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1.
Cad Saude Publica ; 38(4): EN281521, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2154411

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed individuals and families, causing adverse psychological effects, especially in young adults, women, and parents. This study aimed to verify the prevalence of current major depressive episode (CMDE) in mothers of preschoolers (up to five years old) and its associated stressors during the COVID-19 pandemic in a municipality in the Southern Brazil. This is a cross-sectional, population-based study with mothers. All mothers were interviewed by telephone call during the COVID-19 pandemic. We used the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I. Plus) to assess the presence of CMDE. Statistical analysis was conducted using the chi-square test and a multivariate logistic regression. We evaluated 666 mothers. The prevalence of CMDE was 12.3%. Mothers with financial losses had 2.1 (95%CI: 1.3-3.4) more odds of presenting CMDE than those financially stable. We observed that financial losses were determinant for the higher prevalence of depression in mothers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Mothers/psychology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Young Adult
2.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 779, 2022 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1885311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Maternal vaccinations for influenza and pertussis are recommended in New Zealand to protect mothers and their infant from infection. However, maternal immunisation coverage in New Zealand is suboptimal. Furthermore, there is unacceptable inequitable maternal immunisation rates across the country with Maori and Pacific women having significantly lower maternal immunisation rates than those of other New Zealanders. METHODS: This research set out to explore what pregnant/recently pregnant Maori and Pacific women knew about immunisation during pregnancy and what factors influenced their decision to be vaccinated. A semi-structured interview guide was developed with questions focusing on knowledge of pertussis and influenza vaccination during pregnancy and decision-making. Maori and Pacific women aged over 16 years were purposively sampled and interviewed in Dunedin and Gisborne, New Zealand between May and August 2021. Interviews were analysed following a directed qualitative content approach. Data were arranged into coding nodes based on the study aims (deductive analysis) informed by previous literature and within these participant experiences were inductively coded into themes and subthemes. RESULTS: Not all women were aware of maternal vaccine recommendations or they diseases they protected against. Many underestimated how dangerous influenza and pertussis could be and some were more concerned about potential harms of the vaccine. Furthermore, understanding potential harms of infection and protection provided by vaccination did not necessarily mean women would choose to be vaccinated. Those who decided to vaccinate felt well-informed, had vaccination recommended by their healthcare provider, and did so to protect their and their infant's health. Those who decided against vaccination were concerned about safety of the vaccines, lacked the information they needed, were not offered the vaccine, or did not consider vaccination a priority. CONCLUSIONS: There is a lack of understanding about vaccine benefits and risks of vaccine-preventable diseases which can result in the reinforcement of negative influences such as the fear of side effects. Furthermore, if vaccine benefits are not understood, inaccessibility of vaccines and the precedence of other life priorities may prevent uptake. Being well-informed and supported to make positive decisions to vaccinate in pregnancy is likely to improve vaccine coverage in Maori and Pacific Island New Zealanders.


Subject(s)
Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Whooping Cough , Female , Humans , Immunization , Infant , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Mothers , New Zealand , Pertussis Vaccine/therapeutic use , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnant Women , Vaccination , Whooping Cough/prevention & control
3.
J Microbiol Biotechnol ; 32(9): 1098-1102, 2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2144003

ABSTRACT

The placenta is a captivating multifunctional organ of fetal origin and plays an essential role during pregnancy by intimately connecting mother and baby. This study explicates placental pathology and information about 25 placentas collected from the mothers infected with novel coronavirus (SARS-COV-2). So far, congenital transmission of SARS-CoV-2 seems to be remarkably uncommon in spite of many cases of COVID-19 during pregnancy. Out of the 25 placental tissue samples collected, none has shown gene expression of SARS-CoV-2 when confirmed by RT-PCR. At the same time, nasal and throat swab samples collected from newborns of SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers correspondingly tested negative by RT-PCR. The shielding properties of placental barriers against viral infections from mothers to newborns remains a mystery. Major histopathological findings have been recorded as choriodecidual tissue with necrosis, intramural fibrin deposition, chorionic villi with fibrosis, and calcification. Moreover, although recent findings are insufficient to prove direct placental transmission of COVID-19, the abundance of angiotensin-converting enzymes-2 (ACE-2) on the placental surface could potentially contribute to unpleasant outcomes during pregnancy as SARSCoV-2 gains access to human cells via ACE-2. Finally, the significance of these findings is vague and needs further study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Angiotensins , Female , Fibrin , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Mothers , Placenta/pathology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
4.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 10(11): e32757, 2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141362

