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1.
BMJ ; 375: e066588, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560914

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of remote proactive management of toxicities during chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer. DESIGN: Pragmatic, cluster randomised trial. SETTING: 20 cancer centres in Ontario, Canada, allocated by covariate constrained randomisation to remote management of toxicities or routine care. PARTICIPANTS: All patients starting adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer at each centre. 25 patients from each centre completed patient reported outcome questionnaires. INTERVENTIONS: Proactive, standardised, nurse led telephone management of common toxicities at two time points after each chemotherapy cycle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome, cluster level mean number of visits to the emergency department or admissions to hospital per patient during the whole course of chemotherapy treatment, was evaluated with routinely available administrative healthcare data. Secondary patient reported outcomes included toxicity, self-efficacy, and quality of life. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics of participants were similar in the intervention (n=944) and control arms (n=1214); 22% were older than 65 years. Penetration (that is, the percentage of patients who received the intervention at each centre) was 50-86%. Mean number of visits to the emergency department or admissions to hospital per patient was 0.91 (standard deviation 0.28) in the intervention arm and 0.94 (0.40) in the control arm (P=0.94); 47% (1014 of 2158 patients) had at least one visit to the emergency department or a hospital admission during chemotherapy. Among 580 participants who completed the patient reported outcome questionnaires, at least one grade 3 toxicity was reported by 48% (134 of 278 patients) in the intervention arm and by 58% (163 of 283) in the control arm. No differences in self-efficacy, anxiety, or depression were found. Compared with baseline, the functional assessment of cancer therapy trial outcome index decreased by 6.1 and 9.0 points in the intervention and control participants, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Proactive, telephone based management of toxicities during chemotherapy did not result in fewer visits to the emergency department or hospital admissions. With the rapid rise in remote care because of the covid-19 pandemic, identifying scalable strategies for remote management of patients during cancer treatment is particularly relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02485678.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Outpatients , Telemedicine , Telephone , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19 , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/adverse effects , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Ontario , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
3.
BMJ ; 374: n2209, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448003

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine if virtual care with remote automated monitoring (RAM) technology versus standard care increases days alive at home among adults discharged after non-elective surgery during the covid-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Multicentre randomised controlled trial. SETTING: 8 acute care hospitals in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: 905 adults (≥40 years) who resided in areas with mobile phone coverage and were to be discharged from hospital after non-elective surgery were randomised either to virtual care and RAM (n=451) or to standard care (n=454). 903 participants (99.8%) completed the 31 day follow-up. INTERVENTION: Participants in the experimental group received a tablet computer and RAM technology that measured blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, temperature, and body weight. For 30 days the participants took daily biophysical measurements and photographs of their wound and interacted with nurses virtually. Participants in the standard care group received post-hospital discharge management according to the centre's usual care. Patients, healthcare providers, and data collectors were aware of patients' group allocations. Outcome adjudicators were blinded to group allocation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was days alive at home during 31 days of follow-up. The 12 secondary outcomes included acute hospital care, detection and correction of drug errors, and pain at 7, 15, and 30 days after randomisation. RESULTS: All 905 participants (mean age 63.1 years) were analysed in the groups to which they were randomised. Days alive at home during 31 days of follow-up were 29.7 in the virtual care group and 29.5 in the standard care group: relative risk 1.01 (95% confidence interval 0.99 to 1.02); absolute difference 0.2% (95% confidence interval -0.5% to 0.9%). 99 participants (22.0%) in the virtual care group and 124 (27.3%) in the standard care group required acute hospital care: relative risk 0.80 (0.64 to 1.01); absolute difference 5.3% (-0.3% to 10.9%). More participants in the virtual care group than standard care group had a drug error detected (134 (29.7%) v 25 (5.5%); absolute difference 24.2%, 19.5% to 28.9%) and a drug error corrected (absolute difference 24.4%, 19.9% to 28.9%). Fewer participants in the virtual care group than standard care group reported pain at 7, 15, and 30 days after randomisation: absolute differences 13.9% (7.4% to 20.4%), 11.9% (5.1% to 18.7%), and 9.6% (2.9% to 16.3%), respectively. Beneficial effects proved substantially larger in centres with a higher rate of care escalation. CONCLUSION: Virtual care with RAM shows promise in improving outcomes important to patients and to optimal health system function. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04344665.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/nursing , Telemedicine/methods , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Medication Errors/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pain, Postoperative/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Postoperative Period , Surgical Procedures, Operative/mortality
5.
Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) ; 36(2): 240-255, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359307

