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1.
Virology ; 565: 73-81, 2022 01 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545481

ABSTRACT

Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is currently used to prevent tuberculosis infection. The vaccine was found to enhance resistance to certain types of infection including positive sense RNA viruses. The current COVID-19 pandemic is caused by positive sense RNA, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). A higher mortality rate of COVID-19 patients was reported in countries where BCG vaccination is not routinely administered, when compared to the vaccinated ones. We hypothesized that BCG vaccine may control SARS-CoV2 infection via modulating the monocyte immune response. We analyzed GSE104149 dataset to investigate whether human monocytes of BCG-vaccinated individuals acquire resistance to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Differentially expressed genes obtained from the dataset were used to determine enriched pathways, biological processes, and molecular functions for monocytes post BCG vaccination. Our data show that BCG vaccine promotes a more effective immune response of monocytes against SARS-CoV2, but probably not sufficient to prevent the infection.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , BCG Vaccine/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Inflammation , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
2.
Curr Issues Mol Biol ; 43(3): 1212-1225, 2021 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438531

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is the cause of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Most SARS-CoV-2 infections are mild or even asymptomatic. However, a small fraction of infected individuals develops severe, life-threatening disease, which is caused by an uncontrolled immune response resulting in hyperinflammation. However, the factors predisposing individuals to severe disease remain poorly understood. Here, we show that levels of CD47, which is known to mediate immune escape in cancer and virus-infected cells, are elevated in SARS-CoV-2-infected Caco-2 cells, Calu-3 cells, and air-liquid interface cultures of primary human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, SARS-CoV-2 infection increases SIRPalpha levels, the binding partner of CD47, on primary human monocytes. Systematic literature searches further indicated that known risk factors such as older age and diabetes are associated with increased CD47 levels. High CD47 levels contribute to vascular disease, vasoconstriction, and hypertension, conditions that may predispose SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals to COVID-19-related complications such as pulmonary hypertension, lung fibrosis, myocardial injury, stroke, and acute kidney injury. Hence, age-related and virus-induced CD47 expression is a candidate mechanism potentially contributing to severe COVID-19, as well as a therapeutic target, which may be addressed by antibodies and small molecules. Further research will be needed to investigate the potential involvement of CD47 and SIRPalpha in COVID-19 pathology. Our data should encourage other research groups to consider the potential relevance of the CD47/ SIRPalpha axis in their COVID-19 research.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Differentiation/metabolism , CD47 Antigen/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Pandemics , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Signal Transduction/immunology , Blood Donors , Blotting, Western/methods , Bronchi/cytology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Caco-2 Cells , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/virology , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
Cytometry A ; 97(9): 887-890, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384155

ABSTRACT

In patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, the development of cytokine storm induces extensive lung damage, and monocytes play a role in this pathological process. Non-classical (NC) and intermediate (INT) monocytes are known to be involved during viral and bacterial infections. In this study, 30 patients with different manifestations of acute SARS-CoV-2 infection were investigated with a flow cytometric study of NC, INT, and classical (CL) monocytes. Significantly reduced NC and INT monocytes and a downregulated HLA-DR were found in acute patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 symptoms. Conversely in patients with moderate symptoms NC and INT monocytes and CD11b expression were increased. © 2020 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Aged , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomarkers/analysis , CD11b Antigen/analysis , COVID-19 , Cell Separation , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Flow Cytometry , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Leukocytes , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/virology , Pandemics , Phenotype , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
5.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5438-5445, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363683

ABSTRACT

Adequate maternal selenium level is essential for immune response and healthy pregnancy. This study aimed to shed light on the selenium status of pregnant women with COVID-19 and the effects of potential deficiency in serum selenium levels. Totally 141 pregnant women, 71 of them were COVID-19 patients, in different trimesters were included in the study. Maternal serum selenium levels, demographic and clinical parameters were determined. Serum selenium levels of pregnant women in the second (p: .0003) and third (p: .001) trimesters with COVID-19 were significantly lower than in the healthy group. Maternal selenium level was found to be negatively correlated with gestational week (p < .0001, r: -.541), D-dimer (p: .0002, r: -.363) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) level (p: .02, r: -.243). In the second trimester, serum selenium level positively correlated with white blood cell (p: .002, r: .424), neutrophil (p: .006, r: .39), lymphocyte (p: .004, r: .410) count and hemoglobin (p: .02, r: .323), hematocrit (p: .008, r: .38) status. In the third trimester, it was found that maternal selenium level positively correlated with monocyte (p: .04, r: .353) and negatively correlated with C-reactive protein level (p: .03, r: -.384). Serum selenium level was gradually decreased during the pregnancy period, however, this natural decrease was enhanced together with COVID-19 infection. The reason might be increased selenium needs depended on the immune response against infection. The decrease in maternal selenium level was found to be related to IL-6 and D-dimer levels, which indicate selenium's role in disease progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Pregnancy Trimesters/blood , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Selenium/blood , Adult , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Hematocrit , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/virology , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/virology , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimesters/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(15): 5057-5062, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346860

