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1.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 57-63, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587342

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) programs and people with CF (PwCF) employed various monitoring methods for virtual care during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper characterizes experiences with remote monitoring across the U.S. CF community. METHODS: The CF Foundation (CFF) sponsored distribution of home spirometers (April 2020 to May 2021), surveys to PwCF and CF programs (July to September 2020), and a second program survey (April to May 2021). We used mixed methods to explore access, use, and perspectives regarding the use of remote monitoring in future care. RESULTS: By October 2020, 13,345 spirometers had been distributed, and 19,271 spirometers by May 2021. Programs (n=286) estimated proportions of PwCF with home devices increased over seven months: spirometers (30% to 70%), scales (50% to 70%), oximeters (5% to 10%) with higher estimates in adult programs for spirometers and oximeters. PwCF (n=378) had access to scales (89%), followed by oximeters (48%) and spirometers (47%), often using scales and oximeters weekly, and spirometers monthly. Over both surveys, some programs had no method to collect respiratory specimens for cultures associated with telehealth visits (47%, n=132; 41%, n=118). Most programs (81%) had a process for phlebotomy associated with a telehealth visit, primarily through off-site labs. Both PwCF and programs felt future care should advance remote monitoring and recommended improvements for access, training, and data collection systems. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF and programs experienced unprecedented access to remote monitoring and raised its importance for future care. Improvements to current systems may leverage these shared experiences to augment future care models.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Equipment and Supplies/supply & distribution , Home Care Services , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Spirometry , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/diagnosis , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Home Care Services/standards , Humans , Models, Organizational , Needs Assessment , Oximetry/instrumentation , Oximetry/methods , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirometry/instrumentation , Spirometry/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
2.
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed ; 106(6): 627-634, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503592

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors associated with delivery room respiratory support in at-risk infants who are initially vigorous and received delayed cord clamping (DCC). DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Two perinatal centres in Melbourne, Australia. PATIENTS: At-risk infants born at ≥35+0 weeks gestation with a paediatric doctor in attendance who were initially vigorous and received DCC for >60 s. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Delivery room respiratory support defined as facemask positive pressure ventilation, continuous positive airway pressure and/or supplemental oxygen within 10 min of birth. RESULTS: Two hundred and ninety-eight infants born at a median (IQR) gestational age of 39+3 (38+2-40+2) weeks were included. Cord clamping occurred at a median (IQR) of 128 (123-145) s. Forty-four (15%) infants received respiratory support at a median of 214 (IQR 156-326) s after birth. Neonatal unit admission for respiratory distress occurred in 32% of infants receiving delivery room respiratory support vs 1% of infants who did not receive delivery room respiratory support (p<0.001). Risk factors independently associated with delivery room respiratory support were average heart rate (HR) at 90-120 s after birth (determined using three-lead ECG), mode of birth and time to establish regular cries. Decision tree analysis identified that infants at highest risk had an average HR of <165 beats per minute at 90-120 s after birth following caesarean section (risk of 39%). Infants with an average HR of ≥165 beats per minute at 90-120 s after birth were at low risk (5%). CONCLUSIONS: We present a clinical decision pathway for at-risk infants who may benefit from close observation following DCC. Our findings provide a novel perspective of HR beyond the traditional threshold of 100 beats per minute.


Subject(s)
Critical Pathways/standards , Delivery, Obstetric , Electrocardiography/methods , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Umbilical Cord , Australia/epidemiology , Cesarean Section/adverse effects , Cesarean Section/methods , Clinical Decision-Making , Constriction , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure/methods , Delivery, Obstetric/adverse effects , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Female , Gestational Age , Heart Rate , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/adverse effects , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/instrumentation , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , Time-to-Treatment/standards , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20144, 2021 10 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462037

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary function testing (PFT) allows for quantitative analysis of lung function. However, as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, a majority of international medical societies have postponed PFTs in an effort to mitigate disease transmission, complicating the continuity of care in high-risk patients diagnosed with COVID-19 or preexisting lung pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a non-contact wearable pulmonary sensor for pulmonary waveform analysis, pulmonary volume quantification, and crude thoracic imaging using the eddy current (EC) phenomenon. Statistical regression analysis is performed to confirm the predictive validity of the sensor, and all data are continuously and digitally stored with a sampling rate of 6,660 samples/second. Wearable pulmonary function sensors may facilitate rapid point-of-care monitoring for high-risk individuals, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, and easily interface with patient hospital records or telehealth services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Monitoring, Physiologic/instrumentation , Point-of-Care Systems , Respiratory Function Tests/instrumentation , Wearable Electronic Devices , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Feasibility Studies , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Respiratory Physiological Phenomena
7.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 327, 2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403254