ABSTRACT

Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) have suddenly become part of routine care in many hospitals. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has necessitated the use of new technologies and new processes to care for hospitalized patients, including diabetes patients. The use of CGMs to automatically and remotely supplement or replace assisted monitoring of blood glucose by bedside nurses can decrease: the amount of necessary nursing exposure to COVID-19 patients with diabetes; the amount of time required for obtaining blood glucose measurements, and the amount of personal protective equipment necessary for interacting with patients during the blood glucose testing. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is now exercising enforcement discretion and not objecting to certain factory-calibrated CGMs being used in a hospital setting, both to facilitate patient care and to obtain performance data that can be used for future regulatory submissions. CGMs can be used in the hospital to decrease the frequency of fingerstick point of care capillary blood glucose testing, decrease hyperglycemic episodes, and decrease hypoglycemic episodes. Most of the research on CGMs in the hospital has focused on their accuracy and only recently outcomes data has been reported. A hospital CGM program requires cooperation of physicians, bedside nurses, diabetes educators, and hospital administrators to appropriately select and manage patients. Processes for collecting, reviewing, storing, and responding to CGM data must be established for such a program to be successful. CGM technology is advancing and we expect that CGMs will be increasingly used in the hospital for patients with diabetes.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/trends , Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Hospitals/trends , Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Hypoglycemia/blood , Hypoglycemia/epidemiology , Hypoglycemia/prevention & control , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Monitoring, Ambulatory/trends
8.
Kardiol Pol ; 78(7-8): 725-731, 2020 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264793

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the midst of the SARS­CoV­2 pandemic, basic healthcare challenges arise as lockdowns and social isolation are implemented to prevent the spread of the virus. In order to overcome these challenges, the Polish National Health Fund has facilitated telemedical consultations. AIMS: The aim of this study was to compare teleconsultations with regular visits at ambulatory clinic of implantable devices and to assess whether teleconsultations would be an adequate replacement during times of limited face­to­face contact. METHODS: Teleconsultations in the clinic were introduced for patients without the possibility of remote control of cardiac implantable electronic devices. Prior to planned visits, physicians phoned patients and interviewed them about their health. Further treatment decisions were made based on the interview and available medical records. RESULTS: Teleconsultations were carried out over 3.5 weeks (March 13 to April 1, 2020). Out of 400 patients who had visits planned at the clinic, 349 were consulted by phone. A total of 299 patients confirmed stable health status, 14 reported some symptoms, and 4 were hospitalized; 2 patients changed their primary clinic and were no longer under our care, 1 was undergoing quarantine, 15 required additional intervention, and 15 had died prior to contact. In general, patients gave positive feedback on their teleconsultations. CONCLUSIONS: Teleconsultations are a much­needed option during the SARS­CoV­2 pandemic. They are an effective way to decrease interpersonal contact and to overcome sudden changes to the ambulatory visit plan, which may otherwise put an overwhelming burden on the clinic.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections , Defibrillators, Implantable/statistics & numerical data , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Sensing Technology/methods , COVID-19 , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male
9.
Arch Cardiovasc Dis ; 114(5): 407-414, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been a fast-growing worldwide pandemic. AIMS: We aimed to investigate the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias among a large French cohort of implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients over the first 5 months of 2020. METHODS: Five thousand nine hundred and fifty-four implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients were followed by remote monitoring during the COVID-19 period (from 01 January to 31 May 2020). Data were obtained from automated remote follow-up of implantable cardioverter defibrillators utilizing the Implicity® platform. For all patients, the type of arrhythmia (atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation), the number of ventricular arrhythmia episodes and the type of implantable cardioverter defibrillator-delivered therapy were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 472 (7.9%) patients presented 4917 ventricular arrhythmia events. An increase in ventricular arrhythmia incidence was observed after the first COVID-19 case in France, and especially during weeks #10 and #11, at the time of major governmental measures, with an increase in the incidence of antitachycardia pacing delivered therapy. During the 11 weeks before the lockdown order, the curve of the percentage of live-stream television coverage of COVID-19 information matched the ventricular arrhythmia incidence. During the lockdown, the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia decreased significantly compared with baseline (0.05±0.7 vs. 0.09±1.2 episodes per patient per week, respectively; P<0.001). Importantly, no correlation was observed between ventricular arrhythmia incidence and the curve of COVID-19 incidence. No changes were observed regarding atrial fibrillation/atrial tachycardia episodes over time. CONCLUSIONS: An increase in ventricular arrhythmia incidence was observed in the 2 weeks before the lockdown order, at the time of major governmental measures. Ventricular arrhythmia incidence decreased dramatically during the lockdown.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Defibrillators, Implantable , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Remote Sensing Technology/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France/epidemiology , Heart Rate , Heart Ventricles/physiopathology , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Ambulatory/instrumentation , Monitoring, Ambulatory/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Quarantine , Remote Sensing Technology/instrumentation , Tachycardia, Ventricular/diagnosis , Tachycardia, Ventricular/epidemiology
10.
Am J Med Qual ; 36(3): 139-144, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1214705