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Complete blood count parameters are frequently altered in COVID-19 patients. Leucopenia and lymphopenia are the most common findings. This is not specific to COVID-19 as similar alterations are found in various other viral infections. This work is intended to summarize the evidence regarding white blood cell and lymphocyte subset alterations in COVID-19 and their clinical implications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A PubMed search was conducted to identify relevant original studies. Articles not available in English or referring exclusively to pediatric patients were excluded. The study was designed as a narrative review from its inception. RESULTS: Complete white blood cell number and lymphocytes may be reduced in COVID-19 patients. Circulating CD4+ cells (helper T lymphocytes), CD8+ cells (cytotoxic T lymphocytes), regulatory T cells and natural killer (NK) cells may be reduced, with a greater reduction observed in critically ill patients. CD4+ and regulatory cell deficiencies may contribute to the cytokine storm and subsequent tissue damage observed in severe COVID-19 infection. NK and CD8+ cell deficiency might delay infection clearance. These aberrations of cellular immunity may contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of the disease. Alterations observed in monocyte function can also be implicated as they are effector cells responsible for tissue damage and remodeling. B cell dysfunction and maturation abnormalities have also been reported, suggesting that the virus also impairs humoral immunity. CONCLUSIONS: Lymphocyte subset abnormalities may be useful prognostic biomarkers for COVID-19, with circulating CD8+ cell count being the most promising as a predictor of severe disease requiring mechanical ventilation and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Lymphocyte Subsets/virology , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/virology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/virology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/virology
7.
J Infect Dis ; 224(3): 395-406, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clinical expression is pleiomorphic, severity is related to age and comorbidities such as diabetes and hypertension, and pathophysiology involves aberrant immune activation and lymphopenia. We wondered if the myeloid compartment was affected during COVID-19 and if monocytes and macrophages could be infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). METHODS: Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) from COVID-19 patients and controls were infected with SARS-CoV-2 and extensively investigated with immunofluorescence, viral RNA extraction and quantification, and total RNA extraction followed by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction using specific primers, supernatant cytokines (interleukins 6, 10, and 1ß; interferon-ß; transforming growth factor-ß1, and tumor necrosis factor-α), and flow cytometry. The effect of M1- vs M2-type or no polarization prior to infection was assessed. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 efficiently infected monocytes and MDMs, but their infection is abortive. Infection was associated with immunoregulatory cytokines secretion and the induction of a macrophagic specific transcriptional program characterized by the upregulation of M2-type molecules. In vitro polarization did not account for permissivity to SARS-CoV-2, since M1- and M2-type MDMs were similarly infected. In COVID-19 patients, monocytes exhibited lower counts affecting all subsets, decreased expression of HLA-DR, and increased expression of CD163, irrespective of severity. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 drives monocytes and macrophages to induce host immunoparalysis for the benefit of COVID-19 progression.SARS-CoV-2 infection of macrophages induces a specific M2 transcriptional program. In Covid-19 patients, monocyte subsets were decreased associated with up-expression of the immunoregulatory molecule CD163 suggesting that SARS-CoV-2 drives immune system for the benefit of Covid-19 disease progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Monocytes/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Flow Cytometry , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
8.
Viral Immunol ; 34(9): 597-606, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322606