ABSTRACT

A helmet, comprising a transparent hood and a soft collar, surrounding the patient's head can be used to deliver noninvasive ventilatory support, both as continuous positive airway pressure and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), the latter providing active support for inspiration. In this review, we summarize the technical aspects relevant to this device, particularly how to prevent CO2 rebreathing and improve patient-ventilator synchrony during NPPV. Clinical studies describe the application of helmets in cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, pneumonia, COVID-19, postextubation and immune suppression. A section is dedicated to paediatric use. In summary, helmet therapy can be used safely and effectively to provide NIV during hypoxemic respiratory failure, improving oxygenation and possibly leading to better patient-centred outcomes than other interfaces.


Subject(s)
Interactive Ventilatory Support/methods , Noninvasive Ventilation/methods , Work of Breathing/physiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Noninvasive Ventilation/instrumentation , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy
9.
Trials ; 21(1): 828, 2020 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388814

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Primary objectives • To assess the time from randomisation until an improvement within 84 days defined as two points on a seven point ordinal scale or live discharge from the hospital in high-risk patients (group 1 to group 4) with SARS-CoV-2 infection requiring hospital admission by infusion of plasma from subjects after convalescence of SARS-CoV-2 infection or standard of care. Secondary objectives • To assess overall survival, and the overall survival rate at 28 56 and 84 days. • To assess SARS-CoV-2 viral clearance and load as well as antibody titres. • To assess the percentage of patients that required mechanical ventilation. • To assess time from randomisation until discharge. TRIAL DESIGN: Randomised, open-label, multicenter phase II trial, designed to assess the clinical outcome of SARS-CoV-2 disease in high-risk patients (group 1 to group 4) following treatment with anti-SARS-CoV-2 convalescent plasma or standard of care. PARTICIPANTS: High-risk patients >18 years of age hospitalized with SARS-CoV-2 infection in 10-15 university medical centres will be included. High-risk is defined as SARS-CoV-2 positive infection with Oxygen saturation at ≤ 94% at ambient air with additional risk features as categorised in 4 groups: • Group 1, pre-existing or concurrent hematological malignancy and/or active cancer therapy (incl. chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery) within the last 24 months or less. • Group 2, chronic immunosuppression not meeting the criteria of group 1. • Group 3, age ≥ 50 - 75 years meeting neither the criteria of group 1 nor group 2 and at least one of these criteria: Lymphopenia < 0.8 x G/l and/or D-dimer > 1µg/mL. • Group 4, age ≥ 75 years meeting neither the criteria of group 1 nor group 2. Observation time for all patients is expected to be at least 3 months after entry into the study. Patients receive convalescent plasma for two days (day 1 and day 2) or standard of care. For patients in the standard arm, cross over is allowed from day 10 in case of not improving or worsening clinical condition. Nose/throat swabs for determination of viral load are collected at day 0 and day 1 (before first CP administration) and subsequently at day 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 28 or until discharge. Serum for SARS-Cov-2 diagnostic is collected at baseline and subsequently at day 3, 7, 14 and once during the follow-up period (between day 35 and day 84). There is a regular follow-up of 3 months. All discharged patients are followed by regular phone calls. All visits, time points and study assessments are summarized in the Trial Schedule (see full protocol Table 1). All participating trial sites will be supplied with study specific visit worksheets that list all assessments and procedures to be completed at each visit. All findings including clinical and laboratory data are documented by the investigator or an authorized member of the study team in the patient's medical record and in the electronic case report forms (eCRFs). INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: This trial will analyze the effects of convalescent plasma from recovered subjects with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in high-risk patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Patients at high risk for a poor outcome due to underlying disease, age or condition as listed above are eligible for enrollment. In addition, eligible patients have a confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and O2 saturation ≤ 94% while breathing ambient air. Patients are randomised to receive (experimental arm) or not receive (standard arm) convalescent plasma in two bags (238 - 337 ml plasma each) from different donors (day 1, day 2). A cross over from the standard arm into the experimental arm is possible after day 10 in case of not improving or worsening clinical condition. MAIN OUTCOMES: Primary endpoints: The main purpose of the study is to assess the time from randomisation until an improvement within 84 days defined as two points on a seven-point ordinal scale or live discharge from the hospital in high-risk patients (group 1 to group 4) with SARS-CoV-2 infection requiring hospital admission by infusion of plasma from subjects after convalescence of a SARS-CoV-2 infection or standard of care. Secondary endpoints: • Overall survival, defined as the time from randomisation until death from any cause 28-day, 56-day and 84-day overall survival rates. • SARS-CoV-2 viral clearance and load as well as antibody titres. • Requirement mechanical ventilation at any time during hospital stay (yes/no). • Time until discharge from randomisation. • Viral load, changes in antibody titers and cytokine profiles are analysed in an exploratory manner using paired non-parametric tests (before - after treatment). RANDOMISATION: Upon confirmation of eligibility (patients must meet all inclusion criteria and must not meet exclusion criteria described in section 5.3 and 5.4 of the full protocol), the clinical site must contact a centralized internet randomization system ( https://randomizer.at/ ). Patients are randomized using block randomisation to one of the two arms, experimental arm or standard arm, in a 1:1 ratio considering a stratification according to the 4 risk groups (see Participants). BLINDING (MASKING): The study is open-label, no blinding will be performed. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): A total number of 174 patients is required for the entire trial, n=87 per group. TRIAL STATUS: Protocol version 1.2 dated 09/07/2020. A recruitment period of approximately 9 months and an overall study duration of approximately 12 months is anticipated. Recruitment of patients starts in the third quarter of 2020. The study duration of an individual patient is planned to be 3 months. After finishing all study-relevant procedures, therapy, and follow-up period, the patient is followed in terms of routine care and treated if necessary. Total trial duration: 18 months Duration of the clinical phase: 12 months First patient first visit (FPFV): 3rd Quarter 2020 Last patient first visit (LPFV): 2nd Quarter 2021 Last patient last visit (LPLV): 3rd Quarter 2021 Trial Report completed: 4th Quarter 2021 TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT Number: 2020-001632-10, https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/trial/2020-001632-10/DE , registered on 04/04/2020. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol. The study protocol has been reported in accordance with the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Clinical Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines (Additional file 2). The eCRF is attached (Additional file 3).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Plasma/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral , Aged , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Convalescence , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Risk Adjustment , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
10.
Clin Neurophysiol ; 132(9): 2248-2250, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366484

