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1.
BMJ ; 374: n2209, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448003

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine if virtual care with remote automated monitoring (RAM) technology versus standard care increases days alive at home among adults discharged after non-elective surgery during the covid-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Multicentre randomised controlled trial. SETTING: 8 acute care hospitals in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: 905 adults (≥40 years) who resided in areas with mobile phone coverage and were to be discharged from hospital after non-elective surgery were randomised either to virtual care and RAM (n=451) or to standard care (n=454). 903 participants (99.8%) completed the 31 day follow-up. INTERVENTION: Participants in the experimental group received a tablet computer and RAM technology that measured blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, temperature, and body weight. For 30 days the participants took daily biophysical measurements and photographs of their wound and interacted with nurses virtually. Participants in the standard care group received post-hospital discharge management according to the centre's usual care. Patients, healthcare providers, and data collectors were aware of patients' group allocations. Outcome adjudicators were blinded to group allocation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was days alive at home during 31 days of follow-up. The 12 secondary outcomes included acute hospital care, detection and correction of drug errors, and pain at 7, 15, and 30 days after randomisation. RESULTS: All 905 participants (mean age 63.1 years) were analysed in the groups to which they were randomised. Days alive at home during 31 days of follow-up were 29.7 in the virtual care group and 29.5 in the standard care group: relative risk 1.01 (95% confidence interval 0.99 to 1.02); absolute difference 0.2% (95% confidence interval -0.5% to 0.9%). 99 participants (22.0%) in the virtual care group and 124 (27.3%) in the standard care group required acute hospital care: relative risk 0.80 (0.64 to 1.01); absolute difference 5.3% (-0.3% to 10.9%). More participants in the virtual care group than standard care group had a drug error detected (134 (29.7%) v 25 (5.5%); absolute difference 24.2%, 19.5% to 28.9%) and a drug error corrected (absolute difference 24.4%, 19.9% to 28.9%). Fewer participants in the virtual care group than standard care group reported pain at 7, 15, and 30 days after randomisation: absolute differences 13.9% (7.4% to 20.4%), 11.9% (5.1% to 18.7%), and 9.6% (2.9% to 16.3%), respectively. Beneficial effects proved substantially larger in centres with a higher rate of care escalation. CONCLUSION: Virtual care with RAM shows promise in improving outcomes important to patients and to optimal health system function. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04344665.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/methods , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/nursing , Telemedicine/methods , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Medication Errors/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pain, Postoperative/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Postoperative Period , Surgical Procedures, Operative/mortality
2.
Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) ; 36(2): 240-255, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359307

ABSTRACT

Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) have suddenly become part of routine care in many hospitals. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has necessitated the use of new technologies and new processes to care for hospitalized patients, including diabetes patients. The use of CGMs to automatically and remotely supplement or replace assisted monitoring of blood glucose by bedside nurses can decrease: the amount of necessary nursing exposure to COVID-19 patients with diabetes; the amount of time required for obtaining blood glucose measurements, and the amount of personal protective equipment necessary for interacting with patients during the blood glucose testing. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is now exercising enforcement discretion and not objecting to certain factory-calibrated CGMs being used in a hospital setting, both to facilitate patient care and to obtain performance data that can be used for future regulatory submissions. CGMs can be used in the hospital to decrease the frequency of fingerstick point of care capillary blood glucose testing, decrease hyperglycemic episodes, and decrease hypoglycemic episodes. Most of the research on CGMs in the hospital has focused on their accuracy and only recently outcomes data has been reported. A hospital CGM program requires cooperation of physicians, bedside nurses, diabetes educators, and hospital administrators to appropriately select and manage patients. Processes for collecting, reviewing, storing, and responding to CGM data must be established for such a program to be successful. CGM technology is advancing and we expect that CGMs will be increasingly used in the hospital for patients with diabetes.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/trends , Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Hospitals/trends , Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Hypoglycemia/blood , Hypoglycemia/epidemiology , Hypoglycemia/prevention & control , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Monitoring, Ambulatory/trends
4.
Kardiol Pol ; 78(7-8): 725-731, 2020 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264793