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Internationally, there is increasing emphasis on early support for pregnant women to optimize the health and development of mothers and newborns. To increase intervention reach, digital and app-based interventions have been advocated. There are growing numbers of pregnancy health care apps with great variation in style, function, and objectives, but evidence about impact on pregnancy well-being and behavior change following app interaction is lacking. This paper reports on the qualitative arm of the independent multicomponent study exploring the use and outcomes of first-time mothers using the Baby Buddy app, a pregnancy and parenting support app, available in the National Health Service App Library and developed by a UK child health and well-being charity, Best Beginnings. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to understand when, why, and how first-time mothers use the Baby Buddy app and the perceived benefits and challenges. METHODS: This paper reports on the qualitative arm of an independent, longitudinal, mixed methods study. An Appreciative Inquiry qualitative approach was used with semistructured interviews (17/60, 28%) conducted with new mothers, either by telephone or in a focus group setting. First-time mothers were recruited from 3 study sites from across the United Kingdom. Consistent with the Appreciative Inquiry approach, mothers were prompted to discuss what worked well and what could have been better regarding their interactions with the app during pregnancy. Thematic analysis was used, and findings are presented as themes with perceived benefits and challenges. RESULTS: The main benefit, or what worked well, for first-time mothers when using the app was being able to access new information, which they felt was reliable and easy to find. This led to a feeling of increased confidence in the information they accessed, thus supporting family and professional communication. The main challenge was the preference for face-to-face information with a health care professional, particularly around specific issues that they wished to discuss in depth. What could have been improved included that there were some topics that some mothers would have preferred in more detail, but in other areas, they felt well-informed and thus did not feel a need to seek additional information via an app. CONCLUSIONS: Although this study included a small sample, it elicited rich data and insights into first-time mothers' app interactions. The findings suggest that easily accessible pregnancy information, which is perceived as reliable, can support first-time mothers in communicating with health care professionals. Face-to-face contact with professionals was preferred, particularly to discuss specific and personalized needs. Further studies on maternal and professional digital support preferences after the COVID-19 global pandemic and how they facilitate antenatal education and informed decision-making are recommended, particularly because digital solutions remain as a key element in pregnancy and early parenting care. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.1017/S1463423618000294.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Infant , Child , Female , Humans , Parenting , State Medicine , Mothers
5.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2191, 2022 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139238

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Kenya is faced with a triple burden of malnutrition which is multi-faceted with health and socio-economic implications. Huge geographical disparities exist, especially, in the arid and semi-arid lands exacerbated by inadequate resource allocation to the nutrition sector and challenges in multi-sectoral coordination and nutrition governance. UNICEF's Maternal and Child Nutrition Programme is a four-year (2018-2022) resilience-building, multi-sectoral program focused on pregnant and lactating women, mothers of children under five years and children under five years. The objective of the mid-term evaluation was to establish the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, and sustainability of the programme. METHODS: The field evaluation conducted between June and July 2021, adopted a concurrent mixed-methods approach, where qualitative information was gathered through 29 key informant interviews and 18 focus group discussions (6 FGDs per population group; women of reproductive age, adolescent girls and men). Quantitatively, data were obtained through desk review of secondary data from programme reports, budgets, and project outputs where descriptive analysis was undertaken using Excel software. Qualitative information was organized using Nvivo software and analyzed thematically. RESULTS: The findings provide evidence of the relevance of the Maternal and Child Nutrition Programme II to the nutrition situation in Kenya and its alignment with the Government of Kenya and donor priorities. Most planned programme targets were achieved despite operating in a COVID-19 pandemic environment. The use of innovative approaches such as family mid-upper arm circumference, integrated management of acute malnutrition surge model, Malezi bora and Logistic Management Information Management System contributed to the realization of effective outputs and outcomes. Stringent financial management strategies contributed toward programme efficiencies; however, optimal utilization of the resources needs further strengthening. The programme adopted strategies for strengthening local capacity and promoting ownership and long-term sustainability. CONCLUSION: The programme is on track across the four evaluation criteria. However, a few suggestions are recommended to improve relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, and sustainability. A formal transition strategy needs to be developed in consultation with multi-stakeholder groups and implemented in phases. UNICEF Nutrition section should explore a more integrated  programming mode of delivery through joint initiatives with other agencies under the Delivery as One UN agenda, along the more gender transformative approaches with more systematic involvement of males and females in gender-based discussions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , Adolescent , Child , Male , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Child, Preschool , Kenya/epidemiology , Lactation , Pandemics , Mothers
6.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 868, 2022 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139188

