2/2020 after several cases of unclear fever. Visitors were not allowed to stay in the ward. RESULTS: In the first period of lockdown, from March to June 2020, in our Region, biomolecular test was indicated only for symptomatic people. We organized the hospitalization with a sealed compartment system (that we defined "boing system") in which the patient stationed in an 'isolation room' for at least 48 hours upon the entry. From July 2020 molecular test were made to all patients before hospitalization. The boing system remains for emergency recovery. DISCUSSION: In the first phase of pandemia we chose to subject patients to serological examination based on the IgM assay to consider them negative. We organized the hospitalization with a sealed compartment system (that we defined "boing system") CONCLUSION: In the first phase of the pandemic the serological examination has shown high specificity in identifying positive patients for COVID 19. In that period we supposed that patients with negative serology could be considered non-contagious Neither patients or staff has been resulted positive to SarS CoV2 test. KEY WORDS: Covid 19, Emercency Surgery, Spoke Center, Pandemia, Serological Tests.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Models, Organizational , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Prof Inferm ; 74(3): 235-240, 2021.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776576

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic had a great impact on pre and post-natal care, and, more generally, on the female population. Health services have been characterized by significant changes that have involved a review and reorganization of care pathways and clinical practices. The midwife continued to play a key role for the health of women and children, for the continuity of care and for a health-oriented approach throughout their life. The experience of the Pre and Post Natal Care of the Autonomous Province of Trento ensured the continuity of care during the pandemic thanks to the activation of a well-established Hospital-Territory network. The dedicated Case Manager Midwife allowed continuity and appropriateness of care during all phases of the birth pathway. The possibility of having the first interview electronically led to a continuous annual increase in the first interviews. In addition, for all women in the third trimester of pregnancy, the antenatal classes are organized remotely, using simple IT supports, in videoconferencing mode, maintaining homogeneous contents and objectives throughout the territory. The involvement of fathers from the early stages of pregnancy has shown the value of co-parenting even during the pandemic. This organizational model rooted in the territory and in the network of connection between the Territory and the Hospital proved to be a resource to withstand the impact of the emergency and guaranteed appropriate and timely assistance to women, fathers and the family.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Midwifery , Child , Female , Humans , Models, Organizational , Pandemics , Pregnancy
4.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6): 671-676, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724736

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The current pandemic caused by COVID-19 is the biggest challenge for national health systems for a century. While most medical resources are allocated to treat COVID-19 patients, several non-COVID-19 medical emergencies still need to be treated, including vertebral fractures and spinal cord compression. The aim of this paper is to report the early experience and an organizational protocol for emergency spinal surgery currently being used in a large metropolitan area by an integrated team of orthopaedic surgeons and neurosurgeons. METHODS: An organizational model is presented based on case centralization in hub hospitals and early management of surgical cases to reduce hospital stay. Data from all the patients admitted for emergency spinal surgery from the beginning of the outbreak were prospectively collected and compared to data from patients admitted for the same reason in the same time span in the previous year, and treated by the same integrated team. RESULTS: A total of 19 patients (11 males and eight females, with a mean age of 49.9 years (14 to 83)) were admitted either for vertebral fracture or spinal cord compression in a 19-day period, compared to the ten admitted in the previous year. No COVID-19 patients were treated. The mean time between admission and surgery was 1.7 days, significantly lower than 6.8 days the previous year (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The structural organization and the management protocol we describe allowed us to reduce the time to surgery and ultimately hospital stay, thereby maximizing the already stretched medical resources available. We hope that our early experience can be of value to the medical communities that will soon be in the same emergency situation. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6):671-676.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Models, Organizational , Neurosurgical Procedures , Orthopedic Procedures , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral , Spinal Cord Compression/surgery , Spinal Fractures/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Efficiency, Organizational , Emergencies , Female , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Prospective Studies , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
5.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 57-63, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587342