ABSTRACT

Restructuring of healthcare services during the COVID-19 pandemic has led to lockdown of Epilepsy Monitoring Units (EMUs) in many hospitals. The ad-hoc taskforce of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) and the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology (IFCN) highlights the detrimental effect of postponing video-EEG monitoring of patients with epilepsy and other paroxysmal events. The taskforce calls for action to continue functioning of Epilepsy Monitoring Units during emergency situations, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Long-term video-EEG monitoring is an essential diagnostic service. Access to video-EEG monitoring of the patients in the EMUs must be given high priority. Patients should be screened for COVID-19, before admission, according to the local regulations. Local policies for COVID-19 infection control should be adhered to during the video-EEG monitoring. In cases of differential diagnosis where reduction of antiseizure medication is not required, consider home video-EEG monitoring as an alternative in selected patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Electroencephalography/standards , Epilepsy/diagnosis , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Neurophysiology/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Consensus , Electroencephalography/methods , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/physiopathology , Humans , Internationality , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Monitoring, Physiologic/standards , Neurophysiology/methods
11.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4876, 2021 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356557

ABSTRACT

While the printed circuit board (PCB) has been widely considered as the building block of integrated electronics, the world is switching to pursue new ways of merging integrated electronic circuits with textiles to create flexible and wearable devices. Herein, as an alternative for PCB, we described a non-printed integrated-circuit textile (NIT) for biomedical and theranostic application via a weaving method. All the devices are built as fibers or interlaced nodes and woven into a deformable textile integrated circuit. Built on an electrochemical gating principle, the fiber-woven-type transistors exhibit superior bending or stretching robustness, and were woven as a textile logical computing module to distinguish different emergencies. A fiber-type sweat sensor was woven with strain and light sensors fibers for simultaneously monitoring body health and the environment. With a photo-rechargeable energy textile based on a detailed power consumption analysis, the woven circuit textile is completely self-powered and capable of both wireless biomedical monitoring and early warning. The NIT could be used as a 24/7 private AI "nurse" for routine healthcare, diabetes monitoring, or emergencies such as hypoglycemia, metabolic alkalosis, and even COVID-19 patient care, a potential future on-body AI hardware and possibly a forerunner to fabric-like computers.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques/instrumentation , Precision Medicine/instrumentation , Textiles , Wearable Electronic Devices , Wireless Technology/instrumentation , Biosensing Techniques/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Equipment Design , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic/instrumentation , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Precision Medicine/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sweat/physiology
12.
Adv Med Sci ; 66(2): 388-395, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347463

