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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 799558, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662582

ABSTRACT

The poor outcome of the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), caused by SARS-CoV-2, is associated with systemic hyperinflammatory response and immunopathology. Although inflammasome and oxidative stress have independently been implicated in COVID-19, it is poorly understood whether these two pathways cooperatively contribute to disease severity. Herein, we found an enrichment of CD14highCD16- monocytes displaying inflammasome activation evidenced by caspase-1/ASC-speck formation in severe COVID-19 patients when compared to mild ones and healthy controls, respectively. Those cells also showed aberrant levels of mitochondrial superoxide and lipid peroxidation, both hallmarks of the oxidative stress response, which strongly correlated with caspase-1 activity. In addition, we found that NLRP3 inflammasome-derived IL-1ß secretion by SARS-CoV-2-exposed monocytes in vitro was partially dependent on lipid peroxidation. Importantly, altered inflammasome and stress responses persisted after short-term patient recovery. Collectively, our findings suggest oxidative stress/NLRP3 signaling pathway as a potential target for host-directed therapy to mitigate early COVID-19 hyperinflammation and also its long-term outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/metabolism , Monocytes/metabolism , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Receptors, IgG/metabolism , Aged , COVID-19/pathology , Caspase 1/metabolism , Female , GPI-Linked Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondria/metabolism , Mitochondria/pathology , Monocytes/pathology , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology
2.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613627

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic drastically highlighted the vulnerability of the elderly population towards viral and other infectious threats, illustrating that aging is accompanied by dysregulated immune responses currently summarized in terms like inflammaging and immunoparalysis. To gain a better understanding on the underlying mechanisms of the age-associated risk of adverse outcome in individuals experiencing a SARS-CoV-2 infection, we analyzed the impact of age on circulating monocyte phenotypes, activation markers and inflammatory cytokines including interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in the context of COVID-19 disease progression and outcome in 110 patients. Our data indicate no age-associated differences in peripheral monocyte counts or subset composition. However, age and outcome are associated with differences in monocyte activation status. Moreover, a distinct cytokine pattern of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF in elderly survivors versus non-survivors, which consolidates over the time of hospitalization, suggests that older patients with adverse outcomes experience an inappropriate immune response, reminiscent of an inflammaging driven immunoparalysis. Our study underscores the value, necessity and importance of longitudinal monitoring in elderly COVID-19 patients, as dynamic changes after symptom onset can be observed, which allow for a differentiated insight into confounding factors that impact the complex pathogenesis following an infection with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Aging/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/blood , Monocytes/pathology , Acute Disease , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/metabolism , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/metabolism , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
3.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(10): e1009742, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456098

ABSTRACT

Disease manifestations in COVID-19 range from mild to severe illness associated with a dysregulated innate immune response. Alterations in function and regeneration of dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes may contribute to immunopathology and influence adaptive immune responses in COVID-19 patients. We analyzed circulating DC and monocyte subsets in 65 hospitalized COVID-19 patients with mild/moderate or severe disease from acute illness to recovery and in healthy controls. Persisting reduction of all DC subpopulations was accompanied by an expansion of proliferating Lineage-HLADR+ cells lacking DC markers. Increased frequency of CD163+ CD14+ cells within the recently discovered DC3 subpopulation in patients with more severe disease was associated with systemic inflammation, activated T follicular helper cells, and antibody-secreting cells. Persistent downregulation of CD86 and upregulation of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in conventional DCs (cDC2 and DC3) and classical monocytes associated with a reduced capacity to stimulate naïve CD4+ T cells correlated with disease severity. Long-lasting depletion and functional impairment of DCs and monocytes may have consequences for susceptibility to secondary infections and therapy of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Regeneration/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antigens, CD/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Dendritic Cells/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/pathology , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/immunology
4.
Dis Markers ; 2021: 6803510, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443673