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the midst of the SARS­CoV­2 pandemic, basic healthcare challenges arise as lockdowns and social isolation are implemented to prevent the spread of the virus. In order to overcome these challenges, the Polish National Health Fund has facilitated telemedical consultations. AIMS: The aim of this study was to compare teleconsultations with regular visits at ambulatory clinic of implantable devices and to assess whether teleconsultations would be an adequate replacement during times of limited face­to­face contact. METHODS: Teleconsultations in the clinic were introduced for patients without the possibility of remote control of cardiac implantable electronic devices. Prior to planned visits, physicians phoned patients and interviewed them about their health. Further treatment decisions were made based on the interview and available medical records. RESULTS: Teleconsultations were carried out over 3.5 weeks (March 13 to April 1, 2020). Out of 400 patients who had visits planned at the clinic, 349 were consulted by phone. A total of 299 patients confirmed stable health status, 14 reported some symptoms, and 4 were hospitalized; 2 patients changed their primary clinic and were no longer under our care, 1 was undergoing quarantine, 15 required additional intervention, and 15 had died prior to contact. In general, patients gave positive feedback on their teleconsultations. CONCLUSIONS: Teleconsultations are a much­needed option during the SARS­CoV­2 pandemic. They are an effective way to decrease interpersonal contact and to overcome sudden changes to the ambulatory visit plan, which may otherwise put an overwhelming burden on the clinic.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections , Defibrillators, Implantable/statistics & numerical data , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Sensing Technology/methods , COVID-19 , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male
5.
Arch Cardiovasc Dis ; 114(5): 407-414, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been a fast-growing worldwide pandemic. AIMS: We aimed to investigate the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias among a large French cohort of implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients over the first 5 months of 2020. METHODS: Five thousand nine hundred and fifty-four implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients were followed by remote monitoring during the COVID-19 period (from 01 January to 31 May 2020). Data were obtained from automated remote follow-up of implantable cardioverter defibrillators utilizing the Implicity® platform. For all patients, the type of arrhythmia (atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation), the number of ventricular arrhythmia episodes and the type of implantable cardioverter defibrillator-delivered therapy were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 472 (7.9%) patients presented 4917 ventricular arrhythmia events. An increase in ventricular arrhythmia incidence was observed after the first COVID-19 case in France, and especially during weeks #10 and #11, at the time of major governmental measures, with an increase in the incidence of antitachycardia pacing delivered therapy. During the 11 weeks before the lockdown order, the curve of the percentage of live-stream television coverage of COVID-19 information matched the ventricular arrhythmia incidence. During the lockdown, the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia decreased significantly compared with baseline (0.05±0.7 vs. 0.09±1.2 episodes per patient per week, respectively; P<0.001). Importantly, no correlation was observed between ventricular arrhythmia incidence and the curve of COVID-19 incidence. No changes were observed regarding atrial fibrillation/atrial tachycardia episodes over time. CONCLUSIONS: An increase in ventricular arrhythmia incidence was observed in the 2 weeks before the lockdown order, at the time of major governmental measures. Ventricular arrhythmia incidence decreased dramatically during the lockdown.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Defibrillators, Implantable , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Remote Sensing Technology/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France/epidemiology , Heart Rate , Heart Ventricles/physiopathology , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Ambulatory/instrumentation , Monitoring, Ambulatory/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Quarantine , Remote Sensing Technology/instrumentation , Tachycardia, Ventricular/diagnosis , Tachycardia, Ventricular/epidemiology
6.
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont) ; 34(1): 30-37, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175768

ABSTRACT

In the field of digital health research, nurse leaders have an opportunity to be integral to the design, implementation and evaluation of virtual care interventions. This case study details the experiences of two emerging nurse leaders during the COVID-19 pandemic in providing research and clinical leadership for a national virtual health trial. These nurse leaders trained and led a national team of 70 nurses across eight participating centres delivering the virtual care and remote monitoring intervention, using the normalization process theory. This case study presents a theoretically informed approach to training and leadership and discusses the experiences and lessons learned.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/trends , Leadership , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Nurse-Patient Relations , Patient Discharge/standards , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Computers, Handheld/supply & distribution , Humans , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative
7.
Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) ; 36(2): 240-255, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167796