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) programs and people with CF (PwCF) employed various monitoring methods for virtual care during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper characterizes experiences with remote monitoring across the U.S. CF community. METHODS: The CF Foundation (CFF) sponsored distribution of home spirometers (April 2020 to May 2021), surveys to PwCF and CF programs (July to September 2020), and a second program survey (April to May 2021). We used mixed methods to explore access, use, and perspectives regarding the use of remote monitoring in future care. RESULTS: By October 2020, 13,345 spirometers had been distributed, and 19,271 spirometers by May 2021. Programs (n=286) estimated proportions of PwCF with home devices increased over seven months: spirometers (30% to 70%), scales (50% to 70%), oximeters (5% to 10%) with higher estimates in adult programs for spirometers and oximeters. PwCF (n=378) had access to scales (89%), followed by oximeters (48%) and spirometers (47%), often using scales and oximeters weekly, and spirometers monthly. Over both surveys, some programs had no method to collect respiratory specimens for cultures associated with telehealth visits (47%, n=132; 41%, n=118). Most programs (81%) had a process for phlebotomy associated with a telehealth visit, primarily through off-site labs. Both PwCF and programs felt future care should advance remote monitoring and recommended improvements for access, training, and data collection systems. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF and programs experienced unprecedented access to remote monitoring and raised its importance for future care. Improvements to current systems may leverage these shared experiences to augment future care models.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Equipment and Supplies/supply & distribution , Home Care Services , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Spirometry , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/diagnosis , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Home Care Services/standards , Humans , Models, Organizational , Needs Assessment , Oximetry/instrumentation , Oximetry/methods , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirometry/instrumentation , Spirometry/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
6.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 41-46, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CF centers shifted to a telehealth delivery model. Our study aimed to determine how people with CF (PwCF) and their families experienced telehealth and assessed its quality and acceptability for future CF care. METHODS: The CF Patient and Family State of Care Survey (PFSoC) was fielded from August 31-October 30, 2020. The PFSoC explored themes of overall telehealth quality, ease of use, desirability, and preference for a future mix of in-person and telehealth care. Demographic covariates considered included: gender, age, CFTR modulator status, and region of residence. RESULTS: 424 PwCF and parents of PwCF responded (47% parents). Most (81%) reported a telehealth visit which included a MD/APP and nurse team members. 91% found telehealth easy to use, and 66% reported similar/higher quality than in-person care. One-third (34%) reported the highest desire for future telehealth care, with 45% (n =212) desiring 50% or more of visits conducted via telehealth. Adults were more likely than parents to report highest desire for future telehealth (64% vs. 36%). Respondents who perceived telehealth as similar/higher quality were more likely to desire future telehealth compared to those who perceived telehealth as lower quality (96% vs. 50%). Mixed methods analysis revealed themes affecting perceptions of telehealth. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF desire for future telehealth was influenced by perception of quality and age. Several themes emerged that need to be explored as telehealth is adapted into the CF chronic care model, especially when thinking about integration into pediatric care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Family Health , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Models, Organizational , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Pediatrics/methods , Pediatrics/trends , Quality Improvement , Quality of Health Care/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
7.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 16-20, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587336

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic care delivery models faced unprecedented financial pressures, with a reduction of in-person visits and adoption of telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. We sought to understand the reported financial impact of pandemic-related changes to the cystic fibrosis (CF) care model. METHODS: The U.S. CF Foundation State of Care surveys fielded in Summer 2020 (SoC1) and Spring 2021 (SoC2) included questions for CF programs on the impact of pandemic-related restrictions on overall finances, staffing, licensure, and reimbursement of telehealth services. Descriptive analyses were conducted based on program type. RESULTS: Among the 286 respondents (128 pediatric, 118 adult, 40 affiliate), the majority (62%) reported a detrimental financial impact to their CF care program in SoC1, though fewer (42%) reported detrimental impacts in SoC2. The most common reported impacts in SoC1 were redeployment of clinical staff (68%), furloughs (52%), hiring freezes (51%), decreases in salaries (34%), or layoffs (10%). Reports of lower reimbursement for telehealth increased from 30% to 40% from SoC1 to SoC2. Projecting towards the future, only a minority (17%) of program directors in SoC2 felt that financial support would remain below pre-pandemic levels. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in financial strain on the CF care model, including challenges with reimbursement for telehealth services and reductions in staffing due to institutional changes. Planning for the future of CF care model needs to address these short-term impacts, particularly to ensure a lack of interruption in high-quality multi-disciplinary care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , Cystic Fibrosis , Health Services Accessibility , Models, Organizational , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Costs and Cost Analysis , Cystic Fibrosis/economics , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Reimbursement Mechanisms/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/methods , United States/epidemiology
8.
Am J Nurs ; 121(12): 39-44, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522339