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic catalyzed a digital health transformation, placing renewed focus on using remote monitoring technologies to care for patients outside of hospitals. At NewYork-Presbyterian, the authors expanded remote monitoring infrastructure and developed a COVID-19 Hypoxia Monitoring program-a critical means through which discharged COVID-19 patients were followed and assessed, enabling the organization to maximize inpatient capacity at a time of acute bed shortage. The pandemic tested existing remote monitoring efforts, revealing numerous operating challenges including device management, centralized escalation protocols, and health equity concerns. The continuation of these programs required addressing these concerns while expanding monitoring efforts in ambulatory and transitions of care settings. Building on these experiences, this article offers insights and strategies for implementing remote monitoring programs at scale and improving the sustainability of these efforts. As virtual care becomes a patient expectation, the authors hope hospitals recognize the promise that remote monitoring holds in reenvisioning health care delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Monitoring, Physiologic/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Humans , Monitoring, Ambulatory/statistics & numerical data , New York City , Outcome Assessment, Health Care
11.
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont) ; 34(1): 30-37, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175768

ABSTRACT

In the field of digital health research, nurse leaders have an opportunity to be integral to the design, implementation and evaluation of virtual care interventions. This case study details the experiences of two emerging nurse leaders during the COVID-19 pandemic in providing research and clinical leadership for a national virtual health trial. These nurse leaders trained and led a national team of 70 nurses across eight participating centres delivering the virtual care and remote monitoring intervention, using the normalization process theory. This case study presents a theoretically informed approach to training and leadership and discusses the experiences and lessons learned.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/trends , Leadership , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Nurse-Patient Relations , Patient Discharge/standards , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Computers, Handheld/supply & distribution , Humans , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative
12.
J Diabetes Investig ; 12(10): 1923-1924, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142911

ABSTRACT

This prospective study provided an effective way of glucose monitoring for patients with diabetes complicated with coronavirus disease 2019. The use of an intermittently scanned continuous glucose monitoring system was significantly associated with better outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 in patients with pre-existing diabetes.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Monitoring, Ambulatory , Aged , COVID-19/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Telemetry
14.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(6)2021 Mar 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136536