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pregnancy and the postnatal period can be times of psychosocial stress and insecurity, but high quality maternity care and social support can help mothers cope with stress and feel more secure. The COVID-19 pandemic and associated social and economic disruption increased rates of antenatal and postnatal stress, anxiety and depression, and also had profound impacts on the organisation of maternity services in England. METHODS: This was a qualitative descriptive study of the impact of pandemic-related changes to maternity care on mothers' emotional wellbeing, using inductive thematic analysis of open text responses to the National Maternity Survey (NMS) 2020 in England. A random sample of 16,050 mothers who gave birth 11-24th May 2020 were invited to take part in the survey, and 4,611 responded, with 4,384 answering at least one open text question. RESULTS: There were three themes: 'Chaos: impact of uncertainty', 'Abandoned: impact of reduction in care', and 'Alone: impact of loss of social support'. Mothers valued maternity care and many experienced additional stress from chaotic changes and reduction in care during the pandemic; from health professionals' own uncertainty and anxiety; and from restrictions on essential social support during pregnancy, labour and birth. Others felt that health professionals had communicated and cared for them well despite the changes and restrictions, and these mothers felt psychologically safe. CONCLUSIONS: Planning for future crises should include considering how necessary adaptations to care can be implemented and communicated to minimise distress; ensuring that mothers are not deprived of social support at the time when they are at their most vulnerable; and supporting the psychological welfare of staff at a time of enormous pressure. There are also lessons for maternity care in 'normal' times: that care is highly valued, but trust is easily lost; that some mothers come into the maternity system with vulnerabilities that can be ameliorated or intensified by the attitudes of staff; that every effort should be made to welcome a mother's partner or chosen companion into maternity care; and that high quality postnatal care can make a real difference to mothers' wellbeing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Maternal Health Services , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Mothers/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Parturition , England
7.
Soc Sci Med ; 306: 115117, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2132388

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Child allowance (CA) in South Korea was first introduced in September 2018. CA provides a monthly allowance to children from birth to age 5. To date, existing studies on the effects of CA in Korea have focused mainly on household economic outcomes. The current study is the first to examine the effect of CA on maternal physical and mental health, measured by self-reported health status, depression, and life satisfaction. METHODS: We use nationally representative data from the Korea Welfare Panel Study (KOWEPS) from 2017 to 2018. The analytic sample consists of 772 Korean mothers whose youngest child is between age 2 and age 7. Taking advantage of an exogenous policy change and the age eligibility of the policy, we employ a difference-in-regression-discontinuities (DRD) strategy to identify the effects of CA on self-reported health status, depression, and life satisfaction. RESULTS: Overall, we find suggestive evidence that the introduction of CA contributed to reducing depression while improving self-reported health and life satisfaction. In particular, the policy reform had a significant effect on life satisfaction, showing that CA improves life satisfaction by 0.497 points. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that CA can improve both physical and mental health for eligible mothers. Such findings are indicative of a causal link between income and health. There has been a recent political movement to raise the age threshold of CA to up to age 18 to cover older children and increase benefit levels. Our findings provide important policy implications for the political discussion on CA expansion.