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) contribute significantly to the burden of respiratory diseases, frequently as upper respiratory tract infections. Recent emergence of novel coronaviruses in the last few decades has highlighted the potential transmission, disease, and mortality related to these viruses. In this literature review, we shall explore the disease-causing mechanism of the virus through human monocytes and macrophages. Common strains will be discussed; however, this review will center around coronaviruses responsible for epidemics, namely severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-1 and -2 and the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Macrophages are key players in the immune system and have been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of lethal coronaviruses. In physiology, they are white blood cells that engulf and digest cellular debris, foreign substances, and microbes. They play a critical role in innate immunity and help initiate adaptive immunity. Human coronaviruses utilize various mechanisms to undermine the innate immune response through its interaction with macrophages and monocytes. It is capable of entering immune cells through DPP4 (dipeptidyl-peptidase 4) receptors and antibody-dependent enhancement, delaying initial interferon response which supports robust viral replication. Pathogenesis includes triggering the production of overwhelming pro-inflammatory cytokines that attract other immune cells to the site of infection, which propagate prolonged pro-inflammatory response. The virus has also been found to suppress the release of anti-inflammatory mediators such as IL-10, leading to an aberrant inflammatory response. Elevated serum cytokines are also believed to contribute to pathological features seen in severe disease such as coagulopathy, acute lung injury, and multiorgan failure.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Immunity, Innate , Macrophages/virology , Monocytes/virology , Animals , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/virology , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , Virus Replication
9.
J Exp Med ; 218(8)2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269483

ABSTRACT

Our understanding of protective versus pathological immune responses to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is limited by inadequate profiling of patients at the extremes of the disease severity spectrum. Here, we performed multi-omic single-cell immune profiling of 64 COVID-19 patients across the full range of disease severity, from outpatients with mild disease to fatal cases. Our transcriptomic, epigenomic, and proteomic analyses revealed widespread dysfunction of peripheral innate immunity in severe and fatal COVID-19, including prominent hyperactivation signatures in neutrophils and NK cells. We also identified chromatin accessibility changes at NF-κB binding sites within cytokine gene loci as a potential mechanism for the striking lack of pro-inflammatory cytokine production observed in monocytes in severe and fatal COVID-19. We further demonstrated that emergency myelopoiesis is a prominent feature of fatal COVID-19. Collectively, our results reveal disease severity-associated immune phenotypes in COVID-19 and identify pathogenesis-associated pathways that are potential targets for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Case-Control Studies , Cytokines/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic , Female , Hematopoiesis , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Killer Cells, Natural/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/pathology , Monocytes/virology , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Neutrophils/pathology , Neutrophils/virology , Proteomics , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis
10.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(10): 3886-3897, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264765

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Platelets, blood coagulation along with fibrinolysis are greatly involved in the pathophysiology of infectious diseases induced by bacteria, parasites and virus. This phenomenon is not surprising since both the innate immunity and the hemostatic systems are two ancestral mechanisms which closely cooperate favoring host's defense against foreign invaders. However, the excessive response of these systems may be dangerous for the host itself. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched and retrieved the articles, using the following electronic database: MedLine and Embase. We limited our search to articles published in English, but no restrictions in terms of article type, publication year, and geography were adopted. RESULTS: The hemostatic phenotype of the infectious diseases is variable depending on the points of attack of the different involved pathogens. Infectious diseases which show a prothrombotic phenotype are bacterial sepsis, SARS-CoV-2 and malaria. However, among the bacterial sepsis, Yersinia Pestis is characterized by a profibrinolytic behavior. On the contrary, the hemorrhagic fevers, due to Dengue and Ebola virus, mainly exploit the activation of fibrinolysis secondary to a huge endothelial damage which can release a large amount of t-PA in the early phase of the diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Blood coagulation and fibrinolysis are greatly activated based on the strategy of the different infectious agents which exploit the excess of response of both systems to achieve the greatest possible virulence.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/pathology , Fibrinolysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Endothelial Cells/cytology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/virology , Erythrocytes/cytology , Erythrocytes/metabolism , Erythrocytes/parasitology , Humans , Monocytes/cytology , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thromboplastin/metabolism , Viruses/pathogenicity
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 665773, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264333

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused more than three million deaths globally. The severity of the disease is characterized, in part, by a dysregulated immune response. CD16+ monocytes are innate immune cells involved in inflammatory responses to viral infections, and tissue repair, among other functions. We characterized the transcriptional changes in CD16+ monocytes from PBMC of people with COVID-19, and from healthy individuals using publicly available single cell RNA sequencing data. CD16+ monocytes from people with COVID-19 compared to those from healthy individuals expressed transcriptional changes indicative of increased cell activation, and induction of a migratory phenotype. We also analyzed COVID-19 cases based on severity of the disease and found that mild cases were characterized by upregulation of interferon response and MHC class II related genes, whereas the severe cases had dysregulated expression of mitochondrial and antigen presentation genes, and upregulated inflammatory, cell movement, and apoptotic gene signatures. These results suggest that CD16+ monocytes in people with COVID-19 contribute to a dysregulated host response characterized by decreased antigen presentation, and an elevated inflammatory response with increased monocytic infiltration into tissues. Our results show that there are transcriptomic changes in CD16+ monocytes that may impact the functions of these cells, contributing to the pathogenesis and severity of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Monocytes/virology , Receptors, IgG/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Transcription, Genetic , Transcriptome , Adult , Aged , Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/genetics , Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , GPI-Linked Proteins/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Interferon Regulatory Factors/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factors/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondrial Proteins/genetics , Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis , Young Adult
12.
Nat Cell Biol ; 23(6): 620-630, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263492