ABSTRACT

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, Remote Patient Monitoring technologies are highly important for clinicians and researchers. These connected-health technologies enable monitoring of patients and facilitate remote clinical trial research while reducing the potential for the spread of the novel coronavirus. There is a growing requirement for monitoring of the full 24 h spectrum of behaviours with a single research-grade sensor. This research describes a free-living and supervised protocol comparison study of the Verisense inertial measurement unit to assess physical activity and sleep parameters and compares it with the Actiwatch 2 actigraph. Fifteen adults (11 males, 23.4 ± 3.4 years and 4 females, 29 ± 12.6 years) wore both monitors for 2 consecutive days and nights in the free-living study while twelve adults (11 males, 23.4 ± 3.4 years and 1 female, 22 ± 0 years) wore both monitors for the duration of a gym-based supervised protocol study. Agreement of physical activity epoch-by-epoch data with activity classification of sedentary, light and moderate-to-vigorous activity and sleep metrics were evaluated using Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots. For all activity, Verisense showed high agreement for both free-living and supervised protocol of r = 0.85 and r = 0.78, respectively. For physical activity classification, Verisense showed high agreement of sedentary activity of r = 0.72 for free-living but low agreement of r = 0.36 for supervised protocol; low agreement of light activity of r = 0.42 for free-living and negligible agreement of r = -0.04 for supervised protocol; and moderate agreement of moderate-to-vigorous activity of r = 0.52 for free-living with low agreement of r = 0.49 for supervised protocol. For sleep metrics, Verisense showed moderate agreement for sleep time and total sleep time of r = 0.66 and 0.54, respectively, but demonstrated high agreement for determination of wake time of r = 0.83. Overall, our results showed moderate-high agreement of Verisense with Actiwatch 2 for assessing epoch-by-epoch physical activity and sleep, but a lack of agreement for activity classifications. Future validation work of Verisense for activity cut-point potentially holds promise for 24 h continuous remote patient monitoring.


Subject(s)
Accelerometry/instrumentation , Actigraphy/instrumentation , Exercise/physiology , Monitoring, Ambulatory/instrumentation , Sleep/physiology , Telemedicine , Telemetry/standards , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Ambulatory/standards , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Thorax ; 76(7): 696-703, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127610

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Risk factors of adverse outcomes in COVID-19 are defined but stratification of mortality using non-laboratory measured scores, particularly at the time of prehospital SARS-CoV-2 testing, is lacking. METHODS: Multivariate regression with bootstrapping was used to identify independent mortality predictors in patients admitted to an acute hospital with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. Predictions were externally validated in a large random sample of the ISARIC cohort (N=14 231) and a smaller cohort from Aintree (N=290). RESULTS: 983 patients (median age 70, IQR 53-83; in-hospital mortality 29.9%) were recruited over an 11-week study period. Through sequential modelling, a five-predictor score termed SOARS (SpO2, Obesity, Age, Respiratory rate, Stroke history) was developed to correlate COVID-19 severity across low, moderate and high strata of mortality risk. The score discriminated well for in-hospital death, with area under the receiver operating characteristic values of 0.82, 0.80 and 0.74 in the derivation, Aintree and ISARIC validation cohorts, respectively. Its predictive accuracy (calibration) in both external cohorts was consistently higher in patients with milder disease (SOARS 0-1), the same individuals who could be identified for safe outpatient monitoring. Prediction of a non-fatal outcome in this group was accompanied by high score sensitivity (99.2%) and negative predictive value (95.9%). CONCLUSION: The SOARS score uses constitutive and readily assessed individual characteristics to predict the risk of COVID-19 death. Deployment of the score could potentially inform clinical triage in preadmission settings where expedient and reliable decision-making is key. The resurgence of SARS-CoV-2 transmission provides an opportunity to further validate and update its performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Monitoring, Ambulatory/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Decision Making , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
16.
Semin Ophthalmol ; 36(4): 310-314, 2021 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125541

ABSTRACT

Technological advances provide a number of options for glaucoma monitoring outside the office setting, including home-based tonometry and perimetry. This has the potential to revolutionize management of this chronic disease, improve access to care, and enhance patient engagement. Here, we provide an overview of existing technologies for home-based glaucoma monitoring. We also discuss areas for future research and the potential applications of these technologies to telemedicine, which has been brought to the forefront during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological/trends , Glaucoma/diagnosis , Monitoring, Ambulatory , Telemedicine/trends , Telemetry/instrumentation , Biomedical Technology/trends , Glaucoma/physiopathology , Humans , Intraocular Pressure/physiology , Ophthalmology/trends , Self Care/methods , Tomography, Optical Coherence/methods , Tonometry, Ocular/methods , Visual Field Tests/methods
17.
CMAJ Open ; 9(1): E142-E148, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115548