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: During the COVID-19 pandemic, many health care facilities closed their doors to nursing students, depriving them of the experience of caring for patients, a foundation of nursing education. The purpose of this article is to report on how the National Council of State Boards of Nursing convened nurse leaders from around the country to explore this problem and develop possible solutions.Coming together virtually, these leaders recommended a national model, the practice-academic partnership, to provide nursing students with in-person clinical experiences during the pandemic. This model is unique in its recognition of the important role of nursing regulatory bodies in these partnerships. The practice-academic partnership model creates clinical education opportunities for students during a public health crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, the model could be applied to meet the chronic challenges nursing education programs have often faced in securing clinical sites, even in the absence of a global or national public health emergency. We provide the context in which the practice-academic partnership model was developed, along with keys to its successful implementation and suggestions for its evaluation. We also discuss the implications of using this model once the pandemic ends.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Health Facilities , Interinstitutional Relations , Schools, Nursing , Forecasting , Humans , Models, Organizational , Students, Nursing
9.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259226, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502072

ABSTRACT

When emerging technologies transform an organization's way of working, explorative business process management (BPM) becomes a new challenge. Although digital innovations can boost process efficacy and business productivity, employees do not necessarily accept the implied work changes. We therefore looked at the increased digitalization efforts during the COVID-19 lockdowns, during which employees were forced to drastically rethink work by heavily depending on technology for communication and almost all business tasks. This global setting allowed us to scrutinize disruptive work changes and how employees can cope with disruptive work adaptations. We also looked into the explorative skillset needed to adapt to these changes. To theorize about an explorative BPM acceptance model, eleven hypotheses were supported based on a solid theoretical foundation. We followed a quantitative research design using partial least squares for structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) at the university administration settings in two regions, including purposive sampling. Data analysis covered both a measurement model assessment and structural model assessment. Our findings reveal that employees' perceived work modalities, feeling creative and feeling flexible are more promising features than perceived influence and attitude related to explorative work and skill development. We also offer novel insights into explorative business process management (BPM) skills, and which skills are more productive in uncertain or dynamic working conditions. This research is a learning path for managers struggling with flexible or competitive business environments, and more specifically to facilitate employee willingness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Commerce , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Employment , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Algorithms , Creativity , Female , Humans , Learning , Least-Squares Analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Organizational , SARS-CoV-2 , Technology , Young Adult
10.
Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am ; 30(4): 809-826, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415269

ABSTRACT

Psychiatry and psychology have a long history of competition that too often interferes with the collaboration that can characterize complementary contributions to our common missions. We hope this article will inspire our disciplines to expand on this collaboration, for the sake of our children and families, our communities, our colleagues, and honestly, ourselves. We are better together than apart. This text is a blueprint for the assumptions, attitudes, skills, and advocacy that can make this partnership healthy and successful.


Subject(s)
Child Psychiatry/methods , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Primary Health Care , Psychology, Child/methods , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Intersectoral Collaboration , Mental Health , Models, Organizational , Primary Health Care/ethics , Primary Health Care/organization & administration
11.
Int J Equity Health ; 20(1): 204, 2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412693

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with disabilities (PwD) have been facing multiple health, social, and economic disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic, stemming from structural disparities experienced for long time. This paper aims to present the PREparedness, RESponse and SySTemic transformation (PRE-RE-SyST): a model for a disability-inclusive pandemic responses and systematic disparities reduction. METHODS: Scoping review with a thematic analysis was conducted on the literature published up to mid-September 2020, equating to the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. Seven scientific databases and three preprint databases were searched to identify empirical or perspective papers addressing health and socio-economic disparities experienced by PwD as well as reporting actions to address them. Snowballing searches and experts' consultation were also conducted. Two independent reviewers made eligibility decisions and performed data extractions on any action or recommended action to address disparities. A thematic analysis was then used for the model construction, informed by a systems-thinking approach (i.e., the Iceberg Model). RESULTS: From 1027 unique references, 84 were included in the final analysis. The PRE-RE-SyST model articulates a four-level strategic action to: 1) Respond to prevent or reduce disability disparities during a pandemic crisis; 2) Prepare ahead for pandemic and other crises responses; 3) Design systems and policies for a structural disability-inclusiveness; and 4) Transform society's cultural assumptions about disability. 'Simple rules' and literature-based examples on how these strategies can be deployed are provided. CONCLUSION: The PRE-RE-SyST model articulates main strategies, 'simple rules' and possible means whereby public health authorities, policy-makers, and other stakeholders can address disability disparities in pandemic crises, and beyond. Beyond immediate pandemic responses, disability-inclusiveness is needed to develop everyday equity-oriented policies and practices that can transform societies towards greater resiliency, as a whole, to pandemic and other health and social emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Pandemics , Public Health Practice , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Models, Organizational , Pandemics/prevention & control
13.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102228, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333362

