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1.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 802447, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699427

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a serious epidemic, characterized by potential mutation and can bring about poor vaccine efficiency. It is evidenced that patients with malignancies, including prostate cancer (PC), may be highly vulnerable to the SARS-CoV-2 infection. Currently, there are no existing drugs that can cure PC and COVID-19. Luteolin can potentially be employed for COVID-19 treatment and serve as a potent anticancer agent. Our present study was conducted to discover the possible drug target and curative mechanism of luteolin to serve as treatment for PC and COVID-19. The differential gene expression of PC cases was determined via RNA sequencing. The application of network pharmacology and molecular docking aimed to exhibit the drug targets and pharmacological mechanisms of luteolin. In this study, we found the top 20 up- and downregulated gene expressions in PC patients. Enrichment data demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects, where improvement of metabolism and enhancement of immunity were the main functions and mechanism of luteolin in treating PC and COVID-19, characterized by associated signaling pathways. Additional core drug targets, including MPO and FOS genes, were computationally identified accordingly. In conclusion, luteolin may be a promising treatment for PC and COVID-19 based on bioinformatics findings, prior to future clinical validation and application.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery/methods , Luteolin/therapeutic use , Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Computational Biology/methods , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Humans , Luteolin/pharmacology , Male , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/drug effects , Models, Molecular , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Protein Interaction Maps/drug effects , Protein Interaction Maps/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
2.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 29, 2022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655546

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is transmitted on mink farms between minks and humans in many countries. However, the systemic pathological features of SARS-CoV-2-infected minks are mostly unknown. Here, we demonstrated that minks were largely permissive to SARS-CoV-2, characterized by severe and diffuse alveolar damage, and lasted at least 14 days post inoculation (dpi). We first reported that infected minks displayed multiple organ-system lesions accompanied by an increased inflammatory response and widespread viral distribution in the cardiovascular, hepatobiliary, urinary, endocrine, digestive, and immune systems. The viral protein partially co-localized with activated Mac-2+ macrophages throughout the body. Moreover, we first found that the alterations in lipids and metabolites were correlated with the histological lesions in infected minks, especially at 6 dpi, and were similar to that of patients with severe and fatal COVID-19. Particularly, altered metabolic pathways, abnormal digestion, and absorption of vitamins, lipids, cholesterol, steroids, amino acids, and proteins, consistent with hepatic dysfunction, highlight metabolic and immune dysregulation. Enriched kynurenine in infected minks contributed to significant activation of the kynurenine pathway and was related to macrophage activation. Melatonin, which has significant anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effects, was significantly downregulated at 6 dpi and displayed potential as a targeted medicine. Our data first illustrate systematic analyses of infected minks to recapitulate those observations in severe and fetal COVID-19 patients, delineating a useful animal model to mimic SARS-CoV-2-induced systematic and severe pathophysiological features and provide a reliable tool for the development of effective and targeted treatment strategies, vaccine research, and potential biomarkers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Macrophages, Alveolar/metabolism , Metabolome , Mink/virology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Amino Acids/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Macrophages, Alveolar/pathology , Macrophages, Alveolar/virology , Melatonin/metabolism , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sterols/metabolism , Virulence , Virus Replication/genetics
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650980

ABSTRACT

TMPRSS2 is a type II transmembrane protease with broad expression in epithelial cells of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, the prostate, and other organs. Although the physiological role of TMPRSS2 remains largely elusive, several endogenous substrates have been identified. TMPRSS2 serves as a major cofactor in SARS-CoV-2 entry, and primes glycoproteins of other respiratory viruses as well. Consequently, inhibiting TMPRSS2 activity is a promising strategy to block viral infection. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of TMPRSS2 in the entry processes of different respiratory viruses. We then review the different classes of TMPRSS2 inhibitors and their clinical development, with a focus on COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Molecular Targeted Therapy/trends , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , COVID-19/genetics , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Virus Internalization/drug effects
4.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 145: 112420, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588219