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is currently the most significant public health threat worldwide. Patients with severe COVID-19 usually have pneumonia concomitant with local inflammation and sometimes a cytokine storm. Specific components of the SARS-CoV-2 virus trigger lung inflammation, and recruitment of immune cells to the lungs exacerbates this process, although much remains unknown about the pathogenesis of COVID-19. Our study of lung type II pneumocyte cells (A549) demonstrated that ORF7, an open reading frame (ORF) in the genome of SARS-CoV-2, induced the production of CCL2, a chemokine that promotes the chemotaxis of monocytes, and decreased the expression of IL-8, a chemokine that recruits neutrophils. A549 cells also had an increased level of IL-6. The results of our chemotaxis Transwell assay suggested that ORF7 augmented monocyte infiltration and reduced the number of neutrophils. We conclude that the ORF7 of SARS-CoV-2 may have specific effects on the immunological changes in tissues after infection. These results suggest that the functions of other ORFs of SARS-CoV-2 should also be comprehensively examined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Chemotaxis , Monocytes/pathology , Neutrophils/pathology , Open Reading Frames/physiology , Pneumonia/pathology , Viral Proteins/metabolism , A549 Cells , Chemokine CCL2/metabolism , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Proteins/genetics
5.
Biomolecules ; 11(9)2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408458

ABSTRACT

Systemic vascular damage with micro/macro-thrombosis is a typical feature of severe COVID-19. However, the pathogenesis of this damage and its predictive biomarkers remain poorly defined. For this reason, in this study, serum monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-2 and P- and E-selectin levels were analyzed in 204 patients with COVID-19. Serum MCP-2 and P-selectin were significantly higher in hospitalized patients compared with asymptomatic patients. Furthermore, MCP-2 increased with the WHO stage in hospitalized patients. After 1 week of hospitalization, MCP-2 levels were significantly reduced, while P-selectin increased in patients in WHO stage 3 and decreased in patients in WHO stages 5-7. Serum E-selectin was not significantly different between asymptomatic and hospitalized patients. The lower MCP-2 levels after 1 week suggest that endothelial damage triggered by monocytes occurs early in COVID-19 disease progression. MCP-2 may also predict COVID-19 severity. The increase in P-selectin levels, which further increased in mild patients and reduced in severe patients after 1 week of hospitalization, suggests that the inactive form of the protein produced by the cleavage of the active protein from the platelet membrane is present. This may be used to identify a subset of patients that would benefit from targeted therapies. The unchanged levels of E-selectin in these patients suggest that endothelial damage is less relevant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chemokine CCL8/blood , E-Selectin/blood , Endothelium, Vascular , P-Selectin/blood , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/injuries , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/pathology
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 720109, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348492

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a contagious viral disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 that led to an ongoing pandemic with massive global health and socioeconomic consequences. The disease is characterized primarily, but not exclusively, by respiratory clinical manifestations ranging from mild common cold symptoms, including cough and fever, to severe respiratory distress and multi-organ failure. Macrophages, a heterogeneous group of yolk-sac derived, tissue-resident mononuclear phagocytes of complex ontogeny present in all mammalian organs, play critical roles in developmental, homeostatic and host defense processes with tissue-dependent plasticity. In case of infection, they are responsible for early pathogen recognition, initiation and resolution of inflammation, as well as repair of tissue damage. Monocytes, bone-marrow derived blood-resident phagocytes, are recruited under pathological conditions such as viral infections to the affected tissue to defend the organism against invading pathogens and to aid in efficient resolution of inflammation. Given their pivotal function in host defense and the potential danger posed by their dysregulated hyperinflammation, understanding monocyte and macrophage phenotypes in COVID-19 is key for tackling the disease's pathological mechanisms. Here, we outline current knowledge on monocytes and macrophages in homeostasis and viral infections and summarize concepts and key findings on their role in COVID-19. While monocytes in the blood of patients with moderate COVID-19 present with an inflammatory, interferon-stimulated gene (ISG)-driven phenotype, cellular dysfunction epitomized by loss of HLA-DR expression and induction of S100 alarmin expression is their dominant feature in severe disease. Pulmonary macrophages in COVID-19 derived from infiltrating inflammatory monocytes are in a hyperactivated state resulting in a detrimental loop of pro-inflammatory cytokine release and recruitment of cytotoxic effector cells thereby exacerbating tissue damage at the site of infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , HLA-DR Antigens/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Macrophages/pathology , Monocytes/pathology , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4117, 2021 07 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297301