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection often causes severe complications and even death. However, asymptomatic infection has also been reported, highlighting the difference in immune responses among individuals. Here we performed single-cell chromatin accessibility and T cell-receptor analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected from individuals convalescing from COVID-19 and healthy donors. Chromatin remodelling was observed in both innate and adaptive immune cells in the individuals convalescing from COVID-19. Compared with healthy donors, recovered individuals contained abundant TBET-enriched CD16+ and IRF1-enriched CD14+ monocytes with sequential trained and activated epigenomic states. The B-cell lineage in recovered individuals exhibited an accelerated developmental programme from immature B cells to antibody-producing plasma cells. Finally, an integrated analysis of single-cell T cell-receptor clonality with the chromatin accessibility landscape revealed the expansion of putative SARS-CoV-2-specific CD8+ T cells with epigenomic profiles that promote the differentiation of effector or memory cells. Overall, our data suggest that immune cells of individuals convalescing from COVID-19 exhibit global remodelling of the chromatin accessibility landscape, indicative of the establishment of immunological memory.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic , Epigenomics , Genes, T-Cell Receptor , Immunologic Memory , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Cell Analysis , Adaptive Immunity , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/virology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cell Differentiation , Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , Lymphocyte Subsets/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Young Adult
13.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(22)2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232098

ABSTRACT

Comprehensive and accurate comparisons of transcriptomic distributions of cells from samples taken from two different biological states, such as healthy versus diseased individuals, are an emerging challenge in single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) analysis. Current methods for detecting differentially abundant (DA) subpopulations between samples rely heavily on initial clustering of all cells in both samples. Often, this clustering step is inadequate since the DA subpopulations may not align with a clear cluster structure, and important differences between the two biological states can be missed. Here, we introduce DA-seq, a targeted approach for identifying DA subpopulations not restricted to clusters. DA-seq is a multiscale method that quantifies a local DA measure for each cell, which is computed from its k nearest neighboring cells across a range of k values. Based on this measure, DA-seq delineates contiguous significant DA subpopulations in the transcriptomic space. We apply DA-seq to several scRNA-seq datasets and highlight its improved ability to detect differences between distinct phenotypes in severe versus mildly ill COVID-19 patients, melanomas subjected to immune checkpoint therapy comparing responders to nonresponders, embryonic development at two time points, and young versus aging brain tissue. DA-seq enabled us to detect differences between these phenotypes. Importantly, we find that DA-seq not only recovers the DA cell types as discovered in the original studies but also reveals additional DA subpopulations that were not described before. Analysis of these subpopulations yields biological insights that would otherwise be undetected using conventional computational approaches.


Subject(s)
Aging/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Cell Lineage/genetics , Melanoma/genetics , RNA, Small Cytoplasmic/genetics , Skin Neoplasms/genetics , Aging/metabolism , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/virology , Brain/cytology , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Lineage/immunology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Datasets as Topic , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/virology , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Melanoma/immunology , Melanoma/pathology , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/virology , Phenotype , RNA, Small Cytoplasmic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Skin Neoplasms/immunology , Skin Neoplasms/pathology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/virology , Transcriptome
14.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5438-5445, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230212

ABSTRACT

Adequate maternal selenium level is essential for immune response and healthy pregnancy. This study aimed to shed light on the selenium status of pregnant women with COVID-19 and the effects of potential deficiency in serum selenium levels. Totally 141 pregnant women, 71 of them were COVID-19 patients, in different trimesters were included in the study. Maternal serum selenium levels, demographic and clinical parameters were determined. Serum selenium levels of pregnant women in the second (p: .0003) and third (p: .001) trimesters with COVID-19 were significantly lower than in the healthy group. Maternal selenium level was found to be negatively correlated with gestational week (p < .0001, r: -.541), D-dimer (p: .0002, r: -.363) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) level (p: .02, r: -.243). In the second trimester, serum selenium level positively correlated with white blood cell (p: .002, r: .424), neutrophil (p: .006, r: .39), lymphocyte (p: .004, r: .410) count and hemoglobin (p: .02, r: .323), hematocrit (p: .008, r: .38) status. In the third trimester, it was found that maternal selenium level positively correlated with monocyte (p: .04, r: .353) and negatively correlated with C-reactive protein level (p: .03, r: -.384). Serum selenium level was gradually decreased during the pregnancy period, however, this natural decrease was enhanced together with COVID-19 infection. The reason might be increased selenium needs depended on the immune response against infection. The decrease in maternal selenium level was found to be related to IL-6 and D-dimer levels, which indicate selenium's role in disease progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Pregnancy Trimesters/blood , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Selenium/blood , Adult , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Hematocrit , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/virology , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/virology , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimesters/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
15.
Curr Res Transl Med ; 69(2): 103289, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179993