ABSTRACT

Deciphering the molecular downstream consequences of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)- 2 infection is important for a greater understanding of the disease and treatment planning. Furthermore, greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies can help in the development of vaccines and drugs against COVID-19. At present, the molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 in the host cells are not sufficiently comprehended. Some of the mechanisms are proposed considering the existing similarities between SARS-CoV-2 and the other members of the ß-CoVs, and others are explained based on studies advanced in the structure and function of SARS-CoV-2. In this review, we endeavored to map the possible mechanisms of the host response following SARS-CoV-2 infection and surveyed current research conducted by in vitro, in vivo and human observations, as well as existing suggestions. We addressed the specific signaling events that can cause cytokine storm and demonstrated three forms of cell death signaling following virus infection, including apoptosis, pyroptosis, and necroptosis. Given the elicited signaling pathways, we introduced possible pathway-based therapeutic targets; ADAM17 was especially highlighted as one of the most important elements of several signaling pathways involved in the immunopathogenesis of COVID-19. We also provided the possible drug candidates against these targets. Moreover, the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathway was found as one of the important cross-talk pathways through a pathway-pathway interaction analysis for SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Drug Discovery , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans
5.
Life Sci ; 291: 120267, 2022 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587054

ABSTRACT

Tauopathy is a term that has been used to represent a pathological condition in which hyperphosphorylated tau protein aggregates in neurons and glia which results in neurodegeneration, synapse loss and dysfunction and cognitive impairments. Recently, drug repositioning strategy (DRS) becomes a promising field and an alternative approach to advancing new treatments from actually developed and FDA approved drugs for an indication other than the indication it was originally intended for. This paradigm provides an advantage because the safety of the candidate compound has already been established, which abolishes the need for further preclinical safety testing and thus substantially reduces the time and cost involved in progressing of clinical trials. In the present review, we focused on correlation between tauopathy and common diseases as type 2 diabetes mellitus and the global virus COVID-19 and how tau pathology can aggravate development of these diseases in addition to how these diseases can be a risk factor for development of tauopathy. Moreover, correlation between COVID-19 and type 2 diabetes mellitus was also discussed. Therefore, repositioning of a drug in the daily clinical practice of patients to manage or prevent two or more diseases at the same time with lower side effects and drug-drug interactions is a promising idea. This review concluded the results of pre-clinical and clinical studies applied on antidiabetics, COVID-19 medications, antihypertensives, antidepressants and cholesterol lowering drugs for possible drug repositioning for management of tauopathy.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Drug Repositioning , Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology , Tauopathies/drug therapy , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Antihypertensive Agents/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/physiopathology , Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Tauopathies/physiopathology
6.
Bioengineered ; 12(2): 12461-12469, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585255

ABSTRACT

Severe mortality due to the COVID-19 pandemic resulted from the lack of effective treatment. Although COVID-19 vaccines are available, their side effects have become a challenge for clinical use in patients with chronic diseases, especially cancer patients. In the current report, we applied network pharmacology and systematic bioinformatics to explore the use of biochanin A in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and COVID-19 infection. Using the network pharmacology approach, we identified two clusters of genes involved in immune response (IL1A, IL2, and IL6R) and cell proliferation (CCND1, PPARG, and EGFR) mediated by biochanin A in CRC/COVID-19 condition. The functional analysis of these two gene clusters further illustrated the effects of biochanin A on interleukin-6 production and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction in CRC/COVID-19 pathology. In addition, pathway analysis demonstrated the control of PI3K-Akt and JAK-STAT signaling pathways by biochanin A in the treatment of CRC/COVID-19. The findings of this study provide a therapeutic option for combination therapy against COVID-19 infection in CRC patients.


Subject(s)
Anticarcinogenic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/drug effects , Genistein/therapeutic use , Phytoestrogens/therapeutic use , Atlases as Topic , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Colorectal Neoplasms/immunology , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Colorectal Neoplasms/virology , Cyclin D1/genetics , Cyclin D1/immunology , ErbB Receptors/genetics , ErbB Receptors/immunology , Humans , Interleukin-1alpha/genetics , Interleukin-1alpha/immunology , Interleukin-2/genetics , Interleukin-2/immunology , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/immunology , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/drug effects , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Multigene Family , PPAR gamma/genetics , PPAR gamma/immunology , Pharmacogenetics/methods , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/genetics , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/immunology , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/genetics , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/immunology , Receptors, Interleukin-6/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-6/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , STAT Transcription Factors/genetics , STAT Transcription Factors/immunology , Signal Transduction
7.
Mol Med ; 27(1): 162, 2021 12 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582120