Subject(s)
Health Status , Maternal Health , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Mothers , Republic of Korea
8.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(11)2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2123744

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The postpartum maternal physical and psychological state played a fundamental role in the mother-child relationship at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of the study is to analyze the influence of maternal psychological manifestations on the mother-child couple through three objectives (briefly expressed): (I) Determination of the main acute and chronic conditions of newborns/infants. (II) Verification of the hypothesis of the existence of a link between the following neonatal variables: gestational age, birth weight, number of days of hospitalization, and specific neonatal therapies (oxygen, surfactant, and blood products' transfusion). (III) Verification of the influence of postpartum maternal psychological status on the mother-child couple through three hypotheses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in two hospitals in Timișoara, Romania, between 1 March and 1 September 2020, and included 165 mothers and their 175 newborns. Mothers answered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Spielberger's Inventory of State-Trait Anxiety, and the Collins and Read Revised Adult Attachment Scale. RESULTS: (I) The acute and chronic pathology of the infants in the study group was polymorphic. (II) Large correlations were identified between the following infant variables: gestational age with birth weight, and number of hospitalization days with birth weight, gestational age, and use of blood product transfusion (all p < 0.001). (III) (1) State anxiety was the only significant predictor of number of hospitalization days (p = 0.037), number of acute disorders (p = 0.028), and number of infant chronic diseases (p = 0.037). (2) Maternal depressive symptoms were the only predictor of postpartum maternal attachment (p = 0.018). (3) Depressive symptoms, state, and trait anxiety were non-significant in all models studied (all p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Postpartum maternal physical and psychological state plays a fundamental role on the mother-child relationship in the new social and complex family conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression, Postpartum , Infant , Female , Adult , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Birth Weight , Romania/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mother-Child Relations , Mothers/psychology , Hospitals
9.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 850, 2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2123310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the nutritive and immunologic benefits of breastmilk, children should be exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months of life, even during the corona virus pandemic. However, fear of transmission risk and pandemic-related restrictions could undermine the practice of breastfeeding. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and determinants of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) during COVID-19 among lactating mothers in Mekelle, Tigrai, Ethiopia. METHODS: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted among 621 lactating mothers living in Mekelle city, Tigrai, from April to June, 2021. Data were collected using an adapted form of a standard KAP questionnaire. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the independent determinants of EBF at a statistical significance of p < 0.05. The strength of the association was measured by odds ratio and 95% confidence interval. RESULTS: Four hundred (64.4%) mothers exclusively breastfed their children. Infants from female-headed households had twice (AOR 2.21; 95% CI 1.31, 3.71) higher odds of EBF. Higher educational status was associated with higher odds of EBF practice. A unit increase in parity was associated with a 23% increase in the odds of EBF. Mothers who received breastfeeding information had a 73% (AOR 1.73; 95% CI 1.17, 2.56) higher odds of EBF. Moreover, mothers with high knowledge score and positive attitude showed a 74% higher (AOR 1.74; 95% CI 1.20, 2.51) and more than double (AOR 2.35; 95% CI 1.50, 3.70) odds of EBF, respectively. CONCLUSION: About two-thirds of the mothers practiced EBF. Household head, maternal educational, parity, breastfeeding information, knowledge of breastfeeding, and attitude towards EBF were significant determinants of EBF. Our study findings highlighted that programs that enhance women's participation in education and decision-making could improve EBF practice. Besides, during the COVID-19 pandemic, providing lactating mothers with adequate and up-to-date breastfeeding information could be significant in improving EBF practice.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , COVID-19 , Infant , Pregnancy , Child , Female , Humans , Mothers , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Lactation
10.
J Perinat Neonatal Nurs ; 36(4): 362-370, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2114408

ABSTRACT

Survival rates for extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants are improving as neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) rates stay stable, thereby increasing the overall number of infants with NDI. Although there are many determinants of NDI in this population, nutritional factors are of interest because they are readily modifiable in the clinical setting. Nurses can influence nutritional factors such as improving access to human milk feeding, using growth monitoring, establishing feeding policies, implementing oral care with colostrum, facilitating kangaroo care, and providing lactation education for the mother. All of these measures assist in leading to a decrease in NDI rates among ELBW infants.