ABSTRACT

Elevated PCT level in COVID-19 was associated with higher risk of severe disease and higher risk of overall mortality. An increased PCT level of PCT in COVID-19 patients especially in severe cases would be assumed as bacterial coinfection. Could PCT level increase in SARS-CoV-2 infection without bacterial coinfection? Several SARS-CoV-2 proteins activate STAT3-dependent transcriptional pathways particularly in monocytes, that could lead to increased PCT production. STAT3α isoform could cause increased ACE2 expression, resulting more SARS-CoV-2 infected cells and further production of PCT.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coinfection/diagnosis , Procalcitonin/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/complications , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Coinfection/blood , Coinfection/complications , Humans , Immunity/physiology , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/virology , Predictive Value of Tests , Procalcitonin/metabolism , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Signal Transduction/immunology
16.
Biosci Rep ; 41(1)2021 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174708

ABSTRACT

Millions of people infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have been diagnosed with coronavirus infectious disease 2019 (COVID-19). The prevalence and severity of COVID-19 differ between sexes. To explain these differences, we analyzed clinical features and laboratory values in male and female COVID-19 patients. The present study included a cohort of 111 people, i.e. 36 COVID-19 patients, 54 sex- and age-matched common viral community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients, and 21 healthy controls. Monocyte counts, lymphocyte subset counts, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the peripheral blood were analyzed. Higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, monocyte counts, and CRP and ALT levels were found in male COVID-19 patients. Decreased lymphocyte subset counts and proportions were observed in COVID-19 patients, except for the CD3+ and CD8+ T cell proportions. The lower CD4+ T cell proportions and higher CD8+ T cell proportions were observed in male and severe COVID-19 patients and the differences were independent of estrogen level. The CD4+ T cell proportion was negatively associated with the CD8+ T cell proportion in male COVID-19 patients; this correlation was non-significant in females. Our work demonstrates differences between sexes in circulating monocyte counts and CD4+ T cell and CD8+ T cell proportions in COVID-19 patients, independent of estrogen levels, are associated with the clinical manifestations in COVID-19 patients with high specificity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Lymphocytes/virology , Monocytes/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , CD4-CD8 Ratio , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Community-Acquired Infections , Estradiol/blood , Female , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Lymphocytes/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors
17.
Front Immunol ; 12: 655934, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156126

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 manifests with a wide diversity of clinical phenotypes characterized by dysfunctional and exaggerated host immune responses. Many results have been described on the status of the immune system of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, but there are still aspects that have not been fully characterized or understood. In this study, we have analyzed a cohort of patients with mild, moderate and severe disease. We performed flow cytometric studies and correlated the data with the clinical characteristics and clinical laboratory values of the patients. Both conventional and unsupervised data analyses concluded that patients with severe disease are characterized, among others, by a higher state of activation in all T cell subsets (CD4, CD8, double negative and T follicular helper cells), higher expression of perforin and granzyme B in cytotoxic cells, expansion of adaptive NK cells and the accumulation of activated and immature dysfunctional monocytes which are identified by a low expression of HLA-DR and an intriguing shift in the expression pattern of CD300 receptors. More importantly, correlation analysis showed a strong association between the alterations in the immune cells and the clinical signs of severity. These results indicate that patients with severe COVID-19 have a broad perturbation of their immune system, and they will help to understand the immunopathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytotoxicity, Immunologic , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Monocytes/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Flow Cytometry , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Killer Cells, Natural/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/virology , Phenotype , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/virology
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 627548, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156119