ABSTRACT

Epidemiological and clinical reports indicate that SARS-CoV-2 virulence hinges upon the triggering of an aberrant host immune response, more so than on direct virus-induced cellular damage. To elucidate the immunopathology underlying COVID-19 severity, we perform cytokine and multiplex immune profiling in COVID-19 patients. We show that hypercytokinemia in COVID-19 differs from the interferon-gamma-driven cytokine storm in macrophage activation syndrome, and is more pronounced in critical versus mild-moderate COVID-19. Systems modelling of cytokine levels paired with deep-immune profiling shows that classical monocytes drive this hyper-inflammatory phenotype and that a reduction in T-lymphocytes correlates with disease severity, with CD8+ cells being disproportionately affected. Antigen presenting machinery expression is also reduced in critical disease. Furthermore, we report that neutrophils contribute to disease severity and local tissue damage by amplification of hypercytokinemia and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. Together our findings suggest a myeloid-driven immunopathology, in which hyperactivated neutrophils and an ineffective adaptive immune system act as mediators of COVID-19 disease severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Monocytes/pathology , Neutrophil Activation , Aged , Antigen-Presenting Cells/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/blood , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Female , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/metabolism , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12716, 2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275959

ABSTRACT

Monocyte Distribution Width (MDW), a new cytometric parameter correlating with cytomorphologic changes occurring upon massive monocyte activation, has recently emerged as promising early biomarker of sepsis. Similar to sepsis, monocyte/macrophage subsets are considered key mediators of the life-threatening hyper-inflammatory disorder characterizing severe COVID-19. In this study, we longitudinally analyzed MDW values in a cohort of 87 COVID-19 patients consecutively admitted to our hospital, showing significant correlations between MDW and common inflammatory markers, namely CRP (p < 0.001), fibrinogen (p < 0.001) and ferritin (p < 0.01). Moreover, high MDW values resulted to be prognostically associated with fatal outcome in COVID-19 patients (AUC = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.66-0.87, sensitivity 0.75, specificity 0.70, MDW threshold 26.4; RR = 4.91, 95% CI: 1.73-13.96; OR = 7.14, 95% CI: 2.06-24.71). This pilot study shows that MDW can be useful in the monitoring of COVID-19 patients, as this innovative hematologic biomarker is: (1) easy to obtain, (2) directly related to the activation state of a fundamental inflammatory cell subset (i.e. monocytes, pivotal in both cytokine storm and sepsis immunopathogenesis), (3) well correlated with clinical severity of COVID-19-associated inflammatory disorder, and, in turn, (4) endowed with relevant prognostic significance. Additional studies are needed to define further the clinical impact of MDW testing in the management of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cell Size , Monocytes/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Italy/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Pilot Projects , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
10.
J Exp Med ; 218(8)2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269483

ABSTRACT

Our understanding of protective versus pathological immune responses to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is limited by inadequate profiling of patients at the extremes of the disease severity spectrum. Here, we performed multi-omic single-cell immune profiling of 64 COVID-19 patients across the full range of disease severity, from outpatients with mild disease to fatal cases. Our transcriptomic, epigenomic, and proteomic analyses revealed widespread dysfunction of peripheral innate immunity in severe and fatal COVID-19, including prominent hyperactivation signatures in neutrophils and NK cells. We also identified chromatin accessibility changes at NF-κB binding sites within cytokine gene loci as a potential mechanism for the striking lack of pro-inflammatory cytokine production observed in monocytes in severe and fatal COVID-19. We further demonstrated that emergency myelopoiesis is a prominent feature of fatal COVID-19. Collectively, our results reveal disease severity-associated immune phenotypes in COVID-19 and identify pathogenesis-associated pathways that are potential targets for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Case-Control Studies , Cytokines/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic , Female , Hematopoiesis , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Killer Cells, Natural/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/pathology , Monocytes/virology , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Neutrophils/pathology , Neutrophils/virology , Proteomics , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis
11.
Platelets ; 32(8): 1092-1102, 2021 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230987