ABSTRACT

Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) have suddenly become part of routine care in many hospitals. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has necessitated the use of new technologies and new processes to care for hospitalized patients, including diabetes patients. The use of CGMs to automatically and remotely supplement or replace assisted monitoring of blood glucose by bedside nurses can decrease: the amount of necessary nursing exposure to COVID-19 patients with diabetes; the amount of time required for obtaining blood glucose measurements, and the amount of personal protective equipment necessary for interacting with patients during the blood glucose testing. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is now exercising enforcement discretion and not objecting to certain factory-calibrated CGMs being used in a hospital setting, both to facilitate patient care and to obtain performance data that can be used for future regulatory submissions. CGMs can be used in the hospital to decrease the frequency of fingerstick point of care capillary blood glucose testing, decrease hyperglycemic episodes, and decrease hypoglycemic episodes. Most of the research on CGMs in the hospital has focused on their accuracy and only recently outcomes data has been reported. A hospital CGM program requires cooperation of physicians, bedside nurses, diabetes educators, and hospital administrators to appropriately select and manage patients. Processes for collecting, reviewing, storing, and responding to CGM data must be established for such a program to be successful. CGM technology is advancing and we expect that CGMs will be increasingly used in the hospital for patients with diabetes.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/trends , Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Hospitals/trends , Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Hypoglycemia/blood , Hypoglycemia/epidemiology , Hypoglycemia/prevention & control , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Monitoring, Ambulatory/trends
9.
CMAJ Open ; 9(1): E142-E148, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115548

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After nonelective (i.e., semiurgent, urgent and emergent) surgeries, patients discharged from hospitals are at risk of readmissions, emergency department visits or death. During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, we are undertaking the Post Discharge after Surgery Virtual Care with Remote Automated Monitoring Technology (PVC-RAM) trial to determine if virtual care with remote automated monitoring (RAM) compared with standard care will increase the number of days adult patients remain alive at home after being discharged following nonelective surgery. METHODS: We are conducting a randomized controlled trial in which 900 adults who are being discharged after nonelective surgery from 8 Canadian hospitals are randomly assigned to receive virtual care with RAM or standard care. Outcome adjudicators are masked to group allocations. Patients in the experimental group learn how to use the study's tablet computer and RAM technology, which will measure their vital signs. For 30 days, patients take daily biophysical measurements and complete a recovery survey. Patients interact with nurses via the cellular modem-enabled tablet, who escalate care to preassigned and available physicians if RAM measurements exceed predetermined thresholds, patients report symptoms, a medication error is identified or the nurses have concerns they cannot resolve. The primary outcome is number of days alive at home during the 30 days after randomization. INTERPRETATION: This trial will inform management of patients after discharge following surgery in the COVID-19 pandemic and offer insights for management of patients who undergo nonelective surgery in a nonpandemic setting. Knowledge dissemination will be supported through an online multimedia resource centre, policy briefs, presentations, peer-reviewed journal publications and media engagement. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT04344665.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/trends , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Patient Discharge/standards , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Computers, Handheld/supply & distribution , Humans , Middle Aged , Postoperative Period , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , User-Computer Interface
10.
IEEE J Biomed Health Inform ; 25(4): 903-908, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087889

ABSTRACT

Because of the rapid and serious nature of acute cardiovascular disease (CVD) especially ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), a leading cause of death worldwide, prompt diagnosis and treatment is of crucial importance to reduce both mortality and morbidity. During a pandemic such as coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), it is critical to balance cardiovascular emergencies with infectious risk. In this work, we recommend using wearable device based mobile health (mHealth) as an early screening and real-time monitoring tool to address this balance and facilitate remote monitoring to tackle this unprecedented challenge. This recommendation may help to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of acute CVD patient management while reducing infection risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Monitoring, Ambulatory/instrumentation , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Wearable Electronic Devices , Acute Disease , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Risk Factors , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/complications , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
11.
Telemed J E Health ; 27(1): 96-98, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066236

ABSTRACT

Immediately before the pandemic, 300 enterprise Mayo Clinic physicians and advanced practice providers had performed a minimum of one video telemedicine consult in the preceding year. By July 15, 2020, the number of Mayo Clinic providers performing video telemedicine consults had risen to >6,500, reflecting a 2,000% increase. Through this pandemic, we have witnessed unprecedented growth in telemedicine utilization. The existing telemedicine system has proven to be scalable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Humans , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Specialization , Videoconferencing/organization & administration
14.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e040738, 2020 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-961058