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel type b coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. With over 224 million confirmed infections with this virus and more than 4.6 million people dead because of it, it is critically important to define the immunological processes occurring in the human response to this virus and pathogenetic mechanisms of its deadly manifestation. This perspective focuses on the contribution of the recently discovered interaction of SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein with neuropilin 1 (NRP1) receptor, NRP1 as a virus entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2, its role in different physiologic and pathologic conditions, and the potential to target the Spike-NRP1 interaction to combat virus infectivity and severe disease manifestations.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Neuropilin-1/chemistry , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Infant , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Neuropilin-1/immunology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
8.
Molecules ; 26(24)2021 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572567

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is the name of the disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection that occurred in 2019. The virus-host-specific interactions, molecular targets on host cell deaths, and the involved signaling are crucial issues, which become potential targets for treatment. Spike protein, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), cathepsin L-cysteine peptidase, transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2), nonstructural protein 1 (Nsp1), open reading frame 7a (ORF7a), viral main protease (3C-like protease (3CLpro) or Mpro), RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) (Nsp12), non-structural protein 13 (Nsp13) helicase, and papain-like proteinase (PLpro) are molecules associated with SARS-CoV infection and propagation. SARS-CoV-2 can induce host cell death via five kinds of regulated cell death, i.e., apoptosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis, autophagy, and PANoptosis. The mechanisms of these cell deaths are well established and can be disrupted by synthetic small molecules or natural products. There are a variety of compounds proven to play roles in the cell death inhibition, such as pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) for apoptosis, necrostatin-1 for necroptosis, MCC950, a potent and specific inhibitor of the NLRP3 inflammasome in pyroptosis, and chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine, which can mitigate the corresponding cell death pathways. However, NF-κB signaling is another critical anti-apoptotic or survival route mediated by SARS-CoV-2. Such signaling promotes viral survival, proliferation, and inflammation by inducing the expression of apoptosis inhibitors such as Bcl-2 and XIAP, as well as cytokines, e.g., TNF. As a result, tiny natural compounds functioning as proteasome inhibitors such as celastrol and curcumin can be used to modify NF-κB signaling, providing a responsible method for treating SARS-CoV-2-infected patients. The natural constituents that aid in inhibiting viral infection, progression, and amplification of coronaviruses are also emphasized, which are in the groups of alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, diarylheptanoids, and anthraquinones. Natural constituents derived from medicinal herbs have anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties, as well as inhibitory effects, on the viral life cycle, including viral entry, replication, assembly, and release of COVID-19 virions. The phytochemicals contain a high potential for COVID-19 treatment. As a result, SARS-CoV-2-infected cell death processes and signaling might be of high efficacy for therapeutic targeting effects and yielding encouraging outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Death/drug effects , Drug Discovery/methods , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Amino Acid Chloromethyl Ketones/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Furans/pharmacology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Imidazoles/pharmacology , Indenes/pharmacology , Indoles/pharmacology , Necroptosis/drug effects , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Pyroptosis/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Viral Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors
9.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 101(Pt A): 108328, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517296

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The novel Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused great distress worldwide. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is well familiar but when it happens as part of COVID-19 it has discrete features which are unmanageable. Numerous pharmacological treatments have been evaluated in clinical trials to control the clinical effects of CARDS, but there is no assurance of their effectiveness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the literature of the Medline, Scopus, Bentham, PubMed, and EMBASE (Elsevier) databases was examined to understand the novel therapeutic approaches used in COVID-19-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and their outcomes. KEY FINDINGS: Current therapeutic options may not be enough to manage COVID-19-associated ARDS complications in group of patients and therefore, the current review has discussed the pathophysiological mechanism of COVID-19-associated ARDS, potential pharmacological treatment and the emerging molecular drug targets. SIGNIFICANCE: The rationale of this review is to talk about the pathophysiology of CARDS, potential pharmacological treatment and the emerging molecular drug targets. Currently accessible treatment focuses on modulating immune responses, rendering antiviral effects, anti-thrombosis or anti-coagulant effects. It is expected that considerable number of studies conducting globally may help to discover effective therapies to decrease mortality and morbidity occurring due to CARDS. Attention should be also given on molecular drug targets that possibly will help to develop efficient cure for COVID-19-associated ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Animals , COVID-19/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
10.
Life Sci ; 291: 120111, 2022 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487890