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has spread rapidly worldwide, causing the COVID-19 pandemic. Platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte complex formation are proposed to contribute to disease progression. Here, we report platelet and leukocyte activation during acute and convalescent COVID-19 in patients recruited between May-July 2020. Blood samples were analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISA using paired comparison between inclusion (day 0) and 28 days later. The majority of patients were mildly or moderately ill with significantly higher cytokine levels (IL-6 and IL-10) on day 0 as compared with day 28. Platelet activation and granule release were significantly higher on day 0 compared with day 28, as determined by ADP- or thrombin-induced surface CD62P expression, baseline released CD62P, and thrombin-induced platelet-monocyte complex formation. Monocyte activation and procoagulant status at baseline and post activation were heterogeneous but generally lower on day 0 compared with day 28. Baseline and thrombin- or fMLF-induced neutrophil activation and procoagulant status were significantly lower on day 0 compared with day 28. We demonstrate that during the acute phase of COVID-19 compared with the convalescent phase, platelets are more responsive while neutrophils are less responsive. COVID-19 is associated with thromboembolic events where platelet activation and interaction with leukocytes may play an important role.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets , COVID-19 , Convalescence , Monocytes , Neutrophil Activation , Neutrophils , Platelet Activation , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/pathology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Neutrophils/pathology
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 651656, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211812

ABSTRACT

Although immune dysfunction is a key feature of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the metabolism-related mechanisms remain elusive. Here, by reanalyzing single-cell RNA sequencing data, we delineated metabolic remodeling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to elucidate the metabolic mechanisms that may lead to the progression of severe COVID-19. After scoring the metabolism-related biological processes and signaling pathways, we found that mono-CD14+ cells expressed higher levels of glycolysis-related genes (PKM, LDHA and PKM) and PPP-related genes (PGD and TKT) in severe patients than in mild patients. These genes may contribute to the hyperinflammation in mono-CD14+ cells of patients with severe COVID-19. The mono-CD16+ cell population in COVID-19 patients showed reduced transcription levels of genes related to lysine degradation (NSD1, KMT2E, and SETD2) and elevated transcription levels of genes involved in OXPHOS (ATP6V1B2, ATP5A1, ATP5E, and ATP5B), which may inhibit M2-like polarization. Plasma cells also expressed higher levels of the OXPHOS gene ATP13A3 in COVID-19 patients, which was positively associated with antibody secretion and survival of PCs. Moreover, enhanced glycolysis or OXPHOS was positively associated with the differentiation of memory B cells into plasmablasts or plasma cells. This study comprehensively investigated the metabolic features of peripheral immune cells and revealed that metabolic changes exacerbated inflammation in monocytes and promoted antibody secretion and cell survival in PCs in COVID-19 patients, especially those with severe disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Glycolysis/genetics , Lysine/metabolism , Monocytes/metabolism , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Adenosine Triphosphatases/blood , Adenosine Triphosphatases/genetics , Antibodies/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Databases, Genetic , GPI-Linked Proteins/metabolism , Gene Ontology , Hematopoiesis/genetics , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/pathology , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/metabolism , Lysine/genetics , Membrane Transport Proteins/blood , Membrane Transport Proteins/genetics , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/physiology , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/pathology , Oxidative Phosphorylation , RNA-Seq , Receptors, IgG/metabolism , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology , Transcriptome/genetics
13.
Front Immunol ; 12: 645124, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201169