ABSTRACT

AIM: Amidst COVID-19 pandemic, the health care delivery in India faces major challenges owing to the overwhelming hospitals, exhausted healthcare workers, and shortage of crucial medical supplies such as ventilators and oxygen. The study aims to propose a novel successful interventional home care model, the Virtual COVID In-Patient (VCIP) care for effective COVID management. METHODS: The Covid-19 positive patients enrolled in VCIP were chosen for the study. A 24/7 active multidisciplinary WhatsApp group was created for each patient, for remote monitoring of temperature, blood pressure, blood glucose, respiratory and pulse rate along with the symptoms. Advice on sleep and exercises were given along with the medication via video-audio consultations. Lab facility was provided at the doorstep. Training on various devices, medications including steroids, delivering subcutaneous injections etc were given via video platforms. RESULTS: Among the 220 patients who availed the VCIP facility, only two were hospitalized, yielding a 99.5 % success rate in preventing hospitalizations and patients enrolled have been immensely satisfied with their experience. CONCLUSIONS: With similar pandemics anticipated in near future, VCIP model may be considered for successful domiciliary treatment and overcoming the challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Algorithms , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Internationality , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Nursing , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Pandemics , Prognosis , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Treatment Outcome
14.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 77(19): 1592-1597, 2020 09 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317905

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Guidance on alternate care site planning based on the experience of a health-system pharmacy department in preparing for an expected surge in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases is provided. SUMMARY: In disaster response situations such as the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare institutions may be compelled to transition to a contingency care model in which staffing and supply levels are no longer consistent with daily practice norms and, while usual patient care practices are maintained, establishment of alternate care sites (eg, a convention center) may be necessitated by high patient volumes. Available resources to assist hospitals and health systems in alternate care site planning include online guidance posted within the COVID-19 resources section of the US Army Corps of Engineers website, which provides recommended medication and supply lists; and the Federal Healthcare Resilience Task Force's alternate care site toolkit, a comprehensive resource for all aspects of alternate care site planning, including pharmacy services. Important pharmacy planning issues include security and storage of drugs, state board of pharmacy and Drug Enforcement Administration licensing considerations, and staff credentialing, education, and training. Key medication management issues to be addressed in alternate site care planning include logistical challenges of supply chain maintenance, optimal workflow for compounded sterile preparations (eg, on-site preparation vs off-site preparation and delivery from a nearby hospital), and infusion pump availability and suitability to patient acuity levels. CONCLUSION: Planning for and operation of alternate care sites in disaster response situations should include involvement of pharmacists in key decision-making processes at the earliest planning stages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Decision Making, Organizational , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Health Facility Planning/organization & administration , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergencies , Health Facility Planning/standards , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Humans , Medication Therapy Management/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pharmacists/organization & administration , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Workflow
16.
Fam Med Community Health ; 8(4)2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316963

ABSTRACT

Despite policies for addressing shortages and maldistribution of health professionals, sub-Saharan Africa continues to experience shortages and maldistribution of skilled health professionals. Policies such as return-of-service schemes or state-funded educational initiatives do not seem to be achieving their intended objectives, potentially due to poor design, implementation; and lack of monitoring and evaluation of the strategies. A focus by global health experts on strengthening and reformulating educational initiatives offers potential for producing, retaining and recruiting health professionals.


Subject(s)
Global Health , Health Workforce , Africa South of the Sahara , Health Policy , Health Workforce/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Workforce/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Models, Organizational
17.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(10): 2708-2715, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301523

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has exacted a disproportionate toll on the health of persons living in nursing homes. Healthcare providers and other decision-makers in those settings must refer to multiple evolving sources of guidance to coordinate care delivery in such a way as to minimize the introduction and spread of the causal virus, SARS-CoV-2. It is essential that guidance be presented in an accessible and usable format to facilitate its translation into evidence-based best practice. In this article, we propose the Haddon matrix as a tool well-suited to this task. The Haddon matrix is a conceptual model that organizes influencing factors into pre-event, event, and post-event phases, and into host, agent, and environment domains akin to the components of the epidemiologic triad. The Haddon matrix has previously been applied to topics relevant to the care of older persons, such as fall prevention, as well as to pandemic planning and response. Presented here is a novel application of the Haddon matrix to pandemic response in nursing homes, with practical applications for nursing home decision-makers in their efforts to prevent and contain COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Evidence-Based Practice , Homes for the Aged/organization & administration , Infection Control , Models, Organizational , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Evidence-Based Practice/methods , Evidence-Based Practice/trends , Health Services for the Aged/organization & administration , Health Services for the Aged/standards , Health Services for the Aged/trends , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
18.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(7): e2120295, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300327