ABSTRACT

The Nrf2 transcription factor governs the expression of hundreds genes involved in cell defense against oxidative stress, the hallmark of numerous diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, some viral pathologies, diabetes and others. The main route for Nrf2 activity regulation is via interactions with the Keap1 protein. Under the normoxia the Keap1 binds the Nrf2 and targets it to the proteasomal degradation, while the Keap1 is regenerated. Upon oxidative stress the interactions between Nrf2 and Keap1 are interrupted and the Nrf2 activates the transcription of the protective genes. Currently, the Nrf2 system activation is considered as a powerful cytoprotective strategy for treatment of different pathologies, which pathogenesis relies on oxidative stress including viral diseases of pivotal importance such as COVID-19. The implementation of this strategy is accomplished mainly through the inactivation of the Keap1 "guardian" function. Two approaches are now developing: the Keap1 modification via electrophilic agents, which leads to the Nrf2 release, and direct interruption of the Nrf2:Keap1 protein-protein interactions (PPI). Because of theirs chemical structure, the Nrf2 electrophilic inducers could non-specifically interact with others cellular proteins leading to undesired effects. Whereas the non-electrophilic inhibitors of the Nrf2:Keap1 PPI could be more specific, thereby widening the therapeutic window.


Subject(s)
Antioxidant Response Elements/physiology , Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1/metabolism , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , Oxidative Stress , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Humans , Ozone/therapeutic use , Protein Interaction Maps/drug effects , Signal Transduction
11.
Adv Drug Deliv Rev ; 179: 113998, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1465980

ABSTRACT

Gene therapy has been widely investigated for the treatment of genetic, acquired, and infectious diseases. Pioneering work utilized viral vectors; however, these are suspected of causing serious adverse events, resulting in the termination of several clinical trials. Non-viral vectors, such as lipid nanoparticles, have attracted significant interest, mainly due to their successful use in vaccines in the current COVID-19 pandemic. Although they allow safe delivery, they come with the disadvantage of off-target delivery. The application of ultrasound to ultrasound-sensitive particles allows for a direct, site-specific transfer of genetic materials into the organ/site of interest. This process, termed ultrasound-targeted gene delivery (UTGD), also increases cell membrane permeability and enhances gene uptake. This review focuses on the advances in ultrasound and the development of ultrasonic particles for UTGD across a range of diseases. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and future perspectives of UTGD.


Subject(s)
Gene Transfer Techniques , Genetic Therapy/methods , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Ultrasonics , Animals , COVID-19 , Humans , Liposomes , Nanoparticles
12.
Pharmacol Rev ; 73(3): 924-967, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447969

ABSTRACT

The endothelium, a cellular monolayer lining the blood vessel wall, plays a critical role in maintaining multiorgan health and homeostasis. Endothelial functions in health include dynamic maintenance of vascular tone, angiogenesis, hemostasis, and the provision of an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic interface. Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium presents with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, heightened oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, leukocyte adhesion and hyperpermeability, and endothelial cell senescence. Recent studies have implicated altered endothelial cell metabolism and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as new features of endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as a hallmark of many diverse human panvascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes. Endothelial dysfunction has also been implicated in severe coronavirus disease 2019. Many clinically used pharmacotherapies, ranging from traditional lipid-lowering drugs, antihypertensive drugs, and antidiabetic drugs to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitors and interleukin 1ß monoclonal antibodies, counter endothelial dysfunction as part of their clinical benefits. The regulation of endothelial dysfunction by noncoding RNAs has provided novel insights into these newly described regulators of endothelial dysfunction, thus yielding potential new therapeutic approaches. Altogether, a better understanding of the versatile (dys)functions of endothelial cells will not only deepen our comprehension of human diseases but also accelerate effective therapeutic drug discovery. In this review, we provide a timely overview of the multiple layers of endothelial function, describe the consequences and mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction, and identify pathways to effective targeted therapies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: The endothelium was initially considered to be a semipermeable biomechanical barrier and gatekeeper of vascular health. In recent decades, a deepened understanding of the biological functions of the endothelium has led to its recognition as a ubiquitous tissue regulating vascular tone, cell behavior, innate immunity, cell-cell interactions, and cell metabolism in the vessel wall. Endothelial dysfunction is the hallmark of cardiovascular, metabolic, and emerging infectious diseases. Pharmacotherapies targeting endothelial dysfunction have potential for treatment of cardiovascular and many other diseases.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Agents , Cardiovascular Diseases , Endothelium, Vascular , Atherosclerosis/drug therapy , Atherosclerosis/metabolism , Atherosclerosis/physiopathology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Agents/classification , Cardiovascular Agents/pharmacology , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Drug Discovery , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Molecular Targeted Therapy/trends , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Cell ; 184(6): 1604-1620, 2021 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392179