ABSTRACT

Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive, radiation-free method of diagnostics imaging, allowing for a bedside, real-time dynamic assessment of lung function. It stands as an alternative for other imagining methods, such as computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound. Even though the technique is rather novel, it has a wide variety of possible applications. In the era of modern mechanical ventilation, a dynamic assessment of patient's respiratory condition appears to fulfil the idea of personalized treatment. Additionally, an increasing frequency of respiratory failure among intensive care populations raises demand for improved monitoring tools. This review aims to raise awareness and presents possible implications for the use of EIT in the intensive care setting.


Subject(s)
Electric Impedance , Monitoring, Physiologic , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Tomography/methods , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic/instrumentation , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102228, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333362

ABSTRACT

AIM: Amidst COVID-19 pandemic, the health care delivery in India faces major challenges owing to the overwhelming hospitals, exhausted healthcare workers, and shortage of crucial medical supplies such as ventilators and oxygen. The study aims to propose a novel successful interventional home care model, the Virtual COVID In-Patient (VCIP) care for effective COVID management. METHODS: The Covid-19 positive patients enrolled in VCIP were chosen for the study. A 24/7 active multidisciplinary WhatsApp group was created for each patient, for remote monitoring of temperature, blood pressure, blood glucose, respiratory and pulse rate along with the symptoms. Advice on sleep and exercises were given along with the medication via video-audio consultations. Lab facility was provided at the doorstep. Training on various devices, medications including steroids, delivering subcutaneous injections etc were given via video platforms. RESULTS: Among the 220 patients who availed the VCIP facility, only two were hospitalized, yielding a 99.5 % success rate in preventing hospitalizations and patients enrolled have been immensely satisfied with their experience. CONCLUSIONS: With similar pandemics anticipated in near future, VCIP model may be considered for successful domiciliary treatment and overcoming the challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Algorithms , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Internationality , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Nursing , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Pandemics , Prognosis , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Treatment Outcome
15.
Am J Cardiol ; 153: 125-128, 2021 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293528

ABSTRACT

Mobile electrocardiogram (mECG) devices are being used increasingly, supplying recordings to providers and providing automatic rhythm interpretation. Given the intermittent nature of certain cardiac arrhythmias, mECGs allow instant access to a recording device. In the current COVID-19 pandemic, efforts to limit in-person patient interactions and avoid overwhelming emergency and inpatient services would add value. Our goal was to evaluate whether a mECG device would reduce healthcare utilization overall, particularly those of urgent nature. We identified a cohort of KardiaMobile (AliveCor, USA) mECG users and compared their healthcare utilization 1 year prior to obtaining the device and 1 year after. One hundred and twenty-eight patients were studied (mean age 64, 47% female). Mean duration of follow-up pre-intervention was 9.8 months. One hundred and twenty-three of 128 individuals completed post-intervention follow-up. Patients were less likely to have cardiac monitors ordered (30 vs 6; p <0.01), outpatient office visits (525 vs 382; p <0.01), cardiac-specific ED visits (51 vs 30; p <0.01), arrhythmia related ED visits (45 vs 20; p <0.01), and unplanned arrhythmia admissions (34 vs 11; p <0.01) in the year after obtaining a KardiaMobile device compared to the year prior to obtaining the device. Mobile technology is available for heart rhythm monitoring and can give feedback to the user. This study showed a reduction of in-person, healthcare utilization with mECG device use. In conclusion, this strategy would be expected to decrease the risk of exposure to patients and providers and would avoid overwhelming emergency and inpatient services.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Computers, Handheld/statistics & numerical data , Electrocardiography/instrumentation , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
16.
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci ; 376(1831): 20200228, 2021 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284967

ABSTRACT

The goal of achieving enhanced diagnosis and continuous monitoring of human health has led to a vibrant, dynamic and well-funded field of research in medical sensing and biosensor technologies. The field has many sub-disciplines which focus on different aspects of sensor science; engaging engineers, chemists, biochemists and clinicians, often in interdisciplinary teams. The trends which dominate include the efforts to develop effective point of care tests and implantable/wearable technologies for early diagnosis and continuous monitoring. This review will outline the current state of the art in a number of relevant fields, including device engineering, chemistry, nanoscience and biomolecular detection, and suggest how these advances might be employed to develop effective systems for measuring physiology, detecting infection and monitoring biomarker status in wild animals. Special consideration is also given to the emerging threat of antimicrobial resistance and in the light of the current SARS-CoV-2 outbreak, zoonotic infections. Both of these areas involve significant crossover between animal and human health and are therefore well placed to seed technological developments with applicability to both human and animal health and, more generally, the reviewed technologies have significant potential to find use in the measurement of physiology in wild animals. This article is part of the theme issue 'Measuring physiology in free-living animals (Part II)'.