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The real-time continuous monitoring of vital parameters in patients affected by multiple chronic conditions and/or COVID-19 can lead to several benefits to the Italian National Healthcare System (IT-NHS). The UBiquitous Integrated CARE (UBICARE) technology is a novel health digital platform at the validation stage in hospital setting. UBICARE might support the urgent need for digitalisation and early intervention, as well as minimise the face-to-face delivery of care in both hospital and community-based care settings. This research protocol aims to design an early-stage assessment of the multidimensional impact induced by UBICARE within the IT-NHS alongside technology validation in a hospital ward. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The targeted patients will be medium/high-risk hypertensive individuals as an illustrative first example of how UBICARE might bring benefits to susceptible patients. A mixed-method study will be applied to incorporate to the validation study a multistakeholder perspective, including perceived patient experiences and preferences, and facilitate technology adoption. First, semistructured interviews will be undertaken with a variety of stakeholders including clinicians, health managers and policy-makers to capture views on the likely technology utility, economic sustainability, impact of adoption in hospital practice and alternative adoption scenarios. Second, a monocentric, non-randomised and non-comparative clinical study, supplemented by the administration of standardised usability questionnaires to patients and health professionals, will validate the use of UBICARE in hospital practice. Finally, the results of the previous stages will be discussed in a multidisciplinary-facilitated workshop with IT-NHS relevant stakeholders to reconcile stakeholders' perspectives. Limitations include a non-random recruitment strategy in the clinical study, small sample size of the key stakeholders and potential stakeholder recruitment bias introduced by the research technique. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The Ethics Committee for Clinical Experimentation of Tuscany Region approved the protocol. Participation in this study is voluntary. Study results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and academic conferences.


Subject(s)
Early Warning Score , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Validation Studies as Topic
15.
S Afr Med J ; 110(11): 1124-1127, 2020 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922936

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The positive impact of physical activity and exercise on health is well known. Individuals who walk at least 10 000 steps per day are likely to meet recommended physical activity guidelines. Very little is known about the physical activity levels of doctors at work, in particular those working in emergency departments (EDs). OBJECTIVES: To determine how many steps per shift were taken by doctors in a South African (SA) ED. Secondary objectives were to assess what factors influenced the number of steps taken. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study in a tertiary academic teaching hospital ED in Johannesburg over a 1-month period. Doctors wore pedometers during their day shifts in the ED and the number of steps taken during their shifts was measured, as well as the number and triage category of patients seen and whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed. RESULTS: The median (interquartile range) number of steps taken per shift was 6 328 (4 646 - 8 409). The number of steps taken exceeded the 10 000-step target in only 11.7% of shifts. The overall mean (standard deviation (SD)) number of steps per hour was 744 (490). Factors that significantly increased the number of steps taken included shift duration, number of patients seen who were triaged yellow, and performance of CPR in a shift. Each additional hour of shift led to a mean (SD) increase of 575 (115) steps. Each additional yellow patient seen led to a mean (SD) increase of 118 (108) steps. The mean (SD) number of steps for a shift with CPR was significantly higher (8 309 (850) steps) than for a shift without CPR (6 496 (384) steps). CONCLUSIONS: Doctors working in an SA ED are not achieving the daily recommended number of steps while at work. The increased risk of ill health and burnout in an already high-risk specialty heightens the importance of exercise and physical activity that needs to be achieved outside the workplace.


Subject(s)
Emergency Service, Hospital , Exercise/physiology , Health Status , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Walking/statistics & numerical data , Actigraphy/methods , Cohort Studies , Female , Health Promotion/methods , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Prospective Studies , South Africa , Walking/physiology , Workload/statistics & numerical data
17.
Adv Chronic Kidney Dis ; 27(5): 442-446, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729002

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has had a significant impact on patients with end-stage kidney disease and their care, especially given the potential for severe coronavirus disease 2019 in those with a depressed immune status. Patients receiving in-center hemodialysis have been particularly affected by this pandemic because of their need to travel multiple times a week to receive treatment. Although patients on home dialysis are able to avoid such exposure, they face their own unique challenges. In this review, we will discuss the challenges posed by the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic for patients on home dialysis, the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 on various aspects of their care, and the resultant rapid adaptations in policy/health-care delivery mechanisms with implications for the future care of patients on home dialysis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Policy , Hemodialysis, Home/methods , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Peritoneal Dialysis, Continuous Ambulatory/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, U.S. , Delivery of Health Care , Hemodialysis Solutions/supply & distribution , Humans , Kidneys, Artificial/supply & distribution , Peritoneal Dialysis/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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