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic is the greatest global test of health leadership of our generation. There is an urgent need to provide guidance for leaders at all levels during the unprecedented preresolution recovery stage. Objective: To create an evidence- and expertise-informed framework of leadership imperatives to serve as a resource to guide health and public health leaders during the postemergency stage of the pandemic. Evidence Review: A literature search in PubMed, MEDLINE, and Embase revealed 10 910 articles published between 2000 and 2021 that included the terms leadership and variations of emergency, crisis, disaster, pandemic, COVID-19, or public health. Using the Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence reporting guideline for consensus statement development, this assessment adopted a 6-round modified Delphi approach involving 32 expert coauthors from 17 countries who participated in creating and validating a framework outlining essential leadership imperatives. Findings: The 10 imperatives in the framework are: (1) acknowledge staff and celebrate successes; (2) provide support for staff well-being; (3) develop a clear understanding of the current local and global context, along with informed projections; (4) prepare for future emergencies (personnel, resources, protocols, contingency plans, coalitions, and training); (5) reassess priorities explicitly and regularly and provide purpose, meaning, and direction; (6) maximize team, organizational, and system performance and discuss enhancements; (7) manage the backlog of paused services and consider improvements while avoiding burnout and moral distress; (8) sustain learning, innovations, and collaborations, and imagine future possibilities; (9) provide regular communication and engender trust; and (10) in consultation with public health and fellow leaders, provide safety information and recommendations to government, other organizations, staff, and the community to improve equitable and integrated care and emergency preparedness systemwide. Conclusions and Relevance: Leaders who most effectively implement these imperatives are ideally positioned to address urgent needs and inequalities in health systems and to cocreate with their organizations a future that best serves stakeholders and communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Leadership , Pandemics , Consensus , Disaster Planning , Health Personnel/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Humans , Models, Organizational , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Soc Work Public Health ; 36(5): 577-587, 2021 07 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294637

ABSTRACT

Summary: The main purpose of the current study was to assess whether there are significant differences among variables, such as social workers' familiarity with the crisis intervention model, receiving up-to-date information about the latest developments in COVID-19, having adequate information about what the symptoms of COVID-19 are, and willingness to work with COVID-19 patients, and social workers' ability to apply the crisis intervention model when they are working with clients and its three sub-scales (assessing and identifying the problem, establishing a relationship, and formulating an action plan). The cross-sectional survey method was used to conduct the sample of the study. The sample (N = 274) used in the study consisted of social workers in Kuwait.Findings: The results showed that CIS is valid and reliable and can be trusted to measure levels according to the purpose of the study. Analysis using T-test showed significant relationships between the CIS and study's variables at p < .05.Application: This study would help to raise the knowledge and awareness about the ability of social workers to apply the crisis intervention model during COVID-19 pandemic when they are working with clients and what variables may be associated with it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Crisis Intervention , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Social Workers , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Crisis Intervention/organization & administration , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Kuwait/epidemiology , Models, Organizational
20.
Int J Surg ; 91: 105987, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253037

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multiple industries and organisations are afflicted by and respond to institutional crises daily. As surgeons, we respond to crisis frequently and individually such as with critically unwell patients or in mass casualty scenarios; but rarely, do we encounter institutional or multi-institutional crisis with multiple actors as we have seen with the COVID-19 pan-demic. Businesses, private industry and the financial sector have been in a more precar-ious position regarding crisis and consequently have developed rapid response strate-gies employing foresight to reduce risk to assets and financial liquidity. Moreover, large nationalised governmental organisations such as the military have strategies in place ow-ing to a rapidly evolving geopolitical climate with the expectation of immediate new chal-lenges either in the negotiating room or indeed the field of conflict. Despite both nation-alised and privatised healthcare systems existing, both appeared ill-prepared for the COVID-19 global crisis. METHODS: A narrative review of the literature was undertaken exploring the approach to crisis man-agement and models used in organisations exposed to institutional crises outside the field of medicine. RESULTS: There are many parallels between the organisational management of private business institutions, large military organisations and surgical organisational management in healthcare. Models from management consultancies and the armed forces were ex-plored discussed and adapted for the surgical leader providing a framework through which the surgical leader can bring about an successful response to an institutional crisis and ensure future resilience. CONCLUSION: We believe that healthcare, and surgeons (as leaders) in particular, can learn from these other organisations and industries to engage appropriate generic operational plans and contingencies in preparation for whatever further crises may arise in the future, both near and distant. As such, following a review of the literature, we have explored a number of models we believe are adaptable for the surgical community to ensure we remain a dy-namically responsive and ever prepared profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Surgery/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Surgeons/organization & administration , Humans , Leadership , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/psychology
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