Subject(s)
Biosensing Techniques/instrumentation , COVID-19/diagnosis , Synthetic Biology/methods , Wearable Electronic Devices , Zika Virus Infection/veterinary , Zoonoses/diagnosis , Animals , Animals, Wild/microbiology , Animals, Wild/parasitology , Animals, Wild/virology , Biomarkers/analysis , Cell Engineering/methods , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic/instrumentation , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Nanotechnology/instrumentation , Nanotechnology/methods , Point-of-Care Testing , Zika Virus Infection/diagnosis
17.
Open Heart ; 8(1)2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259016

ABSTRACT

AIMS: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the UK was placed under strict lockdown measures on 23 March 2020. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects on physical activity (PA) levels using data from the prospective Triage-HF Plus Evaluation study. METHODS: This study represents a cohort of adult patients with implanted cardiac devices capable of measuring activity by embedded accelerometery via a remote monitoring platform. Activity data were available for the 4 weeks pre-implementation and post implementation of 'stay at home' lockdown measures in the form of 'minutes active per day' (min/day). RESULTS: Data were analysed for 311 patients (77.2% men, mean age 68.8, frailty 55.9%. 92.2% established heart failure (HF) diagnosis, of these 51.2% New York Heart Association II), with comorbidities representative of a real-world cohort.Post-lockdown, a significant reduction in median PA equating to 20.8 active min/day was seen. The reduction was uniform with a slightly more pronounced drop in PA for women, but no statistically significant difference with respect to age, body mass index, frailty or device type. Activity dropped in the immediate 2-week period post-lockdown, but steadily returned thereafter. Median activity week 4 weeks post-lockdown remained significantly lower than 4 weeks pre-lockdown (p≤0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In a population of predominantly HF patients with cardiac devices, activity reduced by approximately 20 min active per day in the immediate aftermath of strict COVID-19 lockdown measures. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04177199.


Subject(s)
Accelerometry , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Heart Failure , Monitoring, Physiologic , Physical Distancing , Telemedicine , Accelerometry/instrumentation , Accelerometry/methods , Accelerometry/statistics & numerical data , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Exercise , Female , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Monitoring, Physiologic/instrumentation , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Monitoring, Physiologic/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Wearable Electronic Devices
18.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 186, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255959

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), extravascular lung water index (EVLWi) and pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) measured by transpulmonary thermodilution reflect the degree of lung injury. Whether EVLWi and PVPI are different between non-COVID-19 ARDS and the ARDS due to COVID-19 has never been reported. We aimed at comparing EVLWi, PVPI, respiratory mechanics and hemodynamics in patients with COVID-19 ARDS vs. ARDS of other origin. METHODS: Between March and October 2020, in an observational study conducted in intensive care units from three university hospitals, 60 patients with COVID-19-related ARDS monitored by transpulmonary thermodilution were compared to the 60 consecutive non-COVID-19 ARDS admitted immediately before the COVID-19 outbreak between December 2018 and February 2020. RESULTS: Driving pressure was similar between patients with COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 ARDS, at baseline as well as during the study period. Compared to patients without COVID-19, those with COVID-19 exhibited higher EVLWi, both at the baseline (17 (14-21) vs. 15 (11-19) mL/kg, respectively, p = 0.03) and at the time of its maximal value (24 (18-27) vs. 21 (15-24) mL/kg, respectively, p = 0.01). Similar results were observed for PVPI. In COVID-19 patients, the worst ratio between arterial oxygen partial pressure over oxygen inspired fraction was lower (81 (70-109) vs. 100 (80-124) mmHg, respectively, p = 0.02) and prone positioning and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) were more frequently used than in patients without COVID-19. COVID-19 patients had lower maximal lactate level and maximal norepinephrine dose than patients without COVID-19. Day-60 mortality was similar between groups (57% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.45). The maximal value of EVLWi and PVPI remained independently associated with outcome in the whole cohort. CONCLUSION: Compared to ARDS patients without COVID-19, patients with COVID-19 had similar lung mechanics, but higher EVLWi and PVPI values from the beginning of the disease. This was associated with worse oxygenation and with more requirement of prone positioning and ECMO. This is compatible with the specific lung inflammation and severe diffuse alveolar damage related to COVID-19. By contrast, patients with COVID-19 had fewer hemodynamic derangement. Eventually, mortality was similar between groups. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER AND DATE OF REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04337983). Registered 30 March 2020-Retrospectively registered, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04337983 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Capillary Permeability , Extravascular Lung Water/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , COVID-19/complications , Hemodynamics , Humans , Lung/blood supply , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Prognosis , Pulmonary Edema/metabolism , Thermodilution
19.
Am J Ophthalmol ; 227: 222-230, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252395