ABSTRACT

Background: Emerging evidence argues that monocytes, circulating innate immune cells, are principal players in COVID-19 pneumonia. The study aimed to investigate the role of soluble (s)CD163 and sCD14 plasmatic levels in predicting disease severity and characterize peripheral blood monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs), in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia (COVID-19 subjects). Methods: On admission, in COVID-19 subjects sCD163 and sCD14 plasmatic levels, and peripheral blood monocyte and DC subsets were compared to healthy donors (HDs). According to clinical outcome, COVID-19 subjects were divided into ARDS and non-ARDS groups. Results: Compared to HDs, COVID-19 subjects showed higher sCD163 (p<0.0001) and sCD14 (p<0.0001) plasmatic levels. We observed higher sCD163 plasmatic levels in the ARDS group compared to the non-ARDS one (p=0.002). The cut-off for sCD163 plasmatic level greater than 2032 ng/ml was predictive of disease severity (AUC: 0.6786, p=0.0022; sensitivity 56.7% [CI: 44.1-68.4] specificity 73.8% [CI: 58.9-84.7]). Positive correlation between plasmatic levels of sCD163, LDH and IL-6 and between plasmatic levels of sCD14, D-dimer and ferritin were found. Compared to HDs, COVID-19 subjects showed lower percentages of non-classical (p=0.0012) and intermediate monocytes (p=0.0447), slanDCs (p<0.0001), myeloid DCs (mDCs, p<0.0001), and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs, p=0.0014). Compared to the non-ARDS group, the ARDS group showed lower percentages of non-classical monocytes (p=0.0006), mDCs (p=0.0346), and pDCs (p=0.0492). Conclusions: The increase in sCD163 and sCD14 plasmatic levels, observed on hospital admission in COVID-19 subjects, especially in those who developed ARDS, and the correlations of these monocyte/macrophage activation markers with typical inflammatory markers of COVID-19 pneumonia, underline their potential use to assess the risk of progression of the disease. In an early stage of the disease, the assessment of sCD163 plasmatic levels could have clinical utility in predicting the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD/blood , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/blood , Monocytes/immunology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Receptors, Cell Surface/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/virology , Disease Progression , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/virology , Myeloid Cells/metabolism , Myeloid Cells/virology , Patient Admission , Phenotype , Severity of Illness Index , Up-Regulation
19.
Inflamm Res ; 70(4): 407-428, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103389

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this review is to explore whether patients with autoimmune diseases (AIDs) were at high risk of infection during the COVID-19 epidemic and how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic affected immune system. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed using the foreign databases (NCBI, web of science, EBSCO, ELSEVIER ScienceDirect) and Chinese databases (WanFang, CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure), VIP, CBM) to locate all relevant publications (up to January 10, 2021). The search strategies used Medical Search Headings (MeSH) headings and keywords for "COVID-19" or "SARS-CoV-2" or "coronavirus" and "autoimmune disease". RESULTS: This review evaluates the effect of SARS-CoV-2 on the immune system through ACE-2 receptor binding as the main pathway for cell attachment and invasion. It is speculated that SARS-COV-2 infection can activate lymphocytes and inflammatory response, which may play a role in the clinical onset of AIDs and also patients were treated with immunomodulatory drugs during COVID-19 outbreak. Preliminary studies suggested that the risk of developing severe forms of COVID-19 in patients with AIDs treated with immunomodulators or biologics might not increase. A large number of samples are needed for further verification, leading to an excessive immune response to external stimuli. CONCLUSION: The relationship between autoimmune diseases and SARS-CoV-2 infection is complex. During the COVID-19 epidemic, individualized interventions for AIDs should be provided such as Internet-based service.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/complications , Autoimmune Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Azetidines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Dendritic Cells/virology , Humans , Immune System , Immunity, Innate , Immunization, Passive/trends , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/virology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Monocytes/virology , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use
20.
J Infect Dis ; 223(4): 562-567, 2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101848

ABSTRACT

We assessed the expression of CD169, a type I interferon-inducible receptor, on monocytes (monocyte CD169 [mCD169]) in 53 adult patients admitted to the hospital during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak for a suspicion of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. Monocyte CD169 was strongly overexpressed in 30 of 32 (93.7%) confirmed COVID-19 cases, compared with 3 of 21 (14.3%) patients in whom the diagnosis of COVID-19 was finally ruled out. Monocyte CD169 was associated with the plasma interferon-alpha level and thrombocytopenia. Monocyte CD169 testing may be helpful for the rapid triage of suspected COVID-19 patients during an outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Monocytes/metabolism , Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 1/metabolism , Aged , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Early Diagnosis , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/virology , ROC Curve
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