Subject(s)
Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight , Mothers , Infant, Newborn , Infant , Female , Humans , Survival Rate
12.
Pediatr Ann ; 51(11): e426-e430, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110337

ABSTRACT

The landscape of pediatric vaccination has changed dramatically due to changing attitudes toward immunizations and recent world events. The rise of vaccine hesitancy and refusal related to the concurrent rise of social media and anti-vaccination messages with misinformation campaigns have led to populations of children being unimmunized or under-immunized. These populations have been left vulnerable to the rapid spread of vaccine-preventable infection. Additionally, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the clinical syndrome known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) resulted in the emergence of a worldwide pandemic. Control measures to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 resulted in numerous reports of children missing routine vaccines along with the stopping of many public health immunization programs. Finally, armed conflicts and war have led to large family migrations from their homelands to various countries and regions leading to increased risk for missed maternal and child immunization as well as difficulty in keeping vaccination records. [Pediatr Ann. 2022;51(11):e426-e430.].


Subject(s)
Armed Conflicts , Vaccination Hesitancy , Vaccine-Preventable Diseases , Vaccines , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccine-Preventable Diseases/epidemiology , Vaccine-Preventable Diseases/prevention & control , Vaccines/administration & dosage , Vaccines/adverse effects , Immunization Programs , Disinformation , Emigration and Immigration , Mothers , Vaccination Refusal
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110098

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Fear or mistrust of the vaccine and concern for the well-being of their unborn infants are the main reasons for COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in pregnant women. The aim of this work was to validate a questionnaire on knowledge about COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy and to examine the sources of information in a group of new mothers, as well as their effectiveness and intelligibility. METHODS: A literature review was carried out to develop a questionnaire of forty-five questions, divided into six sections, called MAMA-19. The assessment of agreement and the interrater reliability was carried out using Cronbach's analysis and Cohen's kappa statistic. Data obtained from the questionnaire were analysed using descriptive and univariate statistics. RESULTS: The total alpha values in the two sections about knowledge of vaccination during pregnancy and about the effects of disease and possible post-COVID-19 consequences for the unvaccinated showed sufficient consistency, at 0.860 and 0.725, respectively. Non-vaccinated women thought that receiving the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy can lead to malformations in the newborn (60% vs. 40%, p = 0.002) and to an increased risk of foetal growth restriction (61.9% vs. 38.1%, p < 0.001). The percentage of vaccinated women was significantly higher than non-vaccinated when more than one professional was consulted and consistent information was received from them (74.2% vs. 25.8%, p = 0.008). CONCLUSION: The MAMA-19 questionnaire shows results in line with the literature and valid in the two main sections. It is quick to use for measuring communication effectiveness by healthcare professionals and institutions in the context of the COVID-19 vaccination campaign in the pregnant population. The results evidence that a physician's recommendation to get vaccinated is the most important factor in maternal decision making, regardless of geographic, social or educational context.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Pregnancy , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Female , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Reproducibility of Results , Mothers , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 833, 2022 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2121880