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine if a mobile application, the Checkup Vision Assessment System, could reliably monitor visual acuity (VA) and metamorphopsia remotely versus standard VA reference tests in the clinic. With the current COVID-19 pandemic, an even greater need for remote monitoring exists. Mobile tools enhance the ability to monitor patients virtually by enabling remote monitoring of VA and Amsler grid findings. DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter reliability analysis. METHODS: Participants: Patients (N = 108) with near corrected VA better than 20/200 and a diagnosis of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, or healthy patients without retinal disease (best-corrected visual acuity [BCVA] of 20/32 or better). INTERVENTION: participants were tested using the Checkup, reference VA, and Amsler tests, with the order of testing (Checkup or reference) randomized. Patients monitored their vision using Checkup at least twice a week at home between office visits. Main outcome measurements were near corrected VA and Amsler grid test results. RESULTS: Agreement was strong between Checkup and reference tests for VA (r = 0.86) and Amsler grid (sensitivity: 93%; specificity: 92%). Home versus clinic testing showed excellent agreement (r = 0.96). Patients reported successful home use. There were no serious adverse events or discontinuations. Patients rated the usability of Checkup to be excellent. CONCLUSIONS: There was good agreement between Checkup and in-clinic test results for VA and Amsler grid. The low variance of Checkup testing, agreement between in-clinic and home results, and excellent usability support Checkup as a reliable method for monitoring retinal pathology in clinic and home settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetic Retinopathy/physiopathology , Macular Degeneration/physiopathology , Mobile Applications , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Visual Acuity , Visual Fields/physiology , Aged , Comorbidity , Diabetic Retinopathy/diagnosis , Diabetic Retinopathy/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Macular Degeneration/diagnosis , Macular Degeneration/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(10): 1010-1022, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254105

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The new coronavirus infection from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been recognized as a global public health emergency, and neonates may be more vulnerable due to their immature immune system. The first aim of this study was to report our experience on the management of neonates from mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infection focusing on a 28-day follow-up since birth. The second aim is to assess how many data on neonatal outcomes of the first month of life are reported in literature, performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. STUDY DESIGN: We report our experience based on routine management of neonates born to mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infection and follow-up until 28 days of life. RESULTS: In our experience at discharge, 1/48 (2.08%) of entrusted (mother refusing personal protective equipment) and none of separated presented positive nasopharyngeal swab (p = NS). All babies show good outcome at 28 days of life. The literature data show that the percentage of positive separated infants is significantly higher than the percentage of infants entrusted to positive mothers with appropriate control measures (13.63 vs. 2.4%; p = 0.0017). Meta-analysis of studies focused on follow-up showed a 2.94% higher risk of incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in entrusted newborns than in separated newborns (95% confidence interval: 0.39-22.25), but this was not significant (p = 0.30). CONCLUSION: A vertical transmission in utero cannot be totally excluded. Since in newborns, the disease is often ambiguous with mild or absent symptoms, it is important to define the most efficient joint management for infants born to COVID-19 positive mothers, being aware that the risk of horizontal transmission from a positive mother, when protective measures are applied, does not seem to increase the risk of infection or to affect the development of newborns from birth to first four weeks of life, and encourages the benefits of breastfeeding and skin-to-skin practice. KEY POINTS: · Entrusting the newborn to the positive mother does not increase the risk of infection.. · Our follow-up shows that newborns have good growth and outcome at one month of life.. · Applying protective measures we suggest breastfeeding and skin-to-skin practice..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Neonatal Screening/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pregnancy , Symptom Assessment/methods
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