ABSTRACT

Background: The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II characterized by monocytes CD14+ expression of human leukocyte antigen receptors (HLA-DR), is essential for the synapse between innate and adaptive immune response in infectious disease. Its reduced expression is associated with a high risk of secondary infections in septic patients and can be safely corrected by Interferon-y (IFNy) injection. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) induces an alteration of Interferon (IFN) genes expression potentially responsible for the observed low HLA-DR expression in circulating monocytes (mHLA-DR). Methods: We report a case of one-time INFy injection (100 mcg s.c.) in a superinfected 61-year-old man with COVID-19-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with monitoring of mHLA-DR expression and clinical tolerance. Observations: Low mHLA-DR pretreatment expression (26.7%) was observed. IFNy therapy leading to a rapid increase in mHLA-DR expression (83.1%). Conclusions: Severe ARDS in a COVID-19 patient has a deep reduction in mHLA-DR expression concomitantly with secondary infections. The unique IFNy injection was safe and led to a sharp increase in the expression of mHLA-DR. Based on immune and infection monitoring, more cases of severe COVID-19 patients with low mHLA-DR should be treated by IFNy to test the clinical effectiveness.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , HLA-DR Antigens/immunology , Interferon-gamma/administration & dosage , Monocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/drug therapy , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/immunology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/pathology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/pathology
14.
J Leukoc Biol ; 109(1): 115-120, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188015

ABSTRACT

The disease COVID-19 has developed into a worldwide pandemic. Hyperinflammation and high levels of several cytokines, for example, IL-6, are observed in severe COVID-19 cases. However, little is known about the cellular origin of these cytokines. Here, we investigated whether circulating leukocytes from patients with COVID-19 had spontaneous cytokine production. Patients with hyperinflammatory COVID-19 (n = 6) and sepsis (n = 3) were included at Skåne University Hospital, Sweden. Healthy controls were also recruited (n = 5). Cytokines were measured in COVID-19 and sepsis patients using an Immulite immunoassay system. PBMCs were cultured with brefeldin A to allow cytokine accumulation. In parallel, LPS was used as an activator. Cells were analyzed for cytokines and surface markers by flow cytometry. High levels of IL-6 and measurable levels of IL-8 and TNF, but not IL-1ß, were observed in COVID-19 patients. Monocytes from COVID-19 patients had spontaneous production of IL-1ß and IL-8 (P = 0.0043), but not of TNF and IL-6, compared to controls. No spontaneous cytokine production was seen in lymphocytes from either patients or controls. Activation with LPS resulted in massive cytokine production by monocytes from COVID-19 patients and healthy controls, but not from sepsis patients. Finally, monocytes from COVID-19 patients produced more IL-1ß than from healthy controls (P = 0.0087) when activated. In conclusion, monocytes contribute partly to the ongoing hyperinflammation by production of IL-1ß and IL-8. Additionally, they are responsive to further activation. This data supports the notion of IL-1ß blockade in treatment of COVID-19. However, the source of the high levels of IL-6 remains to be determined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/pathology
15.
Eur J Immunol ; 51(6): 1449-1460, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159935

ABSTRACT

The pathogenesis of autoimmune complications triggered by SARS-CoV2 has not been completely elucidated. Here, we performed an analysis of the cellular immune status, cell ratios, and monocyte populations of patients with COVID-19 treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) (cohort 1, N = 23) and normal care unit (NCU) (cohort 2, n = 10) compared with control groups: patients treated in ICU for noninfectious reasons (cohort 3, n = 30) and patients treated in NCU for infections other than COVID-19 (cohort 4, n = 21). Patients in cohort 1 presented significant differences in comparison with the other cohorts, including reduced frequencies of lymphocytes, reduced CD8+T-cell count, reduced percentage of activated and intermediate monocytes and an increased B/T8 cell ratio. Over time, patients in cohort 1 who died presented with lower counts of B, T, CD4+ T, CD8+ T-lymphocytes, NK cells, and activated monocytes. The B/T8 ratio was significantly lower in the group of survivors. In cohort 1, significantly higher levels of IgG1 and IgG3 were found, whereas cohort 3 presented higher levels of IgG3 compared to controls. Among many immune changes, an elevated B/T8-cell ratio and a reduced rate of activated monocytes were mainly observed in patients with severe COVID-19. Both parameters were associated with death in cohort 1.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/pathology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/pathology , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
16.
Immunity ; 54(4): 797-814.e6, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1149231