ABSTRACT

Historically, emerging viruses appear constantly and have cost millions of human lives. Currently, climate change and intense globalization have created favorable conditions for viral transmission. Therefore, effective antivirals, especially those targeting the conserved protein in multiple unrelated viruses, such as the compounds targeting RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, are urgently needed to combat more emerging and re-emerging viruses in the future. Here we reviewed the development of antivirals with common targets, including those against the same protein across viruses, or the same viral function, to provide clues for development of antivirals for future epidemics.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/drug therapy , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Pandemics , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Viruses/enzymology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Humans , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Virus Diseases/virology , Virus Internalization/drug effects
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(17)2021 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374422

ABSTRACT

The lungs play a very important role in the human respiratory system. However, many factors can destroy the structure of the lung, causing several lung diseases and, often, serious damage to people's health. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a polypeptide which is widely expressed in lung tissues. Under different microenvironments, NGF participates in the occurrence and development of lung diseases by changing protein expression levels and mediating cell function. In this review, we summarize the functions of NGF as well as some potential underlying mechanisms in pulmonary fibrosis (PF), coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), pulmonary hypertension (PH), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer. Furthermore, we highlight that anti-NGF may be used in future therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
Airway Remodeling/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Nerve Growth Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Asthma/drug therapy , Asthma/pathology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Hypertension, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Hypertension, Pulmonary/pathology , Lung/drug effects , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Nerve Growth Factor/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/drug therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology
15.
Biol Aujourdhui ; 215(1-2): 25-43, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358361

ABSTRACT

Targeted protein degradation (TPD), discovered twenty years ago through the PROTAC technology, is rapidly developing thanks to the implication of many scientists from industry and academia. PROTAC chimeras are heterobifunctional molecules able to link simultaneously a protein to be degraded and an E3 ubiquitin ligase. This allows the protein ubiquitination and its degradation by 26S proteasome. PROTACs have evolved from small peptide molecules to small non-peptide and orally available molecules. It was shown that PROTACs are capable to degrade proteins considered as "undruggable" i.e. devoid of well-defined pockets and deep grooves possibly occupied by small molecules. Among these "hard to drug" proteins, several can be degraded by PROTACs: scaffold proteins, BAF complex, transcription factors, Ras family proteins. Two PROTACs are clinically tested for breast (ARV471) and prostate (ARV110) cancers. The protein degradation by proteasome is also induced by other types of molecules: molecular glues, hydrophobic tagging (HyT), HaloPROTACs and homo-PROTACs. Other cellular constituents are eligible to induced degradation: RNA-PROTACs for RNA binding proteins and RIBOTACs for degradation of RNA itself (SARS-CoV-2 RNA). TPD has recently moved beyond the proteasome with LYTACs (lysosome targeting chimeras) and MADTACs (macroautophagy degradation targeting chimeras). Several techniques such as screening platforms together with mathematical modeling and computational design are now used to improve the discovery of new efficient PROTACs.