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After nonelective (i.e., semiurgent, urgent and emergent) surgeries, patients discharged from hospitals are at risk of readmissions, emergency department visits or death. During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, we are undertaking the Post Discharge after Surgery Virtual Care with Remote Automated Monitoring Technology (PVC-RAM) trial to determine if virtual care with remote automated monitoring (RAM) compared with standard care will increase the number of days adult patients remain alive at home after being discharged following nonelective surgery. METHODS: We are conducting a randomized controlled trial in which 900 adults who are being discharged after nonelective surgery from 8 Canadian hospitals are randomly assigned to receive virtual care with RAM or standard care. Outcome adjudicators are masked to group allocations. Patients in the experimental group learn how to use the study's tablet computer and RAM technology, which will measure their vital signs. For 30 days, patients take daily biophysical measurements and complete a recovery survey. Patients interact with nurses via the cellular modem-enabled tablet, who escalate care to preassigned and available physicians if RAM measurements exceed predetermined thresholds, patients report symptoms, a medication error is identified or the nurses have concerns they cannot resolve. The primary outcome is number of days alive at home during the 30 days after randomization. INTERPRETATION: This trial will inform management of patients after discharge following surgery in the COVID-19 pandemic and offer insights for management of patients who undergo nonelective surgery in a nonpandemic setting. Knowledge dissemination will be supported through an online multimedia resource centre, policy briefs, presentations, peer-reviewed journal publications and media engagement. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT04344665.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/trends , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Patient Discharge/standards , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Computers, Handheld/supply & distribution , Humans , Middle Aged , Postoperative Period , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , User-Computer Interface
18.
IEEE J Biomed Health Inform ; 25(4): 903-908, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087889

ABSTRACT

Because of the rapid and serious nature of acute cardiovascular disease (CVD) especially ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), a leading cause of death worldwide, prompt diagnosis and treatment is of crucial importance to reduce both mortality and morbidity. During a pandemic such as coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), it is critical to balance cardiovascular emergencies with infectious risk. In this work, we recommend using wearable device based mobile health (mHealth) as an early screening and real-time monitoring tool to address this balance and facilitate remote monitoring to tackle this unprecedented challenge. This recommendation may help to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of acute CVD patient management while reducing infection risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Monitoring, Ambulatory/instrumentation , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Wearable Electronic Devices , Acute Disease , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Risk Factors , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/complications , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
19.
Telemed J E Health ; 27(1): 96-98, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066236

ABSTRACT

Immediately before the pandemic, 300 enterprise Mayo Clinic physicians and advanced practice providers had performed a minimum of one video telemedicine consult in the preceding year. By July 15, 2020, the number of Mayo Clinic providers performing video telemedicine consults had risen to >6,500, reflecting a 2,000% increase. Through this pandemic, we have witnessed unprecedented growth in telemedicine utilization. The existing telemedicine system has proven to be scalable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Humans , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Specialization , Videoconferencing/organization & administration
20.
Neurol Sci ; 42(1): 9-13, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064520

ABSTRACT

Over the last months, due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, containment measures have led to important social restriction. Healthcare systems have faced a complete rearrangement of resources and spaces, with the creation of wards devoted to COVID-19 patients. In this context, patients affected by chronic neurological diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are at risk to be lost at follow-up, leading to a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. Telemedicine may allow meet the needs of these patients. In this commentary, we briefly discuss the digital tools to remotely monitor and manage ALS patients. Focusing on detecting disease progression and preventing life-threatening conditions, we propose a toolset able to improve ALS management during this unprecedented situation.


Subject(s)
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/diagnosis , Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/therapy , COVID-19 , Monitoring, Ambulatory , Severity of Illness Index , Telemedicine , Humans
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