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 infection (COVID-19) pandemic is a new global outbreak disease. According to the Taiwan Centers for Diseases Control statement, hospitals had to change their corresponding measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The frequency of parental visits to the special care nursery was reduced from three times to once daily. Visiting was not permitted from April 4 to May 10, 2020, and rooming-in with healthy neonates was discontinued, which could increase maternal postpartum distress. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine whether COVID-19 prevention increased maternal psychological distress. METHODS: This prospective study used convenience sampling to enroll healthy mothers who had just delivered via normal spontaneous delivery. Based on the neonates' status and visiting times, mothers were grouped into no-rooming-in, rooming-in, no-visiting, and one-visit/day groups. Mothers' baseline characteristics were compared using the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test and t-test. Salivary cortisol levels and scores of Chinese versions of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory were evaluated on postpartum days 1 and 3 and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and a paired t-test. RESULTS: There were 16, 58, 28, and 47 women categorized as no-rooming-in, rooming-in, no-visit, and one-visit/day groups, respectively. No significant differences were found between groups in mothers' baseline characteristics and postpartum salivary cortisol levels. The PSS on day 3 was significantly higher than on day 1 in every group (p < 0.001). The PSS increasing trend in the no-rooming-in group was significantly greater than that in the no-visit group (p = 0.02) and significantly greater in the rooming-in group than that in the one-visit/day group (p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Postpartum stress increased for all mothers and was an even more significant response to the COVID-19 pandemic than the stress associated with neonates' hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Infant, Newborn , Female , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pilot Projects , Hydrocortisone/analysis , Prospective Studies , Postpartum Period/psychology , Mothers/psychology
15.
Rev Bras Epidemiol ; 25: e220036, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119215

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the delay or failure to seek primary health care by the mother-child dyads during the COVID-19 pandemic, a practice that has a high potential to increase maternal and child morbidity and mortality. METHODS: Data from three survey rounds of the Iracema-COVID cohort study, collected 6, 12, and 18 months after birth, showed the patterns of postpartum attendance to primary health care consultation of the mother-child dyad. Crude and adjusted multinomial logistic regressions with robust variance were used to assess factors associated with nonattendance. RESULTS: Among the 314 cohort mothers, 25% did not attend any primary health care consultation during the 18-months postpartum, while 30% of the mothers did all three. Regarding the child, 75% had regular primary health care consultations in all three survey rounds, while 4% did not attend any in their first 18 months of life. By the end of the first COVID-19 wave, the proportion of mother and child who attended the consultations had fallen by 23 and 18%, respectively. The main factors associated with nonattendance were mothers aged below 25 years, and mothers with more than one child. CONCLUSION: An important delay or nonattendance to primary health care consultation by the mother-child dyad was observed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Such practice, with a high potential to increase maternal and child morbidity and mortality, was particularly frequent among younger mothers and those with more than one child.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mothers , Female , Humans , Aged , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Pandemics , Primary Health Care
16.
Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi ; 24(11): 1266-1268, 2022 Nov 15.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115749

ABSTRACT

A 7-day-old male neonate was admitted due to testing positive for SARS-CoV-2. The neonate was born through cesarian section at 40 weeks and 2 days of gestation. His mother was diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by Omicron variant infection 1 day before delivery. The neonate was separated from his mother after birth and was taken care of by his father. Three days after the neonate was born, his father was also diagnosed with COVID-19. The neonate was diagnosed with COVID-19 on day 7 of life. The neonate presented with hyperpyrexia, dyspnea, hypoxia, and feeding difficulties, and the chest CT showed the coexistence of consolidation and ground glass-like changes mainly located below the posterior pleura. He was given symptomatic support treatment such as low flow oxygen therapy and posture management after admission. He was cured and discharged after 10 days of hospitalization. This is the first reported case of neonatal severe COVID-19 caused by Omicron variant infection in China. It is necessary to take appropriate protective measures for the neonate to prevent infection when the mother or caregiver of the neonate is a suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Hospitalization , Mothers
18.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(2): 140-146, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100791

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Denial of Pregnancy is a women's subjective lack of awareness of being pregnant. It can be partial (from 20 weeks but lifted before delivery) or complete (the women notice she's pregnant when labour starts). The prevalence is around 1/500 for partial denial and 1/2500 for complete denial. This article's aim is to review the literature broadly on the subject of pregnancy denial, its psychopathological hypothesis and the state of knowledge on the outcome for mothers and children. METHODS: 26 references have been selected bases on a research on pubmed database and through bibliography on the selected papers. RESULTS: Despite a lot of psychopathological hypothesis and some epidemiological studies, no objective knowledge can lead to know what kind of women will deny their pregnancy and how to prevent it. After all the studies on mother characteristics, it seems there are no "clear-cut" explanations on why a woman denies a pregnancy or what type of women could be at risk of denial. There are no official guidelines on how to manage the condition and care for the patient long term. The first elements of research on the developmental outcome for infant seem to show a delay in psychomotor skills and possible speech disorder. They have been significant advancement on the subject of children development after pregnancy denial in the last year but the psychological and developmental impact of pregnancy denial on children and mothers is still majorly unknown. With a clinical picture known for so long, to have so little objective information on how to manage it and on the possible consequences is surprising. CONCLUSION: More research needs to be conducted to objectively know the long term effects of pregnancy denial on the whole family. International consensus should be found on the definition and care management of pregnancy denial.