TITLE: Dégradation induite des protéines par des molécules PROTAC et stratégies apparentées : développements à visée thérapeutique. ABSTRACT: Alors que, pour la plupart, les médicaments actuels sont de petites molécules inhibant l'action d'une protéine en bloquant un site d'interaction, la dégradation ciblée des protéines, découverte il y a une vingtaine d'années via les petites molécules PROTAC, connaît aujourd'hui un très grand développement, aussi bien au niveau universitaire qu'industriel. Cette dégradation ciblée permet de contrôler la concentration intracellulaire d'une protéine spécifique comme peuvent le faire les techniques basées sur les acides nucléiques (oligonucléotides antisens, ARNsi, CRISPR-Cas9). Les molécules PROTAC sont des chimères hétéro-bifonctionnelles capables de lier simultanément une protéine spécifique devant être dégradée et une E3 ubiquitine ligase. Les PROTAC sont donc capables de provoquer l'ubiquitinylation de la protéine ciblée et sa dégradation par le protéasome 26S. De nature peptidique, puis non peptidique, les PROTAC sont maintenant administrables par voie orale. Ce détournement du système ubiquitine protéasome permet aux molécules PROTAC d'élargir considérablement le champ des applications thérapeutiques puisque l'élimination de protéines dépourvues de poches ou de crevasses bien définies, dites difficiles à cibler, devient possible. Cette technologie versatile a conduit à la dégradation d'une grande variété de protéines comme des facteurs de transcription, des sérine/thréonine/tyrosine kinases, des protéines de structure, des protéines cytosoliques, des lecteurs épigénétiques. Certaines ligases telles que VHL, MDM2, cereblon et IAP sont couramment utilisées pour être recrutées par les PROTAC. Actuellement, le nombre de ligases pouvant être utilisées ainsi que la nature des protéines dégradées sont en constante augmentation. Deux PROTAC sont en étude clinique pour les cancers du sein (ARV471) et de la prostate (ARV110). La dégradation spécifique d'une protéine par le protéasome peut aussi être induite par d'autres types de molécules synthétiques : colles moléculaires, marqueurs hydrophobes, HaloPROTAC, homo-PROTAC. D'autres constituants cellulaires sont aussi éligibles à une dégradation induite : ARN-PROTAC pour les protéines se liant à l'ARN et RIBOTAC pour la dégradation de l'ARN lui-même comme celui du SARS-CoV-2. Des dégradations induites en dehors du protéasome sont aussi connues : LYTAC, pour des chimères détournant la dégradation de protéines extracellulaires vers les lysosomes, et MADTAC, pour des chimères détournant la dégradation par macroautophagie. Plusieurs techniques, en particulier des plates-formes de criblage, la modélisation mathématique et la conception computationnelle sont utilisées pour le développement de nouveaux PROTAC efficaces.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Design , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Proteolysis , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Autophagy , Catalysis , Humans , Lysosomes/metabolism , Neoplasm Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism , Protein Conformation , Protein Processing, Post-Translational/drug effects , Protein Stability , Proteolysis/drug effects , RNA/drug effects , RNA-Binding Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/pharmacokinetics , Structure-Activity Relationship , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism , Ubiquitination
16.
Biochim Biophys Acta Gen Subj ; 1865(11): 129974, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330651

ABSTRACT

Background Since December 2019, the newly emerged SARS-CoV-2 virus continues to infect humans and many people died from severe Covid-19 during the last 2 years worldwide. Different approaches are being used for treatment of this infection and its consequences, but limited results have been achieved and new therapeutics are still needed. One of the most interesting biotherapeutics in this era are Nanobodies which have shown very promising results in recent researches. Scope of review Here, we have reviewed the potentials of Nanobodies in Covid-19 treatment. We have also discussed the properties of these biotherapeutics that make them very suitable for pulmonary drug delivery, which seems to be very important route of administration in this disease. Major conclusion Nanobodies with their special biological and biophysical characteristics and their resistance against harsh manufacturing condition, can be considered as promising, targeted biotherapeutics which can be administered by pulmonary delivery pharmaceutical systems against Covid-19. General significance Covid-19 has become a global problem during the last two years and with emerging mutant strains, prophylactic and therapeutic approaches are still highly needed. Nanobodies with their specific properties can be considered as valuable and promising candidates in Covid-19 therapy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Single-Domain Antibodies/therapeutic use , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Neutralizing/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Camelus , Drug Delivery Systems , Humans , Immune Sera/chemistry , Immunologic Factors/biosynthesis , Immunologic Factors/isolation & purification , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Peptide Library , Protein Binding/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Domain Antibodies/biosynthesis , Single-Domain Antibodies/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
17.
Pharmacol Res ; 158: 104929, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318939

ABSTRACT

The epidemic of pneumonia (COVID-19) caused by novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection has been listed as a public health emergency of international concern by the World Health Organization (WHO), and its harm degree is defined as a global "pandemic". At present, the efforts of various countries focus on the rapid diagnosis and isolation of patients, as well as to find a treatment that can combat the most serious impact of the disease. The number of reported COVID-19 virus infections is still increasing. Unfortunately, no drugs or vaccines have been approved for the treatment of human coronaviruses, but there is an urgent need for in-depth research on emerging human infectious coronaviruses. Clarification transmission routes and pathogenic mechanisms, and identification of potential drug treatment targets will promote the development of effective prevention and treatment measures. In the absence of confirmed effective treatments, due to public health emergencies, it is essential to study the possible effects of existing approved antivirals drugs or Chinese herbal medicines for SARS-CoV-2. This review summarizes the epidemiological characteristics, pathogenesis, virus structure and targeting strategies of COVID-19. Meanwhile, this review also focus on the re-purposing of clinically approved drugs and Chinese herbal medicines that may be used to treat COVID-19 and provide new ideas for the discovery of small molecular compounds with potential therapeutic effects on novel COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Crit Rev Ther Drug Carrier Syst ; 38(3): 75-115, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236628

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of novel coronavirus (nCoV) or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, has posed an international public health emergency worldwide and forced people to be confined in their homes. This virus is of high-risk category and is declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO). The worldwide researchers and various health professionals are working together to determine the best way to stop its spread or halt this virus's spread and circumvent this pandemic condition threatening millions of human lives. The absence of definitive treatment is possible to explore to reduce virus infection and enhance patient recovery. Along with off-label medicines, plasma therapy, vaccines, the researchers exploit the various plants/herbs and their constituents to effectively treat nCoV infection. The present study aimed to present brief and most informative salient features of the numerous facts regarding the SARS-CoV-2, including the structure, genomic sequence, recent mutation, targeting possibility, and various hurdles in research progress, and off-labeled drugs, convalescent plasma therapy, vaccine and plants/herbs for the treatment of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Results showed that off-labeled drugs such as hydroxychloroquine, dexamethasone, tocilizumab, antiviral drug (remdesivir, favipiravir), etc., give positive results and approved for use or approved for restricted use in some countries like India. Future research should focus on these possibilities that may allow the development of an effective treatment for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Mutation , Off-Label Use , Pandemics/prevention & control , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Treatment Outcome , Viral Structural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Structural Proteins/genetics , Viral Structural Proteins/metabolism
19.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther ; 21(9): 1055-1066, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221423

ABSTRACT

Background: Cancer patients are more vulnerable to Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) and have a higher risk of adverse outcomes than the general population. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate whether anti-cancer therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy will increase the severity and mortality of cancer patients with COVID-19.Methods: Relevant articles were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). The search time was from December 1, 2019 to January 23, 2021. Meta-analysis was conducted using Revman 5.3 statistical software.Results: A total of 26 studies were included in this meta-analysis, involving 5571 cancer patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. Meta-analysis showed that surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted therapy were not associated with disease severity or mortality (107/688, OR =1.30, 95% CI[0.79, 2.13], P =0.30; 1956/2674, OR =1.27, 95% CI [0.95, 1.69], P =0.10; 342/1455, OR =1.20, 95% CI [0.90, 1.61], P =0.21; 503/1378, OR =0.92, 95% CI [0.72, 1.19], P =0.54, respectively).Conclusion: In cancer patients with COVID-19, anti-cancer therapy had no adverse effect on disease severity or mortality. Further research is necessary to determine the complex interrelationship between anti-cancer therapy, particularly chemotherapy, and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , Immunotherapy/methods , Molecular Targeted Therapy/adverse effects , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/virology , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Drug Discov Today ; 26(6): 1337-1339, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209943

ABSTRACT

Oncology is the frontline of drug development. The current pharmaceutical pipeline is disproportional focused on oncology, where about 1/3 of all phases of development is in this therapeutic area. The emphasis brings about substantial breakthroughs and has made positive impact on the quality of life. However, oncology remains a threat to human existence. To facilitate this process, a comprehensive list of novel/first molecularly targeted oncology drug approvals by the FDA from 2017 to 2020 is assessed. Here, we focus on molecularly targeted oncology drugs and not cytotoxic ones, although the latter remain important. To achieve this purpose, besides their sponsors, years of approval, drug classes, and cancer indications, clinical significance is included. The results show that approved molecularly targeted drugs span across diverse classes, including small molecule receptor inhibitors, and biologics such as monoclonal antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates, check-point inhibitors (i.e., PD1, PDL1, CTLA4) and CAR-T cell therapies. Although complete cure of cancer remains limited, we have made substantial inroads and more is yet to come. Moreover, many of these new knowledge can be extrapolated to other therapeutic areas, especially to those of currently unmet medical needs such as in neurology and other chronic diseases.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/pharmacology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Drug Development , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/pharmacology , Immunoconjugates/pharmacology , Medical Oncology , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Drug Approval , Drug Development/organization & administration , Drug Development/trends , Humans , Medical Oncology/methods , Medical Oncology/trends , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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