ABSTRACT

Immune response dynamics in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and their severe manifestations have largely been studied in circulation. Here, we examined the relationship between immune processes in the respiratory tract and circulation through longitudinal phenotypic, transcriptomic, and cytokine profiling of paired airway and blood samples from patients with severe COVID-19 relative to heathy controls. In COVID-19 airways, T cells exhibited activated, tissue-resident, and protective profiles; higher T cell frequencies correlated with survival and younger age. Myeloid cells in COVID-19 airways featured hyperinflammatory signatures, and higher frequencies of these cells correlated with mortality and older age. In COVID-19 blood, aberrant CD163+ monocytes predominated over conventional monocytes, and were found in corresponding airway samples and in damaged alveoli. High levels of myeloid chemoattractants in airways suggest recruitment of these cells through a CCL2-CCR2 chemokine axis. Our findings provide insights into immune processes driving COVID-19 lung pathology with therapeutic implications for targeting inflammation in the respiratory tract.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Lung/immunology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation , Longitudinal Studies , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/pathology , Middle Aged , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/pathology , Myeloid Cells/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/pathology , Transcriptome , Young Adult
17.
J Leukoc Biol ; 109(1): 13-22, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1095316

ABSTRACT

Excessive monocyte/macrophage activation with the development of a cytokine storm and subsequent acute lung injury, leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is a feared consequence of infection with COVID-19. The ability to recognize and potentially intervene early in those patients at greatest risk of developing this complication could be of great clinical utility. In this study, we performed flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood samples from 34 COVID-19 patients in early 2020 in an attempt to identify factors that could help predict the severity of disease and patient outcome. Although we did not detect significant differences in the number of monocytes between patients with COVID-19 and normal healthy individuals, we did identify significant morphologic and functional differences, which are more pronounced in patients requiring prolonged hospitalization and intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Patients with COVID-19 have larger than normal monocytes, easily identified on forward scatter (FSC), side scatter analysis by routine flow cytometry, with the presence of a distinct population of monocytes with high FSC (FSC-high). On more detailed analysis, these CD14+ CD16+ , FSC-high monocytes show features of mixed M1/M2 macrophage polarization with higher expression of CD80+ and CD206+ compared with the residual FSC-low monocytes and secretion of higher levels of IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α, when compared with the normal controls. In conclusion, the detection and serial monitoring of this subset of inflammatory monocytes using flow cytometry could be of great help in guiding the prognostication and treatment of patients with COVID-19 and merits further evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Macrophages , Monocytes , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adult , Antigens, CD/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/blood , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/pathology , Macrophages/metabolism , Macrophages/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/pathology , Young Adult
18.
J Transl Med ; 19(1): 79, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088601

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Sars-CoV-2 can cause severe pneumonia with multiorgan disease; thus, the identification of clinical and laboratory predictors of the progression towards severe and fatal forms of this illness is needed. Here, we retrospectively evaluated and integrated laboratory parameters of 45 elderly subjects from a long-term care facility with Sars-CoV-2 outbreak and spread, to identify potential common patterns of systemic response able to better stratify patients' clinical course and outcome. METHODS: Baseline white blood cells, granulocytes', lymphocytes', and platelets' counts, hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, D-dimer, and interleukin-6 concentration were used to generate a principal component analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by using R statistical package version 4.0. RESULTS: We identified 3 laboratory patterns of response, renamed as low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk, strongly associated with patients' survival (p < 0.01). D-dimer, iron status, lymphocyte/monocyte count represented the main markers discriminating high- and low-risk groups. Patients belonging to the high-risk group presented a significantly longer time to ferritin decrease (p: 0.047). Iron-to-ferritin-ratio (IFR) significantly segregated recovered and dead patients in the intermediate-risk group (p: 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that a combination of few laboratory parameters, i.e. iron status, D-dimer and lymphocyte/monocyte count at admission and during the hospital stay, can predict clinical progression in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Iron/blood , Lymphocytes/pathology , Monocytes/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Long-Term Care , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Treatment Outcome
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