Subject(s)
Mothers , Child , Female , Humans , Infant , Pregnancy
19.
Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi ; 60(11): 1163-1167, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099938

ABSTRACT

Objective: To summarize the management and short-term outcomes of neonates delivered by mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant. Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 158 neonates born to mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant admitted to the isolation ward of Children's Hospital of Fudan University from March 15th, 2022 to May 30th, 2022. The postnatal infection control measures for these neonates, and their clinical characteristics and short-term outcomes were analyzed. They were divided into maternal symptomatic group and maternal asymptomatic group according to whether their mothers had SARS-CoV-2 symptoms. The clinical outcomes were compared between the 2 groups using Rank sum test and Chi-square test. Results: All neonates were under strict infection control measures at birth and after birth. Of the 158 neonates, 75 (47.5%) were male. The gestational age was (38+3±1+3) weeks and the birth weight was (3 201±463)g. Of the neonates included, ten were preterm (6.3%) and the minimum gestational age was 30+1 weeks. Six neonates (3.8%) had respiratory difficulty and 4 of them were premature and required mechanical ventilation. All 158 neonates were tested negative for SARS-COV-2 nucleic acid by daily nasal swabs for the first 7 days. A total of 156 mothers (2 cases of twin pregnancy) infected with SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant, the time from confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection to delivery was 7 (3, 12) days. Among them, 88 cases (56.4%) showed clinical symptoms, but none needed intensive care treatment. The peripheral white blood cell count of the neonates in maternal symptomatic group was significantly higher than that in maternal symptomatic group (23.0 (18.7, 28.0) × 109 vs. 19.6 (15.4, 36.6) × 109/L, Z=2.44, P<0.05). Conclusions: Neonates of mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant during third trimester have benign short-term outcomes, without intrauterine infection through vertical transmission. Strict infection control measures at birth and after birth can effectively protect these neonates from SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pregnancy , Mothers , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099506

ABSTRACT

Restrictions implemented by the UK Government during the COVID-19 pandemic have served to worsen mental health outcomes, particularly amongst younger adults, women, those living with chronic health conditions, and parents of young children. Studies looking at the impact for ethnic minorities have reported inconsistent findings. This paper describes the mental health experiences of mothers from a large and highly ethnically diverse population during the pandemic, using secondary analysis of existing data from three COVID-19 research studies completed in Bradford and London (Tower Hamlets and Newham). A total of 2807 mothers participated in this study with 44% White British, 23% Asian/Asian British Pakistani, 8% Other White and 7% Asian/Asian British Bangladeshi backgrounds. We found that 28% of mothers experienced clinically important depressive symptoms and 21% anxiety symptoms during the pandemic. In unadjusted analyses, mothers from White Other, and Asian/Asian British Bangladeshi backgrounds had higher odds of experiencing symptoms, whilst mothers from Asian/Asian British Indian backgrounds were the least likely to experience symptoms. Once loneliness, social support and financial insecurity were controlled for, there were no statistically significant differences in depression and anxiety by ethnicity. Mental health problems experienced during the pandemic may have longer term consequences for public health. Policy and decision makers must have an understanding of the high risk of financial insecurity, loneliness and a lack of social support on mother's mental health, and also recognise that some ethnic groups are far more likely to experience these issues and are, therefore, more vulnerable to poor mental health as a consequence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mothers , Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Child, Preschool